Rubio: ‘New ideas? We don’t need no stinking new ideas!’

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In his speech today to a supportive crowd at CPAC in Washington, Sen. Marco Rubio brushed aside criticism that he and others in the Republican Party have no new ideas to offer.

“We don’t need a new idea,” Rubio said. “There is an idea — that idea is called America, and it still works.”

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And the crowd cheered.

That is, I think, the crux of the issue separating the left from the right in the economic debate now underway. The perspective of the right is that nothing fundamental has changed in the American economy, and that the only thing we need to do to return to the era of a fast-growing economy with good middle-class jobs is to get government out of the way.

From the perspective of the left, the American economy has changed in fundamental ways that have little or nothing to do with government. Government did not create the growing gap between the wealthy and the rest of America. Government could not restrain technology that rendered the labor of so many less valuable. Government did not push millions of jobs overseas to take advantage of workers who make a few dollars a day. But from the perspective of the left, government can be used as a tool to help Americans adjust to those changes.

Clearly, I disagree with the conservative critique. It strikes me as ivy-covered nostalgia for a day that is now long gone.

In his speech, Rubio did nothing to discourage that sense of wistful nostalgia. Consider, for example, his argument for disengaging government from many of the social programs it now undertakes:

“Ultimately, we should recognize (that) we do have obligations to each other. In addition to our individual rights, (we have) our individual responsibilities to each other, but not through government, through community, through our churches, and through our neighborhoods, as parents and neighbors and friends. Those are the best ways in which we can serve our fellow Americans, through voluntary organizations where every single day Americans from all walks of life are literally changing the world in one day, one life, one neighbor at a time.”

Again, that’s an attractively nostalgic, even Rockwellian picture drawn by the senator. There is no question that volunteers and community groups play a critical, highly laudable role in American life, and that ought to be encouraged. In his budget proposal, U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan makes a similar point, blaming the erosion of community on an encroaching government.

“To avert the debt crisis,” Ryan writes in his budget, “we need to stop this encroachment and to revive community in American civil society.”

I disagree on two major points. First, it is far too simplistic to blame government for the erosion of community. A transient lifestyle, an economy based on hyper-consumption, a cultural emphasis on the self and technology that serves to isolate us even as it seems to connect us — those and other factors have far more of an erosive impact upon community than does government. But Rubio’s analysis does at least have the merit of consistency, given the conservative movement’s insistence that every evil can be traced back to the same villain.

Second, I find it impossible to conceive of a “civil society” that can be scaled up to meet the enormous needs of a modern, highly industrialized, increasingly urban nation of more than 300 million people under economic stress. Ryan, Rubio and others in their party of course believe otherwise. By cutting back severely on support for nutrition programs, medical care, job training and other aid for the poor, Ryan brags, “Our budget makes room for community — for the vast middle ground between government and the person.”

Again, while it would be nice to believe that, reality suggests otherwise. Take the issue of nutrition. Even with tens of millions of Americans on food stamps in these tough times, volunteer soup kitchens and food programs report themselves overwhelmed by demand. It would simply not be feasible for such community-based programs to step in and fill the void left by a withdrawal of federal resources.

At some level, Rubio and his colleagues probably know that. But they dare not acknowledge that reality, because once acknowledged it undermines the very foundation of the do-nothing ideology that they preach.

Consider, for example, the predicament of a Florida couple described by Rubio himself to his CPAC audience.

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“There’s this couple that I know, they’re on my son’s tackle football team. Their son is eight years old. It’s a couple, they’re married. She works as a receptionist at a dental office, a medical office. He loads boxes from trucks at a warehouse. I don’t have to tell you, they’re struggling. They live in a little, small apartment; they share one car. They’re not freeloaders. They’re not liberals. They’re just everyday people who want what everybody else wants. They want a better life. They want a better life for themselves, and an even better life for their children. They’re desperate.”

Rubio describes their situation with compassion, but the only assistance that he suggests, job training, would almost certainly be government-provided. And the Ryan budget slashes job-training funds significantly.

Furthermore, if that couple’s eight-year-old son suffers a concussion or breaks a leg in a football game, who pays for the medical bill? Given the jobs that his parents hold, it is unlikely that they have employer-provided health insurance. It is far more likely that they would be covered by Medicaid, another program that Republicans insist must be slashed significantly.

Given their incomes, it is also highly likely that the couple in question takes advantage of the earned income tax credit, designed to bolster the income of low-earning working people. Ronald Reagan called it “the best anti-poverty bill, the best pro-family measure, and the best job-creation program ever to come out of the Congress of the United States,” but today’s Republican Party deems it a handout. (The EITC is a major reason why the infamous “47 percent” — which probably includes this couple — pays no federal income tax.)

