State-chartered school proponents show a lot of brass

In his now-famous speech to the Democratic convention back in September, Bill Clinton noted, that “It takes some brass to attack a guy for doing what you did.”

By that definition, supporters of Amendment 1, the proposal to create a system of state-chartered schools around Georgia, have more brass than a 100-person Tijuana mariachi band. They are doing just what they attack their opponents for doing, and they are doing it with audacity and an official seal of approval.

As amendment supporters tell it, it is illegal for local school officials and state School Superintendent John Barge to publicly express opposition to the November ballot measure. Officials who dare to criticize the measure are engaging in taxpayer-supported advocacy, in violation of Georgia law.

Well, right about now that mariachi band ought to be strolling by, trumpets blaring. Not just because Gov. Nathan Deal, among other public officials, is openly advocating passage of Amendment 1. Because as Georgians are in the voting booth in November, trying to make up their minds about Amendment 1, this is the “unbiased” description that they’ll read on their ballot: “Provides for improving student achievement and parental involvement through more public charter school options.”

Again, that language is printed on the ballot itself, and it is clearly intended as an argument in favor of passage. It represents taxpayer-funded advocacy delivered right at the moment of decision-making. Who would vote against “improving student achievement?” Who opposes more “parental involvement?” The preamble is a blatant effort to put a thumb on the scales.

Then voters will turn to the language of the amendment as it appears on the ballot, which is no more straightforward. In fact, it is downright deceptive. It reads: “Shall the Constitution of Georgia be amended to allow state or local approval of public charter schools upon the request of local communities?”

Reading that question, an unwary voter might believe — is supposed to believe — that the right of local school boards to approve charter schools depends on passage of the amendment. It does not. Contrary to the ballot wording, local school boards already have clear power to create charter schools; that authority is not at stake in this issue.

Why then does the ballot language include the words “to allow … local approval”? Purely and simply, to deceive people into believing that charter schools as a whole are under threat. And there’s evidence that the deception may work.

In a recent AJC poll, 45 percent of likely Georgia voters said they support passage of the amendment, while 42 percent oppose it. That is much closer than a poll conducted in July on behalf of supporters of the measure, which found that 58 percent of Georgians backed Amendment 1.

Conceivably, the difference could be explained by the fact that public attitudes have changed between July and October. But Bert Brantley, spokesman for pro-amendment Families for Better Public Schools, gave AJC reporters another explanation.

In the July poll, he pointed out, voters were read the actual language that appears on the ballot and that will guide their voting. The AJC poll asked the question more accurately than the ballot does: “Shall the state of Georgia have a special state commission that has the authority to approve charter schools that have not been approved by local school districts?”

If Brantley’s right — if the wording on the ballot does sway voter decisions to a significant degree — then the deception will have worked. But that in turn raises a crucial question.

With this proposed amendment, Georgia voters are being asked create an unelected state commission appointed by politicians. That commission would have the authority to create a system of state-chartered schools around the state, undercutting the authority of local systems and school boards but without the accountability of those boards.

That’s asking for a lot of trust, and voters ought to ask themselves whether those pushing this amendment are conducting themselves in a manner deserving of that trust. They aren’t being upfront about their motives, and they aren’t being honest about what they hope to accomplish.

– Jay Bookman

191 comments Add your comment

stands for decibels

October 17th, 2012
10:40 am

more brass than a 100-person Tijuana mariachi band

…so stealing that.

Keep Up the Good Fight!

October 17th, 2012
10:43 am

It’s too bad there are no truth in labeling laws for the ballot

Oscar

October 17th, 2012
10:43 am

Charter schools – a bad idea who time, I hope, has not come.

Joe Hussein Mama

October 17th, 2012
10:44 am

I think Gov. Deal and his cronies know that this wouldn’t pass if they were honest about it, so they’re doing a Romney in order to fool people.

Oscar

October 17th, 2012
10:45 am

t’s too bad there are no truth in labeling laws for the ballot

____

There are laws about truth in language on the ballot. Does not appear that they are being followed here.
Someone has to object and raise enough publicity, or get a court order, to enforce the laws, otherwise, laws will be ignored.

Brosephus™

October 17th, 2012
10:47 am

I’m hoping they have the option of marking “Hell No” when I go and cast my ballot.

