If you talk Confederate history, you must also speak of slavery

Next year marks the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, a brutal struggle that pitted American against American and sometimes brother against brother. And while major military conflict ceased with the surrender of Robert E. Lee at Appomattox Courthouse in 1865, the underlying conflict has continued to simmer from Reconstruction and Jim Crow through the civil rights struggles of the 1960s.

Astonishingly, it continues still.

The most recent skirmish has broken out in Virginia, where Gov. Robert McDonnell issued a proclamation decreeing April as Confederate History Month. According to the proclamation, it is important for the people of Virginia “to understand the sacrifices of the Confederate leaders, soldiers and citizens during the period of the Civil War,” which the decree refers to as “a four-year war between the states for independence.”

As many have pointed out, the proclamation makes no mention whatsoever of slavery, no mention of its central role in causing the war, no mention of the fact that the Civil War ended with the liberation of millions of African Americans from generations of bondage. McDonnell’s preferred version of history is, plain and simple, white man’s history.

According to the governor, he did not include mention slavery because “there were any number of aspects to that conflict between the states. Obviously, it involved slavery. It involved other issues. But I focused on the ones I thought were most significant for Virginia.”

Governor, slavery and its abolition were significant for Virginia.

Last year, the Georgia Legislature also passed a resolution proclaiming April as Confederate Heritage and History Month “to honor, observe, and celebrate the Confederate States of America, its history, those who served in its armed forces and government, and all those millions of its citizens of various races and ethnic groups and religions who contributed in sundry and myriad ways to the cause which they held so dear.”

That resolution, like McDonnell’s, made no mention of slavery. But in an interesting twist, black and Democratic legislators did extract a price for allowing its passage. They insisted it be amended so that Section 1 of that resolution made the Ralph Mark Gilbert Civil Rights Museum in Savannah an official state historical civil rights museum; the establishement of Confederate History Month was relegated to Section 2.

(When the Sons of Confederate Veterans proudly announced passage of the ‘09 proclamation on its website, it linked not to the version that actually became law, but to an earlier, unpassed version that made no mention of the civil rights museum. Apparently they thought that language tainted the purity of the original.)

Gov. Sonny Perdue has also issued gubernatorial proclamations commemorating April as Confederate History Month. In his 2010 version, for example, Perdue proclaimed it “important that Georgians reflect upon our state’s past and honor and respect the devotion of her Confederate leaders, soldiers and citizens.” In a nod to diversity, the decree specifically honored the contributions of two Confederate leaders of Cherokee background.

Perdue’s 2009 proclamation took a similar tack, focusing on the contributions of Southern Jews to the Confederacy. But neither version mentioned even the existence of black Georgians, let alone their historic liberation at the war’s end.

It is reasonable to argue that this is much ado about very little, that we should let the past remain the past. That was certainly the approach taken by the Georgia Legislature in recent years when it balked at requests that it apologize for Georgia’s role in maintaining slavery. I can understand and to some degree even support the Legislature’s sentiment. An apology issued 150 years after the fact costs nothing and means nothing. It is cheap theatrics.

However, it is harder to argue that the events of 150 years ago don’t matter much regarding slavery, then turn around and proclaim that they matter so much that a whole month should be set aside to commemorate the Confederacy. If one is important, they both are. In addition, if it doesn’t really mean much that slavery is left out of the narrative, why does that same odd truncation of history keep occurring year after year, in state after state? It’s not by accident, but by willful choice.

That conscious amputation of history is clearly reflected in the original language of Senate Bill 27, the 2009 resolution that proclaimed April as Confederate History and Heritage Month. As that bill recounted history, “the Confederate States of America was created in 1861 as a result of decades of growing cultural, economic, social, and political differences between the southern states and other sections of the United States, particularly New England, and which, as a result of the election of 1860, precipitated the secession of 13 southern states from the union.”

Again there is that word missing, that word whose absence glares as if it were lit in neon. The central and fundamental role of slavery in provoking the war, and the war’s legacy of liberating millions from abject servitude, simply vanishes.

Interestingly, the original Senate resolution also goes on to cite three particular Georgians for their contributions to the Confederacy: Robert Toombs, Benjamin Harvey Hill, and Alexander H. Stephens, who served as vice president of the Confederacy.

Unlike those who now try to whitewash their cause, those three men had no doubt whatsoever about what provoked the Civil War and what formed the central organizing principle of the Confederate States of America: It was slavery.

“The new (Confederate) constitution has put at rest, forever, all the agitating questions relating to our peculiar institution — African slavery as it exists amongst us — the proper status of the Negro in our form of civilization,” Stephens said in a famous speech in Savannah in 1861. “This was the immediate cause of the late rupture and present revolution.”

