School’s spy-cam scandal and the technological imperative

Some of you may remember the case of the suburban Philadelphia school district accused of using remote-activated laptop cameras to spy on its students in the privacy of their own homes. District officials at first claimed that the technology had only been used rarely, and only for legitimate purposes such as tracking stolen laptops.

Well, not exactly.

As the Philadelphia Inquirer reports:

“The president of the Lower Merion school board said Friday that investigators had retrieved “a substantial number” of photos secretly snapped by laptops the district gave its high school students, and that officials were arranging for parents whose children were photographed to see the pictures in private.

In his strongest terms since the furor began over the laptop-tracking program two months ago, board president David Ebby also said district officials “deeply regret the mistakes and misguided actions” that have given rise to a lawsuit, a federal criminal inquiry, a call for new privacy legislation, and a wave of national publicity.

But Ebby said Lower Merion’s continuing internal investigation had found no evidence that its employees used the technology for “inappropriate” purposes.”

“We are committed to disclosing fully what happened, correcting our mistakes, and making sure that they do not happen again,” he said in a statement addressed to parents and guardians and posted on the district’s Web site.

Ebby’s comments came less than a day after a lawyer for Harriton High sophomore Blake Robbins filed a motion in federal court asserting that the district’s system for tracking lost or stolen laptops had secretly captured “thousands” of images, including photos of students in their homes, the Web sites they visited, and excerpts of their online chats.”

The attorney for one family claims that in a two-week period last fall, a laptop webcam was activated more than 400 times by the school district.

There’s a theory in science called “the technological imperative.” In essence, it holds that for individuals as well as for societies, if something can be done, it eventually will be done, because the power granted us by technology is too seductive to be resisted.

That certainly seems to have been the case in this instance. Software embedded in school-supplied laptops for legitimate purposes offered a temptation to be abused, and apparently it was, although the degree and motive of that abuse is still to be determined.

It’s a cautionary tale for those who would trust government and business to “do the right thing” with the technological power and information they are given. Without independent oversight and strict rules and enforcement, the power to do good things will eventually be used to do bad things as well. Because no matter how sophisticated and powerful our technology, the people using it remain only human, with all the frailties that implies.

110 comments Add your comment

stands for decibels

April 19th, 2010
8:58 am

Atrios had a decent Deep Thought about this last week:

“Can’t wait to find out how many people working for the school district knew about this and thought it was ok.”

stands for decibels

April 19th, 2010
9:00 am

Without independent oversight and strict rules and enforcement, the power to do good things will eventually be used to do bad things as well.

Jay, you’re so wrong. We need to take chainsaws and hedge clippers to them nasty regulations so we can have more Freedom and Liberty.

Night Train

April 19th, 2010
9:01 am

That’s why you don’t purchase a system with a built in camera. If your system has one built in, a little duct tape or electrical tape can solve the problem of people watching you. Hearing what is going on and monitoring what you type is another problem. Know what software is installed on any of the systems that you use.
If you need a camera connected to your computer, purchase a USB camera and disconnect it when you do not want people to view what you are doing.The people involved should be fired and sued.

stands for decibels

April 19th, 2010
9:01 am

Southern Comfort

April 19th, 2010
9:03 am

It’s a cautionary tale for those who would trust government and business to “do the right thing” with the technological power and information they are given.

Thought I’d help you a little Jay. Some people might have missed that one this morning. Self-regulation would work in Utopia, but this is the United States. Big difference…

Southern Comfort

April 19th, 2010
9:05 am

dB

Chainsaws and stuff only works when they’re being used by some hideous creature bent on snuffing promiscuous teens. Or at least that’s what I’ve learned from movies.

stands for decibels

April 19th, 2010
9:07 am

some hideous creature bent on snuffing promiscuous teens.

But, enough about Focus on the Family.

.

.

(be back later.)

