In Egypt, protesters take to the streets in numbers, forcing the issue

Tens of thousands of people have been marching through the streets of Cairo, defying the state security apparatus. AP reports that Mohamed ElBaradei, who returned home to take part in the protests, had been assaulted with a water cannon when he tried to march and has since been placed under house arrest. The protest has spread to other Egyptian cities as well.

I just heard a reporter on Al Jazeera English suggest that when the people of Egypt wake up tomorrow morning, they will wake up in an entirely different country. And here in Washington, Vice President Biden has been quoted as saying that Hosni Mubarak is not a dictator and should not step down, which helps no one.

Sometimes, it’s better just to shut your mouth and say nothing.

Here’s an eyewitness account from Alexandria, from the Guardian in London:

“After prayers, the protesters came out of a mosque and started shouting slogans. They were saying “peaceful, peaceful” and raising their hands. They were immediately attacked by police in an armoured car firing teargas. Fierce clashes started then, with exchanges of rock throwing. About 200 police faced about 1,000 protesters. The clashes lasted for nearly two hours. Then a much larger crowd of protesters came from another direction. They were packed in four blocks deep. Police tried to hold them back with teargas and rubber bullets, but they were finally overwhelmed.

Then the police just gave up, at about the time of afternoon prayers. Protesters gave water to police and talked to them. It was was all peaceful. Hundreds of protesters were praying in the street.

Now walking down to downtown Alexandria, the whole road is packed as far as we can see, people shouting slogans against [Hosni] Mubarak and his son Gamal. Asking others to join them. It is a very festive atmosphere. Women in veils, old men, children, I even saw a blind man being led. And there are no police anywhere.”

But it is not by any means all festive and flowers. Here’s a fresh posting from YouTube, in which a protester is shot and killed. WARNING: It’s not for the faint of heart, but neither is revolution.

136 comments Add your comment

Ragnar Danneskjöld

January 28th, 2011
11:50 am

WSj aptly notes that the administration was taken by surprise on the events in Lebanon and Tunisia and Egypt and Yemen – sounds like a “good job, Brownie” moment for the State Department. More to the point, however, it seems that the 30 year experience after Iran has not informed our bureaucrats on a potential response. How does Obama avoid his Katrina moment, the approaching hurricane that is Radical Islamism? And does anyone have the courage to link Petraeus’s budget comments yesterday to the coming Islamist hurricane? Instead of putting our limited resources where they need to be, we are building infrastructure?

jm

January 28th, 2011
11:51 am

WTF (pardon my acronym) are Biden and Obama doing? They appease Venezuela. Now this?

Krike. I know Mubarak has been our ally. That matters. But times also change. Its time for him to step down and have some elections in Egypt.

Ragnar Danneskjöld

January 28th, 2011
11:52 am

Dear jm @ 11:51, there is no reason to apologize for invoking the administration slogan, “Winning the Future.”

ByteMe

January 28th, 2011
11:53 am

The fear, of course, is “if not Mubarak, then who?” The only organized groups are Islamist, although the middle and elite classes there would hate that. So what alternatives are there?

I think Mubarak needs to let go, but doing it all at once usually ends in tears.

jm

January 28th, 2011
11:56 am

Not all liberals seem to believe this (and probably not all conservatives either, but on balance more of them). But I believe Democracy is a fundamental human right. Dictatorships, of any form, whether in China, Egypt, Myanmar, or any other place on the planet are an abomination.

And now our government is endorsing a dictator. Makes me want to vomit. November 2012, only 644 more very long days….

Peadawg

January 28th, 2011
11:57 am

“And here in Washington, Vice President Biden has been quoted as saying that Hosni Mubarak is not a dictator and should not step down, which helps no one.” – Dumbars. If he isn’t quite a dictator, he’s as close to one as you can get.

jm

January 28th, 2011
12:00 pm

Peadawg – a democratically elected leader couldn’t shut down the internet. Wait….

Peadawg

January 28th, 2011
12:00 pm

Hey Biden, on your way out in 2012, don’t let the door hit ya where the Good Lord split ya.