Erwin's cat

October 17th, 2012
10:48 am

Keep – It’s too bad there are no truth in labeling laws for the ballot

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^THIS^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
this amendment is just one example of very many

0311/8541/5811/1811/1801

October 17th, 2012
10:48 am

I see Jay is getting away from his warped definition of terrorism as fast as he can.

0311/8541/5811/1811/1801

October 17th, 2012
10:48 am

The Amendment will pass.

Deal with it.

P.S.

The next thread will be about MARTA.

Jay

October 17th, 2012
10:50 am

“There are laws about truth in language on the ballot. Does not appear that they are being followed here. Someone has to object and raise enough publicity, or get a court order, to enforce the laws, otherwise, laws will be ignored.

Actually, no there aren’t. The Ga. Supreme Court, in its infinite wisdom, has decreed that the language on the ballot must give the voter enough information to know WHICH amendment he or she is voting on. That’s the only legal parameter that exists in this state.

Biased language, even blatantly incorrect language — doesn’t matter. There are no legal means to challenge it.

Jay

October 17th, 2012
10:52 am

As a reader e-mailed me this morning, responding to the column in the AJC:

“You are 100% correct. My two sons did early voting yesterday. They both voted yes on the amendment. They both said they were not clear on exactly what the amendment would do but saw no reason to vote against local control and better schools. Unfortunately, this amendment provides neither, but is worded to make you believe it does.”

Rightwing Troll

October 17th, 2012
10:52 am

Look at the wingnuts on the natioal level… purchased, corrupt and dihonest… why would you expect the results to be different on the State level?

I support charter schools, but the local boards should make those decisions and there is a mechanism in place for you to express your displeasure and effect changes if you don’t support the local board’s decisions… it’s called the “voting booth”…

Finn McCool (The System isn't Broken; It's Fixed)

October 17th, 2012
10:54 am

Can an injunction be filed? Anyway to stop it?

Brosephus™

October 17th, 2012
10:54 am

Republicans: Against increased government regulations except for when they are the one’s regulating.

Union

October 17th, 2012
10:54 am

california has charter schools growing at an exponential rate it seems. while charter schools may not be the solution, it seems to pick up steam as parents are realizing that education is not as it should be for children as a whole.

jd

October 17th, 2012
10:55 am

So, is the ballot, given the wording, an example of taxpayer funded advocacy which the AG says is a no-no?

ByteMe - Got ilk?

October 17th, 2012
10:55 am

The deck, as always, is stacked in favor of the plantation owners. We just work here.

But a typo I almost made reminds me of a sign in front of a house in my neighborhood:

FOR SALE BY OWER

(it says it on both sides of the sign, so we’re pretty sure it’s not a typo)

Roswell mom

October 17th, 2012
10:56 am

Obviously, most Georgians don’t mind a hand in their pocket when it belongs to the GOP. Go fish, y’all.

Keep Up the Good Fight!

October 17th, 2012
10:58 am

Its labeled that way because “providing for the decimation of our already underfunded public school system by socialistically taking taxpayer money to pay for some to go to charter schools (wink, wink, nudge, nudge…you know who gets left behind, right?)” would just be tooooo lengthy, right?

HDB

October 17th, 2012
11:00 am

Brosephus™

October 17th, 2012
10:47 am
“I’m hoping they have the option of marking “Hell No” when I go and cast my ballot.”

I said the same thing when I cast my ballot on Monday…but I said “f-no”!!!

Redneck Convert (R--and proud of it)

October 17th, 2012
11:00 am

Well, I went to a school a few years and I reckon that makes me a expert on this charter school thing.

And I got a question for all of you. Do you want your great grandbabys talking like this one day?

Yes, that’s a picture of your great granddaddy [you]. Doesn’t he look strange? Look at how pasty white his skin is. Nowadays, just about everybody is brown like you, but back in his day about 80% of the people in this country were paper-white like him.

If your answer is no, then you need to back these charter schools. ‘Cause that’s the only way your kids are going to be kept away from Those People you can have a strong voice in where your kids go to school.

As people say on here, just sayin’.

Oscar

October 17th, 2012
11:07 am

Biased language, even blatantly incorrect language — doesn’t matter. There are no legal means to challenge it.

______

Things are much worse than I thought.

barking frog

October 17th, 2012
11:12 am

Why would a local board
create a charter school ?

Simple Truths

October 17th, 2012
11:14 am

“Provides for improving student achievement and parental involvement through more public charter school options.”

