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Archive for the ‘Access Points Revealed’ Category

Access Points 8: Rose garden at King National Historic Site

Verrrrry few guesses on  this week’s Access Points photo game, much to my surprise!

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Does it look any different with the building in focus? It's the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site rose garden. AJC/Jamie Gumbrecht

The Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site on Auburn Avenue didn’t always have a rose garden. In the early ’90s, when Sylvia Villalobos’ daughter visited Atlanta, she called her mom to say she’d found a place that needed one: “‘The MLK Historic Site,’” Villalobos recalls her daughter saying. “‘They have no flowers.’”

Villalobos is one of the founders of International World Peace Rose Gardens, an organization that builds rose gardens in sacred, cultural or historic sites around the world, and organizes community events surrounding them. They have five major gardens: Sacramento and Pacific Palisades in California,  Italy, Mexico and Atlanta’s.

The King Historic Site was “a perfect fit,” Villalobos said. Its first garden was dedicated in 1992, but …

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Access Points 7: Zell Miller portrait at Manuel’s Tavern

Maybe this week’s Access Points photo game was a little too detailed. Interesting guesses — it is, indeed, a painting that involves a man’s jacket — but nobody was able to correctly identify it as the Zell Miller portrait hanging at Manuel’s Tavern.

Look more familiar now?

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A portrait of former Gov. Zell Miller…

Or now?

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…at Manuel's Tavern in Atlanta. AJC/Jamie Gumbrecht

Manuel’s is a bar art museum right in Poncey-Highland. Beyond the glowing beer signs and TVs, every photo of a police officer, painting of a naked woman, playing-card-and-dollar-bill-tacked-on-the-ceiling has a story behind it. Different versions of those stories might emerge based on the person asked and the amount of time till last call. But the  depth of institutional memory behind this portrait made for particularly good storytelling.

Zell Miller and Manuel  Maloof, the onetime DeKalb County executive and tavern owner, were big friends. It wasn’t particularly strange to have the former governor’s image …

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Access Points 6: Giganotosaurus at Fernbank Museum

Did you make a guess at this week’s Access Points photo game? Griftdrift did, and he was dead-on.

It is the Giganotosaurus skull at Fernbank Museum of Natural History. This fiberglass cast gets dragged out for all kinds of events, like the “Night at the Museum” sleepover last month, but it’s been around the museum longer than most of its dinosaurs.

We all think of Fernbank as The Place to See Dinosaurs in Atlanta, but the trademark skeletons in the museum’s Great Hall have really only been on full display since 2001. When Fernbank opened in 1992, they were simply the big dream of staff members and volunteers.

“People associated natural history with the bit picture and dinosaurs are a big, literally, part of that,” said Christine Bean, Fernbank’s vice president of education. “They were big, they were unusual and they’re extinct. We have a natural draw to that story. We wonder if that’s going to be our story.”

Bean is a geologist who has been with Fernbank for 16 years, first …

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Access Points: Chattahoochee Nature Center watershed exhibit

Lots of creative guesses on this week’s Access Point, but just a few of you knew it was a fish in the watershed exhibit at the Chattahoochee Nature Center’s new Discovery Center.

Scales on this fish are made from old CDs. AJC/ Jamie Gumbrecht.

Indeed, many recognized the fishy qualities of the photo, but you seemed convinced that it was the giant creature outside the Atlanta Fish Market. Others saw the CDs, and guessed everything from Hard Rock Cafe to AOL headquarters.

But it was commenter PJ who first mentioned the place — the new Discovery Center at the Chattahoochee Nature Center — and Smokey the Bandit who said it was the giant fish located there. Nice work!

This fellow isn’t just a fish, but a largemouth bass. If you’ve been fishing in Lake Lanier, you’ve caught one. He is one of about 13 animals made from repurposed household goods and on display in the new Discovery Center watershed exhibit.