Thomas Jefferson and most of the other Founding Fathers felt “that the enslavement of the African was in violation of the laws of nature; that it was wrong in principle, socially, morally, and politically….,” Stephens said. “”Our new government is founded upon exactly the opposite idea. Its foundations are laid, its cornerstone rests, upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery subordination to the superior race is his natural and normal condition. This, our new government, is the first, in the history of the world, based upon this great physical, philosophical, and moral truth.”

Toombs, in a speech to the Georgia Legislature shortly after the election of Abraham Lincoln, accused Lincoln and the Republicans of having declared “war against slavery until there shall not be a slave in America, and until the African is elevated to a social and political equality with the white man.” For that reason, he urged his fellow Georgians to secede, telling them “it is your right to do so – your duty to do so.”

In a speech in Macon on June 30, 1860, Hill also acknowledged and even celebrated the centrality of slavery in the dispute between North and South.

“If the Union and the peace of slavery cannot exist together then the Union must go, for slavery can never go,” he told the crowd. “The necessities of man and the laws of Heaven will never let it go and it must have peace. And it has been tantalized and meddled with as long as our self respect can permit.”

It is not necessary to condemn such men as evil, because they dealt with the world as they were born into it and knew it. Few of us can honestly claim that we would do better if placed into identical circumstances. However, it is absolutely necessary to honor their own explanations for why they did what they did, and to acknowledge that the cause for which they fought was evil. Had they succeeded, the United States of America would not exist, and the forced servitude of millions of black Americans would have continued for generations.

To pretend otherwise is to distort history for political purposes that are themselves suspect.

603 comments Add your comment

stands for decibels

April 7th, 2010
3:30 pm

Jackie

April 7th, 2010
3:39 pm

Too many facts will confuse those who believe “the noble cause” had nothing to do with slavery.

Byron Mathison Kerr

April 7th, 2010
3:40 pm

Why not celebrate Southern Culture instead? It would focus more on the pleasant aspect of our regional cultural uniqueness that is shared by people of all races.

Sunny Perdoo

April 7th, 2010
3:43 pm

I’m gonna take everbody Fishin!!!!!!!!!!!
We’re also gonna fix that flag too.

TaxPayer

April 7th, 2010
3:47 pm

Jay,

Surely you do not expect the Republican party to do anything to upset its most loyal constituency. Now, Is you is or is you ain’t one of the loyal constituency.

Kamchak

April 7th, 2010
3:48 pm

It’s not hate, it’s heritage.

Thought I’d get that out there.

joe matarotz

April 7th, 2010
3:49 pm

It astonishes me that there are still people here who are fighting the Civil War. Those knuckleheads can best be described as dumb-a$$ country (rhymes with) hicks. No wonder Georgia is number 50 in education. Thank God Obama the Great was wrong and there aren’t 57 states. We’d be a solid # 57.

Southern Comfort

April 7th, 2010
3:51 pm

If history was actually taught in school as it actually happened and not some glorified hacked-up version, there would be no need for recognition of “individual histories” such as Confederate, Women’s, Black, or Native American histories.

If we had historians writing accurate history books instead of authors or publishers with hidden agendas, this discussion would be moot.

south fulton

April 7th, 2010
3:53 pm

@Byron..I agree. As an american african, it amazes me that people want to celebrate 5 years of history and forget all the amazing things that the south has produced…chitlings, boiled peanuts, porch sittings, sunday evening car rides….the list goes on….and none of those things mention slavery but neither do they deny its harm.

jewcowboy

April 7th, 2010
3:55 pm

And I thought the discussion of tax laws below was boring…

Kamchak

April 7th, 2010
3:56 pm

If we had historians writing accurate history books instead of authors or publishers with hidden agendas, this discussion would be moot.

Not to mention the Texas Commission that just decided the text books for the next how many number of years.

julie levine

April 7th, 2010
3:57 pm

HAS little to do with slavery?

Peadawg

April 7th, 2010
4:00 pm

Blacks have Black History Month. What’s wrong w/ Confederate History Month? just sayin…

“Why not celebrate Southern Culture instead?” That’s a good thought. Maybe Southern History Month or something. I mean really…who doesn’t like boiled peanuts? Seriously…

(BTW, I’m surprised Jay wrote a column about this before Cynthia did)

TaxPayer

April 7th, 2010
4:00 pm

If we had historians writing accurate history books instead of authors or publishers with hidden agendas, this discussion would be moot.

That is what we gots the Bible fer. Fer sitting the bull straight fer all the yeller hairs out there. :roll:

Southern Comfort

April 7th, 2010
4:01 pm

Jay

As far as the slavery issue, I’ll have to disagree with you on that. Economics was more of an issue. The Southern economy was dominated by slave labor, but slavery itself wasn’t as much the issue as was economics. That’s the same as saying the Tea Party is driven by racism. Racism may be a part of the movement, but it does not define the movement itself.