And in another 10 years, the couple’s eight-year-old boy should be ready for college. How would two working-class parents afford such an expense? In his comments, Rubio recalled that as a son of the working class, he financed his own college education through $100,000 in federal student loans. However, he also suggested that such programs have outlived their usefulness and cause more problems than they cure. Both Pell grants and student loans would be cut significantly under Ryan’s budget plan.

Rubio is right about one thing: America works, and it has always worked. But it has worked because it has been more willing than other countries to adapt to changing times with new ideas. The concept that no new ideas are necessary, that the path ahead can be reached by turning back to the past, has never been the American way.

– Jay Bookman

511 comments Add your comment

Keep Up the Good Fight!

March 14th, 2013
3:57 pm

Rubio is gonna be a star for them Crazy People. :lol: :roll:

Granny Godzilla

March 14th, 2013
3:58 pm

“We don’t need a new idea,” Rubio said. “There is an idea — that idea is called America, and it still works.”

That’s the quote that jumped out at me….

It’s not that the GOP does not need new ideas it is they have no new ideas.

I think Mr. Rubio is gonna be a one term senator.

Keep Up the Good Fight!

March 14th, 2013
4:02 pm

Jay, I was trying to find this the other day and could not. How much funding of the so-called religion community programs is from government grants? The cons love to suggest that these programs can step up to meet the need but many of these programs are already funded by government, so they would have a double whammy, making up the lost government funds and finding additional funds.

Jefferson

March 14th, 2013
4:06 pm

If you want to live like a republican, vote democrat.

Lynnie Gal

March 14th, 2013
4:09 pm

Conservatives are into slashing food programs, education, healthcare, job training, along with Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid. What happened to the “compassionate conservative” we used to hear about? If you have to put the word “compassionate” before “Conservative” in order to sell it, you can be assured that it is not. You don’t have to put “compassionate” before the word “Liberal” because compassion is part of the definition.

DannyX

March 14th, 2013
4:09 pm

“…but not through government, through community, through our churches, and through our neighborhoods, as parents and neighbors and friends.”

:-) Rubio says it takes a village. :-)

Jay

March 14th, 2013
4:09 pm

Keep, I’ve never seen data compiled on that, but you’re correct, it’s significant.

indigo

March 14th, 2013
4:10 pm

Rubio’s comments are nothing more than homage to the Republican’s corporate sponsors.

Ideally, Business wants few if any Govt. regulations, and as free a hand as possible to give their employees as few benefits and as little salary as possible.

Republicans and Business want to get Govt. out of the way and allow Business to do what it does best, imposing harsh predatory Capitalism on a defenless American public.

You might wonder why anyone would support such a Party. It’s because Republicans have dumbed down their appeal to the lowest common denominator of their voting public.

Class of '98

March 14th, 2013
4:11 pm

The problem with liberals is that they think something that is “new” is inherently good, which is why we saw the disgusting fetishism over “change” in 2008.

Like every word in the English language, with the possible exception of “mercy”, “new” is neither inherently good nor bad.

But then again, thinking that deeply is WAAAY too much to ask of most liberals, who are like Phil Hartman’s Frankenstein on SNL: “Fire, BAD!!! New, GOOD!!!”

Kamchak ~ Thug from the Steppes

March 14th, 2013
4:11 pm

Welcome to the Occupation

March 14th, 2013
4:13 pm

“Ultimately, we should recognize (that) we do have obligations to each other. In addition to our individual rights, (we have) our individual responsibilities to each other, but not through government, through community, through our churches, and through our neighborhoods, as parents and neighbors and friends”

Pure neoliberal garbage.

So how come...

March 14th, 2013
4:13 pm

…we never hear about Obuma proposing a $50million cut to the children’s medical funding for vaccinations as part of the sequester, yet the Repubs propose a $32mil cut instead, the White House tries to play it up that the mean old repubs are cutting children’s vaccinations, yet when the “talking head” for the WH is called out on it all he says is “uhhhh, I’ll have to get back to you on that.”

Typical, when it works for the Dems it is “mean ol repubs”, but when it is against Dems it is still “mean ol repubs”…

And, by the way, what was wrong with the video this morning – unless you don’t like women then it was a good start to the morning – thanks Jay…

moonbat betty

March 14th, 2013
4:14 pm

Did Rubio drink any water this time?

That’s what America really wants to know.

Jerome Horwitz

March 14th, 2013
4:14 pm

The republcians want to return America to the 1900’s – the days of Carngie, Rockefeller, et al. You know – when the rich controlled the government and the masses lived in tenements.

DannyX

March 14th, 2013
4:15 pm

“…which is why we saw the disgusting fetishism over “change” in 2008.”

Oh yes the good ol’ days. Expensive wars, crashing stock market, housing collapse, financial bailouts, and massive job losses. Good times, good times.

