Barack Obama and the ‘blame Bush’ argument

At one point in his speech last night, President Obama tried to remind his listeners that many of the problems facing the nation had been inherited from his predecessor:

“By the time I took office, we had a one year deficit of over $1 trillion and projected deficits of $8 trillion over the next decade. Most of this was the result of not paying for two wars, two tax cuts, and an expensive prescription drug program. On top of that, the effects of the recession put a $3 trillion hole in our budget. All this was before I walked in the door.”

At which point, Sen. John McCain was seen turning to his seatmate Lindsey Graham and whispering “Blame it on Bush.”

It’s a point others have made as well. In a recent news story, for example, Fox News suggested that “one year into his administration, President Obama might want to consider dropping the ‘blame Bush’ page from his playbook.”

Before Obama’s speech, Bill O’Reilly and Dennis Miller were also joking about it. “Now, how many times do you think he’s going to blame Bush tonight?” O’Reilly asked. “I’m taking a little lottery here. You know, how many times do you think we’re going to have, “Well, we inherited this from that idiot, you know? What are we going to do?”

“My feeling is, you know, when he comes up that aisle at the beginning, he’ll be wearing a sandwich board that says, ‘Bush’s Fault’,” Miller said. “He’s not even going to wait until he gets to the mic.”

A few years back, though, another new president made his own first State of the Union speech under economic conditions somewhat similar to that of today. Here’s part of what that president said:

“To understand the State of the Union, we must look not only at where we are and where we’re going but where we’ve been. The situation at this time last year was truly ominous…

Late in 1981, we sank into the present recession largely because continued high interest rates hurt the auto industry and construction. And there was a drop in productivity and the already high unemployment increased…..

If we had not acted as we did, things would be far worse for all Americans than they are today. Inflation inflation, taxes and interest rates would all be higher. A year ago, Americans’ faith in their governmental process was steadily declining. Six out of ten Americans were saying they were pessimistic about their future…,

… The budget in place when I took office had been projected as balanced. It turned out to have one of the biggest deficits in history.

A new kind of defeatism was heard. Some said our domestic problems were uncontrollable that we had to learn to live with the-seemingly endless cycle of high inflation and high unemployment.

…. Our current problems are not the product of the recovery program that’s only just now getting under way, as some would have you believe; they are the inheritance of decades of tax and tax, and spend and spend.”

That president, of course, was Ronald Reagan. (h/t Think Progress)

366 comments Add your comment

jt

January 28th, 2010
5:09 pm

The desperation is in direct proportion to the Reagan comparisoms.

RW-(the original)

January 28th, 2010
5:09 pm

Yet another “so and so did it too” argument.

Geez…….

Kamchak

January 28th, 2010
5:10 pm

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm!

January 28th, 2010
5:13 pm

Yeah but Reagan turned it around.

obozo, hahahaha, hold your breath if you believe.

On the off chance that mammoth mortgages to people who could barely afford food somehow went bad, Wall Street firms could be confident that their Democrat friends would bail them out.-AnnCoulter

And they did, time and time again.

But of course the children say Bush made them do it.

jewcowboy

January 28th, 2010
5:14 pm

Not Saint Ronnie! Say it ain’t sooooo….

Matilda Old

January 28th, 2010
5:20 pm

Common lib argument…”here’s an example of where conservatives do the SAME thing!!!!” Getting boring. Here are the differences:
1. RR’s entire staff didn’t blame everything on Carter. After the Brown victory…they all – Gibbs, Dean and Obama ETC. said that the LOSS WAS BUSH”S fault!
2.This president is no Ronald Reagan…see, the public was “buying” Reagan. The populous finally sees through this president.
3. He made promises to get elected, and simply ignores them (must I list them?)
4. RR NEVER called out another branch of the government.
And there’s more…

“A good leader takes a little more than his share of the blame, a little less than his share of the credit.”
We’re not in Chicago anymore.

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm!

January 28th, 2010
5:21 pm

There was no “pivot to the center,” no serious accounting for the Massachusetts miracle or his misfortunes. Instead, there was an innumerate, inaccurate and distinctly unpresidential whine — blaming George W. Bush for nearly all of his problems (leaving out, among other things, that the Democrats have been controlling Congress and crafting budgets since 2006).-JonahGoldberg

And every single solitary high spending measure that the dummycrat Congress passed, obozo voted yes for.

Bush’s fault, yes, sir.

Kamchak

January 28th, 2010
5:23 pm

This president is no Ronald Reagan…

…and there was much rejoicing.

Jenifer

January 28th, 2010
5:24 pm

We all know the dire straits this country was in when Obama took office. We were on the brink of a depression.

Should he have said “Mickey Mouse” instead of “the previous administration?

I thought he showed quite a lot of restraint by not mentioning any names.

