Is Louisiana the future of Georgia’s education system?

If you want to see where Georgia conservatives want to take education in this state, look five hundred miles west to Louisiana, where Gov. Bobby Jindal is implementing a voucher program intended to move hundreds of thousands of students out of public schools and into privately run schools at taxpayer expense.

Louisiana officials have made it clear that they do not intend to impose teacher standards on those schools. Students attending voucher schools will be immune to the high-stakes testing that is required in the state’s public schools. In addition, the state will not sit in judgment of what the schools teach or how they teach it.

John White, Louisiana’s school superintendent, has told the press that it should be up to parents, not the state, to gauge whether private schools are delivering a quality education. “To me, it’s a moral outrage that the government would say, ‘We know what’s best for your child,’” White said. “Who are we to tell parents we know better?”

That “who are we to judge?” question is critically important. When fully implemented, the Louisiana program has the potential to shift well over a billion dollars a year in taxpayer money out of the public system into the hands of private for-profit and non-profit schools. Surely that gives state officials not just the right but the obligation to ensure that the money is well-spent and delivers quality education. But that’s counter to the philosophy driving the school voucher movement.

The program was signed into law by Jindal in April and takes effect immediately. The result has been an educational gold rush. For example, Reuters reports that New Living Word, the school offering the most open slots to voucher students, “has a top-ranked basketball team but no library. Students spend most of the day watching TVs in barebones classrooms. Each lesson consists of an instructional DVD that intersperses Biblical verses with subjects such chemistry or composition.”

science:ace

Part of the first-grade "science" class offered by Accelerated Christian Education, a curriculum that the taxpayers of Louisiana will soon be supporting through their public tax dollars.

That’s not at all unusual. Almost all of the 125 private schools that have applied to accept voucher students in the 2012-13 school year are religious-based. Many teach creationism as science, some using curriculum provided through Accelerated Christian Education, an education ministry. Under its system, ACE boasts, “the school is not considered an arm of the church. It is the church in action.”

ACE’s first-grade curriculum, for example, teaches as science that God created the Earth in six days, that on Day One he divided the light from the darkness and on Day Six made man and other living creatures.

As another example of how intertwined church and state become, the Islamic School of Greater New Orleans initially indicated that it too would participate in the voucher program, but later withdrew after a political outcry. As state Rep. Valarie Hodges, R-Watson, explained, vouchers are supposed to finance “teaching the fundamentals of America’s Founding Fathers’ religion,” but “we need to ensure that it does not open the door to fund radical Islam schools…. I do not support using public funds for teaching Islam anywhere here in Louisiana.”

This is the type of program that voucher proponents in Georgia hope to emulate. Last week, for example, Senate Majority Leader Chip Rogers acknowledged that if he had his way, such programs would have been implemented “yesterday,” specifically citing Louisiana as a model. But until full-blown implementation is possible, Rogers and others pursue half steps, such as the proposed constitutional amendment on the ballot this November giving the state the power to create charter schools over the protest of local districts.

It is also consistent with proposals from GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney, who advocates turning federal aid for schools into individual grants “so that eligible students can choose which school to attend and bring funding with them.” Interestingly, the Romney plan avoids the term “vouchers”, although that is clearly how such grants would function.

That’s in keeping with the stealthy, incremental process by which this goal is being pursued.

– Jay Bookman

560 comments Add your comment

USinUK - pro-gay-marriage thug and former Girl Scout

July 18th, 2012
6:49 am

I believe the expression you’re looking for is “race to the bottom”

not that Louisiana has that far to go …

ZoSo

July 18th, 2012
6:49 am

Great article. I couldn’t agree more.

USinUK - pro-gay-marriage thug and former Girl Scout

July 18th, 2012
6:49 am

ooooooooo … firsties, too …

my day is now made.

Mr_B

July 18th, 2012
6:51 am

Where’s the donuts?

