Big Brother is here, and We are Him

“Character is what you do when you think that no one is looking.”

But here’s an interesting question: What happens to character when someone is always looking? How is the concept of character altered in a 24/7/365 world in which more and more of our lives are conducted in public and the sphere of privacy shrinks to the point that it threatens to implode upon itself like a black star?

We live in a world in which knowledge about what we buy, eat, drink, read, wear and watch is now bought and sold freely by corporate America. We are tracked in the virtual world as we travel from website to website; we are tracked in the actual world by the unblinking eye of video cameras recording us from the highway to the parking lot to the store to the bank to the restaurant and back home again.

If we rent a hotel room, board an airplane, make a cellphone call or fill our gas tank, someone somewhere knows it and records it.

And increasingly, such exposure is active rather than passive. It is something that we as a culture now seek. Millions broadcast the intricacies of our lives via Facebook, Twitter, Youtube and other social media, and every utterance and act of our political leaders, sports figures and entertainers become fodder for gossip, exaggeration and distortion.

bigbrother-204x300

Everybody is watching everybody. Big Brother is here, and We are Him. And even those who personally resist such trends must acknowledge the cultural futility of their protest.

Consider, for example, the ongoing scandal involving U.S. Secret Service agents in Colombia. A dispute with a prostitute over payment in a hotel room in far-off Cartagena becomes international knowledge in a matter of hours. They thought no one was looking, but in reality everyone was looking.

But here’s a little sidebar that I find even more telling:

It turns out that one of the Secret Service supervisors fired in the Colombia scandal had been assigned to protect Sarah Palin during the 2008 presidential campaign. On his Facebook page, David Chaney had posted photographs of himself eying Palin behind his sunglasses, bragging that “I was really checking her out, if you know what I mean.”

Palin has expressed outrage at the posting, and she has every right to feel that way. In a profession in which discretion would seem to be a primary virtue, Chaney thought that because everyone is looking, no one would be looking. And here’s the thing: Up to the moment that he got caught in that hooker scandal, he was right. Those photos had been posted more than three years ago, and nobody took notice. It’s as if being transparent means being invisible.

So … what happens to character in such a world? At first blush, it might seem logical that as more of our lives become open to inspection, and as the odds rise that any misbehavior on our part will become public, social pressure and concern for reputation would force people to live more cautiously and abide by social norms.

That’s certainly how George Orwell thought it would work out. In “1984,” his version of the ever-watchful Big Brother enforced a repressive, sterile conformity on everybody within his purview.

But that’s not how things are working out in reality. With the full range of human frailty increasingly on parade, who cares? When all are shamed, none is shamed. Exposure becomes something to be sought rather than something to be avoided, and for good or bad, the result is a liberation from rather than reinforcement of social codes and morality.

And character? Character becomes what you do when everyone is looking and no one cares.

– Jay Bookman

352 comments Add your comment

Steve - USA (I support "None Of The Above")

April 20th, 2012
10:55 am

Character means always paying your hooker. Kindness is including a generous tip.

Mick

April 20th, 2012
11:02 am

You are what you are; character goes with you lights on or off with certain values, mine is truth…

GW

April 20th, 2012
11:02 am

First, good points.

Second, no Secret Service agent should be allowed to have a Facebook page. What an idiot.

Third, why are some people able to capitalize on this kind of exposure, and others are ostracized?

Keep Up the Good Fight!

April 20th, 2012
11:04 am

It is clear that the fight for privacy seems to be losing a lot of battles. Still there is (or perhaps better to say, should be) a difference between what I chose to disclose and what is being disclosed by tracking of phones, webviews and other tracking by corporate america and now what our government can buy.

Jm

April 20th, 2012
11:04 am

I do not like big brother. I think it impinges freedom (PC response).

Screw this. (non-PC response)

Jay

April 20th, 2012
11:04 am

Mick, I didn’t get into it in the piece above, but I’d say the lack of consequences for repeated outright deception and lies fits into the narrative as well.

