GOP voters often more reasonable than radicals they elect

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Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell offers a telling illustration of how differently the modern Republican Party thinks and operates. In fact, I’m not aware of any other major political party behaving in this fashion in the nation’s history, and if anyone can demonstrate otherwise, please do.

In the latest Gallup poll (see chart above), 67 percent of Americans say they would vote to end Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell. There’s nothing particularly dramatic in that number; it’s in line with results obtained by other pollsters on the question.

But take a look at the breakdown among Republicans. Forty-seven percent want to end DADT; 48 percent want to retain it. Even among self-described conservative Republicans, 39 percent say they want to end the policy and allow gay Americans to serve openly.

Yet even though Republican voters are almost equally divided on the issue nationally, Republicans in the U.S. Senate voted almost unanimously against it, with just one GOP senator voting to end the filibuster yesterday afternoon.

pewHere’s an even more dramatic example, from the folks at Pew. Fifty-eight percent of Republican voters acknowledge that the best way to tackle the deficit is through a combination of tax increases and spending cuts. Just 32 percent say the answer is to focus mostly on cutting major programs. Even among self-described Tea Party members, 51 percent say the best way to address the deficit is through spending cuts and tax hikes, with just 39 percent advocating solving the problem through spending cuts alone.

Yet you can’t get a Republican on the Hill to even utter the word “tax hike,” lest they be condemned as a RINO. The sole focus is on cutting programs (of course, in a general rhetorical sense that rarely gets down to specifics.)

On other issues, the gap between Washington Republicans and GOP voters back home is less dramatic, but still significant. According to Gallup, 40 percent of Republicans opposed extending tax cuts for the wealthy or wanted the cuts ended across the board, for everybody. Yet Washington Republicans were unanimous in demanding the cuts for the wealthy be extended. Forty-three percent of Republicans, and 38 percent of conservative Republicans, supported extending unemployment benefits, but again that division of opinion was not reflected at all in Washington.

In other words, it’s not merely that Washington Republicans won’t compromise with Democrats. They won’t compromise even with their own voters. The national party is in the grip of radicals who accept no deviation from the approved party line, and who demonstrate no tolerance for the broader, more reasonable range of opinions that exists within the Republican electorate they claim to represent.

456 comments Add your comment

USinUK

December 10th, 2010
8:56 am

well, they gotta vote for the Republicans they got, not the Republicans they want.

USinUK

December 10th, 2010
8:56 am

oh. and Friday First!

jm

December 10th, 2010
8:58 am

Well, this whole concept applies to both parties. Well known the extremist wings dominate. Hence the creation of the term – wingnuts.

carlosgvv

December 10th, 2010
9:00 am

Since four star Generals and Admirals testified against ending DADT, and since most of these politicans have never set foot in the military, maybe they just decided to listen to the experts.

Granny Godzilla

December 10th, 2010
9:01 am

They may be more reasonable when polled, but they follow lockstep to voting booth.

jm

December 10th, 2010
9:01 am

Maybe Obama (aka The Triangulator) can make mince meat out of both sets of wingnuts. We shall see.

The dirtiest word in politics: Has Barack Obama been caught triangulating?

http://www.politico.com/news/stories/1210/46218.html

Bosch

December 10th, 2010
9:04 am

Just read the headline and thought — well, they obviously didn’t poll any of the wingnuts here.

Normal

December 10th, 2010
9:05 am

jm

December 10th, 2010
9:06 am

It may be cold comfort to Obama that he is exonerated of the triangulation charge by none other than Morris, who claims Obama would not know triangulation from Shinola.

Read more: http://www.politico.com/news/stories/1210/46218.html#ixzz17iW4HgKh

Whacks Eloquent

December 10th, 2010
9:07 am

Democrat voters are also often more reasonable than radicals they elect…

It is akin to having to pick chimpanzees to represent contestants in a game show

Fred

December 10th, 2010
9:07 am

Granny Godzilla

December 10th, 2010
9:01 am

They may be more reasonable when polled, but they follow lockstep to voting booth.
==============================

And granny gets both ears and the tail.