Is that any worse than the crap-preamble for the TSPLOST question?

“Provides for local transportation projects to create jobs and reduce traffic congestion with citizen oversight.”

Oscar

October 17th, 2012
11:15 am

Why would a local board
create a charter school
_____

The school board is elected. If that’s what their constituents want, they will do it.

Brosephus™

October 17th, 2012
11:17 am

Why would a local board
create a charter school ?

Not really sure, but the system seems to work as it is set up now. There are charters all across the state with varying degrees of success. A charter could be used to try new teaching methods and such that are not allowed under state curriculum guidelines. I simply don’t see a need to add more bureaucracy to the system or give politicians another avenue for spending tax dollars on their pet projects.

CS in ATL

October 17th, 2012
11:17 am

I felt completely bamboozled after voting yes and realizing that i was completely misled. Yes, i should have done better homework and i thought i understood the amendment when i went to vote, but after reading and re-reading the actual wording on the ballot, i voted yes … because as you say, who would vote against more parent involvement and more local control? wish i could take back my vote or that i had just left it blank.

barking frog

October 17th, 2012
11:17 am

Oscar
Do these constituents not
have public schools already
available?

St Simons

October 17th, 2012
11:19 am

VOTE NO on ALL AMENDMENTS. We did.

if it passes, this publicly educated high tax paying family will leave for
the banana republic of florida immediately.
Sneaky cons can’t win fair & square, they gotta cheat & lie.

Brosephus™

October 17th, 2012
11:20 am

Is that any worse than the crap-preamble for the TSPLOST question?

“Provides for local transportation projects to create jobs and reduce traffic congestion with citizen oversight.”

Yep, it’s worse because it will use the emotional pull of “helping the children” when it will help the children about as much at T-SPLOST would have helped traffic.

Oscar

October 17th, 2012
11:20 am

Oscar
Do these constituents not
have public schools already
available?

___

Yes, they do. I can’t answer for them and say why they would want a charter school, just pointing out why the local elected officials would create a charter school.
I suspect they think their kids will do better in a charter school. As to why they think that, your opinion is as good as mine.

southpaw

October 17th, 2012
11:21 am

As I understood it, the proponents objected to the opponents’ use of official time, government web sites, etc. to make their point, as opposed to doing it after work and on their personal web sites, blogs, and such. Are Governor Deal and the rest also campaigning when they’re supposed to be at their jobs, or are they doing this on their own time? If the former is true, then a pox on both their houses. If the latter is right, then the “100-person Tijuana mariachi band” has less brass than Herb Alpert’s band of yesteryear.

I must have missed an article or two. If anyone wants to fill in some of the (many:-)) gaps in my knowledge, I’ll be much obliged.

barking frog

October 17th, 2012
11:21 am

Brosephus
Kinda like a semi-private
school paid for with tax
money ?

n

October 17th, 2012
11:24 am

It is incredible that Repubicans state and national now depend on The Big Lie as the cornerstone of their politics. They consider us sheep easily manipulated by propaganda and non-stop lies. And the corporate media, for the most part, are utterly amoral and complicit in allowing this to happen.

East Cobb RINO, Inc. (LLC)

October 17th, 2012
11:24 am

Have there been or will there be legal challenges to this wording to overturn the vote should it be approved? It would be an uphill fight but worth fighting.

skipper

October 17th, 2012
11:24 am

barking frog……if a local school board is like APS (and they are staying ‘coz the voters do not care as long as they are the “same like me!”) then charter, private, home-school….anything looks better. APS is a prime example of what happens when you turn a school system over to incompetants, and folks will vote them back in because they, too, are incompetant. This is actually pretty obvious to educated blacks, whites, or anyone else. And are folks supposed to sit back and do nothing????? Reckon’ somebody will move in, start a business, and send their kids to an inner-city APS? Ha! Yeah, call it what you will but see what has happend to APS. A complete and total cluster attributable more to bad behaviour than anything else. And Jay, and everyone else, lets see whare this cluster is 5-10 years from now. It will not be any better with the present buffoons runing it.

Brosephus™

October 17th, 2012
11:25 am

frog

I’m thinking more along the lines of a magnet school, but yeah, it could be considered as you said. That’s one of my primary objections to charter schools. The exception is if the entire sytem goes charter, which is what I think Fulton has done.

barking frog

October 17th, 2012
11:27 am

The amendment does not
create something new it
makes constitutional a
mechanism for school
funding that previously
was in place but was ruled
unconstitutional by the
Georgia Supreme Court.