USinUK - pro-gay-marriage thug and former Girl Scout

July 18th, 2012
6:51 am

Although, Jay … I can’t believe you brought up the Louisiana voucher program and DIDN’T mention Valerie “religious freedom is for Christians” Hodges

http://www.nola.com/opinions/index.ssf/2012/07/louisiana_lawmaker_needs_lesso.html

USinUK - pro-gay-marriage thug and former Girl Scout

July 18th, 2012
6:52 am

D-OH!!!

that’s what I get for only reading the first half…

(hanging head in shame)

Mr_B

July 18th, 2012
6:55 am

The next step is selling off all that pesky educational real estate at pennies on the dollar to the new class of educational entrepreneurial.

iRun

July 18th, 2012
6:59 am

OMG, I’m from there.

I’m an atheist and all that, but went to Catholic school down near New Orleans…the one thing about most Catholic schools is they do try to actually educate their students. I mean, Catholics and Science have been friends for centuries.

But WTF? It’s okay to teach “Christianity” but not Islam? I mean, which version of Christianity are we talking about? Catholicism, which predominates south Louisiana? Or one of the Protestant ones?

The religion of the founding fathers??? Did anyone tell the Archdiocese of New Orleans they’re going to be shut out?

Call It Like It Is

July 18th, 2012
7:01 am

While I do disagree with what is going on with your hand picked samples from Louisiana, I do agree with the fact that parents should be able to take their kids to the best school possible and use the money they pay in taxes to do that. Ga ranks in the bottom every year in education. They system is broke and parents are getting fed up. Parents blame the teachers, teachers blame the parents. There are a select few who have had it, and want change. Is this the answer? I guess time will tell, when they try to go to college.

Willie

July 18th, 2012
7:03 am

if you want to see where Democrats want to take our educational system, just look at Chicago…or LA. Yikes!
Bookman does not care about your kids…he cares about supporting democrats.
He does not care if your child learns well or poorly, if they are bullied or anything else about them.
As long as you vote democratic.

iRun

July 18th, 2012
7:06 am

By the way, as a comment on the topic, for reals…

So, the tax issue aside (because people will argue that the money is theirs anyway and if they’d never had to have it forcibly removed from their bank accounts they’d blah blah blah naive and self-centered whatever), the question of “Who are you to tell ME what to do?!” can be answered by: Your Employer.

A person’s ability to be a contributing member of society rests on their ability to get a job that pays the bills. And that’s related to education, be it self-employed, blue collar, white collar, whatetver.

In 15 years or less we’re going to have a huge population of kids graduating from these fake schools (I bet you many of them set up simply to make a profit and the other many set up to impose religious education). And they won’t qualify for further education. And they’ll end up on public assistance.

Fantastic.

barking frog

July 18th, 2012
7:07 am

Can the vouchers be cashed
if they home school? They
should have the freedom to
be as ignorant as they want.

iRun

July 18th, 2012
7:08 am

Willie, no comment on the topic? Only here to bash the author? Nice. Another intellectual joining the discussion.

bob

July 18th, 2012
7:08 am

LA should have to follow the lead of Atlanta. Hire an inept leader and cheat to show better test scores. If that does not work, just drop all the failing kids from the rolls and that will show better test scores. Yeah Jay, Jindal is stupid and should just let the NEA write the rules. You have just spent as much time bashing Jindal as you have bashed the super of ATL schools and we have known over a year about the ATL scandel.

iRun

July 18th, 2012
7:08 am

@barking frog – it’s not free if they can’t get a job.

N-GA

July 18th, 2012
7:10 am

What happens when the public schools fail to meet Federal requirements for student progress? Do they lose Federal money?

barking frog

July 18th, 2012
7:11 am

irun
you have the freedom to
not work in right to work
states.

Jay

July 18th, 2012
7:11 am

It’s not the parents’ tax money, Call It. They contribute a tiny tiny tiny percentage of the money that is used to educate their child at public expense.

If government uses its coercive power to extract tax money from citizens and businesses, government has the obligation to ensure that money is well spent. Other states and other countries have no problem producing highly educated students from public school systems. They do not do it through vouchers.