DoggoneGA

January 28th, 2010
5:25 pm

“Common lib argument…”here’s an example of where conservatives do the SAME thing!!!!” Getting boring. Here are the differences:”

And how is that different from the Con game of saying: here’s an example of a liberal doing the same thing!!!

No “side” is immune to that, both sides are EQUALLY guilty. The same playground rule applies to BOTH: “Tommy did it too” is not a valid defense

mike

January 28th, 2010
5:28 pm

LOL. This is why the Dems are doomed in 2010. Independent voters don’t care about partisan arguments and counter-arguments. They just want to see somewhat competent government.

There is a massive anti-incumbent tide that started in 08 and will last through 2010 at least. Democrats are the party in power and are the ones who will face this wrath. Instead of coming out with some relevant policies and positions, most pundits and politicians are continuing this inane conversation that won’t ever be answered definitively and surely won’t put people to work or lower the deficit. That is not the spark that the Dems need to overcome this anti-incumbent wave.

The longer the conversations dwells on this petty nonsense, the better for the GOP.

FinnMcCool

January 28th, 2010
5:30 pm

JonahGoldberg??

oh my. reaching aren’t we?

Soothsayer

January 28th, 2010
5:30 pm

Barack Obama inherited an economy that took nearly 30 years to completely decimate. From Reagan on, the neo-liberal experiment has proven to be a disastrous failure.

On another subject: here is the mainstream media headline.
Endless Oil

Technology, politics, and lower demand will yield a bumper crop of crude

The real story will follow shortly.

mike

January 28th, 2010
5:30 pm

“And how is that different from the Con game of saying: here’s an example of a liberal doing the same thing!!!”

And how is that different than a liberal saying here is an example of a conservative doing something a liberal said a conservative said a liberal said that he does?

Man this is getting silly.

jewcowboy

January 28th, 2010
5:31 pm

“Barack Obama and the ‘blame Bush’ argument”

No…it wasn’t Bush’s fault..not entirely…it was all those nice right wingers who could not even imagine that any Republican could ever do anything wrong. If anyone pointed out what Bush was doing was going against conservative fiscal policy those ardent right wingers would double-down on their fervor and put even bigger blinders on. Supporting Bush even more zealously, while denigrating the person pointing the duplicity.

Bud Wiser

January 28th, 2010
5:31 pm

This falls along that so called ‘train of thought’ where Obowo said that the people of Massachusetts were so very angry at what had been done in the previos eight years, that they voted in a Republican.

Yessir, they voted in a Republican because they were so mad at Bush.

Someone remind me please, what party was Bush? I’m thinking … I know it will come to me soon … no hints now … oh yes, he was a Republican.

The stupidity of this arrogant fool defies description, at least one that can be used here, because all of his mushroom head drooling followers still believe he is a Messiah. Hell, Chris Matthews even “…forgot he was black…” last night, watching him.

It is so easy to control the minds of idiots, because there is so little to do, so little to work with.

A while back I was speaking about Obowo should be impeached. I freely admit now that I was wrong. An arrogant, self-serving, defiant, angry fool like him needs to be on center stage, so all America can see this fraud for what he really is. He is on a course, if not changed, of not only causing major damage to his political party, but to make for dammed sure that qualified and able or not, America will look at minorities running for major office in the future will see their hopes dimmed, if not totally snuffed out.

Of course his idiot patrol and the socialists will still defend him to the end.

They are too stupid not to.

Soothsayer

January 28th, 2010
5:31 pm

Jay

January 28th, 2010
5:32 pm

Maybe I’m wrong — hey, it happens — but I very much doubt that back in 1982, the Democrats were chastising Reagan for blaming the economy on his predecessors. Reagan was stating demonstrable fact and describing reality in those statements, and it would be hard to take issue with them.

The same applies to Obama. Everything he said last night about the conditions he inherited was true. So it’s funny to hear the conservatives pretending that these are things that must not be said.

mike

January 28th, 2010
5:34 pm

“From Reagan on, the neo-liberal experiment has proven to be a disastrous failure.”

I guess. Then again, we have become a far richer country over that time. We are going through some rough seas and will for some time. But when the economy rebounds, as it always does, we will still be the richest and most powerful country on earth for decades to come, deficits or not.

I mean, which country are we supposed to be envying?

Del

January 28th, 2010
5:34 pm

That refrain from Ronald Reagan resonated because he was viewed as an achiever by a majority of people including many Democrats. Obama’s continuing campaign strategy of blaming Bush is now failing because unfortunately for the country and maybe even for him he’s the president. After being in office for now over a year, voters are now seeing him as a overreaching underachiever who can’t even effectively govern while his party holds a majority in both chambers of congress.

jewcowboy

January 28th, 2010
5:37 pm

mike,

“The longer the conversations dwells on this petty nonsense, the better for the GOP”

Uh…mike…where are the GOP’s constructive non-partisan solutions? The GOP fairs no better than the Democrats when it comes to dwelling on petty nonsense…just look at some of the posts on this blog. But I do agree with you, and the President, that we need to move the dialogue past the parsimoniousness.