Peadawg

April 7th, 2010
4:02 pm

“McDonnell’s preferred version of history is, plain and simple, white man’s history.”

Like I said, there’s a Black History Month. What’s you point, Jay?

Normal

April 7th, 2010
4:03 pm

Revisionist history Jay, written by the winners. The war was fought over the right of a state to leave the union if it could not agree with the government of that union. Slavery, as cruel as it was, was just the emotional trigger, of the vocal abolitionists.

It wasn’t the Emancipation Proclamation that freed the slave, it was the thirteenth amendment. All the Proclamation did was “free” slaves in the Confederate South.

“The proclamation did not name the slave-holding border states of Kentucky, Missouri, Maryland, or Delaware, which had never declared a secession, and so it did not free any slaves there. The state of Tennessee had already mostly returned to Union control, so it also was not named and was exempted. Virginia was named, but exemptions were specified for the 48 counties that were in the process of forming West Virginia, as well as seven other named counties and two cities. Also specifically exempted were New Orleans and thirteen named parishes of Louisiana, all of which were also already mostly under Federal control at the time of the Proclamation.”

Most southerners had no slaves so they must have fought for another reason. Maybe they just didn’t want other folks telling them how to live, you recon?

The Confederacy was born from emotion and was probably doomed to fail,
even without the war. But if Lincoln had really wanted to free all slaves, no state would have been exempt. It was political expediency, and noting more.

Michael

April 7th, 2010
4:03 pm

Good write-up, Jay. I took a Georgia history class at UGA and got to learn a lot about the real history of the Civil War. I was one of those “it was about states’ rights!” people when I was younger and stupider. But then you read actual documents from the secession days and realize that IT WAS ABOUT SLAVERY.

To put it in younger kids terms, it was a fight between Team Edward and Team Jacob. Team Edward wanted more vampires (slave states). Team Jacob wanted more werewolves (free states). As the federal government sided with Team Jacob when new states came in, Team Edward got pissed. To add to that metaphor, it’s now like saying the above had nothing to do with vampires or werewolves.

Southern Comfort

April 7th, 2010
4:04 pm

Peadawg

If history accurately reflected the actions and involvements of all people who helped make this country what it is, there would be no need for emphasis on individual contributions. Black History month grew from a desire to learn more about the contributions that Blacks have made to this country. If those contributions were discussed in American History classes, the desire would not have been there. Kinda like a free market thing. If there’s a market, the product will flourish.

LibraryJim

April 7th, 2010
4:06 pm

Frankly, if you talk about American History, you have to mention slavery. In 1827 the only city to have more slaves than Charleston was New York City.

And it’s true: the Civil War did not start out as a war against slavery, but as a war to ‘preserve the Union’. Lincoln made that clear in speech after speech, until flagging enlistments made it necessary to change the timbre of the talking points to bring slavery in as a cause, which led to the Emancipation Proclamation which only declared slaves in states ‘currently in rebellion against the union’ as free.

Peadawg

April 7th, 2010
4:06 pm

“If history accurately reflected the actions and involvements of all people who helped make this country what it is, there would be no need for emphasis on individual contributions”

Well said!!! I wasn’t saying either one was right…I was just making a point. But you said it very well!!!

Jay

April 7th, 2010
4:06 pm

Tommy, I don’t think my place of birth alters in any way what happened 150 years ago.

LibraryJim

April 7th, 2010
4:07 pm

I didn’t see “Normal’s” post at 4:03 which said the same as mine. Sorry for the duplication.

Grace T

April 7th, 2010
4:09 pm

Those who think slavery ended 145 years ago should read the book by Wall Street Journal Reporter Doug Blackmon, “Slavery by Another Name,” which documents the deliberate system of racial suppression and a multitude of atrocities against African-American that existed in the South until after World War II.

Dave R.

April 7th, 2010
4:10 pm

After all, in Jay’s world, you can’t have a celebration without mandating a bit of guilt.

Maybe the next time we do up a proclamation celebrating the next Eagle Scout in our county, we’ll be sure to note the “D” he got in Algebra 3 years ago in order to tell his whole story.

Sheesh, what a loser!

John

April 7th, 2010
4:10 pm

“It’s not hate, it’s heritage.”

That’s what Hitler said.

hello

April 7th, 2010
4:10 pm

c’mon people. We don’t even have to talk about slavery. In the end, the Confederates committed TREASON against the government legally elected in 1860!

If it wasn’t for Lincoln’s “malice towards none” reconcilatory attitude to the South, Jeff Davis, Robert E. Lee and everyone else on Stone Mountain would’ve been hanged after the “War of Northern Aggression.”