In addition, this whole theory that “competition in the marketplace” will improve education is proved utterly fraudulent by the quality of education offered by private for-profit colleges. In effect, the federal student loan program already operates as a voucher system, allowing students to take their loan proceeds and buy an education. And those private for-profit schools are for the most part a ripoff, graduating a very small percentage of their students at prices that are much higher than those offered at public institutions.

It’s a racket.

ragnar danneskjold

July 18th, 2012
7:12 am

Sounds promising. Anything to get us off the Chicago-Washington track.

Jay

July 18th, 2012
7:12 am

Bob, you have no idea what you are talking about.

ragnar danneskjold

July 18th, 2012
7:14 am

haha : “gives state officials not just the right but the obligation to ensure that the money is well-spent” Morning laugh.

Doggone/GA

July 18th, 2012
7:14 am

” I do agree with the fact that parents should be able to take their kids to the best school possible and use the money they pay in taxes to do that”

And what about the money *I* pay in taxes that goes to support the schools? I have NO CHILDREN, never have had…yet MY taxes go to the schools too. Where do *I* get a say in how that money is spent?

ken

July 18th, 2012
7:16 am

Jay, would you let your children go to Fulton County Schools ? Vouchers please.

Jay

July 18th, 2012
7:17 am

Ken, my two daughters attended Atlanta public schools kindergarten through 12th grade and today are graduates of two of the finest colleges in the country and have good jobs in their fields.

Any other questions?

Granny Godzilla - Union Thugette

July 18th, 2012
7:18 am

Keep ‘em stupid.

Then they vote right.

curious

July 18th, 2012
7:18 am

I’m 67 and over 50% of my annual property taxes ($10K) go to the county school system. At least the school board is somewhat accountable. I’m personally not interested in paying for some private education “business” teaching who knows what.

iRun

July 18th, 2012
7:18 am

@bark – still not free. Burden on society due to the actions of said society. Downward spiral.

Thomas Heyward Jr.

July 18th, 2012
7:19 am

Private schools give one a choice of what God to worship.
.
Government schools deny a choice. You WILL worship the state.
.
I thought progs were pro-choice.

Lord Help Us

July 18th, 2012
7:20 am

The voucher approach is a copout for state and local politicians that fail. Much easier than doing their jobs.

If public education works in Mass, Maryland, New Jersey, etc. it can work in LA, GA, SC. The difference is the competence of State and Local government.

iRun

July 18th, 2012
7:21 am

Voucher programs and elimination of public schools will lead to a preponderance of:

1. For profit schools with no motive for success and driven by profit margins
2. Religious schools with no real education on the agenda

And this will lead to:

1. A lot of unemployable people

Which will then lead to a much larger Peasant Class.

Back to the 1700s we go!

Jay

July 18th, 2012
7:22 am

The difference is the competence of State and Local government.

It’s also a matter of cultural expectations about education, about the education level of the parents, about the involvement of parents, etc.

stands for decibels (SfBA)

July 18th, 2012
7:22 am

Part of the first-grade “science” class offered by Accelerated Christian Education

…should make any patriotic Americans vomit in disgust.

iRun

July 18th, 2012
7:23 am

Also, Shout Out to APS. My son, Ruckus, was at Lin and is at Inman in the Fall and then onward to Grady!

(Also, he will have a free education at Emory waiting for him).

stands for decibels (SfBA)

July 18th, 2012
7:25 am

It is also consistent with proposals from GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney

yeah, and f### that guy too. This country is going to have a very tough time recovering from that self-inflicted wound if he actually gets elected.

barking frog

July 18th, 2012
7:26 am

irun
freedom as in free choice
not free as in no cost.

Lord Help Us

July 18th, 2012
7:26 am

‘It’s also a matter of cultural expectations about education, about the education level of the parents, about the involvement of parents, etc.’

Are you saying expectations/involvement of parents is different in GA, LA, SC than in Mass, Maryland, NJ?

stands for decibels (SfBA)

July 18th, 2012
7:27 am

Ok, my bingo card is ready. I’m looking for the “Throw[ing] money at the problem” talking point, and the ever popular “Government Schools” epithet.

scanning…

Tom Middleton

July 18th, 2012
7:29 am

So where will the students go whose parents want them to learn to think? Let’s at least keep the internet free so everyone has a chance!