FinnMcCool

January 28th, 2010
5:37 pm

There must be some way we can blame everything on poor people…

getalife

January 28th, 2010
5:38 pm

The consequences of the w disaster gave us the SC decision and a political SC.

That does not go away.

mike

January 28th, 2010
5:39 pm

“So it’s funny to hear the conservatives pretending that these are things that must not be said.”

I lot of this is residual effect from the absurd amount of personal blame the liberals have placed on Bush.

I had lunch with a liberal friend of mine who was off-handedly claimed that Bush was responsible for a “broken health care” system. I asked him what exactly Bush had done and he changed the subject.

You might also want to consider the fact that 1981 was 29 years ago and a lot of folks were too young to have been paying attention to Reagan’s comments on deficit spending. I assume that Bush 1 and 2 must not have behaved this way if you had to go back to Reagan, so it could be that people my age have not seen a President blame his predecessor so regularly and so late into his Presidency and find Obama doing so unseemly.

FinnMcCool

January 28th, 2010
5:40 pm

Boy, you conservatives use some broad strokes (voters, majority) and really have an excellent grasp of what the future (November) holds.

Keep those dreams alive!

Soothsayer

January 28th, 2010
5:40 pm

Mike,

Do REALLY believe we are richer today than when Reagan took office? My God! Where have you been?

jewcowboy

January 28th, 2010
5:42 pm

mike,

“I lot of this is residual effect from the absurd amount of personal blame the liberals have placed on Bush.”

And President Bush deserved quite a bit of that personal blame. Not all, mind you (for there are many whack jobs out there who want to blame everything on Bush, or Obama for that matter), but quite a bit.

Where does the buck stop?

mike

January 28th, 2010
5:42 pm

getalife –

“The consequences of the w disaster gave us the SC decision and a political SC.”

And no Supreme Courts were political prior to this one? What makes this Court more political than all of the other ones?

Del

January 28th, 2010
5:42 pm

Well sometimes you just have to except the world around you as it is instead of how you want it to be. I think doing otherwise is referred to as denial. The lib’s seem to be doing a lot of denial these days.

getalife

January 28th, 2010
5:44 pm

“A thin majority of the Supreme Court, made possible by President Bush’s appointment of Justice [Samuel] Alito, has thrown out important parts of the law and run roughshod over a long line of longstanding Court precedent,” Leahy said. “This is the most partisan decision since Bush v. Gore. That decision by the activist conservative bloc on the Supreme Court intervened in a presidential election. This decision is broader and more damaging in that they have now decided to intervene in all elections.”

getalife

January 28th, 2010
5:45 pm

Schumer saw the Alito reaction and stood up and applauded the President .

This one will go after con candidates too.

The cons are dithering.

Jess

January 28th, 2010
5:46 pm

Obama doesn’t need to remind anyone. He has done little else his entire first year. And it is strange to see him include tax cuts as a problem he inherited, after bragging over and over about his own tax cut to 95% of Americans.

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm!

January 28th, 2010
5:46 pm

FinnMcCool

January 28th, 2010
5:30 pm

JonahGoldberg??

oh my. reaching aren’t we?

McFool- Go ahead on and join Bookman in the fever swamps and tell us how the dummycrat controlled Congress didn’t control spending in 2006.

Or do you even freaking know what Congress is?

jewcowboy

January 28th, 2010
5:46 pm

mike,

“And no Supreme Courts were political prior to this one? What makes this Court more political than all of the other ones?”

Very long..but interesting information.

http://digitalcommons.law.uga.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1364&context=fac_artchop

mike

January 28th, 2010
5:47 pm

jewcowboy –

“Uh…mike…where are the GOP’s constructive non-partisan solutions?”

Oh come on man, you are smarter than that. I never made any claim that they did. My point was that the Dems are the incumbents in an anti-incumbent environment and if they want to survive, they need a better story than “Bush was bad” or “Party of No”. The GOP can play this game and run out the clock til Nov.

“The GOP fairs no better than the Democrats when it comes to dwelling on petty nonsense…just look at some of the posts on this blog.”

Never said they did and I think I have made my disdain for mindless partisans of both sides pretty clear.

“But I do agree with you, and the President, that we need to move the dialogue past the parsimoniousness.”

I’m not even saying that they should do it for the country’s sake. They need to do it if they want to hold Congress.

Del

January 28th, 2010
5:48 pm

I’m sure Patrick will rally the fractured democratic part with his words of wisdom.