FreedomFryers

April 19th, 2010
9:11 am

As long as the Republicans keep up the good fight to keep this technology from being regulated (as well as continuing their tireless efforts to eliminate all other government regulations), we’ll be OK. Don’t worry. Unregulated free markets, unburdened by the fear of massive lawsuits (via another Republican effort that they like to call “tort reform”) will one day be our savior. :roll:

Paul

April 19th, 2010
9:15 am

[[It’s a cautionary tale for those who would trust government and business to “do the right thing” with the technological power and information they are given.]]

Good follow-on to previous thread (when I heard the suit on the radio, I cheered. I hope criminal charges follow, compensation of managers turned over to investors and long prison terms.)

Public institutions: this. Business: the prior thread. Government: Pres Obama and expansion of wiretapping.

It there’s no law preventing something, people will do it. If the law’s vague, people will do it. If the law prevents it and penalties are light, people will do it.

Question to candidates and supporters who want to eliminate regulations (including laws): Do you trust people to do the right thing when larges sums are involved? If not, how do you protect others from them?

Note to rest of schoolboards: ask your IT dept if you have a similar capability. If so, kill it. Tell parents and officials. Don’t coverup.

Normal

April 19th, 2010
9:15 am

stands for decibels

April 19th, 2010
9:07 am

:lol:

Southern Comfort

April 19th, 2010
9:19 am

Paul

Being a longtime NASCAR fan, I know that if there’s no clear cut rule/law that doesn’t allow something, people will skirt it as best/much as they can. It’s human nature. Regardless to the way some try to equate “regulation” with “boogeyman”, we need regulations, or we’ll all end up glowing green with strange crap oozing out of us.

Paul

April 19th, 2010
9:19 am

FreedomFryers

Some Reps say the current Dem proposals for financial reform are ineffective because they aren’t tough enough. A $50 bil fund is too low. It’ll be made law, nothing will change and in the next crisis taxpayers will be on the hook for hundreds of billions. So the fund should be many times larger.

Do you think the Dem proposal is the best they can do?

Paul

April 19th, 2010
9:20 am

by ‘nothing will change” I meant once the law’s passed, the provisions won’t be modified to increase the fund.

Outhouse GoKart

April 19th, 2010
9:20 am

This institutional program of spying on our children was no doubt set in place by the Obama “Tech-Czar.”

Outhouse GoKart

April 19th, 2010
9:20 am

And, oh btw…its for your own good.

Paul

April 19th, 2010
9:21 am

SoCom

When the ‘which to remove’ gets specific people get tongue-tied.

NASCAR opening at Texas Motor Speedway. Lots of rain. Spectators’ cars stuck in the mud.

TV’s a good way to go -

HDB

April 19th, 2010
9:21 am

Good morning, SoCo – you’re on point, as usual!!

FreedomFryers

April 19th, 2010
9:11 am
As long as the Republicans keep up the good fight to keep this technology from being regulated (as well as continuing their tireless efforts to eliminate all other government regulations), we’ll be OK. Don’t worry. Unregulated free markets, unburdened by the fear of massive lawsuits (via another Republican effort that they like to call “tort reform”) will one day be our savior.

Don’t forget, it was unbridled, laissez-faire economics that got us in the near-collapse of the financial system. Regulated effectively, the American economic system beats every system available!!

Question: if a wrong has been effectively determined and adjudicated, why would you take the power from the JURY to determine compensation?? Isn’t that the purpose?? Tort reform is just another way of saying that a wrong can not be correected by law……

FreedomFryers

April 19th, 2010
9:24 am

Details of these expenses can be found in lobbyists’ reports filed online with the State Ethics Commission. But that spending might become a secret under a bill crafted by House Speaker David Ralston’s staff that is expected to come to a vote this week.

Was Ralston brought in to clean up after Richardson and make sure that concepts such as openness and transparency do not cause any future embarassing moments for the Republicans? It would certainly appear so.