Jay

July 18th, 2012
7:29 am

Yes, LHU, I am.

barking frog

July 18th, 2012
7:30 am

Only the 1% should be
educated as they clearly
have the genetic makeup
to lead the country.

FrankLeeDarling

July 18th, 2012
7:31 am

I really do not want my tax dollars going to some religious nutter of a school if this is going to be the case then we need to start taxing churches to pay for it

Teacher

July 18th, 2012
7:31 am

Education for 1GA student about 5700-7000 depends on district.
State taxes for family of 4 making 100 k with tax credits and deductions maybe 4k.
You have 2kids in the system at about 11-14000 worth of education and somehow your getting ripped off?????

Lord Help Us

July 18th, 2012
7:34 am

‘Yes, LHU, I am.’

Sorry if I am beating a dead horse, but how do you know this? If true, no amount of $ will fix the problem and changing schools certainly won’t help.

IMO, the biggest difference in the school systems I mentioned is competence of elected officials, school administrators, and teachers.

barking frog

July 18th, 2012
7:34 am

Are you saying expectations/
involvement of parents is
different in
GA, LA, SC
than in
Mass, Maryland, NJ?
……..
Ah yes, the old Sons of
Confederate Veterans
educational bias…

stands for decibels (SfBA)

July 18th, 2012
7:34 am

if you want to see where Democrats want to take our educational system, just look at Chicago…or LA. Yikes!

Why don’t you do that, do a like:like comparison to large metro areas of states run by Republicans, and let us know what you find out about expected achievement levels.

Since apparently you’re such an expert in such matters that you are going “yikes” about Chicago and Los Angeles, you must have such info at your fingertips.

Right? Willie? You can do this for us, yes?

TaxPayer

July 18th, 2012
7:35 am

And God said, “let there be the drought” across most of the USA and “let the glaciers melt” and the arctic temperature rise 4F in just 30 years for this is their punishment for not obeying the scripture.

Dang Jay! You should have held off on this topic until you left. We coulda had fun with this one.

“Has anyone seen my igloo. It was right here just a minute ago.” – James Inhofe

Jay

July 18th, 2012
7:35 am

Educational attainment is in part driven by cultural expectation. That is true at the family level, it is true at the community level and it is true at the state level.

Georgia and similar states have had a largely agrarian tradition in which education was not highly valued. In addition, a lot of today’s parents have not had a good education themselves and thus have no real idea of what a good education looks like or how to attain it for their children. That’s not an indictment of them, it simply reflects the world in which they grew up.

Other states with a more industrial and commercial tradition have valued education for longer and have a larger base of educated parents producing children. And the hard stubborn truth is that it takes more than a few decades to move a culture from one perspective to another. Politicians don’t want to hear that or say that. Parents and school officials and business leaders don’t want to hear or say that either.

But it’s the truth.

Jay

July 18th, 2012
7:39 am

I’d also point out that slowly, year by year, Georgia is making progress. It may not look like much year to year, but if you compare the performance of Georgia students on nationalized tests today to 10 years ago, the progress is notable.

barking frog

July 18th, 2012
7:39 am

Jay
when josef arrives he will
splode….

Mr_B

July 18th, 2012
7:39 am

“Private schools give one a choice of what God to worship.
.
Government schools deny a choice. You WILL worship the state.”

100% without any factual content. Come into my classroom any weekday morning and disrupt the time when I (and any of my students who choose to) speak with my God about what’s happening in my life on that day.

See where it gets ya.

You won’t be happy with the results.
It is a violation of federal law to interfere with the free exercise of religion in a publicly funded school.

Misty Fyed

July 18th, 2012
7:40 am

Hmmm…well obviously Georgia’s system is working out so much better. But hey..at least we let libs indoctrinate them with evolution theories.

stands for decibels (SfBA)

July 18th, 2012
7:40 am

Are you saying expectations/involvement of parents is different in GA, LA, SC than in Mass, Maryland, NJ?