Soothsayer

January 28th, 2010
5:48 pm

Blaming Bush doesn’t make any sense, he is just the hapless fool left standing when the music stopped. Our economy (notice I don’t use the term recession) has been nearly 30 years in the making. Unfortunately this IS our economy. Get used to it. If by some chance your job cannot be outsourced (YET) it is a great time. For those without a job, the next 10 – 20 years are going to proved very challenging. This not a recession, this the end product of neo-liberal economics. It is not going to change in the foreseeable future. This is the economy we should have had in 2001 except for the housing asset bubble put it off for about 8 or 9 years.

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm!

January 28th, 2010
5:48 pm

Bookman practices corporate sponsored journalistic malpractice on behalf of the dummycrat party but it is his right of free speech, after all.

hahahaha

mike

January 28th, 2010
5:49 pm

getalife –

“Leahy said”

Wow! You mean one of the most partisan and ideological Senators we have is opposed to a Supreme Court ruling that does not benefit his party?

That’s all the proof I need. I guess if I find a Strom Thurmond rant against Roe v Wade, that proves that decision was political too.

Jonathan Turley is a very liberal law professor at USC who is a regular and welcome guest of Olbermann’s. He said on Olbermann’s show that he agreed with the ruling on legal grounds although he is concerned about the ramifications.

The fact that you don’t like a ruling is no evidence that the court is political.

Curious Observer

January 28th, 2010
5:49 pm

Certainly, Bush II had no condition to blame on his predecessor. You inherit a budget surplus? And when has that happened before.

Of course, the reformed drunk and coke user proceeded to squander so much money on unprovoked wars and tax cuts for the wealthy that he left a trillion dollar deficit. Worse, to hide it, he and his minions refused to count the war appropriations as part of the annual budget. Sort of like writing a big check but not entering it in the register and then pretending the check doesn’t exist as a liability.

Pogo

January 28th, 2010
5:49 pm

I think Obama showed his desperation last night in his totally inappropriate attack on the Supreme Court. The State of the Union is not the forum to take cheap political pot shots at anyone or any institution because this type of thing does not help the country in times of crisis as we find ourselves in now. In fact, it looked down right tacky and low class. There is no doubt now that this man is a super-egomaniacal politician that is way over his head and he will blame anyone and will sacrifice anybody (except himself) to save his legacy. Someone somewhere has done him a grave dis-service by telling him that he was some kind of mega-intellectual that transcended the common man and that he could do no wrong. He absolutely refuses to believe that he could be in error on anything and he continues to display this even though the evidence points otherwise. I think the American media have had a lot to do with his self-delusion and for that they have pretty much done him in. The American people do not trust him and they are beginning not to like him. His own party will turn on him soon and Senator Landreau’s statement is proof of that. And furthermore, even though I am not a fan of Landreau, she was right.

Yosarian

January 28th, 2010
5:50 pm

Ok, I read the Think progress article.
Now in the spirit of political tit-4-tat…& breaking reference taboos
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ucac/20100128/cm_ucac/cantweatleastgetatoaster

jewcowboy

January 28th, 2010
5:50 pm

mike,

“My point was that the Dems are the incumbents in an anti-incumbent environment and if they want to survive, they need a better story than “Bush was bad” or “Party of No”. The GOP can play this game and run out the clock til Nov.”

There are still 40 incumbents from the GOP in the Senate whose only contribution seems to be saying no. My point was that if there is an “anti-incumbent” atmosphere in Independents…it is not just the Democrats who are going to need to sweat a little.

getalife

January 28th, 2010
5:53 pm

“I think Obama showed his desperation last night in his totally inappropriate attack on the Supreme Court.”

con talking point.

Perhaps other countries and corp donors will unite to end conservatism.

Kamchak

January 28th, 2010
5:53 pm

mike

January 28th, 2010
5:56 pm

“Certainly, Bush II had no condition to blame on his predecessor. You inherit a budget surplus? And when has that happened before.”

Well if he was as cynical as Obama, he could have claimed that the Al Qaeda threat grew under Clinton. He could have said that the rapid decline of the manufacturing base was due to NAFTA.

I would not have made those arguments and neither did Bush. That being said, they are as reasonable as Obama’s complaints about Bush.

mike

January 28th, 2010
5:57 pm

getalife –

“con talking point”

tell me again about the political Supreme Court, hypocrite.

Scout

January 28th, 2010
5:58 pm

Yes, but Reagan wasn’t born in Kenya.

getalife

January 28th, 2010
5:58 pm

Yeah mike.

There are very few that will stand up to this decision on the Senate floor. It’s called courage.

The rest want unlimited donations for their campaigns to crush their opponents.

Could be used on the con pols too.

Soros and Buffet could end the cons.

Yosarian

January 28th, 2010
6:00 pm

OK-No problem – I read the Think Progress article.
Now, in the spirit of this blog’s political tit-4-tat…and suspension of reference taboos…
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ucac/20100128/cm_ucac/cantweatleastgetatoaster

jewcowboy

January 28th, 2010
6:00 pm

mike,

“Well if he was as cynical as Obama, he could have claimed that the Al Qaeda threat grew under Clinton.”