Normal

December 10th, 2010
9:07 am

jm,
I think President Obama is going to try to win the election in 2012 by running as a Republican…
;)

RW-(the original)

December 10th, 2010
9:08 am

But take a look at the breakdown among Republicans. Forty-seven percent want to end DADT; 48 percent want to retain it

That’s kind of a stretch based on the question asked. Saying people “want” something implies an advocacy for a position, but the question was simply whether you would vote one way or the other should a ballot question arise.

Yet even though Republican voters are almost equally divided on the issue nationally, Republicans in the U.S. Senate voted almost unanimously against it, with just one GOP senator voting to end the filibuster yesterday afternoon.

Harry Reid had 60 votes in his pocket had he agreed to the debate time and amendment schedule. He chose instead to try to ram through the omnibus defense spending bill that had the DADT rider on it. There was no stand alone vote on proceeding with repeal of DADT.

USinUK

December 10th, 2010
9:08 am

dont anyone tell carlos about the survey that was done in which the results show that those IN THE MILITARY think it should be repealed.

his head may a’splode

Granny Godzilla

December 10th, 2010
9:10 am

Fred

Please tell me they are not from Ferdinand?

Deep Throat

December 10th, 2010
9:11 am

More meaningless Polls, how often do we agree ith Polls ? Only when they support our side of an issue.

Jay

December 10th, 2010
9:12 am

Whacks, I’d like to see some evidence for that assertion beyond “I know you are, but what am I?”

I doubt you’ll find it, for the simple reason that Democrats in Congress lack the party discipline to enforce one narrow line of thought.

StJ

December 10th, 2010
9:13 am

“GOP voters often more reasonable than radicals they elect”

But we’re all still “the enemy”, according to Obama.

jm

December 10th, 2010
9:14 am

Insight into the tax cut battle. Dems disgust me. Want to play games with the economy? Go do it in another country. Vote R Nov 2012.

http://www.politico.com/news/stories/1210/46223.html

TH

December 10th, 2010
9:16 am

Today is December 10.

BONER, WHERE ARE THE JOBS CREATED FROM THE BUSH TAX CUTS FOR THE WEALTHY?

Bosch

December 10th, 2010
9:17 am

“But we’re all still “the enemy”, according to Obama.”

Another example of someone with reading comprehension problems.

Fred

December 10th, 2010
9:17 am

Definitely not Ferdinand. Funny, I will always think of the movie “The Blind Side” when I see, read or hear references of Ferdinand………..

USinUK

December 10th, 2010
9:17 am

“Want to increase the deficit giving tax cuts to the rich? Vote R Nov 2012.”

USinUK

December 10th, 2010
9:18 am

Fred – I hate to say it, but I really liked The Blind Side, schmaltz-fest that it was.

Bosch

December 10th, 2010
9:20 am

“Dems disgust me. Want to play games with the economy? Go do it in another country.”

