Profit motive not always a good thing

From CNN:

As scandals from Wall Street to Washington roil the public trust, the justice system in Luzerne County, in the heart of Pennsylvania’s struggling coal country, has also fallen prey to corruption. The county has been rocked by a kickback scandal involving two elected judges who essentially jailed kids for cash. Many of the children had appeared before judges without a lawyer.

The nonprofit Juvenile Law Center in Philadelphia said Phillip is one of at least 5,000 children over the past five years who appeared before former Luzerne County President Judge Mark Ciavarella.

Ciavarella pleaded guilty earlier this month to federal criminal charges of fraud and other tax charges, according to the U.S. attorney’s office. Former Luzerne County Senior Judge Michael Conahan also pleaded guilty to the same charges. The two secretly received more than $2.6 million, prosecutors said…

Pennsylvania has the second highest number of private facilities after Florida, accounting for about 11 percent of the private facilities in the United States, according to the National Center for Juvenile Justice in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

“Once somebody is going to make more money by holding more kids, there is a pretty good predictable profit motive,” said criminal justice consultant Judith Greene, who heads a nonprofit group called Justice Strategies. “It’s predictable that companies are going to tolerate certain behaviors they shouldn’t.”

That story illustrates one of the greatest risks of what have come to be known as public-private partnerships. Yes, the profit motive gives private companies an incentive to do things more efficiently than public entities; yes, that ability can and should be utilized to cut taxpayer costs in some areas.

But for a private company, greater efficiency is only one way to generate higher profits. Other means might be less positive. In this case, the $2.6 million paid to the judges was basically treated as marketing expense, a means to generate more business and thus greater profit. Corruption is a constant danger in such arrangements.

In other areas, the search for profit might prompt a private company to cut health and safety corners that a public entity might not. In Alabama last month, a county sheriff was jailed by a federal judge because he was essentially starving county prisoners for profit.

Under a law dating to the 1920s, sheriffs in Alabama are given state money to feed their prisoners — a gaudy $1.75 a day — and sheriffs get to pocket any of that money that they don’t spend. In effect, they run their jail kitchens as a private business.

So, over the past three years, while Morgan County Sheriff Greg Bartlett was pocketing  a nice $210,000 in profit, prisoners were emerging from his jail gaunt and malnourished.  “

”There was undisputed evidence that most of the inmates had lost significant weight,” federal Judge U. W. Clemon in Birmingham told the New York Times. ”I could not ignore them.” Clemon jailed the sheriff until he agreed to adequately feed prisoners “more than a few spoonfuls of grits, part of an egg and a piece of toast at breakfast, and bits of undercooked, bloody chicken at supper.”

Sometimes private enterprise can do it better; sometimes it can’t. There is no one answer to every situation.

51 comments Add your comment

Hillbilly Deluxe

February 23rd, 2009
1:32 pm

The 2 in Pennsylvania should receive whatever the maximum sentence is and serve every day of it. And put them in with the general population just for good measure. And you’re right; there is no one answer for every situation.

Chad Harris

February 23rd, 2009
1:42 pm

AJC/DNC Management

February 23rd, 2009
5:51 am
——–>Conservative<———- budgets criticized

Atlanta ran aground financially even while following a conservative budget law designed to generate a surplus every year.-Urinal

So a “Conservative” budget rule telling the democrats in Atlanta to only spend what they collect caused them to spend more!!

The horror!

I knew there was something amiss, why, a lib would never tax and spend on their own!

Evil, horrible rule!
___________________

Conservative Budgets–we know what those are:

Under Bush there was no provision for Iraq or Natural Disasters Ever Put in the White House National Budget

This was brilliant adult behavior because we all know Iraq and Katrina never happened on Bush’s watch.

DB, Gwinnettian

February 23rd, 2009
1:46 pm

“sheriffs get to pocket any of that money that they don’t spend.”

This law is still on the books, why?