Toadie

April 20th, 2012
11:06 am

Go elsewhere. America is over.

ty webb

April 20th, 2012
11:07 am

Jay,
I’m sensing a theme today…cynicism…justified paranoia…what’s next?

cranky old man

April 20th, 2012
11:07 am

I’m a little confused about why they are all in trouble. From what I understand, prostitution is legal in Columbia. So if they didn’t break any laws, what are the grounds for disciplinary action? Maybe the two guys who were arguing with the hooker were breaking a law by refusing to pay for services. But I’ve heard numbers like 11 Secret Service agents and 10 military personnel. What is the justification for disciplining the others? Did they put lap dances on their government credit cards or something?

ty webb

April 20th, 2012
11:09 am

“including a generous tip.”

don’t bring size into this.

Jm

April 20th, 2012
11:10 am

“Jay
April 20th, 2012
11:04 am

Mick, I didn’t get into it in the piece above, but I’d say the lack of consequences for repeated outright deception and lies fits into the narrative as as well.”

I’d say the fact that jay still has a job is certainly evidence of this.

Jm

April 20th, 2012
11:11 am

Crank

You don’t have to break the law to get fired silly

ByteMe - Political thug for sale

April 20th, 2012
11:12 am

And how will this play out in the election with a nominee who has made it clear he will claim he never said all those things that he already said?

ByteMe - Political thug for sale

April 20th, 2012
11:12 am

don’t bring size into this.

It is one of the selling points of many condoms.

getalife

April 20th, 2012
11:12 am

I don’t usually use hookers but when I do I use Columbian hookers.

Pay them my friends.

Mick

April 20th, 2012
11:12 am

jay

Introspection is a good thing, someone else’s perspective helps too. Those are ways to guauge our own perception of reality outside of our common experiences. Hats off to you and this blog, there is no shortage of diversity or strange thinking – in all it’s warped glory…

Steve - USA (I support "None Of The Above")

April 20th, 2012
11:14 am

The hooker did break a cardinal rule…..always get your money up front.

getalife

April 20th, 2012
11:15 am

“Just because you are a character does mean you have character” Pulp Fiction.

Jerome Horwitz

April 20th, 2012
11:20 am

Crank – They violated policies and procedures. And it’s a poor refelction upon the Secret Service.

Brad Steel

April 20th, 2012
11:20 am

When all are shamed, none is shamed.

You seem to be suggesting that these guys aren’t shamed. If he’s not shamed, I’ll bet his momma is.

Admitting to eye balling Palin is a world apart from participating in hooker-stocked orgies while on the clock in what certainly is a job that requires paramount trust, discretion and judgement.

Well… even if he’s not shamed, he’s sure as hell fired. Ooof! – that’s gonna leave a mark. I guess he can get a job with Blackwater or Dick Cheney’s entourage.

#1 Foxy Lady

April 20th, 2012
11:24 am

And it’s a poor refelction upon the Secret Service. ya think?

Dining-and-dashing on a hooker should be a codified breach of the SS code of conduct.

Peadawg

April 20th, 2012
11:25 am

“I was really checking her out, if you know what I mean.”

Sarah Palin is a total milf…I don’t blame him.

Don't Tread

April 20th, 2012
11:27 am

“every utterance and act of our political leaders, sports figures and entertainers become fodder for gossip, exaggeration and distortion”

Yep….certainly is, especially here. Of course, the amount and type of exaggeration or distortion applied depends heavily on ideology.

sheepdawg

April 20th, 2012
11:27 am

my agency fired a guy for character issues, and he immediately got hired by the secret service. David Chaney’s behaviour sounds a lot like the dude we fired. points the finger toward the selection process utilized by what is supposed to be a stellar law enforcement agency

stands for decibels

April 20th, 2012
11:27 am

I was yammering downstairs about people’s unrealistic expectations playing a role in why they seem so dispirited about so many institutions. I just stumbled upon this…

http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2012/04/are-lawmakers-asking-too-much-of-our-schools/256108/?google_editors_picks=true

and I think it kinda fits into the themes Jay’s exploring today.