Matti

January 28th, 2011
12:00 pm

Ragnar,

Something very serious is going on right now on the other side of the world, and you don’t waste a single nanosecond trying to make it about YOUR dislike for our President and the need for bridges that don’t collapse under the weight of our cars. WANKING is something you should do in private. Just sayin’.

Joe the paleo-neo-Plutoctrat

January 28th, 2011
12:01 pm

sure JB, easy for you to chime in, but how many of these pro-democracy protesters are gay?

jm

January 28th, 2011
12:02 pm

Oil prices skyrocketing. How much oil does Egypt have? I bet this is a spillover bet with respect to S.A. and other oil rich dictatorships.

ByteMe

January 28th, 2011
12:03 pm

jm: the Suez is quite the busy place for routing oil tanker ships.

Joe the paleo-neo-Plutoctrat

January 28th, 2011
12:05 pm

jm, Democracy may be a fundamental right, but PLUTOCRACY is the reality

jm

January 28th, 2011
12:05 pm

ByteMe – indeed.

[...] In Egypt, protesters take to the streets in numbers, forcing the issueAtlanta Journal Constitution (blog)Tens of thousands of people have been marching through the streets of Cairo, defying the state security apparatus. AP reports that Mohamed ElBaradei, …Army set to take charge in EgyptHerald SunWhat is happening in Egypt is not our businessTelegraph.co.uk (blog)WikiLeaks cables: US ambassador in Cairo calls for less confrontation in …The Canadian PressWashington Post (blog) -Reuters Africa -Vancouver Sun -Sydney Morning Heraldall 10,771 news articles » [...]

Mr_B

January 28th, 2011
12:08 pm

jm: The world is in large populated by people who do not share the West’s fascination with democracy. Dictatorships, plutocracies and theoracies exist because the people who live under them tolerate and in many instances approve of them. My guess is that we’ll see the rise of another strong man, possibly a well known cleric, in Egypt, which has a pretty much unbroken record of one-man rule for about five thousand years.

jm

January 28th, 2011
12:09 pm

ByteMe – S.A. is basically surrounded by a splitting Sudan, rioting Egypt, and rioting Yemen….. there’s no doubt people are getting nervous about SA too.

If the canal shuts down, they can still ship it around the horn. More expensive, still viable, but I think your point on the Suez is still right on the mark too.

jm

January 28th, 2011
12:09 pm

BTW, Egypt’s reserves are nominal….

Atlantan

January 28th, 2011
12:10 pm

Man if that video won’t inspire the Muslim Brotherhood. A shame the State dept or Presbo doesn’t seem prepared to address it. He really blew it with the Green Revolution in Iran – has he learned anything? Maybe he can say the Egyptian government is acting “stupidly.”

ByteMe

January 28th, 2011
12:10 pm

I’m guessing this “ends” the way it did in Iran. Police will suppress the uprising, no group is strong enough to force the issue, and it quietly subsides after many are killed. And it’ll stay hidden until it bubbles again to the surface. And if Mubarak is smart, he uses the lull to plot a way to get his economy moving again, since unemployed males make great rioters, but employed ones have to go to work.

jm

January 28th, 2011
12:10 pm

Mr_B 12:08 – tell that to the Sudanese.

jm

January 28th, 2011
12:12 pm

ByteMe – I agree, modern technology and military make it harder to overthrow a reasonably well organized and funded “state”. This will get put down probably easily. Which is too bad….

ByteMe

January 28th, 2011
12:12 pm

jm: Sudan is far away (the other side of Egypt), Yemen is a noisy distraction to them. They are more nervous about a strong Iran or its puppet groups (like Hezbollah) creating trouble… or the possibility that Iraq grows closer to Iran. If Egypt falls to Islamists, there’s a good chance Iran would use that to box in SA… and further arm the Gaza and push troups closer to Israel.

No wonder Biden doesn’t want to appear to undermine Mubarak. The alternatives are not pleasant right now.

TaxPayer

January 28th, 2011
12:15 pm

Why haven’t the compassionate conservative Republicans on here packed up their thrity-round clips and hopped the first flight for the fight for Democracy. What’s that. You want the liberal, progressive Democrats to pay for it. Well then. How big of a tax cut will you be needing to cover that tab.