@@

February 23rd, 2009
1:46 pm

One man’s job is another man’s meal ticket, jay.

I agree with Hillbilly Deluxe. Both judges, even if THEY WERE registered republicans which they’re not, they’re democrats, should serve the maximum sentence for preying on the youngest among us.

T

February 23rd, 2009
1:47 pm

DB, Gwinnettian

February 23rd, 2009
1:47 pm

Chad, you really ought to comment on the subject at hand before dragging an old food fight into a new thread. Just sayin’.

AJC/DNC Management

February 23rd, 2009
1:54 pm

Wait until you see the crime the two kids in the White House do when they jail the Pennsylvania coal industry because of junk science.

We will all suffer for that.

Mr. Snarky

February 23rd, 2009
1:55 pm

Well said Jay!
Unfortunately, most prisoners without money for campaign donations or lawyers are subject to the predatory whims of those in power. So, often those arrested for minor violations spend months (longer than their sentence would be) sitting in backwoods county jails waiting for a trial due to the incompetence or indifference of local authorities.

Chad Harris

February 23rd, 2009
1:59 pm

Let’s recognize the umbrella problem in this country. We incarcerate more people in the U.S. than any other country. Probation revocation is a cottage industry and often for the most absurd claims. It’s a lot like quotas for traffic tickets that cops always have. They want to justify their existence.

These two clowns, and the probation officers who are also being convicted should get life in prison so when they die they’ll have assimilated a perspective on how bad they were screwing people.

Deals are Made with Private Industry in the Prison Industrial Complex All the Time

The most egregious and prolific in the federal criminal justice system are the deals between DOJ and private medical providers. If you’re ever asked to review those dharts as an expert witness, and you’ve read/reviewed thousands of charts you’ll find that DOJ is routinely repsonsible for killing people secondary to pure negligent medicine and gross malpractice. It takes minutes to find glaring errors in care.

Brad Steal

February 23rd, 2009
2:01 pm

Private or public seems to be insignificant in the light of the amoral fraud committed by the two corrupt judges. The whole state of Alabama seems to regularly test the boundaries of marality too in their silly little self-defined autocracy.

Chad Harris

February 23rd, 2009
2:04 pm

It took Obama minutes to slam dunk Jerkoff Jindall in a preview of the way he’d slice Jindall up if the thugs are foolish enough to put it politely to run him in 2012.

Charlie Crist is your best shot and he’ll get slaughtered but he’s a lot better than Jindal as a candidate.

Notice that Jindall has zero detials as he focuses in on 1% of the budget plan made necessary by eight years where irresponsibly there was no budgeting for natural disasters in Iraq in the budget because Bush wanted to slush money into secret funds where it is documented that 19 wheelers were filled with stacks of hundred dollar bills and they were thrown away in Iraq.

getalife

February 23rd, 2009
2:25 pm

Paul

February 23rd, 2009
2:32 pm

I just hope the max sentence for the two judges is enough. Those two scarred kids enough some will have trouble functioning. They destroyed lives – they should have decades to sit and think about it.

DB had a good question – why, after such abuses are uncovered, are the laws which gave rise to the conditions on the books?

Public-private? Again, seems to be a problem with lack of oversight. It appears the gov’t agency let the contract and walked away. They apparently did not hire independent people to assure all standards were met. In fact, I’ll wager the standards written in the contract were pretty weak, if they were there at all. The contracts should have listed the standards, then listed the strong financial penalties for not meeting. Plus, if the state would have just had the contracts reviewed by the state’s legal department to make sure the interests of the people were protected…

So much of this seems so…. elementary, so basic. Yet the absurdities continue, on and on and on.

