China taking a more muscular approach internationally

The Chinese government has responded angrily to a newly announced sale of American arms to Taiwan, imposing sanctions on U.S. companies involved and canceling some military exchange programs. As the New York Times reports:

The American decision to sell more weapons to Taiwan “constitutes a gross intervention into China’s internal affairs, seriously endangers China’s national security and harms China’s peaceful reunification efforts,” (Chinese Vice Foreign Minister He Yafei) said in the ministry’s statement.

The Obama administration notified Congress on Friday of its plans to proceed with five arms sales transactions with Taiwan worth a total of $6.4 billion. The arms deals include 60 Black Hawk helicopters, Patriot interceptor missiles, advanced Harpoon missiles that can be used against land or ship targets and two refurbished minesweepers.

And unfortunately, that bristling response fits into a larger pattern of behavior emerging in recent months, as the Washington Post reports:

China’s indignant reaction to the announcement of U.S. plans to sell weapons to Taiwan appears to be in keeping with a new triumphalist attitude from Beijing that is worrying governments and analysts across the globe.

From the Copenhagen climate change conference to Internet freedom to China’s border with India, China observers have noticed a tough tone emanating from its government, its representatives and influential analysts from its state-funded think tanks.

Calling in U.S. Ambassador Jon Huntsman on Saturday, Chinese Vice Foreign Minister He Yafei said the United States would be responsible for “serious repercussions” if it did not reverse the decision to sell Taiwan $6.4 billion worth of helicopters, Patriot Advanced Capability-3 missiles, minesweepers and communications gear. The reaction came even though China has known for months about the planned deal, U.S. officials said.

“There has been a change in China’s attitude,” said Kenneth G. Lieberthal, a former senior National Security Council official who is currently at the Brookings Institution. “The Chinese find with startling speed that people have come to view them as a major global player. And that has fed a sense of confidence.”

…. David Finkelstein, a former U.S. Army officer at the Defense Intelligence Agency who now runs the China program at the Center for Naval Analyses, said the new tone underscores a shift in China. “On the external front,” he said, “we will likely see a China that is more willing than in the past to proactively shape the external environment and international order rather than passively react to it.”

To some degree this is natural behavior from an emerging major power acting more confidently on the international stage. But it’s certainly compounded by the sense that as China rises, the United States has begun to recede in relative terms thanks to its continuing economic problems and the strain of long-term expensive commitments in Afghanistan and Iraq.

But China’s growing confidence is only part of the equation, because its people and its leadership are also insecure and defensive about what they perceive as a lack of respect internationally. That combination of pride and insecurity can be volatile, and I worry about China’s ability to calibrate its behavior in some future crisis.

155 comments Add your comment

joan

January 31st, 2010
11:22 am

Jay, I think you are right to worry about China’s reaction to this arms sale. What idiot has decided that we can afford to irritate our number one banker? Without China’s loans our government would have shut down already–or maybe it would have found a way to live within its means. There is no question that the United States is a superpower now, only in its own insular thinking. When other countries can buy and sell us what have we become? About those commitments in the mid-east–where is Harry Truman when you need him?

Kamchak

January 31st, 2010
11:22 am

Will China dump their bonds?

Left of Center

January 31st, 2010
11:22 am

ROLLERGIRL

January 31st, 2010
11:30 am

There never will be unification, so it’s just bluster for china’s internal domestic propoganda, like everything else china does..they don’t care how we perceive them..they care about 1 party self preservation of the communist party.

I’ll take vegetable kung pao, and hot & sour soup, He Yafei chop chop!

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm!

January 31st, 2010
11:30 am

They sense a weakness, just like the Cons/ Repugs do.

Time to make that move.

Nicolia Disfagonious

January 31st, 2010
11:37 am

Jay— Get real. Taiwan has every right to buy arms and defend itself.
China needs to get over it. We need the business so we can repay China what we owe them.
Maybe another mess O-blame-ah has got us in.

RFR

January 31st, 2010
11:38 am

I guess this is payback for China’s stance on Iran’s nuclear ambitions.

Disgusted

January 31st, 2010
11:44 am

Gee, we’ll be making it a lot tougher for China to take over its “province” if we keep arming Taiwan. And to think–China has spent all that money on building up its military capability.