What…huh?

“They looked at our response after the hostage crisis in Iran, the bombings of the Marine barracks in Lebanon, the first World Trade Center attack, the killing of American soldiers in Somalia, the destruction of two U.S. embassies in Africa, and the attack on the USS Cole. They concluded that free societies lacked the courage and character to defend themselves against a determined enemy… After September the 11th, 2001, we’ve taught the terrorists a very different lesson: America will not run in defeat and we will not forget our responsibilities.” ~ George W. Bush 8.30.2005

FinnMcCool

January 28th, 2010
6:01 pm

totally inappropriate attack on the Supreme Court

There was nothing inappropriate about his remarks. Turn off the Fox News.

Yosarian

January 28th, 2010
6:01 pm

Sorry for the double post!

mike

January 28th, 2010
6:03 pm

jewcowboy –

“There are still 40 incumbents from the GOP in the Senate whose only contribution seems to be saying no.”

Well that is the talking point isn’t it. Did they say no to the Afghan surge? Why should they be expected to vote for legislation that they don’t support? For legislation that the American people do not support?

Were the Dems the party of No in 2004 when Bush pushed Social Security reform and the Dems behaved exactly as the Republicans are now?

Regardless, none of this has anything to do with the point that you seemed to have missed twice.

“My point was that if there is an “anti-incumbent” atmosphere in Independents…it is not just the Democrats who are going to need to sweat a little.”

Actually, you are wrong about that. Mindless partisans on both ends of the spectrum will stick to their pre-programmed responses and independents have moved towards voting out the incumbents. This will make the difference in the purple states that the Dems won in 2008.

Don’t take it from me though. Every political analyst from Jay to Rove has acknowledged this to be true.

El Jefe

January 28th, 2010
6:03 pm

Answer me this, who voted for the TARP bill? Who was it that passed on to our young the excessive debt?

Why, Congress did. Bush signed it because he thought it was important to stabilize the financial markets.

Little did he know about that outcome.

Jay

January 28th, 2010
6:03 pm

Condi Rice: Nobody organized this country or the international community to fight the terrorist threat that was upon us until 9/11. … We were not left a comprehensive strategy to fight al-Qaida. For instance, big pieces were missing, like an approach to Pakistan that might work, because without Pakistan you weren’t going to get Afghanistan.

George Bush: They looked at our response after the hostage crisis in Iran, the bombings of the Marine barracks in Lebanon, the first World Trade Center attack, the killing of American soldiers in Somalia, the destruction of two U.S. embassies in Africa, and the attack on the USS Cole. They concluded that free societies lacked the courage and character to defend themselves against a determined enemy. … After September the 11th, 2001, we’ve taught the terrorists a very different lesson: America will not run in defeat and we will not forget our responsibilities.

George Bush: “When I took office, our economy was beginning a recession.”

Commerce Secretary Don Evans: “The president inherited a Clinton recession and turned it into the early stages of Bush prosperity.”

George W. Bush: “In terms of the economy, look, I inherited a recession, I am ending on a recession.”

Bosch

January 28th, 2010
6:03 pm

Scout,

And neither was Obama.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I believe there are many things that have caused the economic downturn we are seeing today – first, wars – including Vietnam, the various bubbles, NAFTA, deregulation of the financial industry, stagnant wages which have made the American consumer spend more than they make, and health care costs just to name a few.

FinnMcCool

January 28th, 2010
6:04 pm

After September the 11th, 2001, we’ve taught the terrorists a very different lesson: America will not run in defeat and we will not forget our responsibilities

W should have continued that sentence: “and we haven’t a clue on how to win a war or EVEN what a definition of “win” is. And, more importantly we have shown them that we can throw all kinds of money at a problem with no intent to solve it.”

El Jefe

January 28th, 2010
6:05 pm

mike,

How true. The feeling is that anyone who is not a conservative (republican or democrat) should be very worried.

Those that refuse to listen to the people that elected them – Well, lets just say the moving companies will get a great stimulus bonus in January.

md

January 28th, 2010
6:05 pm

The fact of the matter is that all prior administrations brought us to where we are, as every single admin has to deal with policies already on the books. Not a single one of them were allowed to wipe the slate clean and start from scratch.

So it is pitiful that they even resort to finger pointing, as their parties (and Barry himself as a senator) all played a part in the fiasco.

Now, a true leader will put himself in front of this country and say “it is what it is, now lets get to work”. Doubt that will happen any time soon.

mike

January 28th, 2010
6:06 pm

jewcowboy –

Wow, you are really in mindless partisan mode tonight.