Another example of someone who is too ignorant to see the big picture, or a partisan hack, take your pick.

~~~~~~~~~~~

USinUK,

I hated that movie — it literally made me angry.

Doggone/GA

December 10th, 2010
9:20 am

“Another example of someone with reading comprehension problems”

and a victim of reporters and editors who don’t know when to use quotation marks

USinUK

December 10th, 2010
9:21 am

Bosch – “you’ve really changed his life”

“no … he changed mine”

(gagging sound)

but, I can’t help it. I like Sandra Bullock.

Fred

December 10th, 2010
9:21 am

It was a really good movie. What’s not to like? I think it was the first time Sandra Bullock played a grown up. And she did it well.

Is TH an alt or does he/she just do a drive by every blog with the same shouted post?

AmVet

December 10th, 2010
9:21 am

Normal, thanks for that info.

I always respected Rapid Robert. One heckuva pitcher and an even better American.

On December 8, 1941, Feller enlisted in the Navy, volunteering immediately for combat service, becoming the first Major League Baseball player to do so following the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7. Feller served as Gun Captain aboard the USS Alabama, and missed four seasons during his service in World War II, being decorated with five campaign ribbons and eight battle stars.

Yet again there is only ONE segment of American society that is irrefutably way outside of the norm. It is the same segment that is diametrically opposed to what every western democracy posits for, almost across the board.

Own it cons, you are out there all by yourselves.

And though you think you take the high road, the rest of us just think you are high…

Fred

December 10th, 2010
9:22 am

Wow Bosch HATED? Why?

Joel Edge

December 10th, 2010
9:22 am

“Democrat voters are also often more reasonable than radicals they elect…”
Agreed.

Deep Throat

December 10th, 2010
9:24 am

Usuk, are you trying to scare us saying tax cuts to the rich will increase our deficit ? Wheres your proof ? Are you exaggerating ? Are you telling the truth ?

USinUK

December 10th, 2010
9:24 am

Joel – see my 8:56 – unfortunately, too often the same applies to the Dems, too.

Normal

December 10th, 2010
9:26 am

Bosch

December 10th, 2010
9:27 am

Fred,

I hate feel good sports movies for one thing — I’m glad they took the kid in and all, but it just seemed to me like they only did it because of his ability and they used him a bit. Don’t get me wrong, I think they did good and all, but it was just too sappy for me.

It might have been better if something blew up — I don’t like movies unless something blows up.

Joel Edge

December 10th, 2010
9:28 am

USinUK@9:24
Agreed
I totally disagree pretty much with the Dem party in it’s current form. If a competing party shows up other than the Republicans…then we’ll see. I would actually like a choice. Not a lot to chose from.

Jay

December 10th, 2010
9:29 am

Deep Throat, the moniker is USinUK. Please be a little more respectful of others on the blog.

Fred

December 10th, 2010
9:29 am

Wow, they took a cold hungry kid off the street (he wasn’t playing football at the time) and they were using him? I don’t get it. Oh well.

Maybe if the truck would have exploded in the accident?

USinUK

December 10th, 2010
9:30 am

DT – oh, my. do you just not understand that extending the tax cuts will cost $900 bn over 2 years?

no. you probably don’t.

“While economists have said it would boost US growth next year because of the additional fiscal stimulus, the $900bn cost of the package will be added to the budget deficit, potentially adding to America’s long-term debt problems.”

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/f01f889c-03ef-11e0-8dd2-00144feabdc0.html#axzz17ieGMqS4

USinUK

December 10th, 2010
9:31 am

Jay – when all you got is nuttin’, you fling poo. it’s what DT does.

Gale

December 10th, 2010
9:31 am

Jay @ 9:12, My thoughts exactly. I’ve often said a Democrat majority is meaningless because they don’t agree on anything.

Fred

December 10th, 2010
9:33 am

I think that the DADT issue will be resolved before one of these #$%%#@#$ roofers will ever set up a time to come look at the house I’m trying to get roofed…………

USinUK

December 10th, 2010
9:34 am

Joel – 9:28 – me, I don’t see a permanent viable 3rd party option in the US – we’ve had 240+ years to install one, but, other than the occasional electoral anomoly, it just never seems to stick.

and now, with funding elections as ludicrously expensive as it is, it’s too hard to get a toe-hold, money-wise.

ty webb

December 10th, 2010
9:34 am

UsinUK,