Taxpayer

February 23rd, 2009
2:41 pm

Like that coal-fired power plant in Tennessee. They were driven by profit and they let that toxic ash build up and up and up until the dam burst and then it went out onto other’s private property. Now, they’ll pay more, much more after-the-fact. The same for the peanut processor and for Imperial Sugar. In both of those cases, a lust for the almighty buck killed people before their bad ways were brought to an end. Now that we have an administration that cares more about we the people than about the almighty buck, we’re even hearing a renewed interest in clamping down on polluters and reducing the mercury and cadmium and CO2 emissions, for example. These are just samples of things that were just ignored by the past administration so big businesses could rake in more money at the expense of we the people’s health and even lives. Why would anyone place the almighty buck ahead of another’s life.

Eleanor Rigby

February 23rd, 2009
2:42 pm

It really is outrageous and disgusting. The most outrageous is the 15-year old girl sentenced to wilderness camp for mocking an assistant principal on her MySpace site. Why was this even brought to court? What exactly was the charge? Since when is against the law to mock anyone? Since when is what we say on a personal web page censored? Frightening really. Where was the ACLU? Any one who would subvert justice is a threat to freedom and democracy.

RealityKing

February 23rd, 2009
2:42 pm

You got to watch those Pennsylvanians closely…, they tend to change easily.

Chad Harris

February 23rd, 2009
2:44 pm

Let’s offer the commenters a llittle insight into the prison industrial complex in this country via an Eight Circuit opinion issued today that illustrates exactly what I’m talking about. We have 1/100 incarcerated or on probation in the US right now–some for absurd reasons and it is very expensive to incarcerate people–there is a lot more entailed than just throwing them in a cell:

Witness the state of Georgia that is millions of dollars in the hole in fixing their highway system–and although Purdue has been in since 2003 Gena Evans just got around to detailing how badly behind DOT is yet we have one of the largest prison budgets in the world, and the US has far and away the largest prison budget in the world.

The inane and insane realities of federal felon-in-possession prosecutions and sentencings

Citizen of the World

February 23rd, 2009
2:50 pm

There is no one answer, of course, but in some cases, like this one — where people’s lives are at stake — the answer should have been obvious. And now, isn’t Georgia thinking about privatizing mental hospitals?

If we attach a profit motive to locking people up, pretty soon jaywalking will carry a life sentence and squirrely people will be squirreled away for good.

Aside from the question of which types of services would be better privatized, it’s ridiculous to assume that businesses with a profit motive can by virtue of the profit motive do everything better. There’s waste and incompetence, fraud and corruption in the private sector as well as the public sector. After all, business is run by people, too.

Ah, you might argue, but if a private business doesn’t do it better, they’ll be replaced by someone who can! But who’s going to make that determination? The people. And who represents the people? The government. So, we’re right back at square one.

Face it. We need government. If we didn’t have government, we’d invent it!

AJC/DNC Management

February 23rd, 2009
2:52 pm

Taxpayer February 23rd, 2009 2:41 pm Like that coal-fired power plant in Tennessee. They were driven by profit and they let that toxic ash build up and up and up until the dam burst and then it went out onto other’s private property. Now, they’ll pay more, much more after-the-fact. The same for the peanut processor and for Imperial Sugar. In both of those cases, a lust for the almighty buck killed people before their bad ways were brought to an end.

Blah, blah, call me back when your victims number in the millions, toady-

Bakouma was one of approximately one million people who died of malaria last year. Almost all of them were like him: poor, young, and African. And almost all of those deaths could have been prevented through vaccines, insecticide-treated netting, and (gasp) DDT spraying. Empirical research supports the indoor residual spraying (IRS) of DDT as not only safe, but the most economical and effective method for malaria prevention. For example, a 1996 DDT ban in South Africa, pushed by environmental groups, led to a malaria epidemic with over 60,000 cases reported in 2000. After DDT spraying resumed in 2001, infections dropped 80% in one year. Facing a mounting death toll across Africa the World Heath Organization and USAID have recently lent support to IRS using DDT, but its adoption continues to be opposed by environmental extremists relying on shoddy science and fearmongering.-Iowahawk

Since when has the left cared how many people die, oh yeah, when they can score some points on Republicans, I forgot.