Southern Heritage Month should be celebrated, but “Confederacy” month? C’mon.

Keep up the good fight!

April 7th, 2010
4:11 pm

Hey Peedon….how about we have a Union History Month… Let’s celebrate Sherman’s march to the sea! Yea Sherman……just sayin….

Normal…..perhaps you ought to look history prior to the EP and which were “free states”.

Southern Comfort

April 7th, 2010
4:13 pm

no mention of the fact that the Civil War ended with the liberation of millions of African Americans from generations of bondage.

Because it did no such thing. The bondage merely morphed from purely physical to a mental and financial bondage.

TaxPayer

April 7th, 2010
4:13 pm

Southern “businessmen” could not make a profit with free labor then and they still can’t now.

Bigboy

April 7th, 2010
4:14 pm

Touchy subject.The things that happened in the south prior to slavery being repealed was actually the law of the land.Now the things that happened after the civil war in regards to the treatment of ex slaves was a regrettable period in American History.

I Report (-: You Whine )-: Impeach Drunken Fool obozo! Just sayin...

April 7th, 2010
4:14 pm

There is a new class of slaves now-

ROB THY NEIGHBOR: HALF OF HOUSEHOLDS PAY NO FED INCOME TAX

4 months out of every year, the productive are slaves to the parasites, aka, liberalism.

Free us from this bondage!

I Report (-: You Whine )-: Impeach Drunken Fool obozo! Just sayin...

April 7th, 2010
4:15 pm

We shall overcome!, just sayin…

DreameScape, Ltd.

April 7th, 2010
4:16 pm

Maybe the next time we do up a proclamation celebrating the next Eagle Scout in our county, we’ll be sure to note the “D” he got in Algebra 3 years ago in order to tell his whole story.

Why don’t you do that while you’re running your virtual county on farmville. :roll:

Normal

April 7th, 2010
4:16 pm

If the North was fighting for the slave, why were there race riots in 1863 in northern cities like Detroit. Same old story, The southern black man was taking jobs away from the white men.

sfureman

April 7th, 2010
4:17 pm

Fair is Fair Mr. Bookman…In your discussions of slavery, along with your mentions of “the evil white” race, be sure to discuss HOW the slaves came to America. Discuss the slave’s black brothers that originally sold them to the traders, if they weren’t killed while being captured. Slavery was a dark period in our history, one we inherited from the British, but if you require complete recollection of events be prepared to start at the beginning.

As others have written, the war was really about the STATES rights, slavery happened to be one of the factors involved.

Sarah

April 7th, 2010
4:17 pm

Brilliant. So let’s get this straight, blacks are supposed to ignore 200+ years of slavery and/or discrimination and “pull themselves up by their bootstraps”, but whites want to embrace that era.

Ha.

Ya’ll lost, and it was almost 150 years ago, get over it.

Sarah

April 7th, 2010
4:19 pm

A great idea, I should say. Celebrate an affront to the greatest nation ever (the USA) and the fact that ya’ll got your behinds handed to you in that war. That is a great idea.

You lost and you were on the wrong side of history. Kinda like the Nazi party. That would bum me out, not make me want to celebrate.

joan

April 7th, 2010
4:20 pm

The blacks in this country complain about slavery in our history. Why aren’t they complaining about all of the current slavery going on all the time in West Africa, blacks owning blacks. It is rampant. American blacks have no idea how good they have it here. If they had to spend a year in Lome, Togo, they would come back and kiss the ground.

Dave R.

April 7th, 2010
4:21 pm

Not much of a history major, are you Sarah?

Steve C

April 7th, 2010
4:21 pm

It was Congress and Lincoln’s refusal to repeal the Tariff in 1860 which caused Secession and eventual War, because the South was paying 87% of the burden and could no longer make a living. The South was dependant on cheaper goods from England and Europe. Lincoln himself admitted that the War was NOT about slavery (until the middle of the War, after he initially denied the slavery issue) and he refused to do anything about slavery for fear of losing the border states until the North was stagnated after several federal defeats and he nedeed a game change. This is why the Emancipation Proclamation did NOT apply to slave states: Kentucky, Missouri, West Virgina or Maryland, and did not free their slaves. The South did not have to secede over slavery because it was still LEGAL according to the Constitution, (until 1865) just as it was legal in the original Articles of Confederation from 1776-1787 and in the original Constitution of 1787. General Grant’s wife owned slaves and General Lee freed his slaves in the beginning of the War. So why are we told that the Civil War was caused by slavery? Because that is how is has been spun since 1865, after the fact in order to justify Lincoln’s arrest of Northern newspaper editors and dissidents and his suspension of Habeus Corpus, the most fundamental civil right in the Constitution (which was so iimportant that it preceded the Bill of Rights). When Lincoln was ordered by the Supreme Court to honor the writs, Lincoln authorized an arrest warrant for the Chief Jusatice of the Supreme Court. The War was obviously triggered by the Southern States desire to uphold the original Constitution and the “Great Compromise” in which states that the States and the Federal government was to share “dual sovereignty” over the citizens; in other words States Rights as defined in the 10th Amendment.
We need to hear the Southern States leaders writings and their reasons why they seceded in order to acheive a FAIR AND BALANCED VIEW of history and not from one source; northern editors and publishers who enjoy what they see as their predominance of politics and interpretation of history of the U.S. I am a Westerner and not a Southerner, so I can hardly be accused of regional bias. Read all of history, Please!