Lil' Barry Bailout

January 28th, 2011
12:16 pm

Ragnar: How does Obama avoid his Katrina moment, the approaching hurricane that is Radical Islamism?
——————

It’s not a Katrina moment until the lamestream media says it is.

Don’t hold your breath waiting for Mike Leftovich to do a cartoon on this one (unless he can think of some way to blame it on Palin or Boehner).

jm

January 28th, 2011
12:16 pm

ByteMe – if Egypt (and other countries) goes to the islamists, so be it. There will probably be a day of reckoning anyway, I imagine. But I think a Democracy reduces that chance.

Mr_B

January 28th, 2011
12:16 pm

jm: What is occurring in the Sudan is a split between the Muslim north and the Christian/ animist south. There are still no guarantees that the south will emerge as a western-style democracy, and the north isn’t interested in that politocal path at all.

jm

January 28th, 2011
12:19 pm

Well, Brent’s at $98 a barrel. Might as well call it a $100…..

jm

January 28th, 2011
12:20 pm

Mr_B – well, how exactly did South Sudan decide to split off? Help me here….. did I miss it, they picked a dictator to decide for them?

ByteMe

January 28th, 2011
12:21 pm

jm: Oh, I’m very fatalist about it, whatever happens would have happened anyway, regardless of whether we get involved. But I also view this the same way I did TARP: Egypt is going to use money (in the form of police and their army) to buy time. Because having change happen fast is the bigger nightmare.

jm

January 28th, 2011
12:24 pm

An interesting read from The Economist on Egypt etc.

The scent of jasmine spreads
http://www.economist.com/node/18010573

ByteMe

January 28th, 2011
12:25 pm

jm: you did miss it. The split has been a very long time in coming and required a civil war that killed millions. Darfur ring a bell? Not quite the model for what you’re looking for.

Lil' Barry Bailout

January 28th, 2011
12:26 pm

This crisis is a real opportunity for the Idiot Messiah to appear presidential. Watch him do something symbolic like sending ships and Marines to protect the Suez Canal (from waaaay offshore).

BADA BING

January 28th, 2011
12:26 pm

I am not concerned with WTF (winning the future), while we are LTP (losing the present).

ByteMe

January 28th, 2011
12:27 pm

32 comments in nearly an hour?? Jay you need to tie this back to “Gay Republicans needing health care reform.”

BADA BING

January 28th, 2011
12:29 pm

Hey, wasn’t that an 80s hit by the Bangles? “Riot Like An Egyptian”

ty webb

January 28th, 2011
12:29 pm

but more importantly, what is mubarak’s stance on gay marriage?

ty webb

January 28th, 2011
12:30 pm

or elbaradei’s?

jt

January 28th, 2011
12:30 pm

Another American puppet bites the dust.

Kudos to Jay for suggesting some sound advice to a numbskull on his side. (that is rare).

jm

January 28th, 2011
12:31 pm

ByteMe – If he really wants to get things moving, he probably needs to write something along the lines of: “Glenn Beck and Sarah Palin’s Republicans are Hypocrites and Demeaning Gays, Drowning our Nation in Debt, and Rationing Care through the Private Market while undermining Social Security and destroying Education”

That would get things fired up. But be a distraction.

jt

January 28th, 2011
12:31 pm

No matter what happens, Egypt still owes us for some helicopters. Around 200 million dollars worth.

Lil' Barry Bailout

January 28th, 2011
12:31 pm

Well, he’s Muslim so we have a pretty good idea of Mubarak’s stance on gay “marriage”.

BADA BING

January 28th, 2011
12:33 pm

Mubarak is not going anywhere until the Nile runs red as blood, and frogs fall from the sky. Maybe someone can turn a walking stick into a cobra, that will get his attention!

stands for decibels

January 28th, 2011
12:36 pm

Sometimes, it’s better just to shut your mouth and say nothing.

