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Connecticutdoc

May 30th, 2011
2:00 pm

Physicians order unnecesary tests and practice defensive medicine because of disparate testimony provided by individual experts for hire on their view of what constitutes the standard of care in a given case. Health courts will gradually restore physician confidence by utilizing neutral panels of experts which will provide consistency in testomy. This could save billions annually in unnecessary tests, procedures, referrals to specialists and admissions to the hospital.
Health courts will also speed up the case review process at a much lower cost per case, allowing more cases to be heard with more injured victims being compensated. This will create more accountability and should reduce medical errors. Fewer injured victims will be turned away from the process as they are now by attorneys who are looking for the bigger money cases.
At present only 45% of the malpractice insurance dollar finds its way to injured victims. This number should dramatically improve with health courts.
With utilization of Health courts, total compensation dollars going to injured victims may go up, but these additional costs could be made up for by a system which is much more efficient and the tremendous savings with reduction in defensive medicine.

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Bill Fricke

June 3rd, 2011
11:00 am

An example of not following free markets … I called my insurance company and asked how much a knee MRI would cost at a specific provider. It would fall under my deductible, thus be out-of-pocket, so I wanted to budget accordingly. The insurer would not tell me, and said ask the provider. The provider refused to state how much the agreed upon charge was with the insurer, saying it hurts their “competitive advantage”. So, even though I — not the insurer — would pay for this commodity procedure, neither party would tell me the true charge for which I would be liable. It was a matter of wait for the mail and see what surprises lurked in the envelope.

While I admit it may be an oversimplification, we can determine in advance the cost and quality of a meal at one restaurant vs. another and make an informed decision, it is difficult to do the same thing with something far more important, our healthcare.

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rohini

June 6th, 2011
8:18 am

it was realy wonderful blog..!

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Dr. Kerr

June 8th, 2011
10:18 am

I thought you might find this of interest.

Cheers,
Adam Miller

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Ron Barton

June 9th, 2011
9:32 am

The fundamental issue that Americans struggle with in Healthcare is the concept of letting market forces work. This is not complicated, but the vested interest groups are spending billions of dollars to make it appear so. Market forces only work if the consumer has the ability to make a decision on what they need and has data on relative cost/value and “quality” to make an informed decision. In some aspects of HC, Cosmetic and Lasik surgery, this does work because the patient is an informed consumer. You make the decision about what you need and when you will have it, and you have competitive data on the market quality and cost/value.
If you get cancer that is not how your treatment will work, you are not qualified to know what is the best treatment for your symptoms. You may get several opinions from physicians because you have the time(in an emergency situation you probably wouldn’t have) but even then the physicians cannot give you relative cost/value data on different options because they do not have it. I have worked with many hospitals and I know how they price things, it has nothing to do with competitive pricing, I can show data where there is typically over 300% difference in pricing for the same service.

I am the first to say we should be letting market forces work, but they don’t unless you can present the consumer with data on cost/value and quality for the market relative to their need and they have the time and understanding to interpret it. In most cases they don’t and they have to trust healthcare professionals to make cost effective decisions that are in their best interest.
They Don’t. They make decisions that are in their best interests!!

Every other major country in the developed world regulates their HC market in different ways to protect the consumer, it is not because they stupid! Our current legislation regulates the consumer because our politicians on both sides of the aisle sold out to the lobbyists this is the wrong side of the equation.
If we are being driven by “Government” can’t run anything as an emotive soundbite then remember the Government is paying for HC for about 50% of the US population, including politicians and prison inmates with your tax dollars, over 30% of the Federal Budget.If they can’t run anything we need to vote in a government that can, not ignore the facts of HC. We have the worst most wasteful and most expensive HC System because we are dumb enough to listen to emotive soundbites not facts. There is no need to reduce Medicare benefits we need to regulate the HC Industry to deliver it more efficiently. There are 36 other countries that do it better than we do. Do you think we might learn something from them?

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carriemiles1

June 12th, 2011
2:07 am

Overall, I am happy with my health insurance I found through “Penny Health Insurance” network. It is not perfect, but in today’s world what is? The health insurance plan has worked quite well for me and my family.