Steve C

josef nix

April 7th, 2010
4:21 pm

JAY

Hot d*mn, you my friend again! Double or nothin and I won..! :-)

Peadawg

April 7th, 2010
4:22 pm

“how about we have a Union History Month”

go for it pal

Sarah

April 7th, 2010
4:22 pm

Joan, tell me who complains more, the blacks or the conservative whites? Ya’ll a whiney bunch.

I Report (-: You Whine )-: Impeach Drunken Fool obozo! Just sayin...

April 7th, 2010
4:23 pm

The Confederates were democrats, just sayin…

Southern Comfort

April 7th, 2010
4:24 pm

American blacks have no idea how good they have it here.

And you’re some great American Black historian? Geez!!!!

Anna

April 7th, 2010
4:24 pm

Because PeaDawg– EVERY MONTH is white history month!

So there’s one month out of the year to focus on blacks, one month for Asian, one month for women’s history, one month for Hispanic culture— why is it so hard to give recognition to other cultures that also make up America? It’s not reverse discrimination, these dedicated months are just simple recognition within the majority, period!

Every history book we have is written from the POV of White Men Built This Country. Ok, fine, WE ALL GET THAT, but there are others too who have contributed to the rich cloth of this nation..

When the entire year is already written and ruled according to WASP male mentality.. why does it smack of ridiculousness to have a designated month… for the majority? And not just any group- a group that tried to secede from the USA, and a group whose history INCLUDED and ENCOURAGED slavery of people.

Does this mean Germany will start honoring the Germans who served as Nazis as well?

WTF is going on?

Sarah

April 7th, 2010
4:24 pm

So tell me, Dave, what are we going to celebrate?

I Report (-: You Whine )-: Impeach Drunken Fool obozo! Just sayin...

April 7th, 2010
4:25 pm

Thomas Jefferson knocked up his slaves, no wonder he didn’t like God, just sayin…

md

April 7th, 2010
4:26 pm

“Joan, tell me who complains more, the blacks or the conservative whites?”

Got a link. That one I’d like to see.

Southern Comfort

April 7th, 2010
4:26 pm

joan

As far as blacks complaining about slavery in our history, the complaints are because there’s no honest discussion of it in historical context. Kids are taught in school that it was something easy to endure and didn’t cause damage to families of the slaves or the slave owners. From the posts you put here, I can tell you paid attention to mishistory in class.

Keep up the good fight!

April 7th, 2010
4:27 pm

Sarah….. what? Dont tell southerners they lost…its only round 1 for some.

I cant believe you dont support Nazi History Month? Maybe the Governor can declare: “to honor, observe, and celebrate NAZI Germany, its history, those who served in its armed forces and government, and all those millions of its citizens of various races and ethnic groups and religions who contributed in sundry and myriad ways to the cause which they held so dear.” That certainly cant be offensive.

I’m with you! Time they get over it…especially given the southern history in post-Civil War including the 1950s, 1960s (to name a few years) and the use of the Confederate Flag to support continued racism

Anna

April 7th, 2010
4:27 pm

@ I Report (-: You Whine )-: Impeach Drunken Fool obozo! Just sayin… :

Confederates, TRUE, were democrats… but the Democratic Party LOST THE SOUTH to the GOP when Lyndon B Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Whole different demographic making up the Democrats and GOP these days. Today’s Democrats are probably more parallel with Republicans of the past, and todays Republicans are paralleled with the Democrats of the past.

If you’re going to quote history of parties regarding race and slavery and civil rights, you can not leave out this point.

Sarah

April 7th, 2010
4:28 pm

SoCo, i was pointing out a comment from a whiney conservative.

jewcowboy

April 7th, 2010
4:28 pm

josef nix

April 7th, 2010
4:29 pm

Normal–
In case you didn’t get my message below, Grasshopper, you’ve got your homework to do… :-)

I Report (-: You Whine )-: Impeach Drunken Fool obozo! Just sayin...