But why stop at “to the rich”? Won’t all tax cuts(by themselves) increase the deficit? Do you really want to lower the deficit? I don’t want to call you a “partisan hack”(h/t to bosch), but you’re sounding like you’re pretty close to one.

Oblamer

December 10th, 2010
9:34 am

radical? gosh, dude you are off yoru rocker jay..you couldn’t be more wrong that ever…as a GOP voter, I elect people that support the right to life, small government, and will protect the institution of marriage as given to us by God…you on the left are the godless radicals they make our moral climate very cloudy..you should be ashamed of yourself buddy…there is reason we voted you clowns out..

RW-(the original)

December 10th, 2010
9:35 am

I doubt you’ll find it, for the simple reason that Democrats in Congress lack the party discipline to enforce one narrow line of thought.

Unless you guys are talking about some previous conversation you have the very same party discipline on this very vote. One Republican for and one Democrat against.

Paul

December 10th, 2010
9:35 am

Divergent views among voters, some divergence among politicians… and a very effective party discipline enforced from the top. I guess that’s what causes this.

Same’s true on a much lesser scale. I think of Spkr Pelosi telling House members to take a bullet for the cause – vote for health care reform. They did and many were defeated. Sure, there were other issues, but one gets the point. I’m sure she represents the views of her district, but she did use her position to put thru bills at odds with the views of other Democratic constituencies and those other politicians paid the price.

Vocal, monied special interest have inordinate influence on the nomination process. It carries thru to the reelection process. It skews everything.

Bosch

December 10th, 2010
9:36 am

Fred,

I know, I know. Like I said, they did good and all, but I think it just had more to do with the sappiness of it all. I hate sappy feel good sport movies.

I did like the part when Kathy Bates tells Sandra Bullock “I have to admit something….I am a Democrat” and she says something like “well, we can’t all be perfect”

I did like that.

Granny Godzilla

December 10th, 2010
9:37 am

Godless radicals?

And lions and tigers and bears….oh my.

@@

December 10th, 2010
9:37 am

Taking liberties here to reiterate RW’s point:

Harry Reid had 60 votes in his pocket had he agreed to the debate time and amendment schedule. He chose instead to try to ram through the omnibus defense spending bill that had the DADT rider on it.

The dem’s champions are nothing more than a bunch of lame ducks quacking. In their waning days, the only objective is to keep the other side hemmed in, hoping beyond hope, that the people won’t notice what they’re up to.

I’m not so easily impressed.

Fred

December 10th, 2010
9:37 am

The Democrats need a “tea party” movement. Those of us who are socially liberal (to an extent) and fiscally conservative really have no one to represent us. That’s why we are independents I think. IMHO the so called “tea party” movement for the Repubs, got even more “conservative” than the Repubs already were on social issues. I didn’t see much difference between them and the (im)Moral Majority……..

USinUK

December 10th, 2010
9:39 am

ty – hey, if we want to get rid of a progressive tax system and install a flat tax for everyone, no exceptions, no deductions, I’d be the first to stand up and applaud.

until we do, I’m tired of seeing the middle class (those making LESS than a quarter of a million dollars) not being able to get ahead … like they have done for the last 30 years.

Joel Edge

December 10th, 2010
9:39 am

USinUK@9:34
True, no third parties. But parties have failed and been replaced before. I see the Dems as the most likely to collapse now. May change. I’m hoping funding will be less a problem in the future.

drinking the koolaid

December 10th, 2010
9:39 am

“GOP voters often more reasonable than radicals they elect” hmmm…I doubt we’ll ever see an entry titled “Democrat voters often more reasonable than the radicals they elect”…oh wait…only GOP voters elect “radicals” right Jay?

jm

December 10th, 2010
9:40 am

The White House, in turn, was incensed when it learned Schumer planned to push forward with votes — ultimately unsuccessful — on alternative Democratic proposals.

“The bottom line is that he had a short-term partisan strategy for point scoring that would have been really costly in the long run and for which people would be properly angry,” said a top administration official. “He’s a smart guy. This wasn’t a smart or practical strategy.”