Certainly it’s easier, but after reading a somewhat less strident piece on Biden’s TV appearance yesterday than the one you linked…

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/01/biden-egypt-mubarak-dictator-resig/

it’s kinda hard for me to knock what the Administration were attempting to do, the night before the expected violent unrest.

jm

January 28th, 2011
12:38 pm

Ok, gotta go, but before I do….

Obama administration could still get it right on Egypt
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/27/AR2011012705934.html

Mubarak had not been to Washington in five years, thanks to his clashes with the Bush administration over his political repression.

—-…… miss me yet? :)

BADA BING

January 28th, 2011
12:39 pm

If we send Marines and aircraft carriers to Egypt, won’t it tip Egypt over and make the pryamids slide into the sea?

Union

January 28th, 2011
12:40 pm

anyone else notice that with this administration.. people spend a whole lot of time explaining.. “that although so and so in the administration said this.. this is what they meant.”

@@

January 28th, 2011
12:42 pm

Since this protest has become so wide spread, I’m gonna go out on a limb and call it legit.

The Military and the NDP are in negotiations with Mubarak. They want him to address the people’s needs or step aside.

I’m hoping the protesters will not be misled by ElBaradei as were we, during his tenure as Director General of the IAEA. He’s too close to the Muslim Brotherhood. He’s a wolf in sheep’s clothing….always has been.

As long as the military retains power, I’ve got no problem with Mubarak AND his son relinquishing their hold on power. The protesters aren’t asking for a change to the constitution…all they want is freedom from want.

stands for decibels

January 28th, 2011
12:43 pm

Egypt still owes us for some helicopters. Around 200 million dollars worth.

so we send them just 1.1 billion instead, next year?

stands for decibels

January 28th, 2011
12:45 pm

anyone else notice that with this administration.. people spend a whole lot of time explaining.. “that although so and so in the administration said this.. this is what they meant.”

As opposed to those previous administrations, where they just said exactly what happened to be on their minds at any given time, no matter what the diplomatic situation.

Joe the Plutocrat

January 28th, 2011
12:49 pm

jt, I don’t know that at 82 years-old, after 30 years in power, anyone is “biting the dust”. this is the way things happen in other parts of the world. we have meaningless, trivial “elections” to chose betweee twin sons of differen mothers, while other nations have riots and civil unrest, because those in power never give up the power. it’s not about the nature of control (monarchy, dictatorship, theocracy; it’s about how power changes hands (must be taken by force). again, over here, the plutocracy remains in power by reminding Americans about “freedom” and “rights” and “the Constitution” which allows us to believe we have skin the game. we don’t. as I said, I should have majored in Plutocracy instead of history – it’s good work if you can get it.

Lil' Barry Bailout

January 28th, 2011
12:54 pm

“Mubarak had not been to Washington in five years, thanks to his clashes with the Bush administration over his political repression.”
————-

Fortunately we have an Idiot Messiah now who connects with the Muslim world. I feel so much safer.

Matti

January 28th, 2011
12:57 pm

Again, those of you who insist on making this event about YOUR dislike of our President are selfish jerks. This isn’t about Obama, and it isn’t about you. Please go stroke your tool in private. Creepos.

Walk Like an Egyptian

January 28th, 2011
1:00 pm

Cool video, probably won’t see that one on the PC nightly news.

Getting shot down while rioting in the streets and fighting with the police = occupational hazard.

getalife

January 28th, 2011
1:01 pm

It started with men setting themselves on fire to spark global unrest.

They stop, kneel down and pray during the protests.

jt

January 28th, 2011
1:04 pm

Joe the Plutocrat

No bleeding heart liberal here, but it is a fact that we have given billions to Egypt over the years(often in the form of military hardware). A decent state department should have seen this(as a rule it is pretty much the same state department as the previous bozos.)

