Georgia’s Tom Price a central figure in D.C. drama

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With the election finally behind us, President Obama and Congress will now try to set partisanship aside and cut a major deal on taxes, spending and entitlements.

Good luck on that, right?

The good news — which is also the bad news — is that they have enormous incentive to succeed. Without a new law, taxes are set to jump by $400 billion at the start of the year and federal spending will be slashed by $200 billion. If allowed to take full effect, those steps have the potential to set off another deep recession. So the future looks much like the past, with weeks of drama, confrontation, intrigue and brinksmanship looming between Democrats and Republicans, between the House and Senate and between Congress and the White House.

The same can be said of two Georgia Republicans, U.S. Rep. Tom Price of Marietta Roswell and U.S. Sen. Saxby Chambliss. Over the next three to six months, they’ll be watching each other very closely, and their interactions have the potential to directly affect the course of national politics.

Chambliss is a conservative Republican, but on fiscal issues he has been more willing than many of his GOP colleagues to consider compromise with Democrats. Much as he dislikes higher taxes, he seems to fear soaring debt even more. He has taken a leadership role in the Gang of Eight, a group of four Republican senators and four Democratic senators who have been talking and plotting for at least two years to try to reach agreement on how to slash the deficit.

The day after the election, for example, at a moment when the rest of the nation was still trying to digest what happened, Chambliss joined other gang members on a conference call to plot their course once Congress reconvenes on Tuesday. There’s a lot of skepticism about whether they can succeed, but they represent one of the few forums in which Republicans and Democrats are actually trying to reach consensus.

The broad outlines of a deal are no secret. As a matter of politics and simple math, the only way to significantly reduce the deficit is to increase tax revenues and decrease spending. You do both, or you do nothing. It’s as simple as that. Democrats who are protective of entitlement programs and the safety net have to be willing to make cuts in those programs in return for higher tax revenue, particularly from more affluent Americans. Republicans who have refused to consider higher taxes have to be willing to soften that stance in return for entitlement reform.

Which is where Price comes in.

The former physician from Marietta is one of the most conservative members of Congress and continues to reject the notion of compromise with Democrats. Last week, for example, House Speaker John Boehner made the logical point that with the president’s re-election, ObamaCare is now certain to survive. But in an interview on Fox News Sunday, Price refused to make that concession, insisting that Republicans will continue to fight it at every turn.

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Cathy McMorris Rodgers addresses the 2012 Republican National Convention. (AP)

Price has also decided to seek the chairmanship of the House Republican Conference, the No. 4 position in the House hierarchy. There too, he is bumping heads with Boehner, who has thrown his support behind the conference vice chair, Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers of Washington.

If elected conference chair, McMorris Rodgers would become the only woman in a major leadership role in the House GOP. (For example, none of the 21 House committees is chaired by a woman.) That’s a major image problem for a party having serious trouble attracting female voters. McMorris Rodgers is also more moderate than Price, who is trying to rally fellow House conservatives to his cause.

The race between Price and McMorris Rodgers — to be decided in a secret ballot among House Republicans — will be watched as a test of Boehner’s strength and influence within his caucus. Price is considered the underdog, but should he win, it would bode poorly for Boehner’s ability to deliver his caucus on important budget votes in the next few months.

However, if Price loses, that too could have a serious impact on the national debate over revenue and spending. If his ambitions are frustrated in the House, Price becomes much more likely to take on Chambliss in the 2014 Republican Senate primary. His strategy would be to hang the dreaded RINO nametag around the neck of Georgia’s senior senator, depicting Chambliss as a sellout to the GOP cause.

So every time Chambliss is quoted in the media over the next few months as seeking a “balanced” approach to our debt problem, Price will take note. Every time Chambliss appears in public alongside Senate Democrats preaching compromise, a potential campaign commercial will be born.

And both men, I suspect, will be keeping very close tabs on things here at home, through polling and phone calls, trying to determine just how much leeway Georgia Republicans are prepared to give Chambliss in the budget debate.

Should a backlash develop among the GOP base here at home, the senator may be forced to decide whether addressing a major national challenge is worth significant risk to his political future.

It is.

– Jay Bookman

894 comments Add your comment

Adam

November 12th, 2012
8:29 am

Brosephus™

November 12th, 2012
8:33 am

Why can’t they do for country as opposed to doing for self?

Aquagirl

November 12th, 2012
8:35 am

Why can’t they do for country as opposed to doing for self?

They’re politicians. That’s like asking why a tiger doesn’t go vegetarian.

Divide and Conquer

November 12th, 2012
8:36 am

“Why can’t they do for country as opposed to doing for self?”

That was a rhetorical question, right? :)

stands for decibels

November 12th, 2012
8:37 am

Democrats who are protective of entitlement programs and the safety net have to be willing to make cuts in those programs in return for higher tax revenue

Why is that, Jay?

Why should any cuts come from those programs?

The GOP lost. Hugely. They lost on congressional votes, they lost the Presidential election, and there are easily a score or more of Republican congressmen who are vulnerable to being hammered by the Dems (or superPAC surrogates) if the latter group choose to target their purple districts if they don’t go along.