a superintendent provided this list to show how it all adds up. By law, his schools must: provide oral health instruction; give students information about organ donation; set-up anti-bullying policies; ensure that children say the Pledge of Allegiance; make sure that social studies classes celebrate Freedom Week; organize parent involvement committees at every school; set up committees on employee policies; set up school and district committees on “closing the gap”; arrange for bus drivers and other employees to have two paid breaks; see that each teacher has a specified amount of money to spend on classroom supplies; and include the body mass index of each child on his or her report card. As he wrapped up the list, the superintendent added this parting shot: “Oh, by the way, remember No Child Left Behind!” From the same study, 93 percent of superintendents and 88 percent of principals related that their district has experienced “an enormous increase in responsibilities and mandates without getting the resources necessary to fulfill them.”

Most laws in education and elsewhere reflect lawmakers’ and the public’s hopes and good intentions. Health and safety education, consumer education, financial literacy, and promoting patriotism and love of country are all good things — but are we right in asking public schools to absorb them? The impact at the end of the day can be to take away from schools’ underlying goal: teaching kids.

I’m not going to play (say) Sarah Palin’s card and claim this is a result of “government run amok.” I think it’s about ginned-up expectations that get in the way of truly achievable outcomes.

They BOTH suck

April 20th, 2012
11:27 am

“Sarah Palin is a total milf…I don’t blame him.”

Rumor has it that Glenn Rice was a fan even before she attained MILF status

Doggone/GA

April 20th, 2012
11:28 am

“When all are shamed, none is shamed”

And definitions of what are and are not shameful will be changing, just as they always have.

#1 Foxy Lady

April 20th, 2012
11:29 am

and cheney was a tool g-dilf.

ByteMe - Political thug for sale

April 20th, 2012
11:29 am

Sarah Palin is a total milf…I don’t blame him.

Right up until she opens her mouth and then all I hear is trailer-trash talk coming out of her and that’s a turn-off. Someone who should be seen and not heard.

Matti's disgust

April 20th, 2012
11:30 am

WTWS: What’s the WE stuff? I’m not spying on you.

Big Brother consists primarily of big corporations. Government agents get the info from them when they want it, just for the asking. I’m so sick of people yammering on and on about government overreach while ignoring the fact that corporations have invaded us in every orifice of our lives. If someone accuses you of a crime, the cops come snag your PC and dredge up everything you ever searched for on it. (Never mind if you need it for work or personal business! You don’t have it anymore.) But it’s the technology companies and search engine capitalists who ensure we have no privacy. Ever. Hello THOUGHT POLICE! Whatever you were curious about five years ago can and will be used against you in a court of law. Be careful what you’re curious about!

Don’t get me started on how taking a job somehow entitles Blue Cross and your HR department to dissect every part of your anatomy with invasive policies. YUCK.

“This fascist crap makes me want to puke.” — John Spartan, The Demolition Man

ByteMe - Political thug for sale

April 20th, 2012
11:30 am

Rumor has it that Glenn Rice was a fan even before she attained MILF status

Glen’s color didn’t fit with the narrative, though.

Doggone/GA

April 20th, 2012
11:30 am

“If we rent a hotel room, board an airplane, make a cellphone call or fill our gas tank, someone somewhere knows it and records it”

When has it ever been any different? You can’t do any of those things without at least one other person knowing about it and recording it. It’s always been that way.

Peadawg

April 20th, 2012
11:31 am

“Right up until she opens her mouth and then all I hear is trailer-trash talk coming out of her and that’s a turn-off. Someone who should be seen and not heard.”

Dude, there’s so many jokes that I could make about what you just wrote…probably wouldn’t stand a chance to make it through the filter.

Latigo1026

April 20th, 2012
11:31 am

You are what you are, whether someone is watching or not. I assume that a number of these agents have families in the U.S. Those suffering the most from finding out the true character of these agents will be these families.

Aquagirl

April 20th, 2012
11:32 am

Prostitutes are an old staple in the spy business. Hiring a random stranger to hang around your room—possibly while you’re asleep—is dumb.

barking frog

April 20th, 2012
11:34 am

Doesn’t make sense to
believe the killers we hire
are saints.