Jay

January 31st, 2010
11:46 am

Left of Center/Hank Jr., namejacking is not tolerated here and will lead to your banning.

ROLLERGIRL

January 31st, 2010
11:47 am

They were funky China men……….. from funky Chinatown
They were chopping them up ………….and they were chopping them down
It’s an ancient Chineese art a……………..nd everybody knew their part
From a feint into a slip, ……….and kicking from the hip

Everybody was kung-fu fighting..(chinga chinga ching ching chong)…

Those cats were fast as lightning

In fact it was a little bit frightning

But they fought with expert timing

Jess

January 31st, 2010
11:47 am

Don’t bite the hand that feeds you. The price we pay for out of control government borrowing and spending is a loss of status and respect from those who finance our social experiments. I can hardly see how we could expect anything different.

getalife

January 31st, 2010
11:48 am

They execute for corruption in China.

ROLLERGIRL

January 31st, 2010
11:49 am

They were f*nky China men……….. from f*nky Chinatown
They were chopping them up ………….and they were chopping them down
It’s an ancient Chinese art …………….and everybody knew their part
From a feint into a slip, ……….and kicking from the hip

Everybody was k*ng-fu fighting..(ching.a ching.aa ching ching chong)…

Those cats were fast as lightning

In fact it was a little bit frightning

But they fought with expert timing

Nicolia Disfagonious

January 31st, 2010
11:50 am

Take away Taiwan’s right to purchase arms, China takes stronghold over that country. We should never have crawled in bed with those people.
Russians would have supplied the weapons and equipment if we hadn’t.
Get it while it’s there I guess.
What do you think, Jay ?

Nicolia Disfagonious

January 31st, 2010
11:52 am

I think ROLLERGIRL flew out of the skating rink and landed on her head.Good song, though.

Pete

January 31st, 2010
11:53 am

Agreed it is definitely a natural response of a growing power and I must add the insecurity is really due to the type of government, ie the CCP. The centralized Chinese govt/dictatorial rule harks back to the dynasties of 1000s of years so it is part of Chinese culture inherently.

ROLLERGIRL

January 31st, 2010
11:56 am

Nicola, I protect my cranium (lots of earning potential in that big brain of mine)..

Double post was due to the filter, btw…

Jay

January 31st, 2010
11:59 am

Nicolia, I doubt Russia would have sold Taiwan the arms, but I’m glad we did anyway. It’s important that China face some pushback, as it did in the commercial sphere with Google’s decision.

SecState Clinton has also been pretty frank both in public and apparently in private too with the Chinese. Again, I think that’s necessary, and it’s probably even helpful to the Chinese themselves in the long run.

Jay

January 31st, 2010
12:03 pm

I agree Pete. I also have serious doubts about whether the political/economic structure in China can sustain itself longterm. There are an awful lot of tensions and conflicts within China — again, economic as well as political — that have no real means of being resolved. The Chinese gov’t has shown a willingness to use extreme nationalism to cover those tensions, and that kind of approach can get out of control very quickly.

TaxPayer

January 31st, 2010
12:07 pm

The US could always argue that the sales were needed in order to raise funds to pay interest coming due on the bonds that they hold. Now, do they want us to be able to pay that interest payment or not. I mean, surely there is some Fed taxes or something coming from those sales. And what about the military aircraft sales to the UAE. I assume that went well too. Hey, if we have to fork over 680 billion annually to the DoD, we should get something in return.

@@

January 31st, 2010
12:08 pm

China has their own internal problems. This is just a hapless response to Obama’s sabre-toothed tiger approach. They’re extinct you know….those sabre-tooths?

Nicolia Disfagonious

January 31st, 2010
12:10 pm

ROLLERGIRL , your cool with me. Do you really skate?
And Jay I agree.

Left of Center

January 31st, 2010
12:13 pm

Sorry Jay and to you too @@………….

Nicolia Disfagonious

January 31st, 2010
12:17 pm

Sell ice to the Eskimo’s if that’s what it takes.
We need the revenues badly.
However, need to be careful with every transaction.
Have to have best interest of USA and our safety in mind.