Paul

February 23rd, 2009
2:59 pm

Taxpayer

[[Like that coal-fired power plant in Tennessee. They were driven by profit ]]

And people wondered why the meltdown in the financial area occurred. Profit. People will do nearly anything for it, as long as it isn’t illegal (and sometimes, even then). If there’s an ambiguous law, they’ll try to push it as far as they can.

Which is why we have laws. And why we’ll have more. Because people operate out of economic self interest and not for the greater good.

Redneck Convert

February 23rd, 2009
3:03 pm

Well, seems to me we got to know some things before we decide to lock these judges up. Like, was the kids Those People or reglar white folk? Was they just punks walking around with their pants down to their hips and their caps turned backwards and looking for trouble or was they good kids that just crossed the line a bit?

Now I don’t hold with mocking of people put over you. God put them there for a reason. And it’s for sure I don’t hold with getting into peoples cars and taking their change. Anyhow, seems to me these kids are the same kind of people that make fun of rednecks and make them sound like morans.

But I might of knowed a librul like Bookman would take after people doing a little Private Innerprize on the side. These judges probly don’t make enough to buy a big place in FL to retire in. So they saw a little profit with some cos. as a good thing. A quarter million ain’t pocket change. It’s better than putting the kids in jail where we’ll have to pay more taxes to support them. And the judges won’t never be tempted to steal from the fines if they can make a quarter million another way.

As for the people pointing fingers at our jail budget, I say lock everybody up. We got to have Law and Order and it’s better than sinking money into schools and such. Crowd them so deep in the cell they have to stand to sleep. Just don’t raise my taxes to jail them. Have a good day everybody.

Taxpayer

February 23rd, 2009
3:06 pm

Blah, Blah, Blah yourself Andy. Spray your house with DDT every day for all I care. Suck on a tailpipe if you think you can live on CO2. Break open a thermometer and sprinkle mercury on your eggs. Whatever. Take your song and dance over to Iraq and tell them that their innocent civilian relatives died for a good cause — ’cause Bush junior wanted to impress his Daddy or some other equally stupid reason to wage war on innocent people. By the way, we did not go into Iraq after terrorists and Reagan sent Rumsfeld over to Iraq to get in bed with Saddam to begin with. Blah, Blah, Blah.

Since when has the right cared how many people die, oh yeah, when they can score some points on Democrats, I forgot.

Copyleft

February 23rd, 2009
3:06 pm

Well said, Paul. It always amazed me to listen to the Ayn Rand wannabes babbling about how “The market always serves society’s best interests” and “Corporations pursuing profits will always do what’s best for America.”

Erm, no. Not even close. I suspect Jay’s headline here–”Profit Motive Not Always a Good Thing”–gave some aging supply-siders a mild panic attack when they read it. Truth hurts, I suppose.

AJC/DNC Management

February 23rd, 2009
3:07 pm

Classic liberalism-

Fly_on_the_Wall February 23rd, 2009 12:42 pm I’ve been watching this blog for a year or two now and I’ve never seen anyone be able to have a discussion on any ‘facts’ without Andy, Commie or someone like that jumping in and either changing the topic or they resort to name calling which then causes the whole discussion to just collapse.

The very next post-

i r o diM February 23rd, 2009 12:46 pm Commie, why not stick to things you actually know about? like eating boogers.

Hehehehe.

Notice how the Bookman blog serial whiners never complain about liberals?

Paul

February 23rd, 2009
3:13 pm

Copyleft,

I’ve observed before: the only time I ever saw the “free market” operate one hundred percent as advertised was when I got all the answers correct on an econ test on free markets.