So the only reason I can imagine to compromise in a way that would screw ordinary Americans going forward is because establishment Democrats WANT to screw these people. And that is simply unacceptable and frankly, Jay, I’m sick and tired of people like you acting like it is.

(and now to read the rest of your piece, which I’ll admit I haven’t done past that point where I had to stop and berate you.)

Ronald Reagan Parkway

November 12th, 2012
8:37 am

Ashley Judd….gotta get Mitch McConnell’s seat….Georgia Republicans are hurting this state. Sonny Perdue and Nathan Deal have pushed this state back to the dark ages. Are there five things that Nathan Deal has accomplished during his term that has benefited the state of Georgia and not himself?

Road Scholar

November 12th, 2012
8:41 am

Good let Price run against Chambliss and both will embarrass each other as the repub presidential candidates did. Those who complained about the nastiness of President Obama’s campaign against Romney only need to view videos of the republican primaries. All the charges originally made by by Repub candidates against each other were used by our President against Romney.

Yeah, let’s “go to war” but while we do give the opposition more ammunition! I don’t particularly like Chambliss, but when compared to Price, he’s a lot better! Maybe even the Dems will find a good candidate!

Bring it on Price! But it will be hard for you to talk since your head is in the ground, oblivious to what is going to go down!

Adam

November 12th, 2012
8:43 am

I am tired of “Gang of ____” talk. How about Gang of 535 sit down and compromise!

Paul

November 12th, 2012
8:44 am

I watched Price on the Fox Sunday show. Saved the recording as I thought some of the quotes would be good to reference later. Should be noted the other Republican on the Fox panel shot a number of sideways glances at Price.

Price is an ideologue on a power trip and has plenty of people willing to push him along.

One thing I haven’t figured out yet: Republicans are dead set against tax increases. Oops, no, they’re not anymore. They’re willing to close loopholes and adjust things. Which would mean revenue increases without raising marginal rates. But it’s still an increase in revenue from taxes. And that’s not a tax increase?

Maybe they know it’s easier to later on slip in an exemption here and a preference their and reverse the fixes to benefit their buddies than it is to change the marginal rates?

Nah… that couldn’t be it….

GA Dawg

November 12th, 2012
8:45 am

Here in Jawja, we hate Obarma and all the liberals. Tom Price is the man to take on Obarma’s socialism and reappeal Obarmacare.

Price is doctor, he knows how healthcare should be run.

Fly-On-The-Wall

November 12th, 2012
8:46 am

Let’s hope the adult, Chambliss in this case, steps up the challenge and does what an adult would do – find the compromise to get this issue on the road to being resolved.

Stevie Ray..Clowns to the left and Jokers to the right..here I am...

November 12th, 2012
8:49 am

STANDS @ 8:47

BO et al need to be careful of blatantly screwing the GOP..most here look past the fact that BO did this very thing which had some effect on GOP interest in working together (remember..”we won, you lost…”) at a time when GOP offered compromised proposal after BO’s election in 2008? Same book chapter 2…In addition, PelosiCare was shoved down their throats…

It’s easy for those on this forum to forget these “lets screw the GOP…” antics…all the rant here suggests its all the GOP’s fault re gridlock these past few years but it takes two to tango..if the DEMs blatantly screw GOP as you suggest..the distrust will take priority over any spirit of compromise…

Brosephus™

November 12th, 2012
8:49 am

Aquagirl

:lol: :lol:

—————————

That was a rhetorical question, right?

Yep… very rhetorical.

Aquagirl

November 12th, 2012
8:49 am

Let’s hope the adult, Chambliss in this case

When we’re referring to Chambliss as the adult you know our country is in some deep, deep $#!^

stands for decibels

November 12th, 2012
8:49 am

…while I appreciate the time Jay spent to write the synopsis to this particular soap opera, I will admit to having a very difficult time caring about the characters.

Man behind the Curtain

November 12th, 2012
8:51 am

In today’s AJC, Politifact rulled Chambliss’ statement that revenues are at historic lows, at least post WWII, as “mostly true”. Why then are revenues not the MAIN focus in proportion to cuts instead of visa versa??

Fly-On-The-Wall

November 12th, 2012
8:51 am

Aquagirl,

Yes, it is a sad state of affairs when any Republican from Georgia is considered the adult in the room.

M

November 12th, 2012
8:51 am

…and this McMorris Rodgers was on record yesterday as saying the GOP does not need to become more moderate.

indigo

November 12th, 2012
8:52 am

If Price is that conservative, Republicans may see the light and not replace Boehner with him since that kind of mentality is what lost the Presidentia election.

Georgia, however, is another matter. Never ones to turn down the worst, Georgia Republican voters will eagerly replace Chambliss if he shows the slightest turn towards moderation. Replacing Chambliss with “one of the most conservative members in Congress” and one who “continues to reject the notion of compromise with Democrats” is exactly what you would expect from Georgia’s troglodyte Republicans.

Stevie Ray..Clowns to the left and Jokers to the right..here I am...

November 12th, 2012
8:52 am

Paul

Agree Price is a pogue…seem he is still hot over PelosiCare being a physician and all and also seems in denial of pasting GOP just took…

IMO, all the GOP banter of compromise at the same time as no tax increases is simply public posturing as they still have lunatic right fringe voting base to please and lunatic left fringe who wants to screw GOP again..