@@

January 31st, 2010
12:19 pm

Left-O:

Sorry for what?

—————————————————-

It’s important to note that Lindsay Graham has commended Obama for the sale of arms to Taiwan. Curiously enough, he said that you cannot reconcile differences unless both parties are honest with each other.

Was President Obama listening when Graham made that statement? Was he addressing Obama and China? Could be!

LeeH1

January 31st, 2010
12:25 pm

Get real. China accepted international aid for their earthquake victims, but wouldn’t give a dime to help Burma during the typhoon. China will buy mining concessinos in Africa, but will do no trade with them, especially in buying their goods.

China will approve Iran and North Korea getting nuclear arms, but objects over us selling helicopters to Taiwan. Puhlease! We should suggest we will sell nukes to Taiwan, and then really see China get scared.

China today, like China in the 19th century, only spends money inside China and not much of that. They will sell to other countries, but they won’t buy. As a result, they become a large country, but of limited international importance.

Aside from military bluster, what will China do? Refuse to sell us more cheap toxic toys and diluted medicines? Refuse to buy more bonds from us? So what.

We would have to make more things here in the US, and invest in America again, rather than let foreigners do it.

Believe me, China going international is a lot less important than America drawing within itself.

@@

January 31st, 2010
12:32 pm

Another OH DRAT!!!! Best laid government plans laid waste.

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) — The watchdog charged with monitoring the government’s $700 billion bailout unleashed one of his harshest criticisms of the program to date, questioning its overall effectiveness.

In his latest quarterly report to Congress, special inspector general Neil Barofsky said that the Troubled Asset Relief Program, or TARP, has failed to boost bank lending as well as halt the spread of foreclosures — two key aims of the sprawling program.

However, the American public is still expected to incur a massive loss in the end — the question is just how much it will be. A separate estimate issued earlier this year by the Congressional Budget Office warned that TARP will ultimately cost taxpayers approximately $159 billion.

http://money.cnn.com/2010/01/31/news/companies/tarp_report/

Don’t we just hate it when that happens?

Nicolia Disfagonious

January 31st, 2010
12:32 pm

Great , great point, LeeH1.

John

January 31st, 2010
12:42 pm

China is not that power as people think they are. They are the world biggest manufacture. What happens to its economy if we stop buying their products (toxic.poor quality anyway)- IT WILL COLAPPSEEEE period.

They can not dump US bonds. That is their reserved money. Remember we can print out as much money as we need.

TaxPayer

January 31st, 2010
12:47 pm

A separate estimate issued earlier this year by the Congressional Budget Office warned that TARP will ultimately cost taxpayers approximately $159 billion

Sounds like an Eighties re-run.

Hillbilly Deluxe

January 31st, 2010
12:59 pm

I’ve thought for several years that China is the long term threat to us. They have 3 to 4 times the population that we do, they have resources, and they have money, thanks to our building them up in pursuit of the short term dollar. We’ve brought it on ourselves.

@@

January 31st, 2010
1:03 pm

Swine Flu Stirred Profits, but Fewer Deaths than Predicted
Sunday, January 31, 2010

From the U.S. government to the United Nations, the warnings last spring were that H1NI was going to infect billions of people and kill hundreds of thousands. But it turned out the panic produced only millions in profits for pharmaceutical companies that made swine flu vaccines and preventive care.

In 2009, President Barack Obama’s science advisers warned the virus could infect up to 120 million Americans and kill 90,000. Meanwhile, the World Health Organization (WHO) predicted H1N1 could infect two billion and claim hundreds of thousands of lives worldwide.

The one thing that was up last year was earnings for makers of H1N1 vaccines. CSL Limited saw its profits rise 63% above 2008 levels by June 2009, while GlaxoSmithKline enjoyed a 30% jump by the third quarter. Roche, maker of the preventive Tamiflu, enjoyed a twelve fold leap in profits from the second quarter of 2008 to the same period in 2009.

The Council of Europe is reportedly investigating whether WHO officials “faked” the pandemic to boost revenues for drug companies.–AllGov

I got vaccinated but only because I work with children. Not one of our kids (special needs/fragile health) came down with anything more serious than a bad cold.