We didn’t need no stinkin’ change.

keith

March 14th, 2013
4:19 pm

We now have the same Bookman type govt that has accomplished so much in the liberal utopias of Chicago, Detroit California etc. And we are well on our way to the same demise. Great idea Jay!!

Peter

March 14th, 2013
4:20 pm

The new idea is that a guy like Cheney can Bilk American’s and the Republican’s can let their Guard down so we can be attacked….. Then they can create a 60 Billion dollar War so a few can get filthy rich all while forgetting about America.

That is the New Republican ideas……. No mass transit…. cause we are too busy ripping off American’s !

getalife

March 14th, 2013
4:20 pm

Told ya the gop will stay the course.

Class of '98

March 14th, 2013
4:21 pm

The crashing stock market, financial bailouts, and massive job losses were all a direct result of the housing collapse, and the housing collapse was caused liberals policies (mortgages for everyone, even if they have no job or income!).

As for the wars, I was never really for them, but only God knows what kind of calamity Saddam Hussein may have rained down on the world had he remained in power. And I give Bush AND Obama credit for preventing any successful terrorist event since 9/11. Taking the war to the terrorists might have had something to do with that.

Welcome to the Occupation

March 14th, 2013
4:23 pm

“A transient lifestyle, an economy based on hyper-consumption, a cultural emphasis on the self and technology that serves to isolate us even as it seems to connect us — those and other factors have far more of an erosive impact upon community than does government”

Part of your problem, Jay, is that these very things are precisely an outcome (albeit not always planned) precisely of government policy.

By buying into the conservative frame “more government vs. less government” you’re already being led astray. If you want to challenge Rubio’s false claims, the way to do it is not to accept his terms and argue within them but to reject them outright.

The whole conservative claim that they’re skeptical of government and liberals are government-happy is, as Dean Baker and other liberal bourgeois commentators have pointed out, a complete and total sham.

No group is more enslaved to the services of the “government” than the conservative-allied interest groups. So the whole dualism is a sham construction meant to keep the public going round in circles and forever failing to look at the real question, which is not more government or less, but government in the service of WHOM?

Kamchak ~ Thug from the Steppes

March 14th, 2013
4:23 pm

and the housing collapse was caused liberals policies (mortgages for everyone, even if they have no job or income!).

BS that has been debunked more times than Carter has little pills.

Class of '98

March 14th, 2013
4:23 pm

Hey Peter, when you are using the plural form of a noun, you don’t need to use an apostrophe before the “s”.

You’re welcome.

Carlos

March 14th, 2013
4:23 pm

“he financed his own college education through $100,000 in federal student loans”

How many co-signers did he have?

getalife

March 14th, 2013
4:24 pm

Bs no class. The gop voted for it and you know it.

Regarding "community", Jay...

March 14th, 2013
4:25 pm

…and what they can or cannot do, all I know is that a major, major, conservative (meaning mostly white, middle/upper/upper upper class) church here in Atlanta gathered 18,000 backpacks for back to school kids who needed them last fall, then gave over 50,000 lbs of food in 2 weeks to be distributed to those in need, and then raised over $5million, yes, $5,000,000 in two weekends (CASH, not pledges) to be given out to programs that provide for those in need – and 100% of that $5mil was distributed, there were “no carrying costs” like the ‘gubmint’ likes to utilize…

So, yes, community CAN “git-r-dun”…

Class of '98

March 14th, 2013
4:25 pm

“BS that has been debunked more times than Carter has little pills.”

By whom? Rachel Maddow? Paul Krugman? Actually it is un-debunkable. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac guaranteed loans to subpar applicants, so the private sector dove in and sold as many as they could. It was over-regulation that caused the housing crisis, and anyone who disagrees with that is either ignorant or lying.

Kamchak ~ Thug from the Steppes

March 14th, 2013
4:28 pm

Kamchak ~ Thug from the Steppes

March 14th, 2013
4:29 pm

Tick…tick…tick….

Just sayin’.

williebkind

March 14th, 2013
4:29 pm

“The concept that no new ideas are necessary, that the path ahead can be reached by turning back to the past, has never been the American way”

What new ideas have come our way? Tax and spend. You got to admit it has new meaning, 16T. What new ideas have you Jay or any liberal presented to the American people that did not start with sex. That is not a new idea it is been around for a very long time. The idea of European socialism works is not the truth and that is why Fox News journalist are looking good.

Arms Akimbo

March 14th, 2013
4:29 pm

Obama has failed to embrace the new energy revolution through technology. The average time for a new drilling permit from the Federal governemtn is 307 days. I disagree wirth your premise that government is not in the way. The fastest growing regions of the country are those that have embraced the new energy technology. All we get from Washington is more of the let’s borrow to spend our way out of debt stupidity. The Obama administration is simply too inefficient to capture any kind of Keynesian multiplyer effect. With the economy still mired in mediocrity after spending $1Trillion, we need to go back to basics: limited government, balanced budget, and tax structures that encourage investment savings, not penalize it. American families have had to tighten the belt to survive the past four years. Obama needs to do the same.

