Some New Year’s travelin’ music from right here at home

Before the year plays out, I need to correct a major injustice. One of my favorite people working the music scene today is Atlanta’s own Francine Reed, a national treasure living right here in town. For some reason, I’ve never featured her on Friday Night Travelin’ Music, so I’m taking the opportunity to do so now. Ms. Reed often tours with Lyle Lovett and his Large Band, which backs her up here as she performs the classic “Wild women Don’t Get the Blues,” written by Ida Cox, another Georgia girl and blues queen who never got her full due.

Take the time to enjoy, and if you see Francine Reed listed as playing somewhere within reach, do yourself a favor and go.

Happy New Year, y’all!

376 comments Add your comment

ByteMe

December 31st, 2010
3:50 pm

Jay: A safe and happy New Year to you and your family.

Del

December 31st, 2010
4:01 pm

Everyone have an enjoyable and safe New Years eve and a wonderful New Year.

Scout

December 31st, 2010
4:17 pm

To all out there …………. difficult days lay ahead. When the time comes, I’ve got your back. I hope you will cover mine.

God bless …………………..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=acxnmaVTlZA

N-GA

December 31st, 2010
4:44 pm

Truly an Atlanta treasure…I think she’s been out on the west coast (Seattle?) for a couple of years.

dudley

December 31st, 2010
4:49 pm

gonna be a great new year. first grandson is on the way. hopefully tonight

Jackie

December 31st, 2010
4:54 pm

To all, be safe and happy for the holidays and hope the New Year brings much prosperity and continued good health.

Paul

December 31st, 2010
4:57 pm

N-GA

HI!

How’s your daughter?

Paulo977

December 31st, 2010
6:28 pm

dudley… great way to start the new year .To be involved with the growth and development of a grand child is a joy!Bless you.

Normal

December 31st, 2010
7:14 pm

Congratulations Dudley! Your life will never be the same…but it will be better. One thing we all can agree on, Grandkids are GREAT!!!.. Heh, take it from me, I have 14 and two Great Grandkids…lovin’ life.

Normal

December 31st, 2010
7:18 pm

Scout,
Whatever it is, it can be handled. My sincerest best wishes to you, from Squid to Grunt.

Normal

December 31st, 2010
7:24 pm

Hey y’all,
This coming year, let’s build a bridge…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_a46WJ1viA

Mick

December 31st, 2010
7:46 pm

Good luck all – like scout said it could get rough…that’s the way…semper paratus
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdWPkgtaOTw

Normal

December 31st, 2010
7:48 pm

SOUTHERN ATL

December 31st, 2010
7:54 pm

Southern Comfort

December 31st, 2010
7:59 pm

One for the New Year’s because when the clock strikes twelve, this is what I’ll be doing…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=989mvwf5u7o
Early to bed, early to rise.

And, on the theme of homegrown talent, not a local group, but well known with GA roots.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Kb2×0D584c

Catch me if you can!!!

Check in with y’all next year!!!

Wishing everyone a safe and prosperous 2011.

gwtw

December 31st, 2010
8:26 pm

That’s some fine sweet music Jay, thanks for sharing. Happy 2011 everyone!

Chester Drawers

December 31st, 2010
8:36 pm

Nice call Jay! Love me some Francine!!!

Scout

December 31st, 2010
9:13 pm

Normal:

I hear you.

Corpsman up !!

Common Sense isn't very Common

December 31st, 2010
10:06 pm

Normal

December 31st, 2010
7:14 pm
——————–

We have so many grands because we are OLD my friend. I have 19 but no greats YET.
—————–

Scout – We may disagree BUT we are still Americans and will always have each others back.
BTW – my brother was a corpsman Danang ‘68
———————————–

Dudley – my first Grandson was born on the anniversary of my mommas death. He is my first and always has my heart. He will be 16 Jan 19th. How did HE get so old LOL. He wants to be a MARINE god help the US LOL. Godspeed and a happy New Year to All of us children here

Common Sense isn't very Common

December 31st, 2010
10:12 pm

Soco – can we close the border between Ga and Al – Lil’Barry is in Al this weekend so we need to have Customs and Immigration check for passports. If they can’t howsabout cavity searches LOL

Midori

December 31st, 2010
10:15 pm

Happy 2011, everyone :)

Common Sense isn't very Common

December 31st, 2010
10:29 pm

Josef – I took your advise from the other night and I am extremely sore LOL.

Let the others guess at the advise ;-)

Common Sense isn't very Common

December 31st, 2010
10:31 pm

Hi Midori
——————

Everyone is either partying and didn’t invite us :-(

or is already trashed and asleep :-)

Scout

December 31st, 2010
10:42 pm

Common Sense:

He may have given me my shots when I left country in May, 1968 ……………… :o

j$

December 31st, 2010
10:56 pm

obama fills his first game of golf:)

Common Sense isn't very Common

December 31st, 2010
11:41 pm

Scout – one of the few stories he told of that time was on that day that he had to work late. He was heading to his bunk when the base came under attack. When he got to his bunk it had taken a hit (probably from a mortar attack). His upper bunk mate was in his bunk at the time(he only tells it when he is crocked). 5 minutes saved his life.