Read more: http://www.politico.com/news/stories/1210/46223.html#ixzz17ieSJe00

USinUK

December 10th, 2010
9:40 am

“you on the left are the godless radicals they make our moral climate very cloudy”

a cloudy climate?

hate it when that happens.

USinUK

December 10th, 2010
9:41 am

Joel – “But parties have failed and been replaced before”

mmmm … they changed their names, but that’s about it. you’re always going to have a left/right division …

Fred

December 10th, 2010
9:41 am

Oblamer

December 10th, 2010
9:34 am

there is reason we voted you clowns out..
======================================

Actually you and people like you (mindless republican fanatics) didn’t vote ANYONE in or out. you would vote for Lucifer if he had an R next to his name. You people will always vote republican. Your votes are canceled out by the equal number of Democrat fanatics who will ALWAYS vote Democrat.

The independents decide the elections. Get over it.

pete

December 10th, 2010
9:43 am

It’s ironic that many of the Republican politicians against this thing are “chicken hawks,” never served in the military but war mongers and willing to send other people’s kids into war. They need to listen to the professional soldiers on this issue.

Jay

December 10th, 2010
9:43 am

That’s true, RW. But looking at the poll numbers, the votes of Democrats reflected the opinion of all but a handful of Democratic voters on this issue. 81-15 is quite a bit different than 47-48.

Gale

December 10th, 2010
9:44 am

Fred, (quiet cheer from another independent.)

AmVet

December 10th, 2010
9:44 am

ex-pat,as you probably know, implementing a competitive democracy is one of my great clarion calls.

The travesty of the failed duopoly that currently has a stranglehold on the republic must be dismantled.

There ARE vanguards, and they will continue to advocate for this outcome. However, it is likely that they and I are fifty years ahead of our time. But rest assured, that sooner or later enough Americans who care about such matters will mobilize, and we can begin the difficult task of returning the “people’s work” to a people who will once again claim their own sovereignty…

Off to do this “people’s work”!

Keep up the good fight friends, and don’t let the fools get ya down…

Moderate Line

December 10th, 2010
9:44 am

I don’t agree with DADT but it is intereting when someone starts using polls to support their argument when they didn’t put much weight on them when it comes to health care reform or immigration law.

Could I not use polls to show how radical the Democrats are?

The truth of it is the radicals are the most emotionally involved and are more likely to donate time adn money to a party which is the reason both parties are made up of radicals. They are also the least likely to switch from one party to another.

jm

December 10th, 2010
9:45 am

JAY – you may find this climate related article at Politico interesting.

U.S. climate cash pledge in doubt
http://www.politico.com/news/stories/1210/46222.html

USinUK

December 10th, 2010
9:45 am

AmVet – have you ever read Don Quixote?

just sayin’

but, keep fighting the good fight!

Jay

December 10th, 2010
9:45 am

LIike I said earlier, koolaid: Show me the numbers to validate your point. Show me where Democrats have consistently voted in lockstep despite divided opinion among Democratic voters.

Otherwise you’re just playing a childish game.

Fred

December 10th, 2010
9:45 am

pete

I find it ironic that military service was a “non issue” when Bill Clinton was running but now Republicans who the same amount of military service as President Clinton are “chicken hawks.”

But there is NO hypocrisy there is there?

Gale

December 10th, 2010
9:46 am

Of course, the only problem with the independents deciding elections is that too many of us continue to choose between the major party candidates, both of whom are bad choices.

Matti

December 10th, 2010
9:46 am

To the main point, I agree. I know lots of Republicans who are wonderful people for whom the word “whacktoid” does not even begin to apply. Smart, reasonable, good friends and neighbors. Yet, they vote for whacktoid leaders over and over again. Why? The reasonable candidates are fighting the wrong battle. Elections are’t about reason, facts, or common sense. The whacktoids figured that out a long time ago (with a little help from Karl Rove), and have been pounding the crud out of common sense ever since. You can’t reason with people who aren’t listening. You have to SCARE the BeJezuss out of them to even get their attention!

@@

December 10th, 2010
9:47 am

Off to do this “people’s work”!