Southern Comfort

April 19th, 2010
9:24 am

Paul

I was in your neck of the woods yesterday. Had a connect flight thru DFW. I’ve never seen a airport that big that has a terminal shut down by 8pm. That’s weird.

AmVet

April 19th, 2010
9:24 am

SoCo, your post above reminded me of this from the Simpsons:

“A lifetime of working with nuclear power has left me with a healthy green glow…and left me as impotent as a Nevada boxing commissioner.” ~Mr. Burns

FreedomFryers

April 19th, 2010
9:27 am

HDB,

Perhaps you miss the point of my closing my earlier comment that you cite with :roll: ?

Soothsayer

April 19th, 2010
9:27 am

GE: 7,000 tax returns, $0 U.S. tax bill

GE had plenty of earnings last year — just not in the United States. For tax purposes, the company’s U.S. operations lost $408 million, while its international businesses netted a $10.8 billion profit.

Thanks to its deductions and adjustments, GE reported an actual U.S. federal income tax rate of negative 10.5%. It got to add a “tax benefit” of $1.1 billion back into its reported earnings.

See, here’s how it works: you strip out all of the profits by using shell corporations in tax havens like the Cayman Islands so that you end up showing a loss in the U.S. Now in addition to not paying any U.S. taxes, G.E. can expect a nice $1.1 billion check from Uncle Sam. If this doesn’t make you mad something is wrong with you!

USinUK

April 19th, 2010
9:27 am

“There’s a theory in science called “the technological imperative.” In essence, it holds that for individuals as well as for societies, if something can be done, it eventually will be done, because the power granted us by technology is too seductive to be resisted. ”

just to play Devil’s Advocate for a moment …

… don’t you think this is what the whole “Don’t Chip Me, Bro” bill was all about???

just sayin’.

FreedomFryers

April 19th, 2010
9:29 am

Do you think the Dem proposal is the best they can do?

Do we not do anything until we have achieved perfection?

Southern Comfort

April 19th, 2010
9:29 am

“Don’t Chip Me, Bro” :lol:

ty webb

April 19th, 2010
9:29 am

“It’s a cautionary tale for those who would trust government and business to “do the right thing” with the technological power and information they are given. Without independent oversight and strict rules and enforcement, the power to do good things will eventually be used to do bad things as well.”

Well said Jay. Although me thinks each “side” will portray only one of these two sectors(gov’t, business) as the bad guy…oh wait…too late…nevermind. rah rah!

mike

April 19th, 2010
9:31 am

Good article. Well said.

Bosch

April 19th, 2010
9:34 am

SoCo,

You beat me to it. “Don’t Chip Me Bro” – that’ll last all day.

HDB

April 19th, 2010
9:35 am

Lower Merion is one of the more affluent school districts in Pennsylvania; wonder if the ACLU would’ve gotten involved if this had happened in an inner city school??

Just askin’……

FreedomFryers – I got your point…….levity doesn’t translate too well here!! My bad!!

Paul

April 19th, 2010
9:36 am

Soothsayer 9:27

And there are plenty of pictures of the GE chairman sitting right next to Pres Obama as one of his economic advisors.

Profits and payoffs are not party-specific.

SoCom

DFW has a terminal link that can do the circuit of all six terminals in about 8 minutes. But yeah, getting off a flight onto a nearly-deserted terminal at 9pm is eerie.

Paul

April 19th, 2010
9:39 am

We oughta chip the guys getting released from Gitmo.

How do you say “Don’t chip me, bro” in Yemeni?

Outhouse GoKart

April 19th, 2010
9:40 am

Soothsayer

April 19th, 2010
9:27 am

Tax laws are the tax laws. Contact your Congress rep.

Bosch

April 19th, 2010
9:42 am

“How do you say “Don’t chip me, bro” in Yemeni?”

Ask SoCo – he has that fancy fed computer that knows everything.

Bosch

April 19th, 2010
9:42 am

USinUK,

Are you, like, seriously, covered in ash?