Keep Up the Good Fight!

March 14th, 2013
4:30 pm

Amazing how many of the conned armchair warriors were “never really for these wars”. Why I bet if there was a venn diagram of the those that were “for the war”, those that “against the war” and those that are cons, those that are cons would be the bigger than both of the other circles and only a sliver would overlap with the “for the war” circle based on the posts here. :lol:

bman.

March 14th, 2013
4:31 pm

I don’t think they were giving loans to everyone, but they were giving them out to people who should not have been able to qualify. I’m 100% sure of that part…

Kamchak ~ Thug from the Steppes

March 14th, 2013
4:32 pm

Matti

March 14th, 2013
4:33 pm

Bless his heart.

godless heathen - owner of many things he does not need

March 14th, 2013
4:33 pm

Government did not push millions of jobs overseas to take advantage of workers who make a few dollars a day.

So it is your contention that reams and reams of labor and environmental laws have nothing to with companies relocating operations overseas?

Not that labor and environmental protection laws are bad, but for a business that is trying to compete on the world market, it is difficult to compete with firms that do not have the same regulations to deal with.

Logical Dude

March 14th, 2013
4:34 pm

Rubio: “We don’t need a new idea,” Rubio said. “There is an idea — that idea is called America, and it still works.”

AND THE CROWD GOES WILD!!!!!

Because the crowd doesn’t want to actually think about how much people are hurting and suffering. Out of sight, out of mind.

“hey, I pay taxes already to help these people. I tithe to my church to help these people. I do enough. I don’t have to think too hard.”

I think the solution is easy. Remove a few of those large budget items designed to kill people, and actually HELP people instead. Should be more than enough money to help people there. (of course, the solution is more complicated than that, but it’s a start)

Drudge

March 14th, 2013
4:34 pm

It actually hasn’t changed at all Jay – what you expect of it has changed. You expect an guaranteed outcome, not a guaranteed opportunity. It works, you all are just trying to make it do things it was never meant to do and cannot support. After 236 years, it just didn’t stop working in 2009 after creating the most wealth of any engine in the history of this planet.

It drives me batsh1t – liberals see the free trade economy as flawed because there is perceived inequality much in the same way they see the Constitution as no longer relevant because it doesn’t agree with their cause du jour. Well, both have an exponentially higher success rate, in both longevity and results, than liberalism. If you want to see liberalism’s product, go take a look at Europe wallowing in an inescapable quagmire.

Drudge

March 14th, 2013
4:34 pm

BTW Jay, that was racist of you.

Drudge

March 14th, 2013
4:35 pm

But it’s OK, because only conservatives can be racist.

Granny Godzilla

March 14th, 2013
4:35 pm

Class of 98

“Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac guaranteed loans to subpar applicants”

Kindercare? Le Petite Academy?

[...] Atlanta Journal Constitution [...]

Uh Huh.......The mind that opens to a new idea never returns to its original size

March 14th, 2013
4:37 pm

@Keep Up the Good Fight!

March 14th, 2013
4:02 pm
Jay, I was trying to find this the other day and could not. How much funding of the so-called religion community programs is from government grants?
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

“We want to fund programs that save Americans
one soul at a time.”
President George W. Bush, January, 2004, in a speech in New Orleans

In his State of the Union address, George W Bush renewed a call for Congress to make permanent his faith-based proposals that would allow religious organizations to compete for more government contracts and grants without a strict separation between their religious activities and social service programs.

From the Washington Post, January 4, 2005:

.. in 2003, groups dubbed “faith-based” received $1.17 billion in grants from federal agencies, according to documents provided by the White House to the Associated Press.

That’s not enough, said H. James Towey, director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives. An additional $40 billion in federal money is given out by state governments, he said..

From what is known currently, however, faith-based organizations are receiving a steady 17 percent of all funding and a steady 12 percent of the awards made through all grant programs. Even with less money being allocated to most grant-funded social service programs during our recent economically challenging time period, faith-based organizations are GETTING THEIR PIECE OF THE PIE..

Bobaloobob

March 14th, 2013
4:37 pm

Fortunately or unfortunately, Rubio is, indeed, your father’s Oldsmobile.

TaxPayer

March 14th, 2013
4:37 pm

It strikes me as ivy-covered nostalgia for a day that is now long gone.

I would choose the word, whitewashed over ivy-covered but that’s just me and my less than rosy view of the GOP and its constituency.

Drudge

March 14th, 2013
4:39 pm

Logical Dude – what do you mean “help people”? You mean create dependency on government handouts until their only means of support is voting democrat to keep those handouts in place? That is a wonderful life you are providing them – food stamps, bad education, section 8 housing, crime ridden neighborhoods – really the American Dream dude.