If you think Egypts USAID is bad. Read about the wheelbarrows going to Yemen.A decent read below…………………(strengthening the DOMESTIC security,we are good at that)……………

“As for U.S. security and military aid to Egypt, which is about $1.3 billion annually, it does not aim to strengthen Egyptian military power against any external threat, as this would be contrary to the declared U.S. objective of ensuring Israeli security and maintaining Israeli military supremacy over its Arab neighbors, including Egypt. Instead, this aid is devoted mainly to strengthening the regime’s domestic security and its ability to confront popular movements. This hardly enhances USAID’s popularity among the Egyptian people or educated elites.”

http://carnegieendowment.org/publications/index.cfm?fa=view&id=23282

Common Sense isn't very Common

January 28th, 2011
1:07 pm

Matti@12:57 pm

This isn’t about Obama, and it isn’t about you. Please go stroke your tool in private. Creepos
———————

Kinda of makes you wonder about all those guys Wankin over Obama doesn’t it

:-)

Jack

January 28th, 2011
1:07 pm

“Sometimes, it’s better to shut your mouth and say nothing.” I go along with that. But carry a big stick.

Southern Comfort (B.P.O.I.B.W.)

January 28th, 2011
1:07 pm

I’m hoping the protesters will not be misled by ElBaradei as were we, during his tenure as Director General of the IAEA. He’s too close to the Muslim Brotherhood. He’s a wolf in sheep’s clothing….always has been.

HOT DAMN!! Somebody’s paying attention!!! As long as the citizens are acting in their own interests and are not being guided/pushed by more nefarious groups, let them handle it on their own. If the MB is behind those protests, I don’t think people will be anywhere near as happy with the results that follow. That might lead to even more fear in the West.

jconservative

January 28th, 2011
1:09 pm

Careful on wanting elections. If radical Islamic terrorists are elected, see the Jan 2005 Gaza Strip elections, then all of you will be complaining because the US allowed elections in Egypt.

There comes an occassional moment when the best course of action is to butt out and shut up.

It is the Egyptians country. I vote for letting the Egyptians settle their own affairs. Besides we cannot even handle our own internal affairs very well, can we?

jconservative

January 28th, 2011
1:11 pm

Jay the video was on TV this morning.

Common Sense isn't very Common

January 28th, 2011
1:27 pm

jconservative I totally agree with you about leaving them alone.

We have enough on our plate with our 2 wars, economy, unemployment, debt and deficit brought to you by our elected officials.

Del

January 28th, 2011
1:28 pm

Joe Biden keeping his mouth shut? He would have to bite through his foot. The problem I think is if the government falls it wouldn’t be replaced with a democracy but rather by the Muslim Brotherhood far worse than Mubarak.

Thulsa Doom

January 28th, 2011
1:30 pm

Ya can’t ignore the fact that these radicals are also emboldened by the fact that the US has a very weak president who is part of the “blame America first” crowd.

Matti

January 28th, 2011
1:31 pm

Common Sense,

It’s almost like it’s the only way they can “feel good” (heh…) about themselves. Sad.

BW

January 28th, 2011
1:48 pm

Yes…let’s get fully involved in regime change wherever there’s a dictatorship….we are not the world’s police force.

BW

January 28th, 2011
1:49 pm

Lil Barry

Take it to the ballot box…the man is the President until at least January 20, 2013….deal with it…I don’t want your head to explode if the American public decides to re-elect him

stands for decibels

January 28th, 2011
1:53 pm

Ya can’t ignore the fact that these radicals are also emboldened by the fact that the US has a very weak president who is part of the “blame America first” crowd.

Actually, given that your assertion is utterly unsupportable, it’s quite easy to ignore such “facts.”

I don’t need to point out yet again that Ronnie Reagan’s support among Americans, per Gallup, was around 35% in mid-January ’83. 15 points below where Obama is at the moment.

But, that particular administration, it wasn’t “weak,” right?

stands for decibels

January 28th, 2011
1:55 pm

I don’t want your head to explode if the American public decides to re-elect him

speak for yourself.

BW

January 28th, 2011
1:58 pm

LOL…sfd…how dare you try to question Ronnie’s status as a deity…everything was right with the world and America was America damnit

carlosgvv

January 28th, 2011
2:08 pm

How many times in the past have we supported Countries with brutal dictators only to see them overthrown and replaced with even worse rulers. If Muslim fundamentalists take over Egypt you may be certain the Middle East situation will quickly go from bad to much worse. At some point I hope our leaders finally realize we have to make it crystal clear to the Muslim world we will defend ourselves with every means at our disposal.