Paul

April 19th, 2010
9:43 am

The gov’t should put the school spy software on the Goldman Sachs network. Direct link to SEC.

Yeah, that’ll work -

Bosch

April 19th, 2010
9:43 am

And by fancy fed, I mean fancy “federal” instead of fancy fed — like food.

God, I need some more caffeine, and possibly go back to bed and start again.

USinUK

April 19th, 2010
9:44 am

Bosch – 9:34 – my job here is done. :-)

and, while Kam is out … I’d just like to gloat a bit …

http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/premier-league/bale-makes-hay-as-hot-spurs-stun-blues-1947781.html

USinUK

April 19th, 2010
9:48 am

Bosch – 9:42 – as I said earlier this morning, “Actually, the ironic thing with this whole mess is that our weather has been GORGEOUS for the last week … I’m talking blue skies, sun, bees buzzing, flowers blooming, temps in the upper 50s/lower 60s, put-on-the-sunscreen beautiful!”

today, the sky is a bit overcast, but it looks like hazy clouds, not ash

Paul

April 19th, 2010
9:48 am

Bosch

Could SoCom be Blog God? Or is it their TSA system? Like HAL?

Notice no one’s taken up USinUK on her little Devil’s Advocate question? :-)

Bosch

April 19th, 2010
9:48 am

USinUK,

I watched that game, it was pretty brutal.

Bosch

April 19th, 2010
9:49 am

USinUK,

It’s Blog God getting back at you for all the “wingnuts are crazy cause of the pollen” thing. :-)

USinUK

April 19th, 2010
9:50 am

Bosch – 9:48 – YEAH!!! :-D

oh, sorry, I mean, (ahem) yes, you’re right … Chelsea played well

Bosch

April 19th, 2010
9:51 am

Paul,

For some crazy reason, I don’t think illegal micro-chipping is an epidemic in this country, but yeah, of course, USinUK, made a good point. But I still think it was a “HEY LOOK SQUIRREL” kind of thing. But, of course, I could always be surprised. Now…….more coffee..

USinUK

April 19th, 2010
9:53 am

Bosch – 9:49 – :lol: I thought it was the Blog God saying “pollen, schmollen … I’ll give ya something to sneeze at!”

seriously, though, my house isn’t any dustier than usual – all the ash seems to be blowing around up in the atmosphere, not falling on us. that’s why this situation has felt so weird – I think people would be a lot more patient about travel if this looked like the Australian sand storm from a few months back

http://blog.waim.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/sydney-dust-storm.jpg

instead, it looks like a gorgeous, sunny spring day outside …

Paul

April 19th, 2010
9:53 am

Bosch

I like her kind of question. I visualize people going “ERP!!!?!”

USinUK

April 19th, 2010
9:57 am

Bosch – “I don’t think illegal micro-chipping is an epidemic in this country, but yeah, of course, USinUK, made a good point. But I still think it was a “HEY LOOK SQUIRREL” kind of thing”

actually, this wasn’t a SQUIRREL! question … my 9:27 was a legitimate question for Jay – while I agree with you that the gummint isn’t running around chipping people against their will, I would like to know how Jay reconciles his quote about the technological imperative with his stance on the chip legislation.

jewcowboy

April 19th, 2010
9:59 am

As when this story came out before, I still fail to understand what is the purpose of taking photos of students using the laptops. All the administrator would be able to see is the student in front of the camera, and perhaps a little of the background.

What purpose does that have? Administrators cannot tell if someone is doing something illicit by the persons face or surroundings. Technology is available to remotely log onto another laptop and view what the other user is looking at, rather than looking at the user looking at their screen.

I can think of no legitimate reason a school administrator would need to view a student sitting behind the screen.

Paul

April 19th, 2010
10:01 am

USinUK

Offhand, I’d guess it was another “SQUIRREL” effort by the Georgia politicians. Of all the issues pressing in, they chose to spend their time on a largely theoretical issue. One of many examples of such behavior.