Jay

April 20th, 2012
11:35 am

Not true, doggone. Prior to 9/11, I could book a flight in your name and pay for it in cash. You could pay for hotel rooms in cash, no questions asked. Now you need a credit card and photo ID.

AngryRedMarsWoman

April 20th, 2012
11:36 am

@crankyoldman – Legal or not, what those guys did was an OPSEC no-no.

This recent Secret Service incident is just one in a recent rash of OPSEC failures all over the place. Seems we are regularly seeing compromising pics from Iraq and Afghanistan – I am amazed at what our brave men and women apparently feel free to post. According to my DH, “back in the day” you were taught to do things like answer the CQ phone by saying “this is not a secure line” and never even admit to being a soldier, better yet identify your unit, when out in the bars. And your family followed OPSEC protocol too. Now, we have pics and videos popping up everywhere. Where is the leadership? OPSEC is something we should all consider in our everyday lives too. I am regularly amazed by the amount of information shared by folks on social networking sites. Luckily my teen son hasn’t really taken an interest in social networking, but I still regularly warn him and his friends to act like everything they do/say is being recorded “forever” and put on display. So many people screaming about privacy and then posting the video of their colonoscopy on Facebook….sigh.

ByteMe - Political thug for sale

April 20th, 2012
11:37 am

Prior to 9/11, I could book a flight in your name and pay for it in cash

And you could sell your seat to someone else, no questions asked. The good old days. Now the airlines figured out that it was more profitable to prevent that activity.

Jefferson

April 20th, 2012
11:39 am

Someone call in a pizza for George Zimmerman….

stands for decibels

April 20th, 2012
11:39 am

…s’cuse me while I remove my cell phone battery…

Patrick

April 20th, 2012
11:40 am

You are very right, Jay–As we all came to find out through the process of the O.J. trial and all the sideshows associated with it (the legal teams, Judge Ito, Cato Kalin, etc.), the line between “Famous” and “Infamous” has blurred and vanished.

“When all are shamed, none is shamed” is a very accurate statement.

carlosgvv

April 20th, 2012
11:40 am

Jay, the key two words in this blog are “corporate America”. You can thank our bought and paid for lawmakers for allowing Big Business to freely buy and sell this personal information without any legal restraints. It seems we are becoming more and more like The Roman Empire, rotting from the inside. History really can repeat itself.

jms

April 20th, 2012
11:41 am

“I don’t usually use hookers but when I do I use Columbian hookers.”

Now that’s funny.

JamVet

April 20th, 2012
11:42 am

getalife at 11:12, hysterical.

stands for decibels

April 20th, 2012
11:42 am

there’s so many jokes that I could make about what you just wrote…probably wouldn’t stand a chance to make it through the filter.

the last and only time I attempted to make an off-color joke about Ms. Palin, it was moderated out within about 37 seconds of hitting “Submit.”

willie lynch

April 20th, 2012
11:42 am

Sad but true Jay.

Jefferson

April 20th, 2012
11:44 am

One diget away from an overdraft….edi banking.

KT

April 20th, 2012
11:45 am

‘Character’ is for the 99%ers.

stands for decibels

April 20th, 2012
11:45 am

Speaking of intrusive government…

http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2012/04/19/145971/california-watchdog-group-wants.html?storylink=addthis#.T5Fn5fOnVNI.twitter

The leader of the state’s political watchdog agency said Thursday that she wants bloggers to be required to disclose payments received from campaigns.

“The public should know about such a connection in the political arena so they can properly evaluate endorsements,” Chairwoman Ann Ravel said.

The proposal is sure to be watched closely nationwide for targeting a mass medium known as a bastion of anything-goes free speech.

FPPC officials said they believe California would be the first state to place strings on political commentary.

Critics contend that government could be overstepping its bounds.

“I think if people are blogging an opinion, they have a right to do it,” said Democratic Assemblyman Sandre Swanson. “I just think a free press is fundamental, even if people are paid to (blog).”

GOP Assemblyman Bill Berryhill countered that voters have a right to know who is getting paid to sway their opinions.