Jay

March 14th, 2013
4:40 pm

“So it is your contention that reams and reams of labor and environmental laws have nothing to with companies relocating operations overseas?

Yup. That’s my contention. Even if you eliminated every single labor and environmental law on the books, $4 a day beats $100 a day all to hell from an employer’s point of view.

another voice

March 14th, 2013
4:41 pm

Jay, while I agree in general with your premise that government is not the problem I would differ in some ways. Government is at least a part of the problem. While government did not create the growing gap between the wealthy and the rest of America it has contributed to it through lack of regulatory oversight, income tax loopholes for the wealthy that exacerbate that growing gap, and tax breaks for corporations and individuals not available to the average person. While government did not move millions of jobs overseas it has helped create an environment favorable for that to occur by:
1) putting American-made products at a competitive disadvantage through trade policies that favor goods made overseas 2) giving tax advantages to U.S. companies who operate and park their money overseas 3) not cracking down on U.S. companies who do business in ways that indirectly if not directly exploit overseas laborers which would be unlawful here 4) operate overseas in ways that do not meet the safety and environmental standards both for workers and manufactured products required for producing the same here.

Yes, government has been a part of the problem due to its hands-off policies in regulating business and its hands-on policies that give unfair advantage to the wealthy and corporations.

Poor Boy From Alabama

March 14th, 2013
4:41 pm

JB,

You wrote:

“That is, I think, the crux of the issue separating the left from the right in the economic debate now underway. The perspective of the right is that nothing fundamental has changed in the American economy, and that the only thing we need to do to return to the era of a fast-growing economy with good middle-class jobs is to get government out of the way.

From the perspective of the left, the American economy has changed in fundamental ways that have little or nothing to do with government. Government did not create the growing gap between the wealthy and the rest of America. Government could not and should not restrain technology that rendered the labor of so many less valuable. Government did not push millions of jobs overseas to take advantage of workers who make a few dollars a day. But from the perspective of the left, government can be used as a tool to help Americans adjust to those changes.”

I would respectfully submit that you’re wrong in several ways.

First, both the left, right and center think government policies can hurt or help the economy.

Here’s a list of eight suggestions to improve America’s competitiveness from Micheal Porter and Jan Rivkin of Harvard Business School:

http://www.economist.com/news/21566352-michael-porter-and-jan-rivkin-co-leaders-harvard-business-schools-united-states-competitiveness

1. Ease the immigration of highly skilled individuals.
2. Simplify the corporate-tax code.
3. Tax overseas profits only where they are earned.
4. Address trade distortions.
5. Simplify regulation.
6. Enact a multi-year programme to improve infrastructure.
7. Agree on a framework for developing shale gas and oil.
8. Create a sustainable federal budget.

Neither is a partisan. I suggest you read the full piece or view an interview that Porter did with Charlie Rose recently:

http://www.charlierose.com/view/interview/12809

James Hoffa blames much of our problems on bad trade policies:

http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20130313/OPINION01/303130320/1008/America-s-decline-s-trade-deficit-stupid

Here’s a portion of what he wrote:

“Detroit and its people are suffering collateral damage from decades of bad trade deals and trade concessions. For decades, the Motor City was the greatest manufacturing city in the world. Then the U.S. government started to dismantle the nation’s industrial base to achieve foreign policy objectives.”

Clyde Prestowitz touches on similar themes in his book “The Betrayal of American Prosperity – Free Market Delusions, America’s Decline, and How We Must Compete in the Post-Dollar Era”. Prestowitz worked for the Reagan and Clinton administrations:

http://www.clydeprestowitz.com/cprestowitz-bio.htm

He’s hardly a hyper-partisan either. .

The reality is that aspirations for most Americans start and end with a good paying job. There are clearly things government can do to make America a better place to do business, a better place to produce goods and services, a better place to employ workers, etc.

Those who push a social justice agenda need to ask themselves if they can achieve their goals without a strong private sector. The answer ought to be a clear, emphatic, “No!”. Therefore they should evaluate every government policy in the context of whether it promotes economic growth and jobs creation.

Michael Porter told Charlie Rose that we’ve allowed our competitive position to slowly erode over time. He also made a point of saying that nothing in his list was a new idea. I don’t claim to speak for Marco Rubio, but maybe that’s what he was getting at when he said we don’t need a new idea.

Maybe, just maybe, all we need to do is get back to our competitive roots.

zebra

March 14th, 2013
4:43 pm

I am dying to hear how government over-regulation caused our overlords to gamble with $70 TRILLION in derivatives.

No sdense in talking to to people who refuse to hear.

Erwin's cat

March 14th, 2013
4:43 pm

What a bunch of lunatics the “real” Republicans have become. That’s why I label myself a right leaning independent…(fiscal conservative)…anything else is too embarrassing…. go ahead and have a laugh at my expense…it’s on me!

