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High to show Titian paintings never before seen in U.S.

diana1

Titian's "Diana and Acteon" has never been seen in the United States, but it's coming to the High, along with "Diana and Callisto" in October.

The High is about to welcome more masterpieces, AJCer Howard Pousner reports: Atlanta’s High Museum of Art will be the first museum in the United States to show two Titian masterpieces never before seen in this country.

“Diana and Actaeon” and “Diana and Callisto” — what a High press release called “two of the greatest paintings of the Italian Renaissance” — will be part of a 25-piece exhibition, “Titian and the Golden Age of Venetian Painting: Masterpieces from the National Galleries of Scotland,” to open here in October.

The “Diana” paintings were originally commissioned by King Phillip II of Spain, and were acquired by the Duke of Orleans in the 18th century. They went on long-term loan to the National Galleries of Scotland in 1945, and in 2008, “Diana and Actaeon” was acquired by the National Galleries of Scotland and the National Gallery of London. Those institutions are are in the thick of a campaign to acquire “Diana and Callisto,” as well.

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"Diana and Callisto"

The Titian exhibition also includes work by Tintoretto, Veronese and Lotto all from the collection of the National Galleries. It was curated by David Brenneman, the High’s Director of Collection and Exhibitions and Frances B. Bunzl Family Curator of European Art. The High says this this exhibition will launch a new collaboration between the High and the National Galleries, with more exhibitions on the way.

The exhibition will continue on to the Minneapolis Institute of Arts from Feb. 5-May 1, 2011 and then to the Museum of Fine Art, Houston from May 21-Aug. 14, 2011.

Want to go? “Titian and the Golden Age of Venetian Painting: Masterpieces from the National Galleries of Scotland” runs October 16, 2010-Jan. 2, 2011. $18, $15 for people 65 and older and students, $11 for ages 6-17, free for members and children 5 and younger. High Museum of Art, 1280 Peachtree St., Atlanta. 404-733-4444, www.high.org.

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7 comments Add your comment

[...] posted last week about Titian masterpieces that will make their United States at the High Museum of Art in October, and one reader asked for the stories of what’s happening in the paintings, [...]

melissa's mom

March 1st, 2010
5:19 pm

Jamie, Thanks. I’ll look for your post about it.

Matt

March 1st, 2010
11:54 am

I’ve actually read about the Diana and Acteon painting on Wiki before. Mythological if I do recall.

Jamie Gumbrecht

March 1st, 2010
10:21 am

Melissa’s Mom — I’ll check in with the High to get the back story on the paintings and try to post it in the next few days!

melissa's mom

March 1st, 2010
9:07 am

I’d like to know the story behind the paintings. What’s happening in them? They are magnificent! I can’t wait to see them “in person”.

glenn campagna

February 27th, 2010
5:22 am

this is huge. while the High permanent collection is mediocre for a city of this size, the staff has been doing an amazing job bringing in great shows ever since the olympics. titian, in my opinion is probably the greatest painter of all-time. he had unbelievable color and great texture. cezanne, rembrandt and maybe a few others are the only rivals to titian. great job dr. shapiro and the high staff.

the prado, which painting for painting (as in pound for pound) , probably has the best collection in the world, is fortunate to have an amazing group of titian’s, amongst other things. although most spaniards would disagree, 3 of those titian’s are probably the 3 best pictures in the entire collection and thus 3 of the best ever painted by anyone.

another less heralded, but personal favorite, painting at the prado is goya’s “the dog”. very modern, like titian was for his time.

thankfully the High has pretty much maintained a fairly high level of taste and has stayed away from the postmodern pop crap that will someday be seen for what it is. the so called avant garde/cutting edge today is basically a joke and not a very good one. almost nothing from the last 45 or so years that is on most radar screens is any good.

Bev

February 26th, 2010
2:06 pm

Good job David Brenneman and Frances B. Bunzl!