Bosch

January 28th, 2011
2:08 pm

So, we’re seeing Iran 2.0 — but just like the wingnuts who compare all things government to how businesses are ran (which is complete nonsense) — many here will also compare our political process to those in the Arab world — they are two totally different birds.

I believe that democracy is always the right course of action, but you have to understand that is a new concept for many on that side of the planet and it’s not like they are going to jump up and embrace it — it is not in their culture to do so.

But with our ADD minds we expect immediate change, and time does not work like that in the ME.

Bosch

January 28th, 2011
2:09 pm

“we have to make it crystal clear to the Muslim world we will defend ourselves with every means at our disposal.”

Defend ourselves, yes. But invading a country for no damn good reason does not speak well to following that sentiment.

Joe the Plutocrat

January 28th, 2011
2:11 pm

jt, the decisions of the US Department of State are not liberal/conservative in nature. Egypt? Yemen? any different than Pakistan? heck, we have a military presence in Somalia and they don’t even have a government (and this does not include the former Blackwater dude training counter-piracy forces). I hate go off on a tangent, but it’s Friday. maybe JB can cue up “Ohio” by Neil Young for this afternoon’s ditty-bop? first thing I thought; how do you say “Kent State” in Arabic? how do you say “Waco”? or “Bonus Riots” “Ruby Ridge” or “Jackson State University”? how about Crispus Atticks (sp?)? you know, faux patrios like Angle and Palin like to yammer about “2nd Amendment solutions” when it comes to politics, but they don’t talk so much about “Kent State Solutions” when it comes to who the government (plutocracy) deals with civil unrest in protest against policy makers. makes you kinda wonder, as a mentioned earlier, who really has skin in the game? but what happens in Egypt, or Tunisia, or Yemen, or Somalia, is the concern of Egyptians, Tunisians, Yemenis, and Somalians.

Kamchak

January 28th, 2011
2:13 pm

But invading a country for no damn good reason does not speak well to following that sentiment.

But…but…but…we will be greeted as liberators.

BW

January 28th, 2011
2:13 pm

Bosch

I think the more hilarious fact is what do the Egyptians view as the bigger sin: Supporting a Jewish nation in Israel or supporting a dictator in Egypt? Then again everything is supposed to be black and white…America speaks and the world listens…at least that’s how it was when we practiced the Teddy Roosevelt doctrine

Nice Guy

January 28th, 2011
2:20 pm

“it’s not like they are going to jump up and embrace it — it is not in their culture to do so.”

Correct, Bosch.

This is but one of many reasons why that part of the world is so dangerous.

Pat

January 28th, 2011
2:21 pm

How do we manage to keep getting ourselves into these situations over and over again?
It’s a never-ending script: US supports some douchebag to keep the anti-American _______________ (communists, radical Muslims, insert enemy name here) from taking over.

It NEVER works in the long run. Eventually, even without democracy, the authoritarians we back get thrown over – almost always by the worst of the worst. Or if by some miracle, a democracy does eventually take shape, years of backing bad guys put an American face on the repression, and increasingly anti-American populace votes in anti-American extremists.

jasper

January 28th, 2011
2:22 pm

Jay, I suggest Midnight at the Oasis for the tune today, seems the hour is nigh.

Bosch

January 28th, 2011
2:25 pm

Nice Guy,

It’s all relative. It’s like comparing apples and oranges, but on a much grander scale. For example, our pal USinUK, in England…she is “conservative.”

MAKO

January 28th, 2011
2:30 pm

Jay…you need to fly over to Cairo and purchase a new hookah, before the prices go up. Get one with 4 or 5 hoses on it for you and all your liberal doper friends. “Cool, peace, far out, hey Man”

Lil' Barry Bailout

January 28th, 2011
2:31 pm

Still in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Lil' Barry Bailout

January 28th, 2011
2:32 pm

How’s about “Rock the Casbah?”