Both equally at fault..hope things change but they won’t..

stands for decibels

November 12th, 2012
8:53 am

(remember..”we won, you lost…”)

I remember butthurt Goopers carrying on like that was something uppity to say, yes. And I care even less about their tears, now.

MiltonMan

November 12th, 2012
8:54 am

Dr. Price is from Roswell not Marietta. The 11th district includes Marietta; Price is in the 6th. Price is secure in the 6th and highly doubtful he would beat Chambliss.

Jay

November 12th, 2012
8:54 am

“…and this McMorris Rodgers was on record yesterday as saying the GOP does not need to become more moderate.

which is exactly what she needs to say to fend off Price.

Brosephus™

November 12th, 2012
8:54 am

BO et al need to be careful of blatantly screwing the GOP

Dude, all they need to do is sit back. The GOP will screw themselves. They’ve been doing it for years now to the point where they’re almost on autopilot.

stands for decibels

November 12th, 2012
8:54 am

…and SR, who is talking about “screwing the GOP?” I’m talking about running a modern industrialized country. If the GOP chooses to reside in some fantasy land, that’s their business.

Adam

November 12th, 2012
8:55 am

“You know here in the south we say ’sometimes you gotta hit a boy upside the head with a two by four.’ The sound of this election was pine on skull!”

Stevie Ray..Clowns to the left and Jokers to the right..here I am...

November 12th, 2012
8:55 am

AQUAGIRL

Seems all politicians practice “ask not what you can do for your government, ask what your government can do for you..” that’s the problem on all sides..I would think that is one thing we can all agree with…it goes beyond politicians as well in an economy like this…

stands for decibels

November 12th, 2012
8:57 am

I guess what I’m saying is that I don’t think the party that is actually in power save for one badly wounded legislative arm should be compromising, or even talking about compromising. They should LEAD for f-ck’s sakes.

I don’t even want to tell you what I started saying when I heard some dumbass NPR Morning Edition interview with Virginia residents who were repeating this tiresome Village crap. One dipstick actually said “Obama needs to have a late night cocktail with the Speaker.” WTF?

Bosch

November 12th, 2012
8:57 am

For three years the conservatives in Congress had only one goal: defeat Obama. They’ve wasted three years when they could have been working on compromises, negotiations, etc, so sure they were going to have a Romney administration to carry out their evil plans. I am encouraged by some on the right who are willing to step outside the Fox News bubble (hat tip to Luckovich), and are realizing the Angry Old White Man party is not only ineffectual, but base policies on misinformation.

David Frum of all people said it best when pimping his book, paraphrasing, he had access to the same information as Romney’s folks and he was able to see the writing on the wall, why didn’t they?

Oh and stands, part of the reason I haven’t been here is that I became completely obsessed with Nate Silver (sorry Jay).

stands for decibels

November 12th, 2012
8:58 am

anyway, I’ll leave all you surrender monkeys to work with the Goopers. I gots to go produce for a spell…

Redneck Convert (R--and proud of it)

November 12th, 2012
8:58 am

Well, dang if I can figure some of this stuff out. Republicans say they’re dead set against increases in the tax rate. But alot of them say they’re for closing tax loopholes for rich people. I may be just a old GA redneck, but wouldn’t closing tax loopholes raise taxes for rich people? Or is there something here I’m not understanding?

Maybe the AJC could print a page or two explaining why closing tax loopholes for rich people won’t be raising taxes on them. All I know is I’m sick of being the only dummy in this whole debate. Everybody else but me seems to understand all this.

Have a good Monday everybody.

stands for decibels

November 12th, 2012
8:59 am

completely obsessed with Nate Silver

yeah, I gotta say, his commenters appear capable of dressing themselves and whatnot. I miss the local angle of Jay’s when I’m at a national blog, though.

/drive-by

JamVet

November 12th, 2012
8:59 am

Tom Price. Ugh. The karma gods must hate me to have made him my “representative”.

I find him to be one of the more scathing examples of spinelessness in DC.

During one of his telephone call ins last year, a listener asked him why there was such deadlock in DC.

His answer?

Party leadership.

True.

And highly exacerbated by him having so little moral courage that HE won’t stand up to them. Never. Ever.

Tom Price is not the solution to our problems. Tom Price is the problem. ~Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Heyward Jr

November 12th, 2012
9:00 am

Tom Price voted against the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act, which created the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP).
.
A good , decent, and principled man.
Doesn’t stand a chance in Washington.
.
Regardless……Price and Chambliss should still be urine-checked for Viagara and/or other free government drugs.

Aquagirl

November 12th, 2012
9:01 am

Both equally at fault..

Bull. There is serious question whether the Republicans can corral/ignore nutbags like Price. He’s apparently got some support for a position of leadership. AND THE MAN IS NUCKING FUTS. He’s not living in reality.

JamVet

November 12th, 2012
9:01 am

…the GOP does not need to become more moderate.

OK.

Romney JUST lost the moderate vote 56% to 41%.

Let the Republican’s electoral beat downs continue…

Keep Up the Good Fight!