April 7th, 2010
4:30 pm

If you’re going to quote history of parties regarding race and slavery and civil rights, you can not leave out this point.

Aahhh, ok-

A little known fact of history involves the heavy opposition to the civil rights movement by several prominent Democrats. Similar historical neglect is given to the important role Republicans played in supporting the civil rights movement. A calculation of 26 major civil rights votes from 1933 through the 1960’s civil rights era shows that Republicans favored civil rights in approximately 96% of the votes, whereas the Democrats opposed them in 80% of the votes! These facts are often intentionally overlooked by the left wing Democrats for obvious reasons. In some cases, the Democrats have told flat out lies about their shameful record during the civil rights movement.

Democrat Senators organized the record Senate filibuster of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Included among the organizers were several prominent and well known liberal Democrat standard bearers including:
- Robert Byrd, current senator from West Virginia
- J. William Fulbright, Arkansas senator and political mentor of Bill Clinton
- Albert Gore Sr., Tennessee senator, father and political mentor of Al Gore. Gore Jr. has been known to lie about his father’s opposition to the Civil Rights Act.
- Sam Ervin, North Carolina senator of Watergate hearings fame
- Richard Russell, famed Georgia senator and later President Pro Tempore

Just sayin…

Sarah

April 7th, 2010
4:31 pm

I’ve a better idea – all those dreaming of the lost Confederacy can relocate to Mississippi and remove themselves from the USA. Oh, and can ya take the Tea Partiers with ya?

Southern Comfort

April 7th, 2010
4:31 pm

jcb

You are soooooo wrong for that clip. LOL!!!!

Mr. Snarky

April 7th, 2010
4:32 pm

I’d be okay with it if we just called it what it is: ignorant redneck history month

Paul

April 7th, 2010
4:32 pm

Thanks for the information, Jay. Nice point about the world as it was. Too many engage in a sort of historical, moral superiority in that regard.

Kamchak

[[If we had historians writing accurate history books instead of authors or publishers with hidden agendas, this discussion would be moot.

Not to mention the Texas Commission that just decided the text books for the next how many number of years.}}

Aren’t you ever going to let loose of that canard? The current commission did more of a one-for-one grant amongst the various factions. The prior commission rejected every conservative request. So the current go-round was much more balanced.

And you should know – most of the recommendations – those with the ‘hidden agendas’ – were submitted by educators.

Just a bit of educating regarding education –

Michael 4:03

A most excellent analogy!

Grace T

“Those who think slavery ended 145 years ago should read the book”

Thankfully it’s just the effects that linger, not the actual institution. Slavery does still exist – primarily in Africa. One of the great accomplishments of Western Civilization was the abolition of slavery.

Who says one civilization isn’t superior to another?

Jay

April 7th, 2010
4:32 pm

So Steve C and others, who are we supposed to believe?

You?

Or Robert Toombs, Alexander Stephens and Ben Hill and many others who actually made the history in question?

jewcowboy

April 7th, 2010
4:32 pm

“The Confederates were democrats, just sayin…”

And Republicans love their lesbian bondage…

Southern Comfort

April 7th, 2010
4:33 pm

Whiner

So how do you explain the current Republicans, such as Perdue, who were members of the Democratic Party during those times?

josef nix

April 7th, 2010
4:33 pm

SoCo–
When are we going to bring up restitution? One word. Aetna. :-)

Normal

April 7th, 2010
4:34 pm

As late as January 1865, Lincoln authorized “informal” talks with the Confederate leaders to try to end the war…Lincoln himself referred to the Emancipation Proclamation as a “war measure” that would “have effect only from its being an exercise of the war power”

Secretary of War Steward also said that if the South dropped the war and returned to the Union, they could defeat the proclamation in Congress.

Steward also said that if the Confederacy agreed to peace and abolition, then the United States would be willing to reimburse the slave owners for their loss of human property.(the North still thought of Blacks as property, this due to the Supreme Court case of Dred Scott).

Had the war been about slavery to the South, the war would have ended right there with paid in full.

Jefferson Davis insisted on separate nations so no deal was struck and the war continued to Appomattox.

This is verifiable history folks…just sayin’

I Report (-: You Whine )-: Impeach Drunken Fool obozo! Just sayin...

April 7th, 2010
4:34 pm

April 6 (Bloomberg) — The extent of sea ice over the Arctic Ocean grew until the last day of March, the latest the annual melting season has begun in 31 years of satellite records, the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center said.

Hmmm, I thought it was gone already, ahhh, just kiddin….

Dave R.

April 7th, 2010
4:34 pm

Sarah, we celebrate the history of people who refused to knuckle under to oppressive Federal laws and mandates.

We celebrate people who believed in the words written in the U.S. Constitution.