Taxpayer

February 23rd, 2009
3:14 pm

Paul,
And people wondered why the meltdown in the financial area occurred. Profit. People will do nearly anything for it, as long as it isn’t illegal (and sometimes, even then). If there’s an ambiguous law, they’ll try to push it as far as they can. Which is why we have laws. And why we’ll have more. Because people operate out of economic self interest and not for the greater good.

And, that’s a serious short-coming in people and it always has been — likely always will be. So, when do we give up on the fantasy that people can be left alone to do the right thing — assuming they even know the right thing to begin with. We need regulations and those regulations will necessarily change with time as we learn more and we need oversight and lots of transparency. Transparency is our friend because it has the greatest potential for keeping us all “honest” for the least cost and that’s what I call good governance.

AJC/DNC Management

February 23rd, 2009
3:14 pm

Taxpayer February 23rd, 2009 3:06 pm Blah, Blah, Blah yourself Andy. Spray your house with DDT every day for all I care. Suck on a tailpipe if you think you can live on CO2.

Geez, Taxpayer, you don’t have to blubber about it.

Read a book, homey, all through the 1970’s communities regularly sprayed DDT to kill mosquitoes and I’ll bet you can’t show me where anyone died from it.

And CO2 is a plant food, moron, a basic element found in the atmosphere essential to sustaining life.

You’re like really clueless dude.

Taxpayer

February 23rd, 2009
3:19 pm

One of the most fervent practitioners of the “All things Ayn Rand way to self destruction”, Greenspan, had to finally admit that the unregulated, “leave people to do as only they can do”, market approach was an utter failure. Well, Duh. Isn’t that hindsight just grand.

Taxpayer

February 23rd, 2009
3:23 pm

And you are just plain stupid, Andy. Read my post and understand what I say rather than simply bleating out your ignorance.

@@

February 23rd, 2009
3:32 pm

So the judges’ names have been mentioned in all the articles on this topic but I’m not finding anything that mentions the owners of the detention centers. Are they not every bit as guilty?

In today’s society, children are but a mere inconvenience /sarc/ to be disposed of when they rock our world.

I’m so thankful these kids will be given their voice.

I’m well aware of the fact there are those who don’t want to be reminded of this inconvenient fact but they must, at every opportunity, be held accountable.

Planned Parenthood is a government sponsored cottage industry in its own rite.

DB, Gwinnettian

February 23rd, 2009
3:34 pm

“Planned Parenthood is a government sponsored cottage industry in its own rite [sic].”

Sorry @@, the official diversionary topic for this thread is DDT.

DB, Gwinnettian

February 23rd, 2009
3:35 pm

“And CO2 is a plant food, moron”

How about blanketing the room you’re in with this plant food? About 10% by volume or so oughta do the trick. Let us know how that works out for you.

@@

February 23rd, 2009
3:47 pm

Mine wasn’t a diversionary tactic DB. Kids and whatever brings harm to them is very much on topic.

Just an extension of the realities put up for those who choose to consider.

One child is no less important than another.

Dusty

February 23rd, 2009
3:47 pm

OH, I see. The whole Bookman point here is: GOVERNMENT should be running everything. Private enterprise is pure greed and perpetuated by Republicans. Two crooked judges are supposed to be the prime example of greed and greed is always private enterprise. Did I get the message right, Bookman?

A couple of points: The judges were from Pennsylvania, which some of you might not know, is NOT a Southern state. Ignorant, redneck Penn boys? Let’s hear it!

Any sheriff who can feed Prisoners on $1.75 day should be on an Economy TV Show or a How To Slim Down show, both of which are popular. It is a wonder he could give thme more than a few lollipops. If he got rich and nobody died, that’s a miracle.

Corruption is not confined to judges and jailers. It is also prevalent in tax dodgers and we know who they are,like the one who comes on TV and tells us how important it is for us to be “stimulated” by debt. Thank you, Geithner, another one of those don’t-pay-your-taxes and profit. Let’s hear it for the tax evaders residing in Washington, not a lil’ ol’ cheating sheriff in Alabama. On which is the most important to center our concern?