Georgia

October 17th, 2012
11:29 am

Wait a minute. Charter Schools exist for one reason only: to provide a superior environment for rich kids that removes their superior personhoods from the hoards of student-rabble that parents feel would undermine the cultural purity of said rich kids who also happen to carry their homework in nice binders. It’s not about education. It’s the two Americas. Vote for Romney if you’re rich or if you worship rich people.

Brosephus™

October 17th, 2012
11:29 am

frog @ 11:27

Yep. The way to avoid a law being found unconstitutional is to change the constitution. ;)

Simple Truths

October 17th, 2012
11:32 am

I would side with Jay on this until the phrase “Fulton County” pops into my head. That makes things less clear for me.

barking frog

October 17th, 2012
11:32 am

Brosephus
..or change the law.

BW

October 17th, 2012
11:33 am

No worries…voted no on Amendment 1 just yesterday

flagboy?

October 17th, 2012
11:34 am

Charter schools. . .

Not speaking as a conservative (which I am) or a liberal or whatever. . .but most people have no idea what is going on in their local schools. Johnny or Susy might be coming home with A’s and B’s, but believe me, the standard for what is acceptable in today’s high schools, academically and in regard to behavior, is appalling.

I was against charter schools for a long time because it seemed like a case of the have’s versus the have not’s. . but it is turning more into the care’s versus the care not’s.

Pre-Brown vs- Board of Education

October 17th, 2012
11:36 am

The more things change, the more they remain the same. Governor Deal would love to take this state back to the 1950’s. I will vote NO just like I voted NO for the TSPLOST.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U9ACS4PgDFA

East Lake Ira

October 17th, 2012
11:37 am

Can’t wait to retire so I can leave this bass akwards state… if only it weren’t 20 years off…

barking frog

October 17th, 2012
11:38 am

skipper
this amendment allows
the state to sidestep such
a board but that is really
not the purpose. The
state can fund a charter
school in an an area where
locals can’t or won’t is
the main purpose.

godless heathen

October 17th, 2012
11:39 am

It would be a turrible thing for this amendment to pass and give this authority to the State. But total Federal control would be something the liberals would support.

Dunwoodian

October 17th, 2012
11:39 am

Let start by saying this; something needs to be done about public education in this state, I only wish I knew the answer.

Follow the money though…Three big families, through their chairtable foundations, provide lots of support for the charter school cause. The Waltons, of Walmart. The Pritzgers of Hyatt Hotels. The Kaisers, of the BOK corporation. All three have billions in net worth, and all three engage in business deals amongst each other through their family’s private equity/venture capital firms. These are Madrone Capital (Waltons), New World Captial (Pritzgers), and Argonaut Captial (Kaisers).

A couple of these firms have made seed money investments in “Education Technology” & “Charter Management Organization” companies. Many of the family members sit on the boards of Charter School Advocacy groups, alongside Charter School entrepreneurs. Lots of money is spent on education, some say upwards of 500 annually nationwide. Just think if you could run a 6-7% profit margin on 500 billion, you’d have a healthy income.

n

October 17th, 2012
11:45 am

This is a ruse to foist politically connected, corporate controlled, privatized schools on local jurisdictions across the state.
Obviously there is a huge profit motive involved, because it is painfully obvious that our state leadership hasn’t demonstrated any previous concern about the quality of education in Georgia, and steadfastly ignores the traditional conservative doctrine that control of education should be in local hands. Be assured there must be hundreds of millions of dollars in play here for the state leaders to suddenly take an interest in schools and education.
The state leadership has consistently cut education in GA. GA ranks near the bottom in every measure of K-12 educational achievement. Now they want to funnel hundreds of millions into the pockets of corporate donors and cronies by privatizing schools. Local control of education be dam-ed.

Brosephus™

October 17th, 2012
11:45 am

..or change the law.

That requires too much thought and effort. Georgia’s conservatives want to follow the path of least resistance to achieve their goal.

—————————

It would be a turrible thing for this amendment to pass and give this authority to the State. But total Federal control would be something the liberals would support.