I’ll just say this much. One of my biggest culture-shock moments when moving from the northeast to GA, was seeing signs out in front of subdivisions celebrating the amazing achievement of the neighborhood kids having…

graduated high school.

High school!

I can tell you that this is not the sort of thing that is celebrated in the Northeast. Such things are expected of one’s children and routine, like passing from fifth to sixth grade.

I don’t how significant such a thing really is, but I suspect it IS indicative of something deeper, regionally.

stands for decibels (SfBA)

July 18th, 2012
7:40 am

evolution theories.

yippee! I needed that one for the card. Just two more to go now.

Brosephus™

July 18th, 2012
7:41 am

As state Rep. Valarie Hodges, R-Watson, explained, vouchers are supposed to finance “teaching the fundamentals of America’s Founding Fathers’ religion,” but “we need to ensure that it does not open the door to fund radical Islam schools…. I do not support using public funds for teaching Islam anywhere here in Louisiana.”

Why is government the problem? We keep electing idiots to positions of importance. The Founding Fathers had no particular religion. They had differing views on religion, hence the reason we don’t have a state sponsored religion. Such a dumbass!! :roll:

Lord Help Us

July 18th, 2012
7:42 am

Jay@7:35, I see your point, but my experience in GA shows that school districts that literally touch each other can perform drastically differently. That has nothing to do with agrarian or commercial tradition, IMO.

The public schools my kids are in are outstanding (they blow away the local private schools). They are far from perfect and need to improve, but, by and large are good schools.

Just down the road, not so much…

stands for decibels (SfBA)

July 18th, 2012
7:42 am

by the way, if you want to make Misty Fyed’s brain essplode, force him to listen to this.

http://www.onbeing.org/program/evolving-city/4720

David Sloan Wilson believes that evolution is not just a description of how we got here. He says it can also be a tool kit for improving how we live together. He’s taken what he’s learned in studying evolution in animals and is now applying it to the behavior of groups in his hometown of Binghamton, New York. His goal is to help people behave pro-socially — at their best, and for the good of the whole.

Granny Godzilla - Union Thugette

July 18th, 2012
7:45 am

This is about prayer in schools.

Teach your kid to pray privately, quietly, to themselves.

Just like every kid did and still does before a trig quiz.

Problem solved.

JohnnyReb

July 18th, 2012
7:45 am

Of course Statists are against voucher programs and State liberty in education.

Only the Nanny State can go the right thing.

Misty Fyed

July 18th, 2012
7:45 am

I recall similar scoffing when Kennesaw (Sp?) passed their gun law. The libs shut up quick when the stats came out showing a reduction in violent crime. They were so sure the opposite would happen. I can’t wait to see how this turns out. Maybe it’ll be a bust..Maybe not. What seems to bother the libs so much is the loss of control. People like Jay can’t fathom that parents want a say in what their kids are taught and seek by law to keep that from happening.

southpaw

July 18th, 2012
7:45 am

If private schools are going to be that bad, parents have a pretty easy solution: just keep the kids in the public schools. Won’t the COMPETITION (there’s that ugly word again) with the wonderfuld public schools drive the private ones out of existence, for lack of students? I don’t say that to be snarky. I actually graduated from a good (at the time) private school. A few years afterward, it started to go downhill, and it closed a couple of years ago, because it could no longer compete with a revitalized county school system.

“Well, the parents are too dumb to know how bad the private schools are.” News flash: if parents are like that, the kids are in trouble no matter which school they attend. Jay was dead-on in his 7:22 post.