It was a different time even though I am a few years younger I still appreciate what others went through and that is why I will ALWAYS support OUR way of life. LET god sort out our differences thats why he is PAID the big bucks.

Common Sense isn't very Common

January 1st, 2011
12:00 am

count down.

Please kiss those near and dear to you.

And may god bless each and everyone one.

remember those who have passed from our mortal lives.

Common Sense isn't very Common

January 1st, 2011
1:09 am

Jay – you have had your break. Now back to work.

The numbers of employed may be misleading. I think you need to verify the TRUE numbers.

The employed for 2000 by salary range, thru 2009 . by age group 2000 thru 2009, and the overall effect on the economy (purchasing. income taxes paid, etc.)

I don’t know for sure but I feel that you will find that the overall numbers will show that the US is in a drastic decline of our ability to sustain the tax cuts that have been recently extended.

I don’t think we can be a SERVICE NATION any more , we need to create again. We have become a nation of innovation (to ship the plans offshore?). I am sorry if that makes me xenophobic (but I am really not). The US has been (for the most part) the leaders of the world now we create and send the plans offshore to be done CHEAPER. WHO benefits? The US doesn’t, nor do the taxpayers in the US.

Then as a population WE buy the products we created and were made offshore at a price decided by the companies that supposedly are based in the US. Strange eh?

Normal

January 1st, 2011
7:59 am

Happy 2011, one and all!

Normal

January 1st, 2011
8:02 am

Let’s make our resolution to make Congress to work togetther to get things done, like jobs and fixing out infrastructure. We can do it.

AmVet

January 1st, 2011
8:45 am

TaxPayer

January 1st, 2011
8:54 am

Happy 1-1-11

Kamchak

January 1st, 2011
9:04 am

Normal

January 1st, 2011
10:23 am

Scout

January 1st, 2011
10:26 am

Alright, enough of the New Year’s “be nice to everyone/kissy-poo” stuff. Time to get back to business !

Jay, JAY !!

AJC Headline: “Base Bails on Dems in Droves” !

“Rebuilding to be tough as only a third of voters identify with party.”

“Leaders seek growth strategies in a GOP world.”

Redneck Convert (R--and proud of it)

January 1st, 2011
10:27 am

Well, Happy New Year everybody. We made it to 2011. Just one more year till we can vote this Kenyan out of the White House.

Anyhow, I never made no New Year revolutions but the missus did. She’s going to loose 100 lbs., or so she says. I told her it won’t do no good to eat nothing but rice cakes if she eats 10 lbs. of them at a time. I plan to be away from home and at Billy Bob’s while she’s going on that diet. The missus is nobody you want to be around when she’s hungry.

I guess it’s PBR and football today. A shame about my Dawgs last night. It looks like they would loose to a pee wee team. We need to get a new coach that knows how to cheat legal-like. Old Vince had all those classes for dummys so he could bring great but dumb players. Maybe this Mark Richt would make a good missionary. It’s for sure he’s not our kind of coach.

Then I get the Sabbath off too and that means not doing much except going down to the Church of Holiness to listen to the Rev. Postlewaite jaw for awhile. The good news tho is I won’t be spending as much money at Ryans, seeing as how she’s on a diet.

Anyways, I hope everybody has a safe and happy New Year. Even the libruls.

Scout

January 1st, 2011
10:29 am

Has anyone ever noticed in almost all of the photos from Afghanistan/Iraq, etc. that the males in their nightgowns look so “Neanderthalish” ??

I read a good article the other day that said it’s basically due to Islamic law allowing one to marry their first cousin. It’s been going on for centuries now and alas ……….. you have the results of too much inbreeding.

Scout

January 1st, 2011
10:36 am

Headline: “Napolitano Meets With Karzai, Talks About Ways to Intercept IED Chemicals”

What the heck expertise does she have to do that when she can’t even stop the flood at our border?

Pathetic !!

Mick

January 1st, 2011
10:48 am

scout

Merry new year or whatever, this is for you-

CHANGES ARE COMING —-

Whether these changes are good or bad depends in part on how we adapt to them. But, ready or not, here they come

1. The Post Office. Get ready to imagine a world without the post office. They are so deeply in financial trouble that there is probably no way to sustain it long term. Email, Fed Ex, and UPS have just about wiped out the minimum revenue needed to keep the post office alive. Most of your mail every day is junk mail and bills.