AJC/DNC Management

February 23rd, 2009
4:03 pm

DeadBeat- I’d love to but seeing how the maximum atmospheric saturation point of CO2 is less than 1%, I’ll have to build a hermetically sealed chamber and I’m not really in the mood right now, kay?

Taxpayer

February 23rd, 2009
4:33 pm

Talk about profit motive. Let’s hear it for the tax evaders that live all over our great land. There’s potentially thousands of them that UBS has records on. They were bad boys at UBS for helping all those US residents cheat the government out of paying taxes. Just look into Case No. 09-6033-CR-COHN, USA v UBS AG, in US District Court, Southern District of Florida. It is quite the interesting read. Veeeery revealing. Except for Appendix E. It’s sealed. I wonder if that’s where some of those tax cheat’s names are listed. The IRS is not done yet. UBS is going to have to hand over a lot more before this is over. Maybe good ole boy, Phil Gramm can help out there. He does still work at UBS, doesn’t he.

Bud Wiser

February 23rd, 2009
4:42 pm

Profit motive? What is that?

With the Obama Effect destroying Wall Street, profit no longer has any meaning, unless you work for the government, or are one of the millions rapidly becoming disillusioned by the Messiah:

NEW YORK – Wall Street has turned the clock back to 1997.

Investors unable to extinguish their worries about a recession that has no end in sight dumped stocks again Monday. The Dow Jones industrial average tumbled 251 points to its lowest close since Oct. 28, 1997, while the Standard & Poor’s 500 index logged its lowest finish since April 11, 1997.

All the major indexes slid more than 3 percent. The Dow is just over 100 points from 7,000.

“People left and right are throwing in the towel,” said Keith Springer, president of Capital Financial Advisory Services.

Investors pounded most financial stocks even as government agencies led by the Treasury Department said they would launch a revamped bank rescue program this week. The plan includes the option of increasing government ownership in financial institutions without having to pour more taxpayer money into them.

Although the government has said it doesn’t want to nationalize banks, many investors are clearly still concerned that this could be a possibility as banks continue to suffer severe losses because of the recession. They’re also worried that banks’ losses will keep escalating as the recession sends more borrowers into default.

“The biggest thing I see here is the incredible pessimism,” Springer said. “The government is doing a lousy job of alleviating fears.”

Yeah, great job so far. Socialism is becoming entrenched.

Midori

February 23rd, 2009
5:03 pm

Per Andy’s 3:07 – I “could” post some of his greatest hits and inane blather in order to show what a complete loser he is, but why bother?

He shows himself for what he is with each and every one of his “deep thoughts”.

A bigger moron never truly existed.

Midori

February 23rd, 2009
5:04 pm

Taxpayer @ 3:23:

now why would you want to disparage stupid people by lumping them with Andy?

Truth

February 23rd, 2009
5:08 pm

Taxpayer… The FairTax would be a form of regulation that would help stop all the horrible republican tax “cheaters”. Let me guess… No, right?

Taxpayer

February 23rd, 2009
5:19 pm

We’re not allowed to talk about FairTax™ here or was it, Jay promised not to talk about it again or something like that. Anyway, I think that compliance with payment of the FairTax™ would be no better than with the current system without first eliminating currency and then requiring that all transactions be conducted via reference to one’s personal identification number such as one’s Social Security Number. Compliance would be mandatory if one wanted to buy food, shelter, etc., receive a pay check, dividends, etc., and records for everyone could be routinely scanned for inconsistencies and people that raised the red flags would be subjected to waterboarding until they revealed the truth along with full payment of back taxes.

Truth

February 23rd, 2009
5:23 pm

Jesus

February 23rd, 2009
5:23 pm

Impeach Obama now!

RW-(the original)

February 23rd, 2009
5:33 pm

Because compliance is such a nightmare when it comes to collecting embedded taxes on gas, cigarettes, alcohol……wait, I guess it’s no problem at all.