Good thing I’m not one of those Liberals… I think the control needs to remain exactly where it resides now, and that is on the local level. :)

Ronald Reagan Parkway

October 17th, 2012
11:47 am

In a way, the Koch brothers are simply fulfilling their father’s legacy. In 1958, Fred Koch — the founder of Koch Industries — joined a group of manufacturing executives and Robert Welch to found the John Birch Society, a virulent far-right group that dominated the civil rights debate. The John Birch Society organized an impeachment campaign against then-Supreme Court Justice Earl Warren for the Brown v. Board decision outlawing racial segregation, and mobilized its supporters to oppose integration of schools on the grounds that mixing black and white would lead to the “mongrelization” of the races. Fred supported the John Birch Society’s anti-civil rights campaign, and wrote a screed denouncing the civil rights movement as communist-inspired.
Charles and David did not only inherit an oil company, they inherited a political philosophy. The Tea Party movement, orchestrated by AFP and other Koch fronts, reflects the paranoid style of the movement started by their father, Fred. As Thom Hartmann has explained, corporate interests have long funded far-right, paranoid movements to continually shift the balance of politics in America. The radical right creates political space for corporate candidates like Richard Nixon or Mitt Romney to appear “moderate” in contrast. David Koch, it should be noted, actually supports Romney for president in 2012 even though David’s fronts have spent the last two years boosting reactionaries like Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-MN) and Sen. Jim DeMint (R-SC).

http://thinkprogress.org/politics/2011/01/12/138501/koch-segregation/?mobile=nc

Arnold

October 17th, 2012
11:48 am

I voted yesterday. I voted no for this amendment.

Regnad Kcin

October 17th, 2012
11:52 am

Thank you, Arnold.

Erwin's cat

October 17th, 2012
11:53 am

My favorite was Amendment 1 a few years ago “making GA more competitive” when if fact it gave employers the ability to force employees to sign blanket non-compete agreements which could keep you from seeking other employment in the state with a “competing” firm

St Simons- island off the coast of New Somalia

October 17th, 2012
11:53 am

VOTE NO on ALL AMENDMENTS. We did.
The bible thumpers can get YOUR tax money and use it to teach
your children the earth is 6000 yrs old and the baby jesus rode
a dinosaur.
Public education will suffer in a state we already rank 49th or 50th
in everything. It will cripple Georgia for generations. Its beyond
embarrassing. I did not think it genetically possible for a collection
of humans to be so stupid.
These are depths the cons will go to keep Georgia stupid, backwards,
last in everything, and Red.

Erwin's cat

October 17th, 2012
11:53 am

since then I vote NO on all amendments

Georgia

October 17th, 2012
11:53 am

Maybe if more Georgians had attended the superior charter schools then they’d be able to decipher the language on the ballots and vote as they intend to vote.

Azziz

October 17th, 2012
11:54 am

Jay in the last line of your article you state “…and they aren’t being honest about what they hope to accomplish.”

What exactly do you believe they’re trying to accomplish? I ask because I am an undecided voter on Amendment 1, admittedly I pay little attention to public education issues. You’re suggesting that “student achievement and parental involvement” is a red herring and that there is some ulterior motive?

East Cobb RINO, Inc. (LLC)

October 17th, 2012
11:55 am

The state can fund a charter school in an an area where locals can’t or won’t is the main purpose.

Wolf – sheep – costume. The whole GOP theme is local control. Except when it benefits the wealthy I suppose. If the locals do not want it, it is probably for good reason. The reason public schools are “failing” is funding cuts to education under Perdue and continuing with Deal. The GOP/rich bizturds plan is to make it so the public schools look bad, then they can come to the rescue. You know like setting a building on fire then calling the fire department.

Joe Hussein Mama

October 17th, 2012
11:57 am

SSI — “the baby jesus rode a dinosaur.”

It’s a wonder more christians don’t get degrees in Anthropology so they could go on archaeological digs in search of this notable and unique fossil evidence. :D

Brosephus™

October 17th, 2012
11:58 am

EC

I remember that one. I think I had begun checking “No” long before that one though.

Z

October 17th, 2012
12:00 pm

This amendment is just another way for the Rich to get the Middle Class and Poor to pay for their children’s education. Just another layer in State Government with no oversight sucking more money from Public Schools. No Thanks and it will be a NO for this family when we go into that voting booth.

DebbieDoRight - A Do Right Woman

October 17th, 2012
12:00 pm

Republicans: Against increased government regulations except for when they are the one’s regulating and profiting from it.