2. The Check. Britain is already laying the groundwork to do away with checks by 2018. It costs the financial system billions of dollars a year to process checks. Plastic cards and online transactions will lead to the eventual demise of the check. This plays right into the death of the post office. If you never paid your bills by mail and never received them by mail, the post office would absolutely go out of business.

3. The Newspaper. The younger generation simply doesn’t read the newspaper. They certainly don’t subscribe to a daily delivered print edition. That may go the way of the milkman and the laundry man. As for reading the paper online, get ready to pay for it. The rise in mobile Internet devices and e-readers has caused all the newspaper and magazine publishers to form an alliance. They have met with Apple, Amazon, and the major cell phone companies to develop a model for paid subscription services.

4. The Book. You say you will never give up the physical book that you hold in your hand and turn the literal pages. I said the same thing about downloading music from iTunes. I wanted my hard copy CD. But I quickly changed my mind when I discovered that I could get albums for half the price without ever leaving home to get the latest music. The same thing will happen with books. You can browse a bookstore online and even read a preview chapter before you buy. And the price is less than half that of a real book. And think of the convenience! Once you start flicking your fingers on the screen instead of the book, you find that you are lost in the story, can’t wait to see what happens next, and you forget that you’re holding a gadget instead of a book.

5. The Land Line Telephone. Unless you have a large family and make a lot of local calls, you don’t need it anymore. Most people keep it simply because they’ve always had it. But you are paying double charges for that extra service. All the cell phone companies will let you call customers using the same cell provider for no charge against your minutes
.
6. Music. This is one of the saddest parts of the change story. The music industry is dying a slow death. Not just because of illegal downloading. It’s the lack of innovative new music being given a chance to get to the people who would like to hear it. Greed and corruption is the problem. The record labels and the radio conglomerates are simply self-destructing. Over 40% of the music purchased today is “catalog items,” meaning traditional music that the public is familiar with. Older established artists. This is also true on the live concert circuit. To explore this fascinating and disturbing topic further, check out the book, “Appetite for Self-Destruction” by Steve Knopper, and the video documentary, “Before the Music Dies.”

7. Television. Revenues to the networks are down dramatically. Not just because of the economy. People are watching TV and movies streamed from their computers. And they’re playing games and doing lots of other things that take up the time that used to be spent watching TV. Prime time shows have degenerated down to lower than the lowest common denominator. Cable rates are skyrocketing and commercials run about every 4 minutes and 30 seconds. I say good riddance to most of it. It’s time for the cable companies to be put out of our misery. Let the people choose what they want to watch online and through Netflix.

8. The “Things” That You Own. Many of the very possessions that we used to own are still in our lives, but we may not actually own them in the future. They may simply reside in “the cloud.” Today your computer has a hard drive and you store your pictures, music, movies, and documents. Your software is on a CD or DVD, and you can always re-install it if need be. But all of that is changing. Apple, Microsoft, and Google are all finishing up their latest “cloud services.” That means that when you turn on a computer, the Internet will be built into the operating system. So, Windows, Google, and the Mac OS will be tied straight into the Internet. If you click an icon, it will open something in the Internet cloud. If you save something, it will be saved to the cloud. And you may pay a monthly subscription fee to the cloud provider.
In this virtual world, you can access your music or your books, or your whatever from any laptop or handheld device. That’s the good news. But, will you actually own any of this “stuff” or will it all be able to disappear at any moment in a big “Poof?” Will most of the things in our lives be disposable and whimsical? It makes you want to run to the closet and pull out that photo album, grab a book from the shelf, or open up a CD case and pull out the insert.

9. Privacy. If there ever was a concept that we can look back on nostalgically, it would be privacy. That’s gone. It’s been gone for a long time anyway. There are cameras on the street, in most of the buildings, and even built into your computer and cell phone. But you can be sure that 24/7, “They” know who you are and where you are, right down to the GPS coordinates, and the Google Street View. If you buy something, your habit is put into a zillion profiles, and your ads will change to reflect those habits. And “They” will try to get you to buy something else. Again and again.

All we will have that can’t be changed are Memories.

19 Facts About The Deindustrialization Of America That Will Blow Your Mind

The United States is rapidly becoming the very first “post-industrial” nation on the globe. All great economic empires eventually become fat and lazy and squander the great wealth that their forefathers have left them, but the pace at which America is accomplishing this is absolutely amazing. It was America that was at the forefront of the industrial revolution. It was America that showed the world how to mass produce everything from automobiles to televisions to airplanes. It was the great American manufacturing base that crushed Germany and Japan in World War II.

But now we are witnessing the deindustrialization of America . Tens of thousands of factories have left the United States in the past decade alone. Millions upon millions of manufacturing jobs have been lost in the same time period. The United States has become a nation that consumes everything in sight and yet produces increasingly little. Do you know what our biggest export is today? Waste paper. Yes, trash is the number one thing that we ship out to the rest of the world as we voraciously blow our money on whatever the rest of the world wants to sell to us. The United States has become bloated and spoiled and our economy is now just a shadow of what it once was. Once upon a time America could literally out produce the rest of the world combined. Today that is no longer true, but Americans sure do consume more than anyone else in the world. If the deindustrialization of America continues at this current pace, what possible kind of a future are we going to be leaving to our children?