Their state’s imploding, for pete’s sake and that’s what they pick as a pressing issue?

USinUK

April 19th, 2010
10:02 am

totally off-topic …

how I’d like to spend my retirement:

http://wpcomics.washingtonpost.com/client/wpc/nq/

Paul

April 19th, 2010
10:02 am

jewcowboy

District’s explanation was that if the laptop went missing, the software could be activated to give authorities a clue to its location.

Weeeeeeak.

Night Train

April 19th, 2010
10:06 am

jewcowboy, Administrators could tell quite a bit by monitoring their students laptop cameras while the computers are in the kids home. They could catch the student or the parents doing drugs, underage sex (like that’s a crime if both are under age!) the parents beating the snot out of the kid or spouse or any number of other things.

Technology allows for both viewing what the camera sees and to see what is on the monitor.

Paul

April 19th, 2010
10:07 am

Diane Rehm show NPR online just started discussing the Goldman case.

jewcowboy

April 19th, 2010
10:08 am

Paul,

“District’s explanation was that if the laptop went missing, the software could be activated to give authorities a clue to its location.

Weeeeeeak.”

Especially since new laptops are GPS enabled. A GPS position might be a tad bit more reliable than trying to figure out where the laptop is based on a picture.

And really weak when there are products like this out there:

http://www.absolute.com/products/lojackforlaptops/technology

USinUK

April 19th, 2010
10:09 am

Paul – “Their state’s imploding, for pete’s sake and that’s what they pick as a pressing issue?”

meh. there are 180 representatives in the state house and 54 senators in the state senate … do you honestly think that many cats can be herded by 1 single issue? no.

jewcowboy

April 19th, 2010
10:12 am

Night Train.

“hey could catch the student or the parents doing drugs, underage sex (like that’s a crime if both are under age!) the parents beating the snot out of the kid or spouse or any number of other things.”

It is extremely unlikely unless they were monitoring the computers 24/7, which would require tremendous staff and resources. And also completely illegal and outside the purview of a school system.

Doggone/GA

April 19th, 2010
10:15 am

USinUK – re: “Don’t Chip me Bro”

Microchipping can’t be done without your knowledge. If you’re under anesthesia at the time, you’ll still see the wound where it was inserted. Those damn needles are BIG. Plus, the only way you could be scanned without your knowledge is if you’re, again, under anesthesia.

The chips are inert. They can’t be read from a distance. All they have on them is a number. The number has to be tied to a record, it’s not “in” your body.

And if you’re worried, you can be scanned…any Veterinarian can do it if your Doctor can’t. And if one is found, it can be removed.

USinUK

April 19th, 2010
10:19 am

Doggone – 10:15 – again, if you refer to my 9:27, my point isn’t that government is chipping people willy-nilly without their knowledge or even that you COULD be chipped without your knowledge …

… my point was that, if Jay is right about his statement about the technological imperative, how does he reconcile that with this stance on Chip’s chip legislation.

USinUK

April 19th, 2010
10:20 am

Doggone – as for the chips being inert, I think they should be great big ear-tags just like on Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom!

;-)

Doggone/GA

April 19th, 2010
10:22 am

“how does he reconcile that with this stance on Chip’s chip legislation.”

I think it comes down to whether the legislation/regulation is needed. In a manner of speaking, we already have laws against insertion of something like a micro-chip, because we are protected in our persons by the limitations on the government in the Constitution. And even if one was inserted without our knowledge, there’s still the issue of an “illegal search” by scanning for it.

jewcowboy

April 19th, 2010
10:24 am

USinUK,

“I think they should be great big ear-tags just like on Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom!”

They tagged Marlin Perkins?

Doggone/GA

April 19th, 2010
10:26 am

“They tagged Marlin Perkins?”

I was wondering that same thing!