Makes ‘ya wonder, don’t it?

TaxPayer

January 31st, 2010
1:05 pm

They have 3 to 4 times the population that we do

And we have lots of vacant properties in need of occupants and coal in need of minin’ and Carp in need of hungry… Seems like a match made on the Love Boat. Head ‘em up, Move ‘em out.

@@

January 31st, 2010
1:07 pm

Hillbilly:

My Dad always said China was our greatest threat. Their economy is so obscured, it’s hard to tell.

Hillbilly Deluxe

January 31st, 2010
1:11 pm

@@

If they decided to become expansionists, there wouldn’t be much anybody could do about it.

getalife

January 31st, 2010
1:20 pm

The HP vs fox news:

“Asked why Fox News cut away 20 minutes early from the question and answer session Obama held with House Republicans (which was largely seen as a big coup for the president), Ailes sidestepped the question, proclaiming, “We’re the most trusted name in news.”HP

Hilarious!

FrankLeeDarling

January 31st, 2010
1:25 pm

ROLLERGIRL

January 31st, 2010
1:27 pm

Nicola, YES I do..

The Atlanta rollergirls 2010 season starts SAT March 13 at the Yaarab Shrine Center

http://www.atlantarollergirls.com

ROLLERGIRL

January 31st, 2010
1:28 pm

Nicolia, rather…

@@

January 31st, 2010
1:29 pm

Hillbilly:

Doesn’t that apply to any country that seeks to expand? I’m thinking back on Russia’s recent incursion.

George Friedman wrote a special piece a year or so back “The Love of One’s Own and the Importance of Place”. It was an interesting perspective on the psychology within the apparatus of state.

Nicolia Disfagonious

January 31st, 2010
1:36 pm

ROLLERGIRL, GOOD LUCK!!
Not asking your name but can you give your jersey # ?

@@

January 31st, 2010
1:36 pm

Make that any major country. Many of the smaller ones fall victim to the big dogs.

Hillbilly Deluxe

January 31st, 2010
1:39 pm

Doesn’t that apply to any country that seeks to expand?

To a certain extent it does, but it is even more so, if nobody is big enough to stop them.

Scout

January 31st, 2010
1:39 pm

Hummmmm ………….. kind of reminds me of Japan in the 1930’s.

“Air Raid Pearl Harbor – This is No Drill!”

@@

January 31st, 2010
1:43 pm

Hillbilly:

I don’t know much about their military spending or what they’re spending it on. Some light reading from “The Economist”.

The spirit of enterprise fades
The cradle of China’s start-up firms is showing its age

http://www.economist.com/node/15331470/comments

@@

January 31st, 2010
1:45 pm

Of course, that’s not to say ours isn’t fading too. Although I have read that college graduates unable to find jobs are starting their own businesses. They’re looking to private investors for capital.

AA

January 31st, 2010
1:46 pm

As an Asian American, what the hell our government is doing trying to manipulate China’s brother/sister relationship much like if someone is trying to interface Cananda relationship?
We have enough problem at home, lack of employment, crime, terriorst attack, social problem, underrepresented ethnic problem in education. We already have enough problem we created in the Middle East and else where. I spent my tax dollar not wise. We are disburbing world peace. We should not be international police. This is selfish and colonial domination. I think the defense department is suck. We need to take those good old boys out of jobs there and replaced w/ minority and balance ethnic representation.

Precious Mettles

January 31st, 2010
1:47 pm

The Chinese are building a navy. They’ve already launched a gigantic destroyer called the Pangtoon. This is the biggest boy anyone’s ever seen. It looks like a floating island. This bad boy is four city blocks long, and it’s got cruise missiles as long as trees and warheads as big as steers. This ship is so big it blocks out half the sky, and it could make six of the seven seas totally useless to us.

Look, if the Chinese are allowed to build the sister ship of the Pangtoon, the Poontang, then Taiwan will be the last of our problems.

We can’t let China get away with this. We just can’t. Why doesn’t Obama do something? What is he, a tin president?

Hillbilly Deluxe

January 31st, 2010
1:50 pm

I don’t know much about their military spending

I don’t either but if they decided to go that route, they’d have no trouble having the largest armed forces in the world. For sure they have no shortage of man power.