Mr_B

July 18th, 2012
7:46 am

Jay @ 7:35.
Finally somebody figured that on out.
The county where I teach has an overall graduation rate of about 45%. Right now we graduate about 70% of our incoming freshmen.

red herring

July 18th, 2012
7:46 am

Education should be turned over to the states. There should be choice available since public schools in many counties have turned into bloated failures. Parents should pay more for their kids education and property owners should pay less— parents would be more concerned then about getting what they pay for. Competition between private and public education would bring down costs and should lower taxes. Far too much administration in public schools and far too inflated salaries, bonuses, etc. –the AJC has done a good job of documenting this. Take 60 to 75% of the money spent on public school administration and give 1/2 back to the taxpayer and the other put to work in the classrooms. Stop administration and teachers from “conferencing” (aka as mini vacations) 3 or 4 times a year in Atlanta hotels, Savannah, and St. Simons at the taxpayer’s expense— hold the conferences in central locations where the apple tags can ride back and forth to their homes. Our governments (federal and state) have no concept of reducing spending. That must change as the taxpayer should get the maximum value for each of his dollars that are taken from him. It’s not the government footing all these bills –it’s the taxpayer.

JohnnyReb

July 18th, 2012
7:47 am

Granny – praryer is surely in the equation, but this is really about getting the Federal governments nose out of as many things as possible. And, countering the liberal doctrination so rampant in public education. It also retains liberty for both sides of the debate.

Progressive Humanist

July 18th, 2012
7:48 am

When I was teaching at a public high school a few years ago and we got a wave of students from Louisiana after Katrina, they were, in general, by far the most poorly prepared high school students I had ever encountered (and I had previously assessed tens of thousands of public school students at UGA testing facilities). They were years behind the typical Georgia public school student, and that says something.

If these changes take effect the state of Louisiana will be devastated 10- 20 years from now when their education system plummets to new depths due to private school indoctrination at the expense of objective knowledge and real education. It’s unconscionable that this could take place in the U.S.

gdrla

July 18th, 2012
7:48 am

As a baby boomer I went to Fla public schools then got caught up in a religious frenzy of the late 1960’s movements – went to a ‘bible college’ in SE Atlanta @ my own expense, earning a BS, ThB, & MA degree. After 25 years of not being able to get a competitive job in private industry after leaving the religious arena I went to GSU in Atlanta & earned a BBA & MBA degrees. Now have a good position paying reasonably well. My point is that my religious education made me a well-rounded individual knowledgeable about many things but my degrees were WORTHLESS in the job market outside of the closed religious community. Saddens me to see that my country is becomming infested with religious zealots that have NO idea what is required to function in today’s job markets. As stated in the old testament – there is a time and a season for all things.

USMC

July 18th, 2012
7:48 am

I think the money should follow the child; not the child follow the money to a broken school.
The charter schools in Grant Park here in Atlanta have actually saved the neighborhood.
Not every kid in the inner city can go to Morningside, Inman, and Grady High.
And what about our Public Schools which were falsifying test scores???

JohnnyReb

July 18th, 2012
7:48 am

I’m off to see the Wizard. Bye until tomorrow.

Granny Godzilla - Union Thugette

July 18th, 2012
7:49 am

JohnnyReb

Education, contrary to your thinking. isn’t a liberal/conservative thing.

Unless in your heart you are a book burner.

I guess you are.

stands for decibels (SfBA)

July 18th, 2012
7:49 am

praryer [sic] is surely in the equation

thanks for confirming that, J-Reb.

curious

July 18th, 2012
7:50 am

Let’s go back to the “good ole days” when only the theocrats had any knowledge (flawed as that may have been). Best way to control the masses. How do you think the Taliban has so much support among the uneducated people in Afghanistan.

Progressive Humanist

July 18th, 2012
7:52 am

Misty Fyed- I think you might want to go back to school to learn the definition of indoctrination. You apparently don’t understand what it means.

stands for decibels (SfBA)

July 18th, 2012
7:53 am

By the way, you hear the term “liberal indoctrination” a lot at times like these.

It means “teaching globally accepted principles of science.”

Brosephus™

July 18th, 2012
7:53 am

I don’t pay taxes to send someone elses child to a private school, and I refuse to pay for some other person’s private education. If some people were not so friggin’ intent on destroying the educational system, we wouldn’t even have this conversation. However, we have a segment of our society that is hellbent on destroying anything and everything related to government under the guise that government is the problem.

stands for decibels (SfBA)

July 18th, 2012
7:54 am

Also too, it’s important to say early and often that public schools can’t single-handedly fix everything that reactionary elements have messed up in America, so stop expecting them to do that for you.