“Transparency is always good in government,” he said.

I wasn’t quite sure what to make of this at first, but having thought about it, I think one of the commenters at that page put it well: “the GOP wants to regulate the one kind of political speech they haven’t bought. How surprising.”

Mary Elizabeth

April 20th, 2012
11:47 am

Who we are, as well as what our character is, is found from within, not from social norms from without. Many model excellent moral social norms, yet they are morally bankrupt, within. When we center upon and value who we are internally, and inherently, instead of upon the external perceptions of others, and of group norms, we find privacy, in any situation, and we also find peace.

From “The Reunion” on my blog, which focuses on the same theme:

“I thought that some of my former classmates may, yet, have the yearning to express who they were inherently meant to be – irrespective of the group norms that have surrounded them all of their lives. If any do, I hope that they will find the courage to follow their hearts and be true to their deeper selves, even at this late stage in their lives.”

http://maryelizabethsings.wordpress.com/2011/01/07/the-reunion/

ByteMe - Political thug for sale

April 20th, 2012
11:47 am

Critics contend that government could be overstepping its bounds.

Could be??? Let’s go with “is”.

JamVet

April 20th, 2012
11:49 am

Corporate spying on individuals goes back to at least the days when GM tailed Ralph Nader, when he – as one man – dared stand up to them and speak out against their criminal negligence and malfeasance.

Now they are allowed to do it on a massive scale and without warrant or reasonable cause.

And the giant corporations like the ISPs and telecoms are rewarded for gathering the information for Uncle Sam.

Welcome to the Corporatocracy, suckers…

I remember

April 20th, 2012
11:56 am

You might also fit into your narrative that no one cares if one person is exposed as long as you are on the correct side of the political spectrum. But…if you are on the wrong side then you can expect extremely harsh treatment from moralist hypocrites.
No one is more hypocritical than the left.

Brosephus™

April 20th, 2012
11:57 am

Sometimes, technology advances faster than we’re capable of handling. That appears to be the current theme. Best practice is to actually have a sense of decency and morals, and you won’t get caught figuratively with your pants down. Because of my job, this is the extent of my “social networking”. I don’t do twitter, facebook, myspace, or anything else as the things I post can come back to cause the loss of my job. I have only recently had 3 photos of me placed on the internet, and that was because I took my daughter out. I don’t put information on the net, and I can’t understand why people give up so much information so freely.

Mr_B

April 20th, 2012
11:57 am

“I was really checking her out, if you know what I mean.”

Indicative of complete lack of taste, as well as lack of judgement.

barking frog

April 20th, 2012
11:59 am

Can’t get your discount
at the grocery store if you
don’t tell them what you
buy.

Jay

April 20th, 2012
12:00 pm

Remember, you had a valid point until that very last line, at which point you became what you decry.

Doggone/GA

April 20th, 2012
12:00 pm

“Prior to 9/11, I could book a flight in your name and pay for it in cash. You could pay for hotel rooms in cash, no questions asked. Now you need a credit card and photo ID”

You still had to hand that money to SOMEONE. They might not have the correct name, but they saw you and “recorded” the transaction. The only way you can do something without someone else knowing about it is to live in complete and TOTAL isolation and do everything for youself.

Oblama

April 20th, 2012
12:01 pm

The term “Big Brother” in George Orwell’s book referred to BIG government – not the private sector. A prime example is Obama sicking the Secret Service on Ted Nuegent for expressing his political views about Obama in public. The Fed government is the Big Brother. Which ever party that is in charge uses the power of the Fed against it’s enemies. The Dems, under the Obama administration, have repeatedly intimidated their opponents by sending the IRS to “investigate” them. We need less Big government. We need less Fed government control over our personal lives. We need less Obama.

Liberty Minded Freedom Lover

April 20th, 2012
12:03 pm

What fools American’s are to think they are free in a land of constant surveillance. Liberals want America to resemble the average European Welfare country, but Europe’s irreversibly mounting economic troubles and their social ethnic instabilities should be a warning to us that freedom *from* the government is what makes us safe. Obama and Romney are one and the same. Only Ron Paul represents constitutional Freedom and our best hope to restore our once great Republic.