Rope snake. AJC/Jamie Gumbrecht

Plenty of nature centers rely on taxidermy or …

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Access Points 4: Wright Flyer at Tellus science museum

Were you able to identify the image in this week’s Access Points photo game? Here’s a better view.

Access Points: It's the Wright Flyer at Tellus Northwest Georgia Science Museum. AJC/Jamie Gumbrecht

As many of you guessed, it’s a Wright Flyer replica. This one is located at Tellus Northwest Georgia Science Museum in Cartersville. Lots of good guesses, some surprising guesses — roof at the Georgia Dome? — but the first to get it right was commenter Mark! Woohoo!

The Wright brothers' first flight on Dec. 17, 1903. AP file photo.

The story behind this plane is quite famous: Orville Wright at the controls, Wilbur on the ground, a beach in Kitty Hawk, N.C. in 1903, when the brothers from Dayton had the first successful, powered, piloted flight for all of 12 seconds.

But the story behind this replica is far more recent history.

Tellus opened in January after years of construction that allowed it to expand from the 9,000-square foot Weinman Mineral Museum to a 120,000-square foot …

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Access Points 3: Mural outside Junkman’s Daughter

Yeah, you had this one pegged.

But just in case you weren’t sure, this week’s Access Point photo game was outside Junkman’s Daughter in Little Five Points. Tim was the first commenter to identify what it, just 15 minutes after it was posted. Nice! Check back at 4 p.m. Wednesday next week for another round.

Access Point 3: Junkman's Daughter in Little Five Points. AJC/Jamie Gumbrecht

First, a little retail lore: Junkman’s Daughter has been in Atlanta’s Little Five Points neighborhood since 1982, when Pam Majors, the daughter of a junkman, opened up a little space for bell bottoms, knick-knacks and such. Its following grew, and so did its space. In 1994, it upgraded into an old grocery store, some 10,000-some square foot space on Moreland Avenue. (It has a sibling, too: Junkman’s Daughter’s Brother, in Athens.) The exterior was decorated in a kind galactic-sky-spaceship theme.

Watson Atkinson painted the mural. AJC/Jamie Gumbrecht

Enter Watson Atkinson, a tattoo artist who came …

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Access Points 2: String Man at The Wren’s Nest

Were you able to identify what was in this week’s Access Points picture game?

Access Points: It's the String Man at The Wren's Nest! Jamie Gumbrecht/AJC

It’s the String Man, a burlap printed doll with a belly pocket full of aging string. It’s a regular part of the tour at The Wren’s Nest, the historic home writer Joel Chandler Harris in Atlanta’s West End neighborhood. Lots of good guesses, but the first person to guess correctly — via comment and Twitter — was Matt Scofield. Nice work, Matt!

Harris was a newspaperman, but he became famous after writing down the “Uncle Remus” tales, stories he’d as a child from the mouths of slaves. (You can see the author in the photo above, on the dresser to the left.)

Harris’ home has been preserved as a museum since shortly after his death in 1908. Before the tours and storytelling, though, it was just a family home where the Harris family worked, entertained and raised six children to adulthood.

That’s where the String Man comes in.

“As …

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Access Points: Ball machine at Atlanta’s Children’s Museum

Were you able to guess what was in this photo and where you could find it?

Alas, it does not draw lottery numbers, nor does it make margaritas, as some of you suggested for our first Access Points game. But it took parents reading the blog about two seconds to identify the images correctly: it’s the ball machine at Imagine It! The Children’s Museum of Atlanta, also known as the “Tools for Solutions” exhibit. The first reader to correctly identify both in the comments was Liviangel! Thanks to all who played!

"Tools for Solutions" at Imagine It! The Children's Museum of Atlanta. Jamie Gumbrecht/AJC.

I visited the children’s museum last week to check out their Imaginator theater troupe — story coming soon! — but it’s impossible to keep your eyes off the machines sending an endless supply of rainbowed balls through the air. (Fun fact: stray pieces of plastic fruit from the museum’s “Fundamentally Food” exhibit have attempted to make the journey through the tools. They failed.)

A …

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