Any great nation throughout history has been great at making things. So if the United States continues to allow its manufacturing base to erode at a staggering pace how in the world can the U.S. continue to consider itself to be a great nation? We have created the biggest debt bubble in the history of the world in an effort to maintain a very high standard of living, but the current state of affairs is not anywhere close to sustainable. Every single month America does into more debt and every single month America gets poorer.

So what happens when the debt bubble pops?

The deindustrialization of the United States should be a top concern for every man, woman and child in the country. But sadly, most Americans do not have any idea what is going on around them.

For people like that, take this article and print it out and hand it to them. Perhaps what they will read below will shock them badly enough to awaken them from their slumber.

The following are 19 facts about the deindustrialization of America that will blow your mind….

#1 The United States has lost approximately 42,400 factories since 2001. About 75 percent of those factories employed over 500 people when they were still in operation.

#2 Dell Inc., one of America’s largest manufacturers of computers, has announced plans to dramatically expand its operations in China with an investment of over $100 billion over the next decade.

#3 Dell has announced that it will be closing its last large U.S. manufacturing facility in Winston-Salem, North Carolina in November. Approximately 900 jobs will be lost.

#4 In 2008, 1.2 billion cell phones were sold worldwide. So how many of them were manufactured inside the United States? Zero.

#5 According to a new study conducted by the Economic Policy Institute, if the U.S. trade deficit with China continues to increase at its current rate, the U.S. economy will lose over half a million jobs this year alone.

#6 As of the end of July, the U.S. trade deficit with China had risen 18 percent compared to the same time period a year ago.

#7 The United States has lost a total of about 5.5 million manufacturing jobs since October 2000.

#8 According to Tax Notes, between 1999 and 2008 employment at the foreign affiliates of U.S. parent companies increased an astounding 30 percent to 10.1 million. During that exact same time period, U.S. employment at American multinational corporations declined 8 percent to 21.1 million.

#9 In 1959, manufacturing represented 28 percent of U.S. economic output. In 2008, it represented 11.5 percent.

#10 Ford Motor Company recently announced the closure of a factory that produces the Ford Ranger in St. Paul, Minnesota. Approximately 750 good paying middle class jobs are going to be lost because making Ford Rangers in Minnesota does not fit in with Ford’s new “global” manufacturing strategy.

#11 As of the end of 2009, less than 12 million Americans worked in manufacturing. The last time less than 12 million Americans were employed in manufacturing was in 1941.

#12 In the United States today, consumption accounts for 70 percent of GDP. Of this 70 percent, over half is spent on services.

#13 The United States has lost a whopping 32 percent of its manufacturing jobs since the year 2000.

#14 In 2001, the United States ranked fourth in the world in per capita broadband Internet use. Today it ranks 15th.

#15 Manufacturing employment in the U.S. computer industry is actually lower in 2010 than it was in 1975.

#16 Printed circuit boards are used in tens of thousands of different products. Asia now produces 84 percent of them worldwide.

#17 The United States spends approximately $3.90 on Chinese goods for every $1 that the Chinese spend on goods from the United States .

#18 One prominent economist is projecting that the Chinese economy will be three times larger than the U.S. economy by the year 2040.

#19 The U.S. Census Bureau says that 43.6 million Americans are now living in poverty and according to them that is the highest number of poor Americans in the 51 years that records have been kept.

So how many tens of thousands more factories do we need to lose before we do something about it?

How many millions more Americans are going to become unemployed before we all admit that we have a very, very serious problem on our hands?

How many more trillions of dollars are going to leave the country before we realize that we are losing wealth at a pace that is killing our economy?

How many once great manufacturing cities are going to become rotting war zones like Detroit before we understand that we are committing national economic suicide?

The deindustrialization of America is a national crisis. It needs to be treated like one.

If you disagree with this article, I have a direct challenge for you. If anyone can explain how a deindustrialized America has any kind of viable economic future, please do so below in the comments section.

America is in deep, deep trouble folks. It is time to wake up

Scout

January 1st, 2011
10:53 am

Mick:

Don’t know where that came from but it is pretty much “right on” !

Or another way of saying everthing above:

“Our soldiers are at war, our politicians are robbing us blind, our country is going down the tubes and our citizens are at the mall.”

Bud Wiser

January 1st, 2011
11:02 am

You left wing toadies are such pessimists, ..”the glass is half empty…” types.

I prefer the optimism that comes with the dethronement of the dimwits in the House, and a major closing of the gap in the Senate, not to mention the fact that those left standing will be gasping for air and expiring in just another two years.