Mr_B

April 20th, 2012
12:04 pm

Doggone: At least then somebody had to take an active interest in finding out what you were up to; interest enough to spend some serious money on it. Now you can get anybody’s bio with a couple of mouse clicks.

stands for decibels

April 20th, 2012
12:06 pm

Could be??? Let’s go with “is”.

now, now. Can’t get all factual and have people think you’re librully basssssed.

Peadawg

April 20th, 2012
12:07 pm

“No one is more hypocritical than the left.”

Here’s the perception of left vs. right when it comes to gov’t intrusion (for an example):

Right:
Restrict womens’ rights? Good
Insurance mandate? Bad

Left:
Restrict womens’ rights? Bad
Insurance mandate? Good

I’d say both are equally hypocritical.

(If you add in the fact the mandate was the Right’s idea and now they’re pissed b/c a Democrat implemented it…I’d say the Right is a little more hypocritical.)

Matti's disgust

April 20th, 2012
12:08 pm

Oblama,

“Big government” isn’t gathering the massive amounts of data that private industry is. They hand it over to big government upon request, but private industry is doing nearly all of the actual spying. Why do you give them a pass?

Brosephus™

April 20th, 2012
12:08 pm

The term “Big Brother” in George Orwell’s book referred to BIG government – not the private sector.

That is a book. We live in reality. In reality, certain segments of the private sector own the govermnent, and they purchased it right up under our collective noses. Those private sector financiers are the puppet master, and the government is merely a marionette doll. It has nothing to do with Obama, Bush, Clinton, Reagan, or anybody else. Blaming it on one only makes you look like a partisaned idiot.

Brosephus™

April 20th, 2012
12:09 pm

Pea @ 12:07

Can I co-sign with you on that one?

Paul

April 20th, 2012
12:11 pm

Lots to think about. Your conclusions see, at first read, to be counterintuitive, Jay. But thinking about then, they have a lot of validity.

“And even those who personally resist such trends must acknowledge the cultural futility of their protest.”

“Character becomes what you do when everyone is looking and no one cares.”

Futile. Maybe. But influence can still happen. Nothing like “I saw what you did in such and such situation – you didn’t know I was watching – but seeing you not give in – I know I can do that too.”

Little battles, little victories.

To Thine Own Self Be True. Like Richard Kiley, Man of La Mancha.

F. Sinkwich

April 20th, 2012
12:12 pm

I think a good way of defeating even the best surveillance cameras is at all times wear a hoodie.

barking frog

April 20th, 2012
12:12 pm

it seems that those who
profess to love liberty
most are locked into
trying to control everything.

stands for decibels

April 20th, 2012
12:13 pm

Left:
Restrict womens’ rights? Bad
Insurance mandate? Good

Point taken, but I think most actual lefties found the private insurance mandate more like “tolerable (since turns out we ain’t passing single-payer or even a crummy public option for a teensy slice of under-65 year old Americans)”

…rather than “Good.”

getalife

April 20th, 2012
12:13 pm

States can pass laws like banning employers from getting passwords.

Paul

April 20th, 2012
12:13 pm

Freedom Lover

“. Liberals want America to resemble the average European Welfare country, but Europe’s irreversibly mounting economic troubles and their social ethnic instabilities should be a warning to us that freedom *from* the government is what makes us safe.”

So why are conservatives so fixated on telling me what I can do in my bedroom?

massachusetts refugee thug

April 20th, 2012
12:14 pm

the director of the secret service has been given the dreaded “vote of confidence”. if he were managing a baseball team he’d be fired within the week.

They BOTH suck

April 20th, 2012
12:15 pm

“Blaming it on one only makes you look like a partisaned idiot.”

Hope it didn’t that particular post to figure that out……..

had to go there.. it was too easy

What’s up Bro? Hope you are having a great Friday

ty webb

April 20th, 2012
12:16 pm

“So why are conservatives so fixated on telling me what I can do in my bedroom?”

they’re not.

barking frog

April 20th, 2012
12:16 pm

I have yet to see anything
done wrong by a recording
device.