OK you win. Obama and all other politicians who share your views are good, smart and effective. Bush and all other politicians who do not share your views are evil, dumb and incompetent.

Rush’s dittoheads bleat the same chant,. They just reverse it.

Have a good night all.

Jackie

January 28th, 2010
6:07 pm

All that pay attention and understands how our economic system works are aware of the macro and micro ramifications of what is currently in play and the genesis of those forces.

President Obama should spend more of his time proposing what he thinks should be done because nothing he says or proposes will be accepted by many. Put it on the table, stand behind it and let the naysayers do what they normally do, shoot themselves in the foot and exclaim “…it doesn’t hurt.”

jewcowboy

January 28th, 2010
6:07 pm

“Actually, you are wrong about that. Mindless partisans on both ends of the spectrum will stick to their pre-programmed responses and independents have moved towards voting out the incumbents.”

And the GOP has no incumbents? I’m not suggesting that the Democrats, by way of more people in office, are not more vulnerable…but simply because Democrats have more to lose it does not mean Republicans have nothing to lose.

jewcowboy

January 28th, 2010
6:09 pm

mike,

“Wow, you are really in mindless partisan mode tonight”

Sorry Bush’s own words bit you in the bottom, as evidently did Rice’s and Evan’s did. Have a pleasant evening.

md

January 28th, 2010
6:10 pm

Jay, can you tell you it guys that rid icu lous is not a bad word, thanks.

Bosch

January 28th, 2010
6:11 pm

As far as the SCOTUS decision goes, the justices ruled how they interpret the law – many here don’t agree with it, but I have yet to see anyone who disagrees with it scream “judicial activism.” Maybe they have I just haven’t seen it. I think Obama has every right to bring possible consequences of that decision to the attention of the American people, and considering it affects the actual state of our union, the time and place was appropriate. The difference is he did it with class instead of screaming some rhetorical nonsense.

It seems the ones who do agree with it have also expressed their disgust with special interests and lobbyists and how politicians are bought by them, but contradict themselves by agreeing with this decision. Go figure.

Jay

January 28th, 2010
6:11 pm

I have tried, md, to no avail. it’s ridiculous, so to speak

jewcowboy

January 28th, 2010
6:14 pm

md,

“Jay, can you tell you it guys that rid icu lous is not a bad word, thanks.”

absurd, antic, bizarre, comic, comical, contemptible, daffy, derisory, droll, fantastic, farcical, foolheaded, foolish, gelastic, goofy, grotesque, harebrained, hilarious, impossible, incredible, jerky, laughable, ludicrous, nonsensical, nutty, outrageous, preposterous, risible, sappy, silly, slaphappy, unbelievable, wacky.

I like wacky the best. Or perhaps slaphappy.

joan

January 28th, 2010
6:14 pm

He has been in a year, with a majority in the Congress. Let the Democrats implode themselves. They do it so well.

joan

January 28th, 2010
6:15 pm

About his criticism of the Supreme Court. He is supposed to be a “constitutional scholar”, but the opinion expressly excluded foreign corporations. It sounded like he didn’t know that, or if he did, well, then another example of lying.

@@

January 28th, 2010
6:20 pm

jay, I don’t recall the country being as polarized under Reagan. Al Gore boarded the polar express and rode it downhill. The dems have been stoking the fires for eight years.

Obama, most polarized first-year president. What did you expect?

We’ll have to see how low HE can go.

Allllllll aboard! Get ready to have your tickets punched.

DoggoneGA

January 28th, 2010
6:21 pm

” but I have yet to see anyone who disagrees with it scream “judicial activism.” ”

I did, in reference to the objections to Sotomayor that she would “ignore precedent” and “legislate from the bench”

Funny, isn’t it, that those who objected to her because she MIGHT do either of those, had NOTHING to say about the SC judges who actually did BOTH.

DoggoneGA

January 28th, 2010
6:22 pm

“but the opinion expressly excluded foreign corporations”

Is Budweiser a “foreign corporation? If anyone says no, remember they are now owned by Inbev, which is a Belgian company.

getalife

January 28th, 2010
6:22 pm

“Murray Hill Incorporated is Running for Congress
for the Best Democracy Money can Buy”

http://www.murrayhillweb.com/new_day/index.html

josef nix

January 28th, 2010
6:22 pm

Jay–gotcha earlier. Thanks.

I must say banning the r word did go a long way toward me rearranging my line of thought (though not completely) on the bonfire of the bannities hereabouts…

jewcowboy–
I’m right fond of the word slaphappy myself…it just sort of, well, paints just the right mental picture…

jewcowboy

January 28th, 2010
6:25 pm

@@,

Most polerizing ever? Kinda forgetting 2001 huh?

@@

January 28th, 2010
6:25 pm

Uhmmmm, jay? What are we supposed to do with your wealth of “info” at 6:03? Do you have an objective?

jewcowboy

January 28th, 2010
6:25 pm

Josef nix,

Farcical is right up there as well.