Logical Dude

March 14th, 2013
4:44 pm

Drudge: Help, you know. HELP.

Not kick them to the curb and say “tough luck, kid!”

And expecting them all to “vote democrat” really undercuts your argument. If Republicans showed actual compassion, the Republicans WOULD GET THEIR VOTES.
Alas, it’s posts like yours that drive the needy to the democrats.

Jay

March 14th, 2013
4:46 pm

“Amazing how many of the conned armchair warriors were “never really for these wars”.

Amen on that one.

JamVet

March 14th, 2013
4:46 pm

After that disastrous loss last November the neocons cannot figure out whether to ____ or go blind.

Just look at that embarrassing Stoogefest this weekend.

While there will be some backward glances (at least two panels on the agenda are specifically aimed at understanding what went wrong: “Should We Shoot All the Consultants?” and “CSI Washington, D.C.: November 2012 Autopsy”), the conference is mostly supposed to be about finding the way forward.

Forward??? To when? 1954?

Keep Up the Good Fight!

March 14th, 2013
4:46 pm

Uh huh, did you see anything current? I suspect those numbers have changed greatly since 2003

TaxPayer

March 14th, 2013
4:47 pm

Jay forgets that under ideal con rule, there would be no regulations preventing them from reinstituting another dream from their past–sweatshops. And don’t even get me going on their desire to restore peonage to its rightful place in their grand scheme of things. Talk about the true meaning of trickle down. Republicans just plain wee wee all over themselves just thinking about their notion of deregulation.

retired early

March 14th, 2013
4:48 pm

Why do we give tax deductions for donations to religious groups in the first place. Talk about a major breach in the seperation between church and state. One has only to look at these “mega churches” whose “pastors” live in mansions and on a million dollar a year salary to recognize that this should never have become law. Eliminating that tax deduction, alone, would raise a hell of a lot of revenue…no pun intended…but this country is shoulder deep in religious dogma, so that common sense move will never happen.

josef

March 14th, 2013
4:49 pm

First, those coming of age today are pretty much as lost as last year’s Easter eggs. I know that’s harsh, but I still think it’s true. They came through an educational system which declared that all children were being prepared for college and lowered the academic expectations to meet that inflated sense of worth based on schooling. The local college decided to become a “University” with Po-Dunk Hollow State now in the ranks of the Sorbonne and Jagielonian. The results were that you weren’t going to be considered for a clerical position without that BA/BS. Schools no longer had a job training track so that those with the diploma had the market value of an elementary education a scant two or three generations ago.

Forget looking at today. Give it up. Put the time, effort and energy into preparing our HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS for a life sustaining job. If you are going that two year or four year “college” track, then make it free. It is that free public education that put us at the top of the heap.

A new idea? Not really. It’s going back to a philosophy which produced an educated, motivated, citizen-worker.

Kamchak ~ Thug from the Steppes

March 14th, 2013
4:50 pm

It was over-regulation that caused the housing crisis

Unregulated derivatives market says, “What?”

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/warning/view/

Erwin's cat

March 14th, 2013
4:51 pm

JOSEF
Great post!

Logical Dude

March 14th, 2013
4:52 pm

retired early: One has only to look at these “mega churches” whose “pastors” live in mansions and on a million dollar a year salary

Oddly enough, the Catholics seem to get this part right. Basically, priests are married to the church and don’t get rich from the tithes.

Kamchak ~ Thug from the Steppes

March 14th, 2013
4:52 pm

Ruh roh, Jay got out the Bon Ami and scrubbed someone away.

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Class of '98

March 14th, 2013
4:53 pm

Kamchak, I’ll give you credit, you provided a good link to a well thought out column, and it provides actual statistics that made me think.

But (you knew that was coming), I’ll take it with a grain on salt for two reasons: 1) It says the FHA securitization process encouraged “unscrupulous” lenders to take advantage of unsophisticated borrowers. This shows the writers of the column have a clear agenda. Why was it “unscrupulous” to underwrite a mortgage using guidelines that Freddie and Fannie said were adequate? The guidelines may be stupid, but playing by the regulation’s own rules doesn’t make the lender “unscrupulous”. and 2) other than some publication called Inside Mortgage Finance, the only experts quoted in the column were Federal Reserve bigwigs. The Fed employees thought the crisis was caused by the private sector and not government regulation. Gee, imagine that.

TaxPayer

March 14th, 2013
4:58 pm

How’s that Republican 2010 jobs campaign coming along.

Erwin's cat

March 14th, 2013
4:58 pm

LD – Oddly enough, the Catholics seem to get this part right. Basically, priests are married to the church and don’t get rich from the tithes.