USinUK

April 19th, 2010
10:28 am

“They tagged Marlin Perkins?”

they had to. he looked too much like Walt Disney.

http://northhigh73.com/Really%20Old/Televison/Marlin%20Perkins.jpg

tscali

April 19th, 2010
10:28 am

how many kids reported their laptops stolen?

sorry, teach, the dog ate my laptop. the kids signed the policy agreement; the parents were unaware. too many parents are unaware these days putting their kids at risk.

laptops in public schools is a big waste of taxpayers money anyway.

Bosch

April 19th, 2010
10:29 am

Paul,

Yeah, I like ERP!!!

USinUK,

Best comic ever. :-)

~~~~~~~~~~~~

As to the topic, I have to say, that if I remember back in my days in HS and college, mind you these were way before the days of the Internet, and cameras in computers, heck computers, ok, but if I thought somebody was spying on me illegally – I’d given them an eye full.

Bosch

April 19th, 2010
10:31 am

“laptops in public schools is a big waste of taxpayers money anyway.”

Yeah, tscali, I have to agree. It reminds me of the South Park episode where the computer teacher is teaching something really simple, like word processing, and all the kids are on-line playing some kind of war game.

Southern Comfort

April 19th, 2010
10:32 am

Back for a min…

Paul/Bosch

Arabic: لا الرقائق bro مني!

Hindi: मुझे इसकी जरूरत नहीं खंड सीमासडक संगठन है!

and

Persian: نمیدانم تراشه زوئيه IAVr من!
(doesn’t specify if Persian is Farsi or not)

And, no, I’m not the Blog God, nor do I have control over it.

jewcowboy

April 19th, 2010
10:33 am

USinUK

April 19th, 2010
10:40 am

jewcowboy – gosh … that’s more lifelike than he was!

tscali

April 19th, 2010
10:40 am

sometimes spying pays off.

Paedophiles [sic] are now raping children on live webcams

“But the police soon discovered Stevenson had made a small technical error that enabled them to unlock his computers. When they delved into his computers a horrific drama unfolded.

Stevenson had hired a hitman to murder his two sons and torture his wife to death. And as his wife died, the last thing he wanted her to see were the pictures of him abusing their daughter.

Once his family was out of the way Stevenson would have free and unfettered access to Jessica. It was clear that the only thing he cared about in this world was the freedom to abuse his daughter and to share his photographs and fantasies with paedophiles [sic] all over the world.”

Gale

April 19th, 2010
10:43 am

tscali @10:40 More than I ever wnted to know.

I was thinking about schools giving kids laptops and remembered my niece in Ohio telling me they didn’t let the kids take books home because they would steal them. Who steals school books?

Jay

April 19th, 2010
10:48 am

USinUK, I’d make a couple of points in that regard:

1.) Under current law, implantation of microchips against your will would constitute assault and battery, kidnapping and probably several other serious felonies that would get the perpetrator locked up for a very long time. On the other hand, the microchip bill makes forced implantation a mere misdemeanor. So I think it’s fair to conclude that it’s a less-than-serious effort to address a less-than-serious problem.

2.) Preventive legislation ought to be limited to threats that are at least plausible. It was all too plausible that spyware allowing remote activation of laptop cameras would be abused. In contrast, forced implantation of microchips in human subjects is not to my mind in any way a plausible threat. To the contrary, it reeks of paranoia.

USinUK

April 19th, 2010
10:49 am

thanks, Jay – I was just curious :-)

Normal

April 19th, 2010
10:52 am

Uncle Earnie must be lovin’ this technology…

jewcowboy

April 19th, 2010
10:53 am

New generation…same old Republicans:

“Duke College Republicans chairman claims he was ousted over sexual orientation”

http://www.dailytarheel.com/content/leader-duke-college-republicans-forced-out

Outhouse GoKart

April 19th, 2010
10:54 am

Steal school books? Well when I was in school we would steal other students school books and toss them out the bus window on the way home…LOL!!!

Outhouse GoKart

April 19th, 2010
10:54 am

“Fiddle about, fiddle about…”

jefferson

April 19th, 2010
11:02 am

Smile for the camera…

tscali

April 19th, 2010
11:07 am