Whodathunkit? AmVet suffers from multiple personality disorder.

schnirt

RW-(the original)

December 10th, 2010
9:47 am

Jay B,

The poll and the vote don’t deal with the same issue either. Had the poll question been, “Do you think an omnibus defense spending bill should be shoved through the Senate with little or no debate or amendment just so we can slip through a repeal of DADT and this should be done even before we deal with a budget or a looming tax increase” then I’m guessing you would see a different poll result.

Moderate Line

December 10th, 2010
9:47 am

Jay

December 10th, 2010
9:43 am
That’s true, RW. But looking at the poll numbers, the votes of Democrats reflected the opinion of all but a handful of Democratic voters on this issue. 81-15 is quite a bit different than 47-48.
+++++++
What about health care laws and immigration reform? Somehow the Foxnews channel is able to manipulate people to the right wing perspective on those issues but suddenly the masses are enlighted when they agree with you.

jm

December 10th, 2010
9:47 am

Now, Can Washington Tackle the Big Economic Issues?

* We are facing a multi-year adjustment period, a “new normal” that many economists agree includes sustained high unemployment.
* The proposal from the president’s fiscal commission and the tax-cut compromise are promising starting points. But they are not nearly enough.
* Success in Washington should be defined as enacting major structural reforms to improve our economic competitiveness – and our leaders must answer to the American people if they fail.

http://www.pimco.com/Pages/NowcanwashingtontacklethebigeconomicissuesDecember2010.aspx

Del

December 10th, 2010
9:48 am

The only polls that count are the ones taken when voters go into the booth and vote. In this recent mid-term the voters repudiated the policies of Obama and the Democrats. Clearly DADT isn’t at the top of the electorates concerns. The Republicans had no choice but to block DADT not only because of their base also because the military chiefs of 3 of the 4 branches recommended against repeal. The Pentagons methodology in conducting their survey was also flawed in the opinion of some along with the non-acceptance reflected in the “Combat Arms”. DADT is a good policy and should not be repealed.

jm

December 10th, 2010
9:50 am

Many Americans outside Washington prefer divided government. In theory, it forces our political parties to work together on initiatives that have the broadest possible popular support. It demands shared accountability: With one party in control, it is too easy for politicians to shower their constituents with largess and for the party out of power to simply object to everything. Divided government often leads to better governing.

Consider the landmark legislation that has been produced through divided government in the past 30 years: Working with a Democratic House, President Ronald Reagan enacted Social Security, tax and immigration reforms. President Bill Clinton achieved welfare reform with Republicans controlling both chambers of Congress. President George W. Bush got his No Child Left Behind legislation through a Democratic Senate.
http://www.pimco.com/Pages/NowcanwashingtontacklethebigeconomicissuesDecember2010.aspx

Paul

December 10th, 2010
9:50 am

USinUK

“hey, if we want to get rid of a progressive tax system and install a flat tax for everyone, no exceptions, no deductions, I’d be the first to stand up and applaud.”

Two families. One has income of $1,000,000,000 a year (not fantasy, I’ll provide examples of those who earn more). Another family earns $38,000 a year.

Flat tax comes in. 35 percent. First family has $650,000,000 after taxes. Second family has $24,700 left over (that’s about the poverty level for a family of four).

That sound just to you?

(I mean, really, the first family paid almost ALL the taxes! Those scofflaws in the other family paid nearly nothing by comparison). :-)

Del

December 10th, 2010
9:52 am

It’s really disgusting when you see so many Democrats more concerned with vote pandering than they are with fixing the economic woes in this country.

jm

December 10th, 2010
9:52 am

When government taxes an activity, society gets less of that activity. Hence we tax cigarette and alcohol purchases. Those make sense. We also tax income and savings. Don’t we want people to work and save more? Temporary measures such as the one-year payroll tax reduction in the tax cut compromise do not change long-term behavior.

http://www.pimco.com/Pages/NowcanwashingtontacklethebigeconomicissuesDecember2010.aspx

No brainer – the 1 year payroll tax deduction won’t increase hiring….