We celebrate the heroism of those men and women in the face of all odds against them.

josef nix

April 7th, 2010
4:35 pm

Sarah–
What do you know about Mississippi? Are you from there? How much time have you spent there? Why Mississippi?

Paul

April 7th, 2010
4:35 pm

josef nix 4:33

here we go…. heheheh

That discussion we had that night was one of the most enjoyable I’ve experienced here -

Normal

April 7th, 2010
4:35 pm

Joesf, St. Elsewhere

Anna

April 7th, 2010
4:36 pm

@I Report (-: You Whine )-: Impeach Drunken Fool obozo! Just sayin…

What is your point, then?

The Democratic Party today is not clean and pure of racism or bigotry either, but my point is that the demographics changed for both parties. Yes, you had some Democrats who opposed the Civil Rights movement, just like you’ve got some REpublicans nowadays that backed the stimulus plan– there are no hard lines in politics…

So…

What’s you point? You approve of this month celebrating Confederate History then? You approve of McDonnell not mentioning slavery? What’s your stand on this?

LibraryJim

April 7th, 2010
4:37 pm

If at first you don’t secede — try, try again.

:-)

jewcowboy

April 7th, 2010
4:37 pm

Paul,

Speaking of lesbian bondage I ran across a rumor concerning your chick from Battlestar Galactica.

Sarah

April 7th, 2010
4:38 pm

No worries Josef, Kansas. Kansas has shown a wonderful amount of ignorance on a state-wide level. They can relocate to Kansas and declare themselves a new country.

HDB

April 7th, 2010
4:40 pm

Kudos to Anna and SoCo and KUTGF………

Hi, SoCo!! :)

Sarah

April 7th, 2010
4:40 pm

Hmmmm Dave, does this mean ya’ll will stop complaining about Black History Month?

Anna

April 7th, 2010
4:40 pm

I Report (-: You Whine )-: Impeach Drunken Fool obozo! Just sayin…

AND, btw, those senators you listed– ALL SOUTHERN politicians–
My first quote that Johnson knew he was going to lose the South from the Democratic party, and he did.

So yes, those Democrats that were against this, were probably in line with many of the Democrats Lyndon B Johnson lost in 1964. Of course there were Republicans who aided in the Civil RIghts Movement.

And ha ha and thanks for mentioning the melting artic. I can appreciate your humor. =0) Thanks for the diversion.

Paul

April 7th, 2010
4:41 pm

jewcowboy

Which one? The current traitor on 24 or the gladiator-owner’s wife on Spartacus?

Lesbian bondage? Ummmm…. does this mean she’s a Republican? Or that she’s a Democrat ’cause she extracts money from Republicans?

I Report (-: You Whine )-: Impeach Drunken Fool obozo! Just sayin...

April 7th, 2010
4:41 pm

Bomb Sniffer- Oh, so now the Republican Party is full of cross burners, eh?

Where’d ya get that information, from the democrats, those bastions of the truth?

Take this a step further, I can remember when democrats argued that the Civil War had nothing to do with slavery, when it was a convenient way of denying Republicans the credit for freeing the slaves.

And I’ll bet, that if I look hard enough, I could find Bookman making the same case, just sayin…

josef nix

April 7th, 2010
4:42 pm

I had four great-grandfathers who fought in the Civil War on the side of the CSA. I know and can document from their letters and memoirs why they fought. We should be extemely cautious in judging them in their time and place from the hindsight of our time and place.

jewcowboy

April 7th, 2010
4:43 pm

Southern Comfort @ 4.31,

You mean Hollywood might have lead my astray with its depictions of the Old South and the Civil War? Well fiddle dee dee!

Dave R.

April 7th, 2010
4:43 pm

Sarah, since you have no idea whether or not I celebrate, support or complain about Black History month, your question makes no sense.

heartlandboy

April 7th, 2010
4:43 pm

celebrating the fine points of southern culture? go for it.
celebrating the treasonous secession of the Confederacy? hell no!

I Report (-: You Whine )-: Impeach Drunken Fool obozo! Just sayin...

April 7th, 2010
4:44 pm

The Democratic president who signed the bill, Lyndon B. Johnson, wasn’t always on board with equal rights.

“These Negroes, they’re getting pretty uppity these days and that’s a problem for us since they’ve got something now they never had before, the political pull to back up their uppityness,” Johnson said in 1957. ” Now we’ve got to do something about this, we’ve got to give them a little something, just enough to quiet them down, not enough to make a difference.”

Uh, you know what I mean?

Dave R.

April 7th, 2010
4:44 pm

Hiya, josef! :D

jewcowboy

April 7th, 2010
4:45 pm

Paul,

Tricia Helfer…

“Ummmm…. does this mean she’s a Republican? Or that she’s a Democrat ’cause she extracts money from Republicans?”