DoggoneGA

January 31st, 2010
1:54 pm

“already launched a gigantic destroyer called the Pangtoon”

Do you have a link for that information? I can’t seem to find anything about it.

Nicolia Disfagonious

January 31st, 2010
2:04 pm

We currently are under Chinese rule, like it or not.
I have never heard of Pangtoon or Poontang Warships ,either.
Our Navy is the best and the strongest in the world.

Scout

January 31st, 2010
2:12 pm

To Precious Mettles:

Well if it’s the “poontang” we really are “screwed”:

“poontang”
Inflected Forms: plural – poontang; abbreviated – poon
Alternate Spellings: puntang
Etymology: Filipino (Ilokano dialect) putang
1: female genitalia
2: sexual intercourse

Hillbilly Deluxe

January 31st, 2010
2:12 pm

@@

January 31st, 2010
2:25 pm

Hillbilly:

And even more light.

Is this the kinda expansion you talk’n ’bout? Sneaky!

Don’t shun the idea of setting up overseas military bases

The Cato Institute examines the implications.

Hillbilly Deluxe

January 31st, 2010
2:34 pm

@@

I wasn’t talking about anything specific, though your links are quite interesting. I’m just thinking what might happen 50 to 100 years down the road. If they (or any other country for that matter) decided to become expansionist, they’d start small. In their case, probably Taiwan. This sort of thing has happened time and again throughout recorded history. Then they push a little more and a little more. Somebody has to be able to stop it. You have to be prepared for what might happen because nobody has a crystal ball.

Jenifer

January 31st, 2010
2:36 pm

I hope China confiscated all the weasel American corporations that off-shored our jobs.

Jenifer

January 31st, 2010
2:40 pm

Virginia Foxx: Obama Lectured Us. But I Got His Autograph.

Is it true that Karl Rove divorced his wife for this woman?

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/01/29/virginia-foxx-obama-lectu_n_442544.html

Jenifer

January 31st, 2010
2:50 pm

Tea Party Nation Speaks Out: ‘We Never Did This To Be Rich and Famous’

“Phillips said a business loan from Bill Hemrick has been paid back in full and that the members of Congress who pulled out of the event were “rightfully concerned about backlash they will receive from the left-leaning Democrat controlled House Ethics Committee.”

“[W]e have no doubt the Democrats would have found something in that code to cause them problems once the convention was over,” Phillips wrote…”

Because it’s only wrong if a Democrat does it, right?

http://tpmmuckraker.talkingpointsmemo.com/2010/01/tea_party_nation_speaks_out_we_never_did_this_to_b.php

rice

January 31st, 2010
3:11 pm

china is older and wiser.

@@

January 31st, 2010
3:12 pm

Hillbilly:

Could you be more specific on THIS response?

You have to be prepared for what might happen because nobody has a crystal ball.

@@

January 31st, 2010
3:23 pm

Cute site “Oldster’s View”

“Old is physical and happens to all, but elderly is a state of mind.”

No comments, but still…..he keeps on keeping on.

RW-(the original)

January 31st, 2010
3:30 pm

I would have kept my blogs going if I knew there were spambots you could just load a few websites into and have them come back and link every post those sites made.

Hillbilly Deluxe

January 31st, 2010
3:30 pm

@@

Well what happens someday if they’ve taken some small countries and then they decide they might want to take Japan?

dxates

January 31st, 2010
3:50 pm

The American narative never changes. It is always the US is the good guy, and anyone who disagree’s with it is bad. How would the US like it if China decided to give Cuba the high tech weapons?? The hypocrisy is sickening in the United States, especially regarding Iran. Iran is a member of the NPT, and IAEA, and has no proven weapons program, but you read any US propaganda media source, and they are saying the direct opposite. China would be smart to put a base in Iran with weapons capable of making the US think twice about destroying another non-threatening country. A counterweight to US, and Western hegemony is a must.

jokerman

January 31st, 2010
3:50 pm

Jenifer .. Virginia Foxx is HOT..HOT..HOT. Boehner practically has a Boehner every time she sayshays buy.

rice

January 31st, 2010
3:57 pm

All I know as a American businessman, I have never been more booed and hated in all of Asia. They use to worship the grounds I walked on. I been to Beijing , Shanghai, Macu, Hong kong, Seoul, Tokyo. Our reputation is going down the drain.