stands for decibels

December 10th, 2010
9:52 am

I elect people that support the right to life, small government, and will protect the institution of marriage as given to us by God

as these three innocent-sounding issues actually manifest themselves in GOP governance, those are extremely radical positions.

Fred

December 10th, 2010
9:53 am

GALE @9:46:

Spot on. like the recent Governors race here in Georgia for instance…………….

ty webb

December 10th, 2010
9:53 am

“The whacktoids figured that out a long time ago (with a little help from Karl Rove), and have been pounding the crud out of common sense ever since. You can’t reason with people who aren’t listening. You have to SCARE the BeJezuss out of them to even get their attention!”

yeah, but not like telling black that if a republican is elected, it will turn back the clocks to the day that fire hoses were turned on them, or telling seniors that republicans are going to take their SS checks away? karl rove? yeah, right…it’s just his ilk.

USinUK

December 10th, 2010
9:53 am

Paul – 9:50 – you’re so my hero.

Gale

December 10th, 2010
9:53 am

DADT isn’t at the top of the electorate’s concerns and it shouldn’t be. It should be repealed so it can become in reality, the non-issue it is. Gays serve now and always have. The public knows that. The military knows that. It is dumb that in today’s world, some American officers still want to keep the fact a secret.

Matti

December 10th, 2010
9:55 am

It’s really disgusting when you see so many Republicans more concerned with vote pandering than they are with fixing the economic woes in this country.

ty webb

December 10th, 2010
9:56 am

Meant “blacks”. Sorry.

Doggone/GA

December 10th, 2010
9:57 am

Paul – I won’t speak for USinUK, but for ME I’d like to see a serious projection of a progressive flat tax compare to our currect progressive tax system.

Adam

December 10th, 2010
9:57 am

Yep. It makes sense to tackle the problem through taxes AND through spending cuts. The tax code definitely needs to be simplified so there aren’t so many breaks for the top brackets that would reduce the amount of taxes they actually have to less than the percentage paid by lower brackets. I don’t support rolling the cuts back on the lowest brackets just because of how hard a hit that is (a 5% jump as opposed to a 3% jump at the top). Perhaps we could have a more moderate approach? But no one is going to do that in Washington.

One thing I just LOVE about the GOP that has gotten in this time is how much time they spent trying to gather ideas from their constituency so they could do more of what their constituency wants (supposedly) and then BLATANTLY IGNORED the top suggestions, or even polls suggesting they would win points by some of them voting to repeal DADT, among other things. They’re just doing the same old thing.

Left wing management

December 10th, 2010
9:58 am

I’m not talking about the average Republican voter. … Individually, most Republicans are fine people. But there’s a big distinction between the individual Republican voter and the policies of the Republican Party. Something happens to Republican leaders when they get control of the government. … Republicans in Washington have a habit of becoming curiously deaf to the voice of the people. They have a hard time hearing what the ordinary people of the country are saying. But they have no trouble at all hearing what Wall Street is saying.” – Harry Truman, 1948

Harry Callahan

December 10th, 2010
9:59 am

From the NY Times, May 3, 2010…

“The public broadly agrees, across party lines, that the United States could be doing more along its border to keep illegal immigrants out. The view was shared by 78 percent of the respondents. ”

And yet Barack Obama brought the full force and power of the federal government to bear in order to prevent the state of Arizona from defending it’s border and prevent it not only from enforcing AZ law, but FEDERAL law as well.

But in the eyes of Jay Bookman and his lock-step liberal chorus on this blog, it’s only Republicans that act against the will of the people.

jm

December 10th, 2010
9:59 am

USinUK 9:53 – take the love fest to a hotel…. :)

Adam

December 10th, 2010
10:00 am

LWM: They also seem very DISINTERESTED in what the public is saying, and only give lip service to it.

USinUK

December 10th, 2010
10:00 am

jm – 9:59 – can’t help it … it’s PAUL!!! ;-)

jj

December 10th, 2010
10:01 am

I could care less what the people on the hill think or what the polls show. How about we ask ALL military personnel to vote, from Private to 5 Star. Let the people who have to live with the decision make it. If they’re good with why shouldn’t we be?