Misty Fyed

July 18th, 2012
7:54 am

My head doesn’t explode to hear opinion about evolution stands. I’ve taken a great deal of time studying what is known and what is theory. It takes more faith to believe evolution (macro evolution anyway) than creationism. I’d sooner believe we were planted by aliens than evolution. You libs make the mistake of believing anyone who disagrees with how you see the world is uneducated, close minded, and backwards. You don’t grasp the concept that people can study the same science you do and come to different conclusions.

Misty Fyed

July 18th, 2012
7:55 am

And don’t call me a “him”.

Brosephus™

July 18th, 2012
7:56 am

And, countering the liberal doctrination so rampant in public education.

I wouldn’t put that pile of BS too close to an open flame. After all, methane is highly combustible. I learned that in a public school a long time ago.

FrankLeeDarling

July 18th, 2012
7:56 am

Ditto Bro@7:53

barking frog

July 18th, 2012
7:56 am

The anti-voucher side is
about fear of defunding
public schools and i think
that fear is misplaced.This
could easily improve public
schools by causing smaller
classes, smaller schools
and better instruction
and better salaries.

Misty Fyed

July 18th, 2012
7:56 am

Brosephus. I don’t pay taxes to have my children taught liberal nonsense. I guess that makes us even.

Jm

July 18th, 2012
7:57 am

If you get government money, you should have to meet government standards

Just like with welfare and unemployment and government contracts

Doing so much so fast is going to generate some headline making blowups

The status quo is also not acceptable

Charter schools are my preferred route

Thomas Heyward Jr.

July 18th, 2012
7:57 am

I home-schooled my kids for a few years.
.
They are both successful and happy now………..AND they support Ron Paul.
They are both Beacons of light in a sea of state-indoctrinated OBamney zombies.
.
For the love of Decency……….get your children out of the clutches of the State as much as possible and as often as possible.
.
They will love you for it.

Doggone/GA

July 18th, 2012
7:58 am

“I think the money should follow the child”

Ok, as long as it’s ONLY the parents money that follows them. Leave MY money alone.

josef

July 18th, 2012
7:59 am

Josef is here for a minute before taking off to some time on my “two months off” in the service of the public sector in education. I look forward to catching up on this this p.m. I think the IMAM put it up when he did to keep me off the blog. Probably not a bad thing, and I probably owe him one!

Quickly, though, two things:

The public educational SYSTEMS, not the classrooms, teachers, students, and parents have slaughtered themselves by the public allowing them to go slopping at the trough of the public coffer without oversight, then overweighting themselves with a bloated and overpaid bureaucracy from DC down to the Po Dunk School District. What the classroom, teachers, parents and most importantly the students need has been superfluous. Louisiana is a natural reaction to that.

Secondly, before people get too wrung out about the “religious” schools in Louisiana, bear in mind that the state has a long and admirable tradition of parochial education and the mainstream faiths have school systems with the highest standards and teacher qualification, well respected across all sectors of society and long with open admissions policies. So this is not necessarily the Armageddon a lot of people would expect. They will be “setting the bar” there and will be first choice of all concerned.

Georgia lacks that tradition and with it a “bar” from which to assess the effectiveness.

A good idea for Georgia? Well, if nothing else it would put the fear of G-d, even if that G-d’s name is Mamon, into the hearts of those who for so long have run the public educational systems as their own private little plantations…

Have a nice day… :-)

FrankLeeDarling

July 18th, 2012
8:00 am

Creationism is not science and is not comparable to evolution

stands for decibels (SfBA)

July 18th, 2012
8:00 am

It takes more faith to believe evolution (macro evolution anyway) than creationism

Whatever, Mrs. Intellijunt Designer.

I’ll continue to side with the vast majority of educated scientists on this one.