November 12th, 2012
9:02 am

It’s easy for those on this forum to forget these “lets screw the GOP…” antics

Oy vey, the nonsense attempting to pose as “intelligent discourse” has started early from our fake “independent.” :roll:

Stevie Ray..Clowns to the left and Jokers to the right..here I am...

November 12th, 2012
9:02 am

BRO

Yes the GOP will of course screw themselves….but if the DEMS pull another “spirit of compromise” BS like in 2008..with the opposite turning out to be the case…which I expect based on recent history and polarization of the parties, nothing will change..

We are in the same situation excepting BO is second termer..if DEM’s are perceived by their voters as too giving, they many end up with same outcomes in 2 years…

Balancing act that will be fun to watch..

Patrick

November 12th, 2012
9:04 am

I know this sounds like a very stupid question, but at exactly what point did “moderate” and “compromise” become the four letter words that they are now considered to be?

As far as I can tell, moderates who are willing to compromise are the ONLY folks who have EVER achieved much in American politics and often in our history they were praised for it.

What has changed so much in our psyche?

Paul

November 12th, 2012
9:04 am

Stevie Ray

As I noted, seems to me Republicans are cementing their line of ‘no increase in marginal rates” BUT… the willingness to decrease deductions to bring in more revenue does just that – it increases the taxes some will pay and will bring in others to the taxpaying fold who before avoided taxes. Like certain millionaires. So it’s still a tax increase.

But if that’s what it takes to get the compromise done, that’s okay as a starting point.

Stevie Ray..Clowns to the left and Jokers to the right..here I am...

November 12th, 2012
9:06 am

AQUAGIRL

I have come to expect from most on this forum that the GOP is responsible for all that ills..that’ BS..there is enough blame to go around..fact is, there is not incentive to change anything..in this instance, the GA fringe GOP voters are the problem…price is probably playing Bad Guy to Good Guy played by GOP who are open to negotiation.

STANDS

You seem very angry this morning….

Mary Elizabeth

November 12th, 2012
9:07 am

I heard Sen. Chambliss speak on public radio in Atlanta on Friday evening, Nov. 9, regarding this issue. He stated that he does not plan to advocate for increasing taxes on those making over $250.000. per year because that increased revenue would be “spent” by Democrats and not used to bring down the deficit.

Republicans will hang onto whatever last remnants of power they can muster to try to continue to cut “entitlements,” which has been a driving force, with them, for decades. This is their
“Last Hurrah” to change America to a more libertarian direction.

I predict that Republicans in Congress will try fervently to keep the tax cuts for everyone, including the top 1%, because they actually do not want the extra revenue that would save these entitlement programs as safety-nets, while also bringing down the deficit over time. They will continue, imo, to have their “eyes on their long-standing prize” of “starving the beast of government.”

We shall know soon their agenda.

Tom Price’s days are numbered as a political figure, even in Georgia. He is of the past. Georgia had the highest number of votes for Barack Obama – immediately behind North Carolina – of those Red states who chose Romney. Georgia is in a process of moving toward the future, not remaining in the past, where Rep. Price resides.

TaxPayer

November 12th, 2012
9:09 am

Tom Price will object to actions by members of his own party now that President Obama has finished mopping the floor with him over opposing healthcare plans. That pretty much defines Tom Price’s capabilities.

Brosephus™

November 12th, 2012
9:10 am

We are in the same situation excepting BO is second termer..

No, we are NOT in the same situation. The only reason the GOP still has control of the House is because of the 2010 election. He who has control of the states in most cases gets to draw the house district lines. The GOP will likely control the house through the entire decade because of partisaned districting. It has little to do with their message or them having any kind of “mandate”.

If the Dems don’t do what the country is expecting them to do, which is lead, then they will get their due for not doing so. It’s in the GOP’s best interest to compromise with the Dems, and not the other way around. As it currently stands, the Dems have a sizeable advantage in demographics and ground game. As such, they have the people behind them right now.

Stevie Ray..Clowns to the left and Jokers to the right..here I am...

November 12th, 2012
9:11 am

KEEP

You may benefit from staying focused on the issues instead of your childish and deflecting judgement of those you disagree with..I know your opinion of my views…it’s irrelevant to the issue at hand…if you want to have “intelligent discourse” try posting some meaningful responses that defend your position..otherwise, you are simply another kindergartner in the sandbox.. Your desire that I become part of your circle jerkish mutual admiration society is lacking substance…give me a reason to agree with you..

You can do it..I have complete confidence…

Corbin Sharpe. I think, therefore I am...I think.

November 12th, 2012
9:12 am

Off topic, I guess, but a very good read. This review coming from an aging white guy…

http://www.thenation.com/blog/171155/aging-white-guys-real-losers-2012

weetamoe

November 12th, 2012
9:13 am

Ignorance plus anger are a dangerous combination–especially when trademarked.

straitroad

November 12th, 2012
9:14 am

The hubris on this board is very telling. You folks should spend some time in less friendly territory every now and again. You sound like a bunch of parrots.

Aquagirl

November 12th, 2012
9:14 am

price is probably playing Bad Guy to Good Guy played by GOP who are open to negotiation.