(as an admission I would fall under the Conservative label)

Adam

December 10th, 2010
10:01 am

prevent it not only from enforcing AZ law, but FEDERAL law as well.

Jeez man what are you smoking? I want some.

Ragnar Danneskjöld

December 10th, 2010
10:02 am

Good morning all. The flaw with the host’s thesis is the assumption that anyone really cares about the DADT issue. Compared to the economy crushed by the burdens of government, the nuclear threats of Iran and North Korea, the continuing humiliation inflicted on Americans by the Department of Homeland Security, and the widespread general incompetence of the US Department of Justice, DADT is small potatoes.

The virtue of DADT is that it conforms with all that is necessary for “unit cohesion.” Each individual is expected to subordinate his own being into the good of the unit. DADT allow homosexuals to do just that. The cry for repeal of DADT is to allow flaming pansies to be flaming pansies within the military, patently inconsistent with subordinating one’s own being into the unit.

Repeal of DADT would not be the end of the world, and I think even within the current structure there are many jobs homosexuals can perform without disrupting “unit cohesion” – supply, intelligence (the unfortunate case of Private Manning notwithstanding.

I think it would be wise to create a “pansy brigade” (pardon the stereotype) to prove itself in battle. Put an army of homosexuals into the middle of Afghanistan, to allow them to prove their ability. Such was the template for the successful integration of blacks into the “white” Army. Segregated black units performed admirably, and did some of the heaviest lifting in WW2. The less successful integration of women is surely at least in part due to lower standards, a template to avoid.

Adam

December 10th, 2010
10:03 am

jj: How about we ask ALL military personnel to vote, from Private to 5 Star.

Military leaders will not go for that considering that the military is not a democracy. This business about polling the soldiers was ridiculous and an act of APPEASEMENT (for McCain and others) on the part of military leaders to help support their position that the policy should end.

Cal

December 10th, 2010
10:05 am

“Is annual income a good gauge of wealth? Who is richer — the architect in Monterey, Calif., who makes $250,000 a year and pays $700,000 for a modest house while picking up the full tab of $40,000 a year for his daughter at a private liberal arts college, or the engineer in Utah making $100,000 a year with a house twice as large at half the cost, with a son on a need-based scholarship at the university? Should annual income alone trump all other considerations when the costs of living vary widely by region, and eligibility for billions of dollars in federal and state subsidies is predicated on income levels?”

http://www.mercurynews.com/opinion/ci_16819380?nclick_check=1

No loopholes. No tax credits. Leave tax rates where they are.

Doggone/GA

December 10th, 2010
10:05 am

“How about we ask ALL military personnel to vote, from Private to 5 Star”

I’m all for that. And while we’re at it, let’s let them vote on when and if we go to war also. After all, they are INTIMATELY involved in THAT decision.

Moderate Line

December 10th, 2010
10:05 am

Jay

December 10th, 2010
9:45 am
LIike I said earlier, koolaid: Show me the numbers to validate your point. Show me where Democrats have consistently voted in lockstep despite divided opinion among Democratic voters.

Otherwise you’re just playing a childish game
+++++++++++
Voting record of members in agreement with party:
House:
Democrats 92.1%
Republicans 88.4%
Senate-
Democrats – 90.1%
Reublicans – 85.3%

http://projects.washingtonpost.com/congress/111/house/party-voters/

http://projects.washingtonpost.com/congress/111/senate/party-voters/

Who is being childish Jay?

Harry Callahan

December 10th, 2010
10:05 am

Jay

December 10th, 2010
9:45 am

“LIike I said earlier, koolaid: Show me the numbers to validate your point. Show me where Democrats have consistently voted in lockstep despite divided opinion among Democratic voters.

Otherwise you’re just playing a childish game.”

OK, Jay, here we go…from a Pew research poll, posted on Politics Daily dot com…

“Nearly six in 10 Americans support Arizona’s new law aimed at cracking down on illegal immigrants, according to a Pew Research Center poll conducted May 6-9.

Eighty-two percent of Republicans support the law as do 64 percent of independents. By contrast, 45 percent of Democrats approve of it.”
.