Fixed it for you.

barking frog

October 17th, 2012
12:01 pm

East Cobb RINO, Inc.
(LLC)
Local control does not
always mean local
government control.
Usually close to 50%
of voters did not vote
for elected officials.

AmericaShrugged

October 17th, 2012
12:02 pm

Don’t throw out the baby with the bath water. I’m not sure additional competition will improve the performance of public schools, but the kids deserve better educational opportunities. This law doesn’t force anyone to open charter schools or to go to them, it will just provide more educational options. I thought freedom of choice was a good thing.

Mary Elizabeth

October 17th, 2012
12:03 pm

“They aren’t being upfront about their motives, and they aren’t being honest about what they hope to accomplish.”
=================================================

Thank you very much for this column here and in today’s AJC.

The legal steps Republicans have taken to curb dissent. The subterfuge. The intensity to pass this amendment. These should all alert voters to the fact that proponents of this constitutional amendment have ulterior motives and, in my opinion, those motives are that they have an intense aversion to anything “government” and, in addition, they want to turn public schools into a quasi-private profit-making industry to benefit the already well heeled. This will destroy public education as we have known it, in which all children in Georgia are educated, equally. Improve public education with the help of charters that are approved by the local school districts or the state Board of Education. Defeat this constitutional amendment. Vote NO in NOvember to Amendment 1.

CJ

October 17th, 2012
12:04 pm

This amendment is not an attempt to improve education in Georgia. It’s an attempt to privatize education in Georgia.

And by diverting taxpayer money from public school systems to privately-operated charter schools, while simultaneously blaming grossly underfunded public school systems for their failures, the Governor and others might actually succeed with this scam.

Thomas Heyward Jr.

October 17th, 2012
12:05 pm

For once …(maybe twice considering his earlier article about terrorism)……….Bookman is correct.
.
The Admendment or Ballot wording should read……………….Do you support a MORE centralized un-elected Authority, based out of Atlanta…………to influence the education of your child?
.
No matter what side you take…………the answer should be clear.
.
Remember who made the decision to put this on the ballot.
And punish accordingly.
.

paulo977

October 17th, 2012
12:06 pm

Brosephus™

October 17th, 2012
10:47 am

I’m hoping they have the option of marking “Hell No” when I go and cast my ballot
____________________________________

I almost did when I cast my ballot !!

Georgia

October 17th, 2012
12:07 pm

But the real argument should be about curriculum. There’s no stopping rich folks from getting what they want, and that’s fine. But what are we teaching our students? How about bullying 101, and disrespect 101 and sex 101 and tatooing 101?

and gum chewing 101

Where is the supervision? Where? Right now the only authority figure the students take it easy on are the janitors, and that’s only because the janitors carry mops and have seen Kill Bill ten thousand times.

southpaw

October 17th, 2012
12:07 pm

JHM @11:57
A lot of us have serious doubts that there is any such fossil evidence. Didn’t those critters go the way of the thesauras a good bit beforehand, as we discussed a few days ago? :-)

Regnad Kcin

October 17th, 2012
12:07 pm

” This law doesn’t force anyone to open charter schools or to go to them, it will just provide more educational options. I thought freedom of choice was a good thing.”

The law gives an unelected body the right to overturn decisions of the locally-elected school board, over-riding the will of the people. The “freedom of choice” part comes in when the people elect their school board. When the unelected board overrides the will of the people, this is not “freedon of choice”.

barking frog

October 17th, 2012
12:08 pm

A town located a 2 hour
bus ride away from the
nearest school and the
local board will only provide
a bus could get a school
with this mechanism.

Georgia

October 17th, 2012
12:09 pm

Kudos to Bookman for focusing attention on this issue. It’s hard to care about it. My eyes are so glazed over that I’m going to have to DVR the young and the restless.

Regnad Kcin

October 17th, 2012
12:09 pm

“Didn’t those critters go the way of the thesauras a good bit beforehand, as we discussed a few days ago?”

Depends on the species – I’ve heard of sightings of the Roget’s thesaurus recently…

Keep Up the Good Fight!

October 17th, 2012
12:10 pm

St. Simons — why did you vote no on the bill to allow the state to lease for more than one year? I am just trying to get some input before I go to vote.

Beverly Fraud

October 17th, 2012
12:11 pm

On the one hand you got the privateers, represented by folks such as the ALEC crowd.