For whom is he playing this little scenario? If it’s for the Democrats he doesn’t need to make his crazy displays in the media. The only other answer is it’s for partisan loons in the voting population and their egg-sucking apologists. You can decide in which category you belong for yourself.

Joe Hussein Mama

November 12th, 2012
9:16 am

Jay — “Price becomes much more likely to take on Chambliss in the 2014 Republican Senate primary.”

Yeah, I’m not seeing the downside for Georgia and the nation in this. Wouldn’t Price have to resign his House seat to run for Senate? Either way, we lose a conservative d-bag.

Ronald Reagan

November 12th, 2012
9:16 am

Until the Fulton County Liberals can figure out how to rig the voting machines in this whole state, Georgia will continue to vote for the right person & Dr. Price is one of those persons! He is a credit to his community!

dekalbcountyga

November 12th, 2012
9:17 am

Keep Up the Good Fight!

November 12th, 2012
9:19 am

Stevie, very childish response from you. Not surprising.

Stevie Ray..Clowns to the left and Jokers to the right..here I am...

November 12th, 2012
9:20 am

BRO

Disagree..I think you made my argument for me..the BOP holds the house, DEMs the senate, Dems the white house…it’s easy to forget that about half the voters didn’t vote for BO…so this sizable advantage you speak of is news to me..

The DEMS did poor job of leading first time around same as GOP….as a result here we are…screwed in the middle..fiscal cliff is result of zero leadership, evidenced boldly in various books and other outlets..

I’m having a hard time phathoming how it is things will be different..this is the exact same BS that occurred between victory and inauguration in 2008..it turned ugly quick and will return ugly when the fiscal cliff is kicked down the road..

Both parties have need to respond to voters for midterm elections…didn’t do much good last time…despite passing of PelosiCare which most of the country didn’t want..good thing our government knows what is best for us..

independent thinker

November 12th, 2012
9:20 am

These losers still take the their marching orders from Grover and Rush. When everyone gets a tax increase because of their intransigence and lack of cooperation, the rednecks in Gawja will wake up to what kind of clowns they elected. Off the cliff sounds like the best alternative to me. Here we go!

Joe Hussein Mama

November 12th, 2012
9:22 am

GA Dawg — “Price is doctor, he knows how healthcare should be run.”

Saying that a physician is the best man to run an HMO or health insurance company is like saying that Mr. Goodwrench is the best man to run General Motors.

Dr. Price

November 12th, 2012
9:23 am

Let’s talk about a more interesting scenario ……Jessie Jr’s re-election in Chicago.

Joe Hussein Mama

November 12th, 2012
9:23 am

R. Reagan — “Until the Fulton County Liberals can figure out how to rig the voting machines in this whole state”

Or until North Fulton splits off. Right now, only Milton “County” is keeping Fulton from turning a deep, rich shade of blue.

Stevie Ray..Clowns to the left and Jokers to the right..here I am...

November 12th, 2012
9:24 am

AQUAGIRL,

I hear you..on the surface it would seem unlikely the GOP have any cohesion…much less than would be necessary to pull off that old ruse I suggest…I just can’t forget this same rhetoric of compromise that had all congress giddy until the DEMS used control for controls sake…expect the GOP to do the same thing is shoe was on other foot..

There exists no incentives to do otherwise…big money and big votes come from the fringes..if they compromise, they lose..all of them

DannyX

November 12th, 2012
9:24 am

Lets go for a ride over the cliff. It’s the only way Republicans will negotiate. Let the Bush tax cuts and the estate tax cuts expire. It’s really very simple.

Joe Hussein Mama

November 12th, 2012
9:25 am

S. Ray — “…despite passing of PelosiCare which most of the country didn’t want.”

Not true, actually.

If you poll on the *provisions* contained within the ACA, they get significant majority support. It’s only when you poll for it as a whole and call it “Obamacare” or “Pelosicare” that it gets negative numbers.

Good job branding, bad job explaining.

fair and balaced.

November 12th, 2012
9:25 am

Love to see Saxby , Johnny and the Repub delegation from Georgia as they go off the cliff. You want austerity you got it but explain to the taxpayers why their taxes went up. Maybe this will be the death rattle for Grover just like the election was the death rattle for Rove and Faux News.

JDW

November 12th, 2012
9:26 am

Price is an utter embarrassment to the state and his profession. Should he win a primary battle vs. Chambliss it is not at all unlikely that he could go the way of Mourdock and Akin. I can’t conceive of him winning a race with Rogers given the recent Republican noseplant. Should that come to pass it is simply more evidence that the Republicans simply can’t learn from failure.

Stevie Ray..Clowns to the left and Jokers to the right..here I am...

November 12th, 2012
9:26 am

DANNYX

I agree with you for sure…Alan Simpson wrote an op-ed making cogent suggestions to avoid this by going back to his groups findings and rolling things out deliberately..I do think riding over the cliff will bring congression approval to historic lows..which is deserving..