Happy New Year!

Del

January 1st, 2011
11:20 am

Mick, Scout, Happy New Year!

Michael H. Smith

January 1st, 2011
11:22 am

Travelin’ music for the New Year ahead and predict soggy Jan 1 day

CCR ~ Who’ll Stop the Rain

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jaEEFBTtofc&feature=related

When interviewed by Rolling Stone magazine, John Fogerty was asked, “Does ‘Who’ll Stop The Rain’ contain lyrically specific meanings besides the symbolic dimension?” His response: “Certainly, I was talking about Washington when I wrote the song, but I remember bringing the master version of the song home and playing it. My son Josh was four years old at the time, and after he heard it, he said, ‘Daddy stop the rain.’ And my wife and I looked at each other and said, ‘Well, not quite.’”

Scout

January 1st, 2011
11:26 am

Del:

Sorry, but I broke the 24 hr. cease fire ………… just like the NVA.

Paulo977

January 1st, 2011
11:27 am

Wish you all a Happy 2011 . May more of us figure out that we derive our being and nature through mutual dependence
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phjBVqjYS98

Kamchak

January 1st, 2011
11:54 am

Soothsayer

January 1st, 2011
12:17 pm

Mick @ 10:48 Great Post! Where can I find that article?

Common Sense isn't very Common

January 1st, 2011
12:45 pm

Mick – STOP doing Jays research for him LOL.

And I thought that i didn’t sleep enough geesh

To each and all a happy new year

As I was saying to friends and relatives last night. The 75% of us in the middle need to kick the SHYT out of the far far ones and take a stance that says youse guys are outta here.

We the people CARE about the USA and the politicians are screwing with our lives and OUR country

We the people have paid and do pay taxes every day. We are not being heard. The WH has a website. Send an email to them stating your views. PLEASE don’t send trash, I hate you etc.. Send an email that makes sense.

Hillbilly Deluxe

January 1st, 2011
12:49 pm

In reference to Mick’s 10:48

If a US company moves their manufacturing plant to another country and builds products to sell to us, why don’t we charge them an import duty, when they bring those products into our country?

Common Sense isn't very Common

January 1st, 2011
12:58 pm

HD – No SHYT. we have given away our resources to the corporations so that we can but them back at inflated rates. If a flippin flip phone costs $7 to make why do we pay $70 or more for it and who is profiting

Soothsayer

January 1st, 2011
1:13 pm

Hillbilly Deluxe

January 1st, 2011
1:28 pm

Sooth

I once saw John Duffey perform in shorts, flip flops and a Hawaiian shirt because the airlines had lost his luggage. Didn’t affect the music, though.

Soothsayer

January 1st, 2011
1:29 pm

HD: too bad he died of a heart attack in 1996. What a waste!

Common Sense isn't very Common

January 1st, 2011
1:30 pm

HD

that sounds like Jimmy Buffett on a good day :-)

Soothsayer

January 1st, 2011
1:30 pm

HD: if you actually saw The Seldom Scene that’s really saying something! They didn’t play very many concerts–hence the name.

Hillbilly Deluxe

January 1st, 2011
1:35 pm

Sooth

I actually did see them, live and in the flesh. I think I saw them twice but don’t remember for sure.

Kamchak

January 1st, 2011
1:38 pm

Sooth

I had forgotten all about Seldom Scene, thanks for the reminder!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wigjZ7ng_tc&feature=related

Hillbilly Deluxe

January 1st, 2011
1:38 pm

Common Sense

I saw Buffet open up for the Marshall Tucker Band, before Margaritaville. Richie Furay was on the bill, too, and it only cost $5. That was in the Omni.

Soothsayer

January 1st, 2011
1:47 pm

Kamchak: That’s a great song! For many many years I thought that was Grateful Dead’s lead singer. (Before my Bluegrass days!) To my mind, the two sound very similar. Thanks for posting it. It’ll be going to my “favorites” for sure.

Common Sense isn't very Common

January 1st, 2011
1:51 pm

HD and All – how many remember the Great Southeast Music hall in Buckhead. Jiimy Buffett, Steve Martin and so many others.

Buckets of beer and waiting in the mens room line with the Acts LOL. Found ou that the other JB is short LOL

Hillbilly Deluxe

January 1st, 2011
2:30 pm

Common Sense

The Great Southeast Music Hall had the best acoustics of any place, that I’ve ever heard music. And the place was so small that everybody got heckled by somebody. Somebody even ran on the stage when I was listening to The Earl Scruggs Review play. Broadview Plaza isn’t there anymore, is it?

I was coming back from the bathroom there once and Alex Harvey (he wrote Delta Dawn, Reuben James, and others) was being hassled by some guy, who was trying to get him to hire his son, while he was trying to make his way to the stage, to go on.