After touring the Vatican and such … I decided the Catholic church has enough wealth (read: an enormous amount) and don’t need my donations…and that was based on just what they would let you see

Kamchak ~ Thug from the Steppes

March 14th, 2013
4:59 pm

This shows the writers of the column have a clear agenda.

And there’s your sign.

pogo

March 14th, 2013
4:59 pm

All one has to do is observe the people that are using foodstamps and what they buy with their cards to know that his whole hunger argument is bull crap.

Welcome to the Occupation

March 14th, 2013
5:00 pm

Of the people who claim they were never really “for these wars” how many of them think that Iran represents a dire threat to the United States right now? And that question is to Jay, too.

TaxPayer

March 14th, 2013
5:01 pm

All one has to do is observe the people that are using foodstamps and what they buy with their cards to know that his whole hunger argument is bull crap.

I guess Georgia’s lawyers can call off their food drive then.

Jay

March 14th, 2013
5:02 pm

Iran is not a dire threat.

CJ

March 14th, 2013
5:02 pm

Republicans are the political party that received the fewest votes in the last election for the White House, Senate, AND House (they held the House thanks to gerrymandering, despite receiving fewer votes). But when the losing party speaks about their budget–a budget that would never be enacted–the media swoons.

On the other hand, most of America will never hear about the Democratic alternative “Back to Work Budget” proposed by the Congressional Progressive Caucus. The so-called liberal media’s silence on this proposal is a mystery (and source of frustration) to me. The “Back to Work Budget” proposes to create 7 million new jobs in one year and cut the deficit by $4.4 trillion.

Here are some of my favorite components:

*Taxes income from investments the same as income from wages

*rehiring laid-off teachers

*substantially increases infrastructure investment to the level the American Society of Civil Engineers says is necessary to close our infrastructure needs gap

*No benefit cuts to Medicare, Medicaid, or Social Security

*Reduces health care costs by adopting a public option, negotiating drug prices, and reducing fraud

*Eliminates corporate tax subsidies for oil, gas, and coal companies

For those who care, here’s the link: http://cpc.grijalva.house.gov/back-to-work-budget/

josef

March 14th, 2013
5:03 pm

ERWIN

Thanks, but that was much on my mind. I had a meeting with some “concerned” parents today relative to the high rate of high school drop outs among our Latino students. They were overwhelmingly Black and White Buckhead liberals. When one of those attending spoke up against the “college tracking” philosophy and called for sustaining job training, she was accused of being a racist. I rose to her defense as far as I could being myself a part of that damnable system. We were accused of wanting to lock this population into menial work force positions. I had to bite my tongue to keep from saying what I really thought, but with just what I was able to say, the other one with my approach felt emboldened enough to let fly!

Jay

March 14th, 2013
5:03 pm

Itchy, a lot of conservatives post here freely. Profane, pre-adolescent jerks, not so much.

indigo

March 14th, 2013
5:04 pm

Jerome – 4:14

That is exactly correct.

And Republicans are counting on their simple tool followers to make this happen.

TBS

March 14th, 2013
5:06 pm

pogo

Let me guess, you saw yet another lady at Whole Foods purchasing $300.00 worth of filets. She pulled out her EBT card which of course you saw while she was talking on her Iphone. You then were able to get through the line in time to see her loading her steaks into the truck of a 7 series BMW…….

You then just so happen to be behind her as she headed toward her section 8 675k bungalow in Morningside……..

Did I miss anything?

Keep Up the Good Fight!

March 14th, 2013
5:06 pm

Taxpayer, dang it son. Now don’t be mentioning them lawyers doing good. You know how everyone must be hating on them. ;)

Jay

March 14th, 2013
5:06 pm

… although your addictive, craven need to post here is kind of flattering, in a bizarre type of way.

Matti

March 14th, 2013
5:06 pm

retired early @ 4:48,

AMEN! At the very least, we should tax the churches as the for-profit corporations they ARE.

That Black Guy

March 14th, 2013
5:07 pm

Off topic: from downstairs

And the brilliant Dianne Feinstein knocked littleCruz in the unmanly part:
… I’ve seen the bullets that implode…
_______________________________
Has anyone seen a bullet that implodes?

Keep Up the Good Fight!

March 14th, 2013
5:07 pm

Profane, pre-adolescent jerks, not so much.

That’s what Kyle’s blog is for. ;) :lol:

Erwin's cat

March 14th, 2013
5:08 pm

Iran is not a dire threat

It is to itself

TBS

March 14th, 2013
5:08 pm

“……… trunk…”

JamVet

March 14th, 2013
5:08 pm

Donald Trump?? Sarah Palin?? Rick Perry?? Rick Santorum?? Rand Paul??

Lordy, if you Republicans are looking for answers to your mammoth problems from this gang, you’re gonna pray you have the election results you got the last time around.