Well she’s in LA, so I guess that makes her a Democrat, since that is not “real America”.

Sarah

April 7th, 2010
4:46 pm

I think it does make sense Dave – there are many who complain about there being a Black History Month. “Why do I gotta learn about that?”.

If you want to have a Confederate History Month then perhaps ya’ll oughtta pay attention to Black History Month as well.

Paul

April 7th, 2010
4:46 pm

josef nix

That’s what I meant about a look-back with an air of historical moral superiority.

I’ve quite a bit of information regarding my second great-grandfather. Fought for the Union. Took the place of a most patriotic type, as he took the place of a draftee for a few hundred bucks and earned his citizenship (not to different from today, eh?). He was wounded, spent time in a prisoner of war camp, and some years later, owing to the constant, horrendous pain he endured, killed himself. The letters from the time, including the letters from his widow to the government, are pretty heart-rending.

I Report (-: You Whine )-: Impeach Drunken Fool obozo! Just sayin...

April 7th, 2010
4:46 pm

What’s you point? You approve of this month celebrating Confederate History then? You approve of McDonnell not mentioning slavery? What’s your stand on this?

I think of all the things wrong with our country today and I really couldn’t care less about this new grievance y’all have discovered.

Count me out of the pity party, just sayin…

Midori

April 7th, 2010
4:47 pm

darn it stands!!

you beat me posting the Rude one’s screed :)

Tommy

April 7th, 2010
4:49 pm

Of course slavery was a cause of the civil war. Southerners have tried for years to hide behind states rights and the ecnomomic causes of the war while avoiding the horror of slavery.

At the same time, it’s just not historically true to say that the war was only about slavery. Millions of men from the north and south did not endure four years of unimaginably horrible war to free slaves from far away or to keep slaves for the tiny minority of southern planters who owned them. There was much going on in addition to the slavery issue. As Jay knows the interests of the planter’s was not nearly enough to sustain 600,000 casualties among the common poor southerner.

Jay knows that Linclon was not elected to free the slaves. The abolitionists were often regarded in the North as dangerous radicals who wanted to split the union. For every firebrand, like Toombs you can find others who would contradict their perspective.

But the slavery was at the heart of a way of life and society. We must not avoid that reality anymore than we should insist that the war was only about slavery. Both positions are attempts to use the conflicts of long ago to again advantage in the conflicts of today. Both positions demean the truth and will lead us astray from reality.

josef nix

April 7th, 2010
4:49 pm

Grasshopper–
Gotcha!

Sarah–
Nonetheless, the question was, why Mississippi? Why not Kansas to begin with? Or New Hampshire or Idaho where there actually are organized secessionist movements?

PAUL
Oh, the Scalawag did this for meaness and to stir up trouble…but, like I said, I’m happy as a dead pig in the sunshine…I made money off of it and it’s paid off in greenbacks, though I must admit I’d rather have one of them $2 bills with the Jew boy on it… :-)

Paul

April 7th, 2010
4:49 pm

jewcowboy

Six? Rumors about Six?!!? Unfounded, destructive, despicable rumors?

Unless they’re salacious, that is -

DebbieDoRight

April 7th, 2010
4:49 pm

If we celebrate “Southern History Month” can we also celebrate “The History of How Sherman Kicked Confederate Azz Month”? I think that’s fair AND we don’t even have to mention the “S” word.

LibraryJim

April 7th, 2010
4:51 pm

Didn’t one community try to have a celebration of ‘Black Confederate Month’ this past February?

Sarah

April 7th, 2010
4:52 pm

Because, Josef, sometimes it’s just fun to mess with a certain state. Mississippi is an easy target. Idaho’s fun too, and Kansas!

I like your idea about New Hampshire. Why shouldn’t they leave the USA…what do they actually bring to table for us?

Dave R.

April 7th, 2010
4:53 pm

Well, I for one am glad that Tommy just settled that whole thing for us.

I Report (-: You Whine )-: Impeach Drunken Fool obozo! Just sayin...

April 7th, 2010
4:54 pm

“The more they find out about it, the more they will love it, uh huh, duh-”

Questions reflecting confusion have flooded insurance companies, doctors’ offices, human resources departments and business groups.

“They’re saying, ‘Where do we get the free Obama care, and how do I sign up for that?’ ” said Carrie McLean, a licensed agent for eHealthInsurance.com. The California-based company sells coverage from 185 health insurance carriers in 50 states.

You unleashed the stupidity and now they are gonna vote against you, hahahaha.

Sarah

April 7th, 2010
4:54 pm

I like Debbie Do Right’s idea…let there be a Confederate History month in April. And May will be “Ya’ll got your Ass*s handed to you so put that in your pipe and smoke it Month”.