gale, kids in most cases are smarter than their parents. entertainment media serves as their role models these days, not parents. sexting tweens/teens is an epidemic. the age of innocence has been hijacked. parents have allowed it to happen.

“Webcams can be purchased for as little as $20.00, and most tweens and teens who have a computer also want a webcam in order to project live images of themselves on teen chat sites, social networking sites like MySpace, Xanga and Stickam, as well as uploaded videos of themselves on YouTube. According to law enforcement, webcams are the single most dangerous peripheral device to be attached to a computer that is used by children or teens. Why are webcams so dangerous?

If you are like most parents, you would never allow a male to be in your teenage daughter’s bedroom without supervision, but it’s happening on a daily basis while young children and teens are on the internet and using webcams, right under the noses of unsuspecting parents. What’s even worse is that many teens have computers connected to the internet in their bedrooms, and many parents still don’t understand how harmful and dangerous this is. Who is watching your child on webcam?

Webcams pose a serious risk to children because it allows an open window into the activities and lives (and bedrooms) of children and teens, and sexual predators are using this technology to their own perverted advantage to target and sexually abuse innocent children. There is also a very dangerous webcam-specific virus or worm called W32/Rbot-GR, where a child molester can recognize that a child or teen has a webcam attached to the computer and is able to remotely activate the young person’s webcam without their knowledge or approval.

If you think your own children are not at risk of becoming a victim of sexual abuse with or without a webcam, meet Justin Berry. Justin Berry was a young 13 year-old boy who, through his webcam, became part of the sordid online world of pornography, having been targeted by online predators and sexually abused over a period of years.

After being rescued by NY Times Reporter Kurt Eichenwald, Justin has become a child safety advocate, speaking out about the prevalence of sexual abuse of children online through his website InternetSafety.tv and warns parents not to allow their children and teens to have webcams.”

too many parents will argue that kids will be kids. problem is new technology has moved the boundary lines.

http://www.tellinitlikeitis.net/2008/07/the-dangers-of-webcams.html

just tellinitlikeitis. have a good day.

jewcowboy

April 19th, 2010
11:07 am

Take that Mike Huckabee:

“LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — A state judge on Friday struck down an Arkansas law approved by voters that banned gay couples and other unmarried people living together from serving as adoptive or foster parents.”

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/04/16/AR2010041603954.html

Bosch

April 19th, 2010
11:09 am

Another thought on this “technological imperative” – sometimes it can totally change and industry quicker than the industry can adapt – point in mind – when you could start to download music off the Internet – I remember thinking, the music industry needs to quit freaking out and wasting money on lawsuits, and get with the program and figure out how to keep up.

Bosch

April 19th, 2010
11:09 am

jewcowboy,

But, the lifestyle and all – think of the children!! :-)

Paul

April 19th, 2010
11:11 am

Back on the reform issue:

even if this guy’s analysis in on point, the Republican response of “NO” is still inappropriate. “It’s not strong enough and here’s what we propose” is appropriate.

But that, from this current crop of R leaders, is a fantasy.

“the fees for the Dodd bill’s resolution fund that would pay off a failing firm’s creditors would come not just from banks but from a broad array of Main Street businesses. Stable life, auto and home insurance companies would have to pay into this fund to subsidize the failure of the next high-roller, and the fees they pay would likely be passed on in the premiums their policy holders”

http://www.openmarket.org/2010/04/16/obama-dodd-financial-bill-would-futher-enrich-goldman-sachs/

there’s always the Nader solution, to directly tax the high-risk securities traders to fund the bailout fund….

Doggone/GA

April 19th, 2010
11:13 am