Yosarian

January 31st, 2010
4:00 pm

I’ve heard that the US won the cold war by outspending the USSR. Primarily, this was defense spending & foreign aid in return for influence. Now that China is capitalist and a source of capital to the world, it’s influence & ‘friends’ are increasing. We,on the other hand, flirt with the prospects of pulling off a Russian-style collapse by borrowing money to maintain the friends & allies we kept on the ‘take’ during the cold war. This seems to me like the US is in a tag-team wrestling match and it’s two against one…China is fresh & has been tagged by Russia. Ding, Ding…next round!

http://opencrs.com/document/R40361/

mike

January 31st, 2010
4:00 pm

Does anyone think that we will really come to Taiwan’s aid in the event of an invasion? This is one pretense that we do not need to keep up.

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm!

January 31st, 2010
4:02 pm

Switzerland’s justice minister warned in an interview on Sunday that top bank UBS could collapse if sensitive talks with the United States over a high-profile tax fraud investigation fall through.

Tax cheating dummycrats hide their money from the government overseas and so now obozo wants to take the bank out, like they did something wrong, it’s pathological, our “president” is an idiot, he is diseased and he’s a stooge, the trifecta of ignorance, what a champion.

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm!

January 31st, 2010
4:05 pm

Jan. 30 (Bloomberg) — New York University Professor Nouriel Roubini, who anticipated the financial crisis, called the fourth quarter surge in U.S. economic growth “very dismal and poor” because it relied on temporary factors.

Roubini said more than half of the 5.7 percent expansion reported yesterday by the government was related to a replenishing of inventories and that consumption depended on monetary and fiscal stimulus. As these forces ebb, growth will slow to just 1.5 percent in the second half of 2010, he said.

I sense another gigantic wad of cash going out the doors of the treasury to squandered by the parasites and leeches.

Some future we are providing our children, just another form of the liberals hating on them.

@@

January 31st, 2010
4:36 pm

RW:

You wrote some really good pieces at your blog. I acknowledge that it must have been hard work though. I forgive you.

(ISH)

Hillbilly:

What if?

I rarely venture into East Asia. I can barely keep up with South Asia, the former Soviet Union, Europe, the Middle East, and Latin America.

They’re not liking us too much over there in Japan either.

On Saturday, labor unionists, pacifists, environmentalists and students marched through central Tokyo, yelling slogans and calling for an end to the U.S. troop presence. They gathered for a rally at a park – under a banner that read “Change! Japan-U.S. Relations” – for speeches by civil leaders and politicians.

Wuh Oh!

An unconfirmed report in Taiwan’s United Evening News said that a Chinese submarine entered Taiwan’s territorial waters Jan. 27, but retreated after Taiwanese ships set out to locate it, Straits Times reported Jan. 31. The report said Taiwanese helicopters detected the submarine 24 miles off the southern port of Kaohsiung during a military exercise, but that the submarine left after Taiwan’s navy launched a search. The Taiwanese Defense Ministry declined to comment on the report.

Pogo

January 31st, 2010
4:58 pm

We knew decades ago that China would be our eventual nemesis and our polticians then, as Obama and his administration are doing now, went ahead and sold out our country to them anyway. We now owe them and they now own us. There is no way out for America because of the level of debt we owe to the Chinese. Eventually, it will all come down to Mr. Fusion or Fission to right what wrongs the politicians have made. To hope for some big time political change in China as our salvation is a fools dream. Afer all, they are entrenched progressives and we know how destructive that can be.

RW-(the original)

January 31st, 2010
4:59 pm

I swear I think they use Google tools to translate these things

Obama also spoke about the presence of US trips in Iraq and Afghanistan. The spending on the anti-terrorist operation in those two countries has become an intolerable burden for the teetering economy of the United States. Obama promised to end the war in Iraq during his pre-election campaign.