Common Sense isn't very Common

January 1st, 2011
2:53 pm

HD – The Plaza is there but not the same as it once was.

When you saw ESR play I was probably there. I was the one drinking beer LOL.

Great place to see all the up and comers. I think it sat maybe 150 people. Thats why you could see the same people over and over. Uncomfortable seats but everybody was so close to the stage nobody GAS about it (might have been the beer LOL)

TnGelding

January 1st, 2011
3:41 pm

To those that came before:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QwCPAo5e_F8

2011 could be one for the ages. Get bin Laden and get out!

$7 = $70 soon because of value added. Not to mention marketing, which is more than 50% on some products.

TnGelding

January 1st, 2011
3:43 pm

Old Ponce. The good old days! How many of us passed through on our way to fame and fortune?

Southern Comfort

January 1st, 2011
3:45 pm

If a US company moves their manufacturing plant to another country and builds products to sell to us, why don’t we charge them an import duty, when they bring those products into our country?

We can’t charge them import duty because they move to countries that have a “Free Trade” agreement with the US. Since South Korea just signed one, you can bet that is the next place where jobs will be shipped. Our politicians are selling us out to their corporate donors left and right.

TnGelding

January 1st, 2011
3:54 pm

We’re doing it to ourselves. Stop buying the imported junk. I was in a Ford dealership yesterday and the engine was made in Germany and the transmission in another foreign country on one of the vehicles. But that’s what you get in a global economy. We just have to do it better than anyone else. We can’t do it cheaper. Support your local businesses as well. The Walmart heirs are worth more than 100 billion. When is enough enough? Or too much?

Common Sense isn't very Common

January 1st, 2011
3:57 pm

hey SoCo , TnG. Happy to see you woke up today LOL.

SoCo – why aren’t you at the I-85 Ga-Al border waiting for L’il Barry?

I promised him you would personally do the cavity search (he wanted the MAN to do it) LMAO

Southern Comfort

January 1st, 2011
3:58 pm

When is enough enough? Or too much?

According to some, when you work hard, enough or too much does not exist. You are simply being rewarded for “working hard”.

Southern Comfort

January 1st, 2011
4:00 pm

NoCom

I literally felt like I was in the belly of the beast today. Usually, I’ll at least have a lunch break where I can peek my head in here to see what’s going on. Today was not such a day. It was balls to the wall from the time I stepped into the airport until I stepped back out. If this is any indication of what my year will be like, 2011 is going to be one hell of a rollercoaster ride….

TnGelding

January 1st, 2011
4:01 pm

Yeah, we fooled them and made it through another year and another nght. Greetings!

Common Sense isn't very Common

January 1st, 2011
4:01 pm

TnG – I agree to a point. Germany has laws that require that imported goods/services are taxed. We don’t have those tariffs/taxes in place. I don’t see a lot of people bashing Germanys economy here. They seem to think they have the same open border/trade concept as we do.

Common Sense isn't very Common

January 1st, 2011
4:04 pm

SoCo – so I should send more or less H1bs thru the airport?

According to some you should make more money the harder you work LOL.

Southern Comfort

January 1st, 2011
4:12 pm

NoCom

Fewer H1B’s means less work for me. Either that, or they’ll ramp up the number of L1’s and J1’s. On the issues of import tarriffs and taxes, just look at where our crap comes from vs who we have free trade agreements with. Bush was pushing hard for an agreement with Colombia. They don’t have much of a manufacturing industry right now. Had that agreement been signed, Colombia would probably be flushed with new jobs from companies fleeing the US.

TaxPayer

January 1st, 2011
4:34 pm

I hope y’all have your black-eyed peas and collard greens and corn bread under way so you will be set for a good new year.

Southern Comfort

January 1st, 2011
4:53 pm

Tax

Got a turkey being baptised in some hot peanut oil. Once the baptism is done, the greens and peas will be served. :)

Common Sense isn't very Common

January 1st, 2011
4:53 pm

SoCo – I thought we had an un-official trade agreement with Colombia already? LOL

One day I will relate to you a plan that someone I knew thought of.

Who the hell keeps negotiating those crap agreements anyway. The US always comes out as suckers.

Common Sense isn't very Common

January 1st, 2011
4:55 pm

Free the fowls

RW-(the original)

January 1st, 2011
5:00 pm

Glad to see the SEC starting to redeem itself. I was starting to think Auburn might not be nearly as good as they’ve looked and the conference just sucked.