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

November 12th, 2012
9:28 am

the only way to significantly reduce the deficit is to increase tax revenues and decrease spending

Jay’s chances of getting a christmas card from Grover Norquist are slipping away.

alex

November 12th, 2012
9:28 am

Here’s to compromise ….. either there is or there will be a second severe recession, This is not the legacy Obama wants. Let’s hope the far left and right see meaningful compromise and quit strutting their narcissism. Of course that is a LOT to ask. As I recall both candidates were rather vague on what they were willing to compromise, if the house repubs accept the 250,000 celing , what are the entitlements that will be on the table. I am so excited, this presidency shows the possibility of getting beyond race and gender, find the best and put them in place to lead. No more quotas, wow, that’s the ticket!

Stevie Ray..Clowns to the left and Jokers to the right..here I am...

November 12th, 2012
9:29 am

JOE

Who wouldn’t want pre-existing conditions cover and kids to 26? Those provisions were definitely accepted with great interest from all….its the way the bill is structured…in bed with insurers and a big threat to those who have commercial coverage now as these folks know they will have to pay the burden of the loss leading state pools…

Pizzaman

November 12th, 2012
9:30 am

In my opinion Republican legislators who have signed a pledge to grover norquist not to raise taxes are in violation of their Constitutional Oath and can (and probably should be but won’t impeached). Their loyalty is to the Country not a person. “Support and defend the Constitution of the US against ALL enemies, foreign and domestic….” grover norquist is a domestic enemy and if we do fall off that cliff the blame is his.

All rational Americans know we need a comprehensive tax hikes and spending cuts. So Mr & Mrs Tea Party legislator get over it and do your duty to your Country and fix the problem!

larry

November 12th, 2012
9:31 am

Didn’t we , as a country, reject was Boehner and the GOP is proposing in the spirit of “compromise”?

I guess they didnt get the message.

Well, here ya go John, we like our tax deductions, raise taxes on the wealthy.

Signed, the Middle Class

P.S. If you dont get the message now, you will in 2014!

Brosephus™

November 12th, 2012
9:31 am

it’s easy to forget that about half the voters didn’t vote for BO…so this sizable advantage you speak of is news to me..

Half the voters may not have voted for Obama, but did you not notice the Electoral College numbers? I can’t recall where I saw the breakdown, but there is a noticable trend at work. There’s a period where Dems didn’t cross 250 in the EC count. However, since 1988, I don’t think the GOP has crossed 300 EC votes. The current trend in “toss up” states have Dems gaining based on demographics.

The Dems only have to sit back and let the GOP overplay their hand, which they are very prone to doing. As long as the Dems show themselves to be the “grownups”, they will continue the trend at play.

If I can find the place where I saw the EC breakdown, I’ll post it for you. It even talks about previous “toss up” states, such as California (which was Republican prior to Reagan) as being firmly Democratic states now.

Stevie Ray..Clowns to the left and Jokers to the right..here I am...

November 12th, 2012
9:31 am

JOE

I’ve worked with plenty of physcians..you are correct of course…I’ve never met one who could run a successful business…it’s almost comical how most of them think they can run practices as a group and make horrific decisions..

JDW

November 12th, 2012
9:32 am

“When we’re referring to Chambliss as the adult you know our country is in some deep, deep $#!^”

AMEN, I don’t see how Saxby lives with what he did during his campaign against Cleland.

alex

November 12th, 2012
9:32 am

@ Joe, please read your post”but if you poll as a whole”….Goodness-parsing or what, laughable, really-who cares, it’s done move on

Joe Hussein Mama

November 12th, 2012
9:32 am

S. Ray — “JOE

Who wouldn’t want pre-existing conditions cover and kids to 26? Those provisions were definitely accepted with great interest from all”

And rightly so. I certainly benefit from them, as do many other Americans.

“….its the way the bill is structured…in bed with insurers and a big threat to those who have commercial coverage now as these folks know they will have to pay the burden of the loss leading state pools…”

Then the GOP *should* have gotten behind single-payer instead of insisting on their ideas being used so generously in the ACA. After all, the individual mandate is a REPUBLICAN idea.

I don’t know why that has to be repeated over and over, but people seem to forget it if it isn’t shoved in their face every hour or two.

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

November 12th, 2012
9:32 am

I guess they didnt get the message.

Hard for messages to get through the bubble walls. Those walls are thick.

RB from Gwinnett

November 12th, 2012
9:33 am

“In today’s AJC, Politifact rulled Chambliss’ statement that revenues are at historic lows, at least post WWII, as “mostly true”. Why then are revenues not the MAIN focus in proportion to cuts instead of visa versa??”

The problem with this thinking is that while revenues may be steady as a % of GDP, they’re being paid by an ever shrinking portion of Americans and the “tax the rich” mantra you can see all over this thread will further shrink that percentage. I realize you liberals want to punish successful people for having money, but it’s not going to work. Unintended consequences are going to continue screwing the lower classes as business owners look for ways to stay in business by automation or sending jobs to low wage producers.

If you aren’t smart enough to believe every last business owner isn’t meeting behind closed doors to figure out how to minimize the effect of the ACA on their bottom line REGARDLESS OF THE EFFECT ON EMPLOYEES, you should stop posting here and start paying attention. This job shedding is just beginning and massive inflation is right around the corner. You voted for it, so when it happens, don’t whine about it.

larry

November 12th, 2012
9:33 am

reject was Boehner

That shoud read ” reject what Boehner and the GOP were proposing.