Consider this: Since their straw poll was first held in 1976, only two of its winners have gone on to win the presidency — Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush. Only one other poll winner, Mitt Romney, even went on to win the Republican nomination (Romney is the all-time winning-est CPAC straw poll contender, with four victories: in 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2012).

The other straw poll winners: Jack Kemp (three-time winner), Phil Gramm, Steve Forbes, Gary Bauer, Rudolph Giuliani, George Allen and Ron Paul (two-time winner).

Alas, no Elmer Fudd on the list…

[...] Atlanta Journal Constitution [...]

Matti

March 14th, 2013
5:09 pm

josef: “I had to bite my tongue to keep from saying what I really thought,…”

Oh, MY! Are you okay?

Erwin's cat

March 14th, 2013
5:10 pm

Has anyone seen a bullet that implodes?

That’s the beauty of them :wink:

Bernie

March 14th, 2013
5:11 pm

Marco You Tell them! No stinking New IDEAS! Stay STUPID and KEEP LOSING! No change and the Party DIES! I like that MANTRA! No Changes! means A democratic HOUSE,SENATE & WHITEHOUSE for Years to come. No More endless WAR from the WAR MONGER PARTY!

josef

March 14th, 2013
5:11 pm

TBS
Morningside? How déclassé. :-)

That Black Guy

March 14th, 2013
5:13 pm

Jay, great piece.

TBS

March 14th, 2013
5:14 pm

TBS

The lady pogo was following was hoping for Druid Hills or Ansley Park, but she took what was open at the time.

:-)

Thomas Heyward Jr

March 14th, 2013
5:14 pm

“From the perspective of the left, the American economy has changed in fundamental ways that have little or nothing to do with government. Government did not create the growing gap between the wealthy and the rest of America. Government could not and should not restrain technology that rendered the labor of so many less valuable. Government did not push millions of jobs overseas to take advantage of workers who make a few dollars a day. But from the perspective of the left, government can be used as a tool to help Americans adjust to those changes.”
.
That is a completely false statement and it won’t get any less false no matter how many times you repeat it.
A centralized bank, fiat currency and a Centrally planned economy will ALWAYS bankrupt society.
America is no exception.
You progs can ignore reality but…………..
Reality will not ignore ya’ll.
.

josef

March 14th, 2013
5:15 pm

ERWIN’S

“It is to itself”

Indeed. And an internally destablized Iran does not bode well for its neighbors.The mullahs won’t give up without a fight and they’d prefer that fight to be beyond their frontiers.

matti

I just thought of you, and it went much smoother! :-)

TBS

March 14th, 2013
5:16 pm

josef

He must be a busy body. He sure sees a lot of EBT purchases when he is at the grocery or convenience store.

Matti

March 14th, 2013
5:18 pm

josef,

So glad I could be useful in some small way. I support your efforts to bring sanity to our educational system. While many of us were raised on the principles of denial, it’s clearly not helping the kids. I’m glad you’re on their side.

td

March 14th, 2013
5:19 pm

Jay writes: “Again, that’s an attractively nostalgic, even Rockwellian picture drawn by the senator. There is no question that volunteers and community groups play a critical, highly laudable role in American life, and that ought to be encouraged. In his budget proposal, U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan makes a similar point, blaming the erosion of community on an encroaching government.”

Rubio is exactly right. The “great society/war on poverty” by the government has been a failure ($16 trillion since 1964) and has helped cause the total breakup of the family in this nation.

That Black Guy

March 14th, 2013
5:19 pm

Jerome Horwitz

March 14th, 2013
4:14 pm
The republcians want to return America to the 1900’s – the days of Carngie, Rockefeller, et al. You know – when the rich controlled the government and the masses lived in tenements.
_________________________________________________
You don’t think the “rich” ALREADY control the gov’t?

Under dems and repubs, the “rich” come first.

josef

March 14th, 2013
5:21 pm

TBS

Ain’t it the truth!

union

March 14th, 2013
5:23 pm

Jay
March 14th, 2013
5:02 pm

Iran is not a dire threat.

Obama not bluffing over Iran military threat, Biden tells Aipac
Vice-president tells Aipac that military option remains on the table for Obama to prevent Iran obtaining a nuclear weapon.

somebody thinks so..

josef

March 14th, 2013
5:23 pm

matti

Thanks for the vote of confidence. It really does mean something coming from you, and that’s me not being snarky.

josef

March 14th, 2013
5:25 pm

TD

The War on Poverty/Great Society? How old are you?

JamVet

March 14th, 2013
5:25 pm

Many of us have seen many a meltdown that ended up warranting a permanent red card, but poor [tchy/Christian Conservative is definitely in a league of his own now.

The guy really does need some serious help…

Imploding bullets? (I thought I found an article about them but it turns out it was about the struggles of Washington’s old NBA team!)

Are those like cop-killer bullets?

(I’m pretty sure that Feinstein meant hollow-point bullets…)