Curious Observer

January 28th, 2010
6:26 pm

And let me add here: so many of our greatest statesmen have reminded us that spiritual values alone are essential to our nation’s health and vigor. The Congress opens its proceedings each day, as does the Supreme Court, with an acknowledgment of the Supreme Being — yet we are denied the right to set aside in our schools a moment each day for those who wish to pray. I believe Congress should pass our school prayer amendment. (Applause.)

Now, to make sure there is a full nine-member Supreme Court to interpret the law, to protect the rights of all Americans, I urge the Senate to move quickly and decisively in confirming Judge Anthony Kennedy to the highest Court in the land and to also confirm 27 nominees now waiting to fill vacancies in the federal judiciary. (Applause.)

Ronald Reagan’s Seventh State of the Union Speech

Were the Supreme Court justices, many of whom had voted to strike down state laws injecting prayer into the classroom, absent from this speech? Was this not at least an implicit criticism of the ruling?

Or does it count only when Obama does it?

md

January 28th, 2010
6:26 pm

One very big difference between Reagan and Obama – the 24 hr news cycle.

@@

January 28th, 2010
6:26 pm

jewcowboy:

Gallup.

Jay

January 28th, 2010
6:27 pm

@@, interesting how you put all the blame on Democrats.

To my recollection, this began in the Clinton era. I recall being shocked to see “Don’t blame me, I voted for Bush” bumper stickers just a month or two after his inauguration, before he had a chance to do a damn thing. I had never seen that before.

Newt Gingrich with his GOPAC memo to GOP candidates played a big role in it too, It read:

“Often we search hard for words to define our opponents. Sometimes we are hesitant to use contrast. Remember that creating a difference helps you. These are powerful words that can create a clear and easily understood contrast. Apply these to the opponent, their record, proposals and their party.

* abuse of power
* anti- (issue): flag, family, child, jobs
* betray
* bizarre
* bosses
* bureaucracy
* cheat
* coercion
* “compassion” is not enough
* collapse(ing)
* consequences
* corrupt
* corruption
* criminal rights
* crisis
* cynicism
* decay
* deeper
* destroy
* destructive
* devour
* disgrace
* endanger
* excuses
* failure (fail)
* greed
* hypocrisy
* ideological
* impose
* incompetent
* insecure
* insensitive
* intolerant
* liberal
* lie
* limit(s)
* machine
* mandate(s)
* obsolete
* pathetic
* patronage
* permissive attitude
* pessimistic
* punish (poor …)
* radical
* red tape
* self-serving
* selfish
* sensationalists
* shallow
* shame
* sick
* spend(ing)
* stagnation
* status quo
* steal
* taxes
* they/them
* threaten
* traitors
* unionized
* urgent (cy)
* waste
* welfare

Jay

January 28th, 2010
6:27 pm

@@, the 6:03 was in response to an earlier poster claiming Bush never blamed Clinton for his problems.

kayaker 71

January 28th, 2010
6:27 pm

The pattern continues. We see the same thing over and over in his last 400 or so speeches to whomever will listen. Last night, he was so full of himself that nothing else seemed to matter. He seemed actually angry that America is not accepting his mad rush to implosion. This is so typical of a narcissist. His chin up in the air, that defiant attitute of a teenager protesting to an adult that his spin on things isn’t reality. But this clown is playing with the future of this country. His speech last night wasn’t about the problems we are having in this country….. it was about him and his failure to realize that the American people are not buying his brand of BS. We don’t trust him, we don’t like his brazen attitude and a lot of those who voted for him, although wishing him well, are just like Brett Favre…. wish I had that last pass back.

md

January 28th, 2010
6:29 pm

co,

I see nothing in your post that relates directly to a SC ruling. Do you?

I Report (-: You Whine )-: mmm, mmmm, mmmmm!

January 28th, 2010
6:30 pm

From the same press conference as the last Bookman quote-

Now, obviously these are very difficult economic times. When people analyze the situation, there will be — this problem started before my presidency, it obviously took place during my presidency

And by the way, it just wasn’t with the TARP. If you think about AIG, Fannie and Freddie — a lot of the decisions that were made in this administration are very aggressive decisions, all aiming at preventing the financial system from cratering.

So why would Bushie feel the need to save Fannie and Freddie? Community Reinvestment Act, anyone?

josef nix

January 28th, 2010
6:31 pm

Have had a chance to look more closely at the speech. I didn’t see a lot of Bush blaming. The swipes at the Supreme Court were kind of r-word to me and thrown in to keep the audience happy. He knows there not sh*t he can do about it so he doesn’t have to offer anything of substance and it will play well in Peoria. All in all, it was pretty much a bland pablum for the masses and, after listening to a few bars and watching a few well-timed gestures, it was pretty clear that the “actress HAS learned the lines you want to hear” and would have played well on the balcony of the Casa Rosada…

@@

January 28th, 2010
6:32 pm

Another long list?