Taxpayer

February 23rd, 2009
5:56 pm

Typical what? I gave you an answer — an honest answer. So, keep it going. First, how do you guarantee compliance with any system of taxation. I mean, look at those 52,000 US residents that had or still have accounts with UBS. The IRS has irrefutable evidence via testimony and documentation that UBS helped certain US residents evade taxes. This was a concerted effort from both parties so will a third party be needed to ensure compliance, a fourth, and how does a different tax structure prevent such an occurrence. It doesn’t. Further, that so-called tax rebate that was introduced into the idea amounts to the grandest entitlement scheme ever devised. How does anyone other than a socialist reconcile that little fact.

Taxpayer

February 23rd, 2009
5:58 pm

Excuse my incorrect terminology. That should have been “…tax prebate…”

a dem feeling dissed

February 23rd, 2009
6:39 pm

nothing about this whole damn bailout scheme is fair. maybe it’s time to implement the fair tax for a couple of years just to see if it has a positive impact. what obama and the treasury is doing is looking like a catastrophe in the making. if the market keeps plummeting i’ve lost everything but my job and that’s sure to follow.

Dave R

February 23rd, 2009
8:50 pm

Let’s all come to the conclusion right now, shall we, and agree that the LAST person to be debating the merits of the FairTax (and there are so many), is Taxpayer. Never in the history of mankind has there been a more ignorant person regarding the FairTax (except maybe Bookman).

Compliance is not guaranteed, which is the first thing taxpayer has ever said correctly about the FairTax. Compliance would, however, be much higher than any other system of taxation known. Cash registers are pretty much all computerized right now. The tax rate would be set at that level and periodically checked. Obviously, the larger retailers like WalMart would never be out of compliance, because they set their registers at the corporate level.

And remember, the FairTax is only collected on net new transactions (those that have not been taxed before). Most stores selling new items also have computerized register systems. Smaller retailers (pawn shops, resellers, etc., would not have to charge the FairTax, because the tax would have already been collected the first time of sale.

Would some transactions for new items go underground? Certainly, but less than are going on today. Plus you will also have all those illegal immigrants who do not pay income taxes today paying the FairTax when they shop for food or clothing. And since they are NOT citizens, they don’t get the prebate to be used on their basic goods.

And Taxpayer is wrong again about the prebate being an “entitlement”. Perhaps, for those that do not work, it may well be. But that is the extent of it. There is nothing inherently wrong with removing the tax cost of the basic necessities of life, such as food or clothing. The prebate calculates the cost that an average person or family will incur in taxes for those basic needs, and covers the cost of the tax. Anything purchases over and above the basic level would not be covered through the prebate.

One final point about compliance. One other segment we currently do not capture is the visitor / travel / vacation market. Visitors coming to America do not pay income taxes, but they WILL pay the FairTax, which will also help to offset some compliance issues.

It’s a better system than we have now, except the the libs don’t want it because it takes away their ability to tax people according to the way libs want people to behave.

Dave R

February 23rd, 2009
9:15 pm

Oh, and about the whole “prisoners coming out emaciated” thing in Alabama? Sorry, but I simply have no compassion for criminals.

I’m reminded of the line in “Liar, Liar” when lawyer Jim Carey is asked by his client who robbed a bank or atm and was calling him to get his advice, Jim Carey grabbed the phone and yelled into the receiver, “Stop breaking the law, A$$hole!”

Actions have consequences.

BruinFan

February 24th, 2009
1:32 am

What if you were jailed under false pretenses or mistaken identity? I seem to recall “My Cousin Vinny” was set in Alabama…;-)

If you are awaiting trial and you are innocent, does that mean you also deserve to be underfed?

Dave R

February 24th, 2009
6:59 am

If they work like prisons do in GA, you sit in a county jail awaiting trial, then if convicted, you go to a state prison.