“I remember thinking, the music industry needs to quit freaking out and wasting money on lawsuits, and get with the program and figure out how to keep up.”

And you would have thought the “video recorder revolution” would have alrady taught them that.

jewcowboy

April 19th, 2010
11:13 am

Bosch,

“think of the children!!”

Certainly the people of Arkansas are not.. :)

Speaking of Huckabee, I wonder if he has the balls to accept this invitation:

http://natespop.wordpress.com/2010/04/14/huckabee-invite/

Paul

April 19th, 2010
11:13 am

“No, Bobby/Susie, you may NOT have a computer in your bedroom. You may use the computer that’s in the family room with the monitor facing where all can see it.”

Duh.

Parents…..

Dave R.

April 19th, 2010
11:21 am

I see a big freakin’ lawsuit with lots of people getting taxpayer cash and lots of elected and appointed officials getting canned.

Paul

April 19th, 2010
11:22 am

Dave R.

First part: yup.

Second part: nope.

Dave R.

April 19th, 2010
11:25 am

Paul, I figure when the lawsuits are settled or adjudicated, the people in charge will not be re-elected that put that policy in place.

Doggone/GA

April 19th, 2010
11:25 am

“Second part: nope”

I agree. I think the most they’ll get is a slap on the wrist and a “go and sin no more”

Bosch

April 19th, 2010
11:27 am

“You may use the computer that’s in the family room with the monitor facing where all can see it.””

Paul, well, that’s stupid, then the parents will be exposed to all the porn they download!

Duh!

jt

April 19th, 2010
11:27 am

“It’s a cautionary tale for those who would trust government and business to “do the right thing” with the technological power and information they are given.”

Ha Ha. Another great moment in small government Republican history.

“The EPA was proposed by President Richard Nixon and began operation on December 2, 1970, when its establishment was passed by Congress, and signed into law by President Nixon, and has since been chiefly responsible for the environmental policy of the United States.”

I’m beginning to wonder about the gullibility level of republicans versus democrats.

Hillbilly Deluxe

April 19th, 2010
11:28 am

It’s a cautionary tale for those who would trust government and business to “do the right thing” with the technological power and information they are given.

You can never trust humans to “do the right thing”. A lot will do the right thing, but a lot won’t. It’s the nature of things.

I Report :-) You Whine :-( Impeach Drunken Fool obozo! Just sayin...

April 19th, 2010
11:29 am

Is it any wonder that the same liberals that want to control the temperature in your home, tell you what car to drive, what doctor to see, what illness renders you a burden on society, what you eat, how you dress, how much money you should make, whether you are allowed to engage in free enterprise and if so, which free enterprises and what you can and cannot do, how much taxes is patriotic, etc, etc, etc, etc, etc, God Almighty, etc, feel the need to clarify their positions for spying on little children at home?

Oh come on, you perverts, we know enjoyed it.

Creep~Os.

Paul

April 19th, 2010
11:30 am

Dave R.

Gotcha.

But as far as firing the bureaucrats…..

Paul

April 19th, 2010
11:32 am

Bosch

And then the parents can help their refine their porn searches, get to the best sites and…. (free market capitalism at its finest)…. teach them how to charge the people on the other end the most $$ possible without losing customers!

USinUK

April 19th, 2010
11:32 am

“Oh come on, you perverts, we know enjoyed it.” (sic)

the corollary to “he who smelt it dealt it” … the folks who make these kinds of accusations are usually the ones guilty of it …

Paul

April 19th, 2010
11:32 am

Bosch

Kids. Parents scan help their ‘kids.’

Bosch

April 19th, 2010
11:34 am

USinUK @ 11:32

Don’t feed the trolls. Please.

Bosch

April 19th, 2010
11:35 am

AmVet

April 19th, 2010
11:37 am

jc at 11:13,

Ain’t no way Hucksterbee would take up the invite.

This darling of the far right wing and the American Talibaptists at Bookman’s must believe that “those people” are all depraved and abnormal. And bound for an eternity of suffering and pain.

But if they send a “love offering” to his church, well, maybe that will assuage their angry god…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MeSSwKffj9o