I voted for Clinton, jay. Other than his lying under oath, I have no regrets.

Have you ever read Alinsky’s “Rules for Radicals”? Obama has…Hillary too. Many of those same words appear. Would you like me to pull some excerpts?

jewcowboy

January 28th, 2010
6:35 pm

Curious,

Only applies to Obama.

Jay

January 28th, 2010
6:35 pm

I didn’t’ know it existed, @@, until the right began to link it to Obama. Did he mention in one of his books that he had read it?

How about Hillary? Is that an assumption that she read it, or is it documented?

@@

January 28th, 2010
6:35 pm

Saul Alinsky’s “Rules for Radicals” — Opening Page Dedication:

“Lest we forget at least an over-the-shoulder acknowledgment to
the very first radical: from all our legends, mythology, and history… the first radical known to man who rebelled against the establishment and did it so effectively that he at least won his own kingdom — Lucifer.”

Balance Our Budget

January 28th, 2010
6:36 pm

Wonder if Jay and his fellow liberal bloggers can look back over the last year and think of a couple of big accomplishments that they would like to boast about.Remember don’t blame the republicans super majority in the senate and huge majority in the house.

jt

January 28th, 2010
6:36 pm

Considering the Great and Sovereign State of Georgia’s political affairs, budget woes and the lack of harmony therein of her citizens,

isn’t it a tragic redundancy to be so fixated on an unnecessary Federal layer of government.

Those federales are blaming everyone to bankruptcy. Including your kids and grandchildren.

Hillbilly Deluxe

January 28th, 2010
6:36 pm

I can remember many times as a boy my parents telling me, “Don’t matter whose fault it was, you’re the one getting the whipping”.

Josef

Left you a comment below about Teddy Roosevelt.

Jay

January 28th, 2010
6:39 pm

Hillbilly, I saw your reference to the Lewis & Clark diaries earlier. I read them every few years, just for fun. Once I read them in the full, multi-volume edition, which actually was a blast.

Dave R.

January 28th, 2010
6:39 pm

Just a couple of comments.

Once again, Bookman ignores the fact that the Dems controlled CONGRESS for the past 4 years, who are the folks who REALLY control the budget, but of course, you can’t blame them and their “management” of the financial sector during this crisis, can you? (Remember Barney – Fannie and Freddie are fundamentally sound – Frank two years before their meltdown?)

And if what he inherited from Bush was so darned bad, why didn’t he focus on the important things with the economy – like jobs – instead of trying to cram a health care bill down our throats? This bozo was missing in action for the first year.

And to the thread below; not only was Hope & Change rude to chastise the court during the speech, he was also classless AND wrong. His fundamental complaint last night was about foreign corporations being able to sway elections, but as ABC pointed out in their fact check today, foreign corporations are STILL barred from contributing to American political campaigns.

Classless, clueless and and a threat to freedom. That’s our Commander-in-Chief.

josef nix

January 28th, 2010
6:41 pm

Interesting to read over the list. I don’t know how many of the AJC’s editors are still honest enough to admit it, but back when I was a young Turk doing copy editing, in my “bible” there were two lists labeled by parts of speech. One was to be used when the subject matter was in the favor of the editorial stance, the other for when it was not…there was also a LONG list of verboten under any circumstances. That list may still be around, but it’s decidedly a lot shorter than it once was….

Jay

January 28th, 2010
6:43 pm

I’ve never seen nor even heard of such a list, Josef, and I’ve worked at both liberal and conservative papers. Not to be rude, but maybe that had disappeared by the time I came in the field.

AmVet

January 28th, 2010
6:44 pm

Dennis Miller is still on the air in ANY capacity?

My gawd, he is to comedy what Newt’s nephew, Karl Rove, is to decency in politics.

The funniest thing Miller could do is to be water boarded alongside Hannity.

A year on, and the conned still pretend the deadly stench from the BushCo sewer is a myth…

Drew

January 28th, 2010
6:44 pm

Conservatives cannot accept responsibility, can they? Neither here, nor on Capitol Hill.

Yes, Bush is to blame for the budgets he signed into law. Every member of Congress who voted for those budgets – Republicans mostly, including those snickering fools, McCain and Graham, but some Democrats, too – is responsible. Senator Orrin Hatch said “it was standard practice not to pay for things.” They are responsible for that. And so is every voter who cast a ballot for any one of them, even when that “standard practice” was obvious. I suspect that includes Miller, O’Reilly, and many of the deficit hawks in this thread. They are responsible for trillions in debt.

But make note of that, and whoa, watch them squeal. It has to be the all the Democrats’ fault somehow, doesn’t it?