Paul

April 20th, 2012
12:18 pm

massachusetts

So the manager of a baseball team has the same number of degrees of separation with the players on the field as the director of the secret service has with agents in the field.

Got it.

marty

April 20th, 2012
12:18 pm

Best plan may be to drop out of social media sites, pay cash, and wear a hoodie

JamVet

April 20th, 2012
12:19 pm

Oblama, in 1949 Britain, there was no corporatocracy.

Orwell had no idea that the dual American dictatorships – the GOP and Democratic Party – would resort to relying on corporate proxies to ensure that everyone is under complete surveillance…

To that extent, yes,

Paul

April 20th, 2012
12:20 pm

ty webb

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

whew………………………

(BTW – the “in the bedroom” phrase is a metaphor for regulating private conduct and relationships).

Doggone/GA

April 20th, 2012
12:20 pm

“Now you can get anybody’s bio with a couple of mouse clicks”

And it was a lot easier to find out someon’s bio 50 years ago than it was 100. Easier 100 than it was 200. That’s the nature of improving technology.

getalife

April 20th, 2012
12:21 pm

ty,

You know your party are pervs in our bedrooms.

Own it.

ty webb

April 20th, 2012
12:23 pm

getalife,
“conservative” is not a party anymore than “liberal” is…kudos for the “haiku” though.

massachusetts refugee thug

April 20th, 2012
12:23 pm

paul – point taken. i was attempting, in my inelegant way, to make a humorous statement about the “vote of confidence” – in most cases when the manager (or GM or coach, or whatever) gets the public VOC from the boss, it usually means the kiss of death. cheers…

barking frog

April 20th, 2012
12:24 pm

When you control the mail,
you control…information.
-Newman(Seinfield)

getalife

April 20th, 2012
12:25 pm

ty,

If you have a problem with your party in our bedrooms tell your reps.

Brosephus™

April 20th, 2012
12:25 pm

They BOTH

Friday’s off to a good start. I wonder why I came here to torture my brain cells though. :)

barking frog

April 20th, 2012
12:26 pm

parties in bedrooms were
once good things..

stands for decibels

April 20th, 2012
12:26 pm

it usually means the kiss of death.

hmm. What color shirt was this director last seen wearing?

Paul

April 20th, 2012
12:28 pm

getalife

I guess in their minds, we need to get all that stuff out of our bedrooms and back into airport bathroom stalls and bondage clubs where it belongs.

massachusetts

Yeah, humor, sarcasm and irony are the bane of the written word for a blogger -

getalife

April 20th, 2012
12:29 pm

“parties in bedrooms were
once good things..”

Government in our bedrooms is creepy.

barking frog

April 20th, 2012
12:29 pm

is the proper response to a
haiku…gesundheit?

Grasshopper

April 20th, 2012
12:30 pm

I’m curious Jay.

Do you consider your blog part of the Big Brother problem or an antidote to it?

getalife

April 20th, 2012
12:32 pm

The truth is not haiku.

You want to pee in a cup so go the next step is to check your fertility.

Weirdos.

ty webb

April 20th, 2012
12:32 pm

“(BTW – the “in the bedroom” phrase is a metaphor for regulating private conduct and relationships).”

“metaphor”? no…but if marriage licensing is “regulating private conduct and relationships”, the government(local, state, and federal, run by members of both parties) have been doing that for years…and same sex relationships are but only one issue in which it is regulated(age, not being able to marry someone within your immediate family, or polygamy, being a few others)…guess you blame those on “conservatives” too.

They BOTH suck

April 20th, 2012
12:33 pm

“Do you consider your blog part of the Big Brother problem or an antidote to it?”

Well at this moment he is working with the programmer to see how best to aggregate and separate all of he info he has collected from us…………. So you figure it out…………

barking frog

April 20th, 2012
12:33 pm

getalife
is the government in your
bedroom?

BRW

April 20th, 2012
12:33 pm

“I don’t usually use hookers but when I do I use Columbian hookers.”

I was thinking “Stay horny my friends”……..