One the other hand you got the status quo, represented by people like Erroll Davis and APS (and what a great job they did with North Atlanta)

Sounds like a choice between giving your vote to Somali pirates or North Korean bureaucrats; no wonder Georgia is the envy of the nation!

southpaw

October 17th, 2012
12:12 pm

Regnad @12:09
JHM gets the joke. I’ll leave it at that.

barking frog

October 17th, 2012
12:13 pm

Georgia has an
etch-a-sketch Constitution.

JamVet

October 17th, 2012
12:15 pm

A very significant percentage of Georgia’s kids and parents – black, brown and white – are a sorry lot and this is not going to make a damn bit of difference. Just throwing more money at different people.

Stupid is as stupid comes from and this state has mastered stupid for a LONG time.

We should get a new state flag with a new state motto: Georgia – first in corruption, first in obesity and last in education.

indigo

October 17th, 2012
12:17 pm

The motives of those invoking “parental involvement” are to establish charter schools which teach the following:

1. The Earth is 6,000 years old.
2. The Earth is the center of the universe.
3. Evolution and the Big Bang Theory are evil liberal ideas straight from the pits of hell
4. The New Testament is the undisputed factually proved Word of God.

If you think Georgia students are near the bottom in scholastic achivement, just wait until hundreds of these new charter schools are established and their teachings kick in. In time, a majority of Georgia students will be at the educational level of students in Moslem countries who spend their time memorizing the Koran.

Peadawg

October 17th, 2012
12:17 pm

Will charter schools improve GA’s education ranking? IDK.

But I’m willing to try. It can’t get any worse that’s for sure.

”This law doesn’t force anyone to open charter schools or to go to them, it will just provide more educational options.” <<<< This

Brosephus™

October 17th, 2012
12:18 pm

Georgia has an
etch-a-sketch Constitution.

Now that’s funny!!!!

:lol:

Old Physics Teacher

October 17th, 2012
12:18 pm

Why would a local board
create a charter school ?

There are some very good reasons for a charter. Suppose a “community” has a large segment of artistic-type parents (economists, historians, writers, publishers, etc). Their children are being told, “you need STEM, STEM, and more STEM courses!” Their children don’t enjoy, nor are they good at, STEM classes. The school has been on the “Needs Improvement” lists since 1865 (slight exaggeration), and the teachers are being whipped daily for their deficiencies.

A set of parents go before the board to develop a charter school for the Arts. They are removed from this insanity called NCLB (or Georgia’s new version – whatever) and the kids are taught what they need to know mathematically (which isn’t calculus) and the basics in science (not chemistry and physics). The kids go on to become writers, publishers, historians, etc, and have a good life without the interference of Authoritarian Administrators (redundant), the State legislature, AND the Federal Dept of Education!

That’s why.

Old Physics Teacher

October 17th, 2012
12:20 pm

Oh, and I’m totally against the Liars… er.. Legislators Amendment. This is totally about them getting themselves, and their “buddies” richER at the public trough.

Jay

October 17th, 2012
12:21 pm

“I would side with Jay on this until the phrase “Fulton County” pops into my head. That makes things less clear for me.”

And if I told you that the entire Fulton County school system has “gone charter,” what happens to your head?

East Cobb RINO, Inc. (LLC)

October 17th, 2012
12:22 pm

We should get a new state flag with a new state motto: Georgia – first in corruption, first in obesity and last in education

Not quite there yet on the last in education part. Still 1 or 2 below us, but they are working hard at it. And passage of this amendment could put it over the top – or uh bottom actually.

Joe Hussein Mama

October 17th, 2012
12:30 pm

Southpaw — “Didn’t those critters go the way of the thesauras a good bit beforehand, as we discussed a few days ago?”

Yes, the Thesaurus. a large, reptilian creature of the Jurassic Era, distinguishable by its dangling participles.

http://www.cs.princeton.edu/~aahobor/Lucy-Day/Excerpts/Bored-of-the-Rings.shtml

Erwin's cat

October 17th, 2012
12:31 pm

indigo
not all charters are religious …surely you have other avenues to bash Christians

maximum

October 17th, 2012
12:36 pm

Republicans telling big, boldface lies about their intentions … shocking!!!

Absolute power corrupts, and the Georgia Republican politburo is proudly and unabashedly corrupt.

Brosephus™

October 17th, 2012
12:37 pm

A set of parents go before the board to develop a charter school for the Arts.