Its Monday …………

Stevie Ray..Clowns to the left and Jokers to the right..here I am...

November 12th, 2012
9:33 am

BRO

C’mon, we both know that I’m very familiar with EC….too bad for DEMS sake it doesn’t apply to congressional elections…sometimes you are the bug, and sometimes you are the windshield…we as taxpayers are always the bug..

Aquagirl

November 12th, 2012
9:34 am

big money and big votes come from the fringes..if they compromise, they lose..all of them

I disagree, you ellipsis overusing cheese eating surrender monkey. :)

The big money comes from business, which usually backs compromise. Extremist partisans may be darlings of fringe voters but they usually are completely ineffective and are removed after a couple of terms. Allen West and Cynthia McKinney are two notable examples from opposite sides of the spectrum.

Price is taking a hardcore no-prisoners approach and he’s apparently not considered a fringe loon by significant numbers of his own Republican colleagues. This does not bode well for the GOP in the long run. It’s also testament the Goopers have run off the righty cliff.

saywhat?

November 12th, 2012
9:35 am

Brosephus ” The only reason the GOP still has control of the House is because of the 2010 election. He who has control of the states in most cases gets to draw the house district lines. The GOP will likely control the house through the entire decade because of partisaned districting. It has little to do with their message or them having any kind of “mandate”.”
______________________________________________________________
In fact, the Democrats in Congress received more votes combined than the Republicans in Congress. It just goes to show how effectively districts have been gerrymandered.

Joe Hussein Mama

November 12th, 2012
9:35 am

S. Ray — “JOE, I’ve worked with plenty of physcians..you are correct of course…I’ve never met one who could run a successful business…it’s almost comical how most of them think they can run practices as a group and make horrific decisions..:”

And when you ask them questions about coverage or administrative procedures, they immediately get a case of the stoopids. I needed a Letter of Medical Necessity from my GP for some consumable medical supplies that I routinely use, and he was totally baffled by how to do it. I practically had to write the thing myself and put it in front of him to sign before I could get it.

Without the letter or a prescription, I wouldn’t be able to claim the supplies on my flex spending account.

Ben Shockley

November 12th, 2012
9:36 am

Saxby Chambliss is eyeballs-deep in farm subsidies, which I consider a scandal. The AJC actually did a very thorough series a few years ago exposing it. He’s a scumbag, and I hope the Tea Party can find a candidate to defeat him in the Republican primary.

Stevie Ray..Clowns to the left and Jokers to the right..here I am...

November 12th, 2012
9:36 am

JOE

Couldn’t agree more about single payer…make no mistake, both the DEMS and GOP benefit equally from hospital operators and especially insurers cash donations..

The latter would take massive job cuts…will affect voting districts…kinda the reason we won’t get meaningful IRS reform…the tax lawyers who are likely supported by there brethren in other legal fields, have too much influence..

JohnnyReb

November 12th, 2012
9:37 am

Let’s see – the Dems cover millions of uninsured with Obamacare, BTW without one Republican vote, while not passing a budget in four years but borrowing a Trillion a year. Now, Repubs should compromise by raising taxes on the rich. Never mind the “rich” are small business owners who provide jobs. And, that the taxes raised from the rich will be a drop in the bucket of what is needed. Yep, that’s the popular answer, the cure-all, the Obama way.

What’s most amazing from the election is how many stupid voters we have.

Joe Hussein Mama

November 12th, 2012
9:38 am

alex — “@ Joe, please read your post”but if you poll as a whole”….Goodness-parsing or what,”

Yes, it is. The claim that ‘the majority is against the ACA is definitely parsing.

“laughable, really-who cares, it’s done move on”

There’s no need for you to be a Richard. Besides, if you don’t care to read what I have to say, a scrollbar is conveniently available for your use. Give it a try and see what you think.

larry

November 12th, 2012
9:38 am

This job shedding is just beginning and massive inflation is right around the corner. You voted for it, so when it happens, don’t whine about it.

Funny, i saw on 60 minutes last night where employers were having trouble finding employees , over 3 million jobs are going unfulfilled because of the skills gap.

There wasnt any mention of the ACA at all. If it was hurting businesses so bad, wouldn’t these businesses just leave those jobs unfilled and blame it on ACA instead of the skills gap?

Joe Hussein Mama

November 12th, 2012
9:39 am

RB — “I realize you liberals want to punish successful people for having money”

Delusional troll is delusional. (laughing) :D

They BOTH suck

November 12th, 2012
9:40 am

side topic:

To all the veterans; Thank you.

Happy Veterans Day!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

CFB Fan

November 12th, 2012
9:41 am

Jay, let me get this straight, taxes go up by $400B and spending goes down by $200B, resulting in a $600B reduction in the deficit. How is that a bad thing?

larry

November 12th, 2012
9:42 am

Speaking of the skills gap, the show also highlighted what some states are doing to close the skills gap, which is mostly in manufacturing.

Stevie Ray..Clowns to the left and Jokers to the right..here I am...