Happy New Year everybody :!:

Pogo

January 1st, 2011
5:02 pm

Mick. The article is right on. The Washington Times also has an excellent article today on the downfall of America. As with any great civilization, it seems our days are numbered. We are consuming ourselves into oblivion without producing anything that the rest of the world can’t produce cheaper. Without an industrial base in this country the vast majority of Americans quite simply will not have a means of survival because most of us aren’t Harvard scholars, professional atheletes, successful musical artists, Wall Street Bankers/Brokers, politicians or movie stars. Most of us are just “plain Joes and Janes” and “plain Joe’s and Jane’s” must eat to. We have lived in fantasy land way too long now. The private sector in this country cannot sustain what the government is spending and I fear that we do not have politicians, of any ilk, with enough guts and fortitude to do what is right (which is to cut the mindless spending). To save our country, we are all going to have to suffer and do without the things we were raised to believe that we deserved JUST because we were Americans and because our leaders told us we deserved them. We either do it to the benefit of this country or this country is going to die. We simply do not have the money to keep paying for everything that we as a people think that we deserve. There is a lot wrong with us and there are many, many people to blame for it. Our leaders only gave us what we demanded, which was the easy way out so ultimately we ourselves are to blame for our country’s present situation. Afterall, we elected these idiots.

Southern Comfort

January 1st, 2011
5:03 pm

NoCom

Colombia has that agreement with pretty much the entire world. I think the negotiations are done by those high up on the food chain in these megaconglomerates. Any way to boost profits and bonuses, regardless what it does to those on the front lines.

RW

Me too… I was beginning to worry about my beloved SEC.

Hillbilly Deluxe

January 1st, 2011
5:05 pm

Who the hell keeps negotiating those crap agreements anyway. The US always comes out as suckers.

It’s mostly us in the Great Unwashed that come out the suckers. The folks who negotiate the crap agreements are doing just fine.

Southern Comfort

January 1st, 2011
5:37 pm

The private sector in this country cannot sustain what the government is spending and I fear that we do not have politicians, of any ilk, with enough guts and fortitude to do what is right (which is to cut the mindless spending).

The mindless spending is but only a small part of our problem. The spending wouldn’t even be noticable had our politicians not sold out to corporate interests and allowed the wholesale loss of our manufacturing industry. People can cry all day about labor costs and such, but that is only a part of the issue.

Investors and speculators have caused our business leaders to go on a fool’s quest for the lost city of gold. Instead of looking at long term implications of their decisions, they’ve become beholden to quarterly profits. Nothing can continually profit without loss. Instead of being satisfied with meager profitability, the mentality is to maximize profits at any cost.

Well, the chickens have come home to roost. The idea to increase profits by lowering labor led to a mass exodus of jobs. There is no way to recoup those jobs without incurring losses, and businesses are not going to accept even a minor loss. Our country is FUBAR, and there is no forseeable remedy in the near future. It doesn’t matter about educational levels or anything. Without a major industry to provide for the masses, we’re fu*ked. The service industry does not have the financial ability to support this country.

Kamchak

January 1st, 2011
5:42 pm

Investors and speculators have caused our business leaders to go on a fool’s quest for the lost city of gold.

No…no…no…it was the evil unions.

Didn’t you get the memo?

Scout

January 1st, 2011
6:27 pm

josef Nix:

Well, well, well ………………. the last time Alabama, Mississippi and Florida boys faced Michigan and Pennsylvania boys on the same day was in September of 1864 on Missionary Ridge, Chattannoga, Tennessee.

Normal

January 1st, 2011
6:28 pm

For all football Fons everyone…and a tutorial for UGA fans… :D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-z3XvZ-lh7I

Southern Comfort

January 1st, 2011
6:37 pm

Didn’t you get the memo?

Ooops… Forgot that point. Although I do hold unions responsible for the loss of jobs, but not for the same reasons as most do. When it was time to renegotiate contracts, they should have tried to leverage stock options as a part of their packages. Play the same game that the CEO’s play. When the company does well, we all win. That way, even if they get the shaft, they have some stocks to help out with finances.

Scout

The only difference is those Southern boys today completely whooped ass!!!!

Scout

January 1st, 2011
6:45 pm

There is a Santa Claus !!

Headlijne: “The Sun Sets on the Kennedy Era”

“For the first time in 64 years, there will be no Kennedy in Congress.”

Scout

January 1st, 2011
6:51 pm

I guess every NCAA college football team has the right to wear black jerseys ?

Kamchak

January 1st, 2011
6:51 pm

Southern Comfort

A whopping 7.2% of the labor force in the private sector belong to a union. Hard to imagine that such a small labor force can cower corporate America to off shore so much work.

As to the stock option thingie–the investor class started that kind of thing beginning in the early 80s when the traditional pension plan gave way to what I remember was called cafeteria investing where you cold allocate certain percentages of the company plan into stocks and bonds. Pretty soon that gave way to the 401k plans. As I see it, the only ones that were sure to make money off of retirement were the marketeers.

Scout

January 1st, 2011
6:52 pm

Southern:

You got that right ……… it was really kind of embarrassing ! It’s hard to believe there is that much of a gap in conferences.