TnGelding

January 31st, 2010
5:13 pm

I worry about our proclivity to stir up trouble. This decision should be reversed. You can understand the Chinese reaction. We need to stop arms proliferation worldwide. Let’s concentrate on housing, clothing and feeding the world, not arming it,

Welcome Mr. Brown:

http://www.ajc.com/news/nation-world/sen-elect-brown-says-287648.html

TnGelding

January 31st, 2010
5:18 pm

Pogo

January 31st, 2010
4:58 pm

If they are it’s because we force them to be. They’ve experienced the horrors of war that we haven’t and I don’t think they’re anxious to engage in one.

Nicolia Disfagonious

January 31st, 2010
5:19 pm

We do NOT need to be housing, clothing or feeding the world. We need to worry about housing,clothing and feeding OUR OWN.
When is the rest of the non-poor countries in the world and do their part?
THE ANSWER———— NEVER. The good old USA will so why bother.

yellowfish

January 31st, 2010
5:26 pm

The president is doing the right thing. Supporting Taiwan is a must.

dontcare@goojje.com

January 31st, 2010
6:03 pm

Th fundamental problem between China and US is a lack of trust. There is no way that the two countries can ever be friends. They are bound to clash at some point if the US does not give up on arming Taiwan. Period! Do not dream about a G2. It is either the US or China. It is G1. Wait for 20 more years and see who is the G1

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm!

January 31st, 2010
6:04 pm

Simply as a matter of internal logic, this is somewhat perplexing. After all, when he isn’t blaming George W. Bush, Obama blames “Washington” – a Washington mired in “partisanship” and “pettiness” and “the same tired battles” and “Washington gimmicks” that do nothing but ensure that our “problems have grown worse.” Washington, Obama tells us, is “unable or unwilling to solve any of our problems.”

So let’s have more Washington! In our schools, in our hospitals, in our cars, in everything!

Which raises the question: Does even Obama listen to Obama’s speeches?-MarkSteyn

Does anybody listen to obozo anymore?

China World News |

January 31st, 2010
6:11 pm

[...] to sell arms to Taiwan, … China threatens sanctions over US arms deal CNN International China taking a more muscular approach internationally Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog) China threatens sanctions over arms sale to Taiwan Los [...]

Mike

January 31st, 2010
6:23 pm

If Republican and Democratic parties get into a civic war and one party has to flee to Alaska. And whoever stay in Alaska would like to claim independence. And the second biggest economical entity think that maintaining the standoff positions on both sides will stabilize the region and hence approve a high arm sell to Alaska. Any comments?

ROLLERGIRL

January 31st, 2010
6:23 pm

nicolia..MGD64

@@

January 31st, 2010
6:27 pm

This’ll be interesting:

Goldman Sachs, the world’s richest investment bank, could be about to pay its chief executive a bumper bonus of up to $100 million in defiance of moves by President Obama to take action against such payouts.

Bankers in Davos for the World Economic Forum (WEF) told The Times yesterday they understood that Lloyd Blankfein and other top Goldman bankers outside Britain were set to receive some of the bank’s biggest-ever payouts. “This is Lloyd thumbing his nose at Obama,” said a banker at one of Goldman’s rivals.

http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/industry_sectors/banking_and_finance/article7010492.ece

ROLLERGIRL

January 31st, 2010
6:27 pm

I had another number last year but a more experienced transfer brought it with her and I had to give it up :(

Jenifer

January 31st, 2010
6:32 pm

Reckon the Baptists will ever get out of jail?

@@

January 31st, 2010
6:36 pm

I’ve always thought this would be a great idea here in the U.S.. Get companies to foot the bill for educating their future employees. They’d have a vested interest in doing it right.

Dissatisfied parents and teachers push for free education outside state system

The New Schools Network, a not- for-profit organisation that has fielded at least 350 requests for help, is introducing parents’ groups and teachers to companies that might plan or operate schools. Although “free”, the schools would be owned by charitable trusts and would hire contractors on a commercial basis.

It has definitely worked out well for the kids at my school. Very generous corporate sponsors.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/education/school_league_tables/article7010293.ece

mike

January 31st, 2010
6:38 pm

“If Republican and Democratic parties get into a civic war and one party has to flee to Alaska. And whoever stay in Alaska would like to claim independence. And the second biggest economical entity think that maintaining the standoff positions on both sides will stabilize the region and hence approve a high arm sell to Alaska. Any comments?”