November 12th, 2012
9:42 am

PIZZAMAN

The no new taxes pledge suggest to me that GOP is representing its base which is their obligation…hopefully the controlling tea party et al will fall by the wayside to a degree that benefits all..

I resemble more of a q-tip than any member of the animal kingdom..and I haven’t surrendered anything…and I doubt, despite any suggestion of 2000 page BS bills, either party will unless these monkeys of which you speak fly out of my butt…

I do love me some cheese though

Brosephus™

November 12th, 2012
9:43 am

Stevie Ray

http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/the-gops-electoral-map-problem/2012/11/11/35ec162e-2c20-11e2-89d4-040c9330702a_story.html?tid=pm_politics_pop

In the past six presidential elections, including 2012, the Democratic nominee has averaged 327 electoral votes while the Republican nominee has averaged just 210. (A candidate needs 270, a simple majority of the total of 538 electoral votes, to be elected.)

During those two-plus decades dating back to 1992, the most — repeat most — electoral votes a Republican presidential candidate has won is 286, when George W. Bush claimed a second term in 2004. In that same time frame, Democratic nominees have received more than 300 electoral votes four times: Barack Obama in 2008 (365) and 2012 (332) and Bill Clinton in 1992 (370) and 1996 (379). The lowest total for a Democratic nominee during that period was Sen. John Kerry’s 251 electoral votes in 2004; Republicans’ floor during that same period was 159 electoral votes in 1996.

That Democratic electoral-vote dominance is the mirror image of the huge edge Republicans enjoyed in the six elections prior to 1992. From 1968 to 1988, Republican presidential nominees averaged a whopping 417 electoral votes per election while Democrats managed just 113. The most electoral votes a Democratic nominee won was 297, when Jimmy Carter claimed the presidency in 1976. Ronald Reagan, in beating Carter four years later, rolled up 489 electoral votes — and followed that up with a 525-electoral-vote victory in 1984. From 1968 to 1988, Democrats never broke 300 electoral votes, while Republicans broke that barrier five times: 1968 (301), 1972 (530), 1980 (489), 1984 (525) and 1988 (426).

That’s only for the presidential election. If the GOP continues it’s piss poor inclusion of minorities, the demographics will begin to bite them in the ass in Senate elections. Come 2020, if they haven’t made inroads, then the House will begin to suffer because of redistricting. The 2010 GOP sweeps on the state level is the primary reason why the GOP has the House majority now. Without the creation of more GOP friendly districts, they would likely have a very slim majority, if they had it.

That’s why I say it’s more important for the GOP to compromise for the good of the people. The Dems already have an advantage based on demographics, so they only need to sit back and watch the GOP doom themselves. The numbers are all there for anybody to see.

Jay

November 12th, 2012
9:44 am

I didn’t realize until this morning that Mia Love, the black, Mormon mayor from Utah featured prominently in the GOP convention and championed by Romney, Cantor, Boehner and others, lost her congressional race in a district drawn to be Republican.

alex

November 12th, 2012
9:46 am

@Stevei Ray, if you think that is comical, you will be laughing youa azz off, when your M.D. is run like the Ga. DMV or Fulton Co. Voting Commision or the Airport concessions Commitee. HAR, HAR. I’ve got an appt. with my conceraige doc…..

@ brocephus, the repubs have no hand to overplay really and both parties will have to worry about it……

larry

November 12th, 2012
9:46 am

HEADLINE: Grover Norquist says that the reason the President won the election is because he called Romney a ” poopy head”.

Will someone give poor Grover his medication, he hasnt taken it since Tuesday.

TaxPayer

November 12th, 2012
9:46 am

I look forward to seeing Price and Chambliss going after each other. It should be entertaining. I especially look forward to any head-to-head confrontations between the two. Price will make some typical remark about Chambliss and his willingness to compromise and then Chambliss will beechslap Tom and Tom will whine with his usual “I Object.” The drama…

Regnad Kcin

November 12th, 2012
9:47 am

“Who wouldn’t want pre-existing conditions cover and kids to 26? Those provisions were definitely accepted with great interest from all….its the way the bill is structured…in bed with insurers and a big threat to those who have commercial coverage now as these folks know they will have to pay the burden of the loss leading state pools…”
=============
Two comments: “in bed with insurers.” Single payer, or do you have another idea?

“and a big threat to those who have commercial coverage now as these folks know they will have to pay the burden of the loss leading state pools…”

Of course, our hospitals won’t have to deal with the huge currently-uninsured population getting their health care via emergency rooms – won’t there be some off-setting savings there?

Stevie Ray..Clowns to the left and Jokers to the right..here I am...

November 12th, 2012
9:47 am

Johnny Reb

I’m not sure those stupid voters aren’t actually much more practical than us….as in the past, I think the 30% of total voters identifying themselves as independent may feel the same way many of us do..the system is corrupt so it just doesn’t matter..

alex

November 12th, 2012
9:48 am

but your so much fun……

larry

November 12th, 2012
9:48 am

I didn’t realize until this morning that Mia Love, the black, Mormon mayor from Utah featured prominently in the GOP convention and championed by Romney, Cantor, Boehner and others, lost her congressional race in a district drawn to be Republican.

Oooops…………. And in a state that went 73% for Romney too.