TaxPayer

July 18th, 2012
8:00 am

If one religion survives then all will survive in the charter school system. I cannot imagine a Supreme Court that would allow one religion to be taught in a publicly funded school. Louisiana will either have no religion in their publicly funded charter schools or they will have Islam and Sikh and L. Ron Hubbard, etc., alongside the Christian charter schools.

curious

July 18th, 2012
8:00 am

If public schools are so bad, just end public education. A county in Virginia did exactly that in the 60’s to avoid integration.

Anybody know the result?

the cat

July 18th, 2012
8:00 am

Which student would you rather perform your heart transplant?

Citizen of the World

July 18th, 2012
8:01 am

My kids went to DeKalb County public schools, then went on to Georgia State and UGA and graduated with honors — magna and summa, respectively. Both of them had jobs straight out of college, and they are using their degrees. This is anecdotal, and I do feel that their home environment contributed to their success as much as their educational environment; however, I can’t imagine that we’d have had any better outcomes with a private education — especially a for-profit private education where the goal would be to maximize the bottom line, not the brain power of the students.

Brosephus™

July 18th, 2012
8:01 am

I don’t pay taxes to have my children taught liberal nonsense. I guess that makes us even.

You guess wrong. If your child is learning liberal nonsense, it has nothing to do with the educational system. It may come from a lack of parental guidance at home. The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree unless the tree falls in the opposite direction. A child with a good upbringing doesn’t stray far from the parent(s) unless the parent(s) don’t involve themselves enough in their childs learning at all.

Louisiana and its money

July 18th, 2012
8:02 am

Will Georgia emulate their prison system also?

Plantations, Prisons and Profits

“Louisiana is the world’s prison capital. The state imprisons more of its people, per head, than any of its U.S. counterparts. First among Americans means first in the world. Louisiana’s incarceration rate is nearly triple Iran’s, seven times China’s and 10 times Germany’s.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/26/opinion/blow-plantations-prisons-and-profits.html?_r=1

philosopher

July 18th, 2012
8:04 am

Granny Godzilla – Union Thugette:Keep ‘em stupid. Then they vote right.

You are so scarily right on the mark!

Like Jay said, it is the culture here-parents have lower expectations for their kids- I’ve worked my tail off in the 25 years I’ve had children in these schools to educate them. That means we had to teach them outside school hours and UNTEACH the crap they learned from friends and even from some of their teachers…even principals who invited us to their Baptist church in answer to complaints about religious teachings in the public school. Little changed in 25 years…until we were able to move our youngest into a school in an area where educational excellence meant something. I look forward to never again having a child in Georgia’s public education system. The belief that ” The South will rise again!” burns nearly as brightly as it did 100 years ago…and so much that happens in the home, schools, churches, and legislature is hell bent towards meeting that goal. Educated masses are a threat to those who would control us.

stands for decibels (SfBA)

July 18th, 2012
8:04 am

This is about the time when I remind folks that 90% of Americans in K-12 attend public schools.

http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=65

Granny Godzilla - Union Thugette

July 18th, 2012
8:04 am

“A child with a good upbringing doesn’t stray far from the parent(s) unless the parent(s) don’t involve themselves enough in their childs learning at all.”

Bro, I bow to your wisdom!

Recon 0311 2533

July 18th, 2012
8:05 am

We’ve become a nation of educated idiots thanks to the far-left polluting our public school system and universities. At this point shifting to a private school system might be our only salvation.

FrankLeeDarling

July 18th, 2012
8:06 am

This will open the door for Islamic madras schools

TaxPayer

July 18th, 2012
8:07 am

I’ve taken a great deal of time studying what is known and what is theory.

Obviously someone does not understand that their proclamation is but a confession of a lack of knowledge of so much as the definition of science.

stands for decibels (SfBA)

July 18th, 2012
8:09 am

the far-left polluting

This, too, is Wingnutese for “teaching globally accepted principles of science.”

Brosephus™

July 18th, 2012
8:10 am

GG

Seems more like common sense to me than wisdom.