Yes. I am confused.

@@

January 31st, 2010
6:49 pm

I am confused.

I was too, but I just figured “Capital” M-ike was trippin’.

Kamchak

January 31st, 2010
6:50 pm

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm!

January 31st, 2010
6:54 pm

BHO: By the time I took office, we had a one year deficit of over $1 trillion dollars, and projected deficits of $8 trillion dollars over the next decade. Most of this was the result of not paying for two wars, two tax cuts, and an expensive prescription drug program. On top of that, the effects of the recession put a $3 trillion dollar hole in our budget. All this was before I walked in the door.

Hugh Hewitt: Now Mark Steyn, the prescription drug bill, the two wars, the tax cuts, were all in place by the end of 2007 when the deficit was $161 billion.

MS: Right.

HH: Today, it’s $1.35 trillion.

MS: Yeah.

HH: It’s nonsense what he’s saying.

Duh, you reckon?

Jenifer

January 31st, 2010
6:55 pm

This morning on MTP, the Tan Man told David Gregory the republicant party does not have a leader. Duh.

BTW, The Tan Man served only 8 weeks in the Navy in 1968, during Vietnam – bad back.

Jenifer

January 31st, 2010
7:05 pm

Hello Kamchak, 6:50,

I saw that exchange. Krugman ruled. Ailes is a big liar, a BIG liar. Repulsive.

RW-(the original)

January 31st, 2010
7:10 pm

Isn’t MGD64 a beer?

@@,

I missed your comment earlier. Thanks!

Kamchak

January 31st, 2010
7:14 pm

TaxPayer

January 31st, 2010
7:21 pm

The DoD budget for 2011 is going to peak out at over 700 billion dollars. That should make the war mongers happy, huh. No more cuts to F-22s oranything this time around so everyone gets something. More drones, more choppers, more F-35 work, more soldiers, more surges, more everything. I imagine that Democrats and Republicans alike will be voting in favor of this endowment. It looks like we’re also on target to borrow about $1.6 trillion dollars to fund the fed budget next year as well. I wonder how receptive the Chinese will be to lending us that. No matter. Ninety-five percent of us will be paying almost nothing toward that bill — we’re getting another tax cut instead — so life is good. I’m just glad that I’m not in the top five percent. They’ve got a heavy load to carry. Too bad there aren’t more jobs out there so that load could be spread around a little more. But, hey, you can’t squeeze blood from a turnip and you sure can’t squeeze tax dollars from the poor and starving, can you.

Jenifer

January 31st, 2010
7:22 pm

Sen.-Elect Brown Backs Abortion Rights

Republican says he disagrees with his party’s stand

Brown can’t pass the GOP purity test. I wonder how long before he pulls a Romney and reverses his position.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/35169343/ns/politics-capitol_hill/

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm!

January 31st, 2010
7:28 pm

taxxie- That was a beautiful, heartfelt tirade. I can almost imagine the specks of foam that must be flying about. How long did it take you to compose this little jewel?

Kamchak

January 31st, 2010
7:29 pm

Isn’t MGD64 a beer?

If by “beer” you mean flavored water, then yes. In the remote case that you are interested, Man. U. defied the odds-makers and won 3-1 on the road.

TaxPayer

January 31st, 2010
7:32 pm

How long did it take you to compose this little jewel?

A few minutes. Then again, it was an original and I do struggle with typing faster than 30 to 50 wpm. What can I say. Old age. Arthritis. The usual culprits. Cut-n-paste is obviously much faster. I can accomplish that task in seconds.

ROLLERGIRL

January 31st, 2010
7:33 pm

for Prec Mettles:

we’ve got to sink the poontang, was the battle cry!

on her decks were guns as big as steers, and sailors 4 feet high

For six long days and wear-y nights obama stayed in vail
Hillary told the navy, put ever’ ship a-sail
This is my chance to set up , 2012 for me
We got-ta sink the poon-tang to the bot-tom of the sea.

this forum is more fun than someone you hate, getting a yeast infection…