They should still be requrired to study Bernoulli’s Principle since that might help them pipe paints and stuff throughout their school. :)

Couldn’t resist the physics jab.

Joe Hussein Mama

October 17th, 2012
12:37 pm

E. Cat — “not all charters are religious …”

A fair point, sir.

Can someone provide some sort of authoritative figures on that? Perhaps a breakdown by state and an overall national figure? I would be interested in knowing what percentage of charters are religious and what percentage are not.

vince

October 17th, 2012
12:39 pm

Whoever wrote the preamble and whoever approved its inclusion on the ballot should be fired….or recalled.

The ballot reads like something one would expect to see in a dictatorship.

A true ballot is free from bias. This one is a farce and creates such a legal challenge that a vote of approval would not stand up in court.

Tony

October 17th, 2012
12:41 pm

In Florida, they were complaining because they have to publish the entire amendment as part of the ballot. “Too much legal” to decipher. Perhaps, we need a grass roots effort to improve the ballot process in Georgia. I believe the ballot should be clear and not deceptive.

PS: I voted early and voted NO for amendment 1.

Redneck Convert (R--and proud of it)

October 17th, 2012
12:41 pm

Will charter schools improve GA’s education ranking? IDK.

But I’m willing to try. It can’t get any worse that’s for sure.

Well, I expect when the kids go to charter school they’ll learn to pray alot. And women go in for men that do that big-time. After awhile the charter school guys will have whole binders of women after them.

barking frog

October 17th, 2012
12:42 pm

Old Physics Teacher
October 17th, 2012
12:18 pm
Why would a local board
create a charter school ?
There are some very good
reasons for a charter.
Suppose a “community”
has a large segment of
artistic-type parents
(economists, historians,
writers, publishers, etc).
Their children are being
told, “you need STEM,
STEM, and more STEM
courses!” Their children
don’t enjoy, nor are they
good at, STEM classes. The
school has been on the
“Needs Improvement” lists
since 1865 (slight
exaggeration), and the
teachers are being
whipped daily for their
deficiencies.
A set of parents go before
the board to develop a
charter school for the Arts.
They are removed from
this insanity called NCLB
(or Georgia’s new version –
whatever) and the kids are
taught what they need to
know mathematically
(which isn’t calculus) and
the basics in science (not
chemistry and physics).
The kids go on to become
writers, publishers,
historians, etc, and have a
good life without the
interference of
Authoritarian
Administrators (redundant)
, the State legislature, AND
the Federal Dept of
Education!
That’s why.
………….
If the amendment passes
and the local board turns
you down you can go to
the state board.

Towncrier

October 17th, 2012
12:46 pm

From downstairs:

“The premise of the entire debate is false, because the attack on our consulate in Benghazi was not an act of terror. An act of terror, by definition, targets the civilian population and attempts to inflict terror on that population. This was a military operation/assassination, targeted not at civilians but at the top American presence in Libya and, indirectly, at the armed guards who protected that presence. It was an attack on the United States and its interests.”

I believe your definition is overly simplistic, Jay. Terrorism has been defined in various ways – a quick investigation would confirm what I am saying. It is almost always political, it is almost always perpetrated by a non-state organization, it almost always involves violence against others, it is meant to frighten people (not just civilians) and its targets can be symbols and not just innocent civilians. The fact that the attack on the consulate happened on 9/11 and was carried out by a terrorist organization further discredits your contention. I believe you are in the vast minority calling this a mere “attack”.

So I don’t think the Obama administration is going to split hairs as you have 3 weeks before the election. If Obama wants to claim he called the attack and act of terror on September 12th, then he has basically proven that – contrary to his claims last night of never sinking to the level of politicizing the deaths of 4 Americans – he and his entire administration has in fact lied about the reason for the attack (no one I know of calls an angry mob “terrorists”). And that means he politicized it.

Ray

October 17th, 2012
12:47 pm

If this charter amendment is such a great idea, why draft it for the ballot in such a misleading way?? If that sort of thing doesn’t cause your bs detector to go off, then you’re not paying attention.

TaxPayer

October 17th, 2012
12:49 pm

I no longer have any children in k-12 so I am actually leaning towards giving the Republican constituency what they deserve. I’m kinda getting a kick out of the prospect of Republicans eventually paying more to get their kids into for-profit grade school so they can larn all about how the earth is only 9000 years old, etc. They might even learn something about irony before it’s over with.