Joe the Plutocrat

January 28th, 2011
2:33 pm

carlos, we supported Saddam Hussein until we didn’t. we “opposed” the Chinese government crackdown in Tiennamen Square, and two decades later we’re hosting state dinners for the President of China. in a very real sense, our foreign policy has more to do with Wal-Mart, ExxonMobil, and flat screen TVs than “freedom” and “human rights”. come to think of it, so does our domestic policy. nevermind.

retired early

January 28th, 2011
2:35 pm

This revolt should spread throughout the Arab world. We need to stay on the sidelines and just watch. Now is not the time to pick sides, unless it is on the side of a freely elected democracy. We can only hope that this revolt is the result of modern communications like “twitter” and “youtube”. This revolt does not appear to be inspired by radical fundamentalism….just the opposite. This could be the beginning of the end for these despots…and just may bring these countries out of the “Dark Ages”.
Watch and enjoy the power of “free will”.

Doggone/GA

January 28th, 2011
2:37 pm

“How’s about “Rock the Casbah?”

The Casbah is in Algeria, not Egypt.

Matti

January 28th, 2011
2:38 pm

The Casbah is in Algeria, not Egypt.

Yes, but it still *bleeping* rocks!

Del

January 28th, 2011
2:39 pm

Mubarak isn’t paying any attention to what the administration says, the protesters aren’t paying any attention to what the administration says and the MB along with their friends in Tehran don’t care what we say because they know exactly what they want to do, while also knowing that we’re powerless. The ineptitude of the Obama administrations foreign policy is only surpassed by its ineptitude in domestic policy.

Doggone/GA

January 28th, 2011
2:40 pm

“Yes, but it still *bleeping* rocks!”

Well, if you like it…maybe it does. It’s not one of my favorites.

Doggone/GA

January 28th, 2011
2:41 pm

I would suggest “Desert Rose”

TaxPayer

January 28th, 2011
2:41 pm

If the people over there with the oil want to sell it bad enough on the free market, they’ll find a way to get it to market and we can be there waiting to buy it, or not. Personally, I’d just as soon do business with someone building solar cells and batteries. In the long run, that would be the more cost-effective approach for the end user.

BADA BING

January 28th, 2011
2:45 pm

And Mubarak spake ” Pharaoh, Let my People Go”. Oh wait, I’m the Pharaoh….Never mind!

Joe the Plutocrat

January 28th, 2011
2:50 pm

Li’l barry b; didn’t take you for a Clash fan. but what do you think of Washington Bullets? “…if you can find an Afgan rebel that the Moscow bullets missed, ask what thinks of voting Communist? ask the Dali Lama in the hills of Tibet, how many monks did the Chinese get? in a war torn swamp, stop any mercernary in check the British bullets in his armory…” FYI, Strummer, a self-avowed “hippie” and “left-wiger” said of “Rock the Casbah”; “…there is no humanity in fanaticism.” needless to say, he did not endorse the use of his song by Armed Forces Radio during the first Persian Gulf War. check out “The Future is Unwritten: The Joe Strummer Story” sometime.

carlosgvv

January 28th, 2011
2:50 pm

Bosch

But….but….but what if Egypt has weapons of mass destruction?

Doggone/GA

January 28th, 2011
2:50 pm

“And Mubarak spake ” Pharaoh, Let my People Go”. Oh wait, I’m the Pharaoh….Never mind!”

Shouldn’t that be ElBaradei saying that?

carlosgvv

January 28th, 2011
2:52 pm

Joe the Plutocrat

I agree with what you say. I just don’t see what it has to do with what I said.

BADA BING

January 28th, 2011
2:54 pm

With all the aid money we are giving Egypt, is the gov’t sure that they are not involved in some type of pyramid scheme?

Bosch

January 28th, 2011
2:56 pm

carlos,

I’ve never been one to think that the lives of 5000 service men and women and the destruction our economy is worth a “what if.” Know what I mean?

stands for decibels

January 28th, 2011
3:00 pm

With all the aid money we are giving Egypt, is the gov’t sure that they are not involved in some type of pyramid scheme?

[rimshot]

BADA BING

January 28th, 2011
3:00 pm

Jay, are the Egytian troops using frickin’ lasers on the rioters?