Hillbilly Deluxe

January 1st, 2011
7:07 pm

Kamchak

I’ve posted this before but if you haven’t seen it, you might find it interesting. It’s about the history of the 401k.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/retirement/world/401k.html

josef nix

January 1st, 2011
7:20 pm

SCOUT
Yeah, too bad we couldn’t've just had a football game, eh? Oh, well, D-o Vendice!

SoCO
And you can bet your last Judah P that emancipation would’ve come a lot quicker, too! :-)

Funny, though, this should come up…I was doing some research today on the last of the inter-tribal conflicts before Removal settled by a ball game…Creeks vs Choctaw…the Choctaw won (them’s some mean a33 stickball players for those of y’all who don’t follow the sport)…course 500 braves went to the Happy Hunting Grounds before it was over with…!!

Common Sense isn't very Common

January 1st, 2011
7:27 pm

It’s the Damned Northern Unions causing the trouble,

If those darnn NYC trash collectors would get rid of the snow all those wall streeters would be able to get the economy going again.

Damn those unions

Common Sense isn't very Common

January 1st, 2011
7:30 pm

Hey LITTLE joe(josef) has joined in. How is the brainache today LOL.

I still hurt and you are the cause :-)

josef nix

January 1st, 2011
7:39 pm

Common Sense

I’m just fine and dandy, thakee-ye!

So, why am I at fault here?

And, yeah, I’ve been thinking of changing my monniker to Little Gay Jew Boy… Surely there’s nothing offensive about that, is there? :-)

Common Sense isn't very Common

January 1st, 2011
7:46 pm

Josef – Your advice to do something other than IT that I enjoy.

I came up to East NC the other night. My stepson (youngest of my latest late wife’s) needed a helper for a remodeling job. Had to replace the floor in an apartment (the right way).

I told ya I am too old for that SHYT. I hurt like hell today. But then again he is much younger and is sore also LMAO

I saw that LITTLE post the other day and damn near laughed myself stupid ;-)

Little Gay Jew Boy

January 1st, 2011
7:55 pm

SCOUT
Yeah, too bad we couldn’t’ve just had a football game, eh? Oh, well, D-o Vendice!

SoCO
And you can bet your last Judah P that emancipation would’ve come a lot quicker, too!

Funny, though, this should come up…I was doing some research today on the last of the inter-tribal conflicts before Removal settled by a ball game…Creeks vs Choctaw…the Choctaw won (them’s some mean a33 stickball players for those of y’all who don’t follow the sport)…course 500 braves went to the Happy Hunting Grounds before it was over with…!!
—————————-

Nope, doesn’t work LOL

josef nix

January 1st, 2011
7:56 pm

Common

THAT! Heh, heh! Good to have a younster feeling that way, too, though, eh?

And that Little thingie…the more I think about it. It was a topic of discussion last p.m. around here and it was sort of surprizing who took the most “offense.”

I ran across a phrase today I had never heard which has gotten me intrigued…”diseased diversity.” Your opinion on the term,..?

josef nix

January 1st, 2011
7:57 pm

LGJB

“Nope, doesn’t work LOL”

Aw, why not?

Kamchak

January 1st, 2011
8:02 pm

Hillbilly Deluxe

Thanks. I haven’t seen that before now and it figures that FRONTLINE would dig into the numbers behind the 401k investing. From the link: In my experience, the old formal pension plan costs the average company somewhere between 6 and 8 percent of payroll. If you had a $100 million payroll and had a formal pension plan, … you were paying $6 million or $8 million a year. … That was the pension industry before 401(k).

And in 401(k)?

The company’s contribution generally was structured to be a match based on whatever the employee put in. They might say, “You put in a dollar, we’ll put in 50 cents.” Well, suddenly the company had a great deal to gain if not 100 percent of the people joined the 401(k) plan. Let’s say only half the people joined and put in 4 percent of pay. Well, the company matched 50 cents on the dollar, so the company would be putting in 2 percent of payroll for half the people. That’s 1 percent of payroll. …

So companies have been saving 6-7% a year for nearly thirty years.

OK. Good for them. Seems like that kind of savings could keep jobs here.

But here’s where it really gets interesting: Now, the financial system — the mutual fund system in this case — will take about two and a half percentage points out of that return, so you will have … a net return of 5.5 percent, and your $1,000 will grow to approximately $30,000. One hundred ten thousand dollars goes to the financial system and $30,000 to you, the investor. Think about that. That means the financial system put up zero percent of the capital and took zero percent of the risk and got almost 80 percent of the return, and you, the investor in this long time period, an investment lifetime, put up 100 percent of the capital, took 100 percent of the risk, and got only a little bit over 20 percent of the return.

On any given day, one or more people here will start whinging about how the government, through taxation, is stealing their hard earned money.

When it comes to Wall Street taking 80% of their retirement?

Crickets.