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djs_NC

June 12th, 2011
7:03 am

i think all medical insurances should pay for preventative products and testing. i also think they should pay for 2 attempts to stop smoking (for the medication or patches for this). but to reward financially? no. how about- a person is given the chance to stop smoking-the preventative measures etc–if they dont use them or dont take care of themselves they are given less benefits? im a smoker and i know know how expensive all the smoking cessation tools are. it sometimes takes 2-5 times at seriously trying to stop before a person can stop. so im all for help with this. and there can be supposrt groups and classes to help people have better health habits-im all for that. i am not for peoplel being rewarded monetarily for taking care of themselves. they are being helped by getting free help to start with. there are many people who work at low paying jobs and cant afford insurance and do not qualify for medicade. how fair is it for these people to not get any help when the ones who dont work a lick and get medicade get paid to be healthy when they are already getting huge resources to get medical help?

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susan

June 14th, 2011
2:01 pm

ACOs “could” be a good thing for the patients. Providers get incentives for keeping her healthy and she gets treated for her “whole body.” Patients may begin to see the links between, say, good dental hygiene and eating more veggies. And they may feel more comfortable asking questions. I found this helpful: http://whatstherealcost.org/video.php?post=five-questions

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Elizabeth Richards, healthcare attorney

June 14th, 2011
2:01 pm

djs_NC You make a very good point regarding the number of times it may take someone to overcome a negative health habit. That is definitely should be considered in any incentive program.

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Halftrack

June 19th, 2011
5:19 pm

The country has gone too long with allowing Health Insurance Co.’s set the fees for reimbursement. The Insurance Co. is the 3rd person is a bad equation. Many reforms could and should be made to that system. Everyone knows the government can’t administer health issues efficiently or quickly. If Obummercare is so good why doesn’t Congress want to get on board?

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zeke

June 19th, 2011
5:40 pm

Another $100 million of taxpayer dollars wasted!!!!

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tar and feathers party

June 19th, 2011
6:37 pm

I have a great incentive to bring down health care cost: Eliminate contingency law suits! America has the highest cost health care on a per capita basis in the world, and is also the only country that allows contingency law suits for alleged malpractice. Get the stinking, useless lawyers out of health care, and I guarantee costs will go down.

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Frank

June 19th, 2011
7:56 pm

Well said Ron martin

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Frank

June 19th, 2011
7:57 pm

Well said Ron Barton

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Elizabeth Richards, healthcare attorney

June 20th, 2011
9:25 am

Tar and Feathers party I do agree with you that an important component of reform is Medical Malpractice Reform. The cost of defensive medicine is exorbitant. However, there are many lawyers who work day in and out in the healthcare system to assist providers. Without these lawyers, the system would be far worse off. In addition, egregious Medical Malpractice does still occur, and there must be some type of system to protect the innocent victims. Maybe this is material for another post!

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Ray Poole @ First American

June 21st, 2011
9:24 am

Good points, Shawn!

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D.L. Forbes

June 21st, 2011
1:30 pm

Great post…I look forward to continuing this dialogue!

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Carl Gritzmaker

June 22nd, 2011
2:44 pm

Nice writing…

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Budd

July 1st, 2011
6:01 pm

You really saved my skin with this infomraiton. Thanks!

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MrLiberty

July 7th, 2011
10:04 am

Just another reason why the AMA monopoly over professional licensure MUST be ended. Americans need to have freedom restored so that they no longer have to trust the corrupt system of state licensure, restricted medical school enrollment, restricted residency access, and all the other protectionist schemes the medical profession has come up with to limit the number of practicing physicians in this country. A true free market in medical care delivery would provide the much needed competition that would suppress this kind of under the table relationship that jeopardizes everyone’s health and well-being. And end to the FDA-BigPharma incestuous relationship would also serve the health needs of every american as well. There is certainly no need for such an unconsitutional government entity. A more effective approach could be achieved by independent certification agencies that would actually suffer liability consequences for bad judgements versus the criminal FDA that suffers no consequences no matter how many die from their poor judgements.

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MrLiberty

July 8th, 2011
12:07 pm

Can anyone seriously deny that it is the involvement of government in medical care that is most reponsible for the horrific prices and rising prices we all face?? Just look at this crap. This is not about patient care. This is about makeing every record easily available to the government so that when they destroy the quasi-socialist system we currently have and force everyone into a fully government run system they will have complete access to everyone’s medical history to use against them possibly, the identify those not worth treating, to whatever. The bottom line is that if we actually had a FREE Market in medicine and hospitals and doctors found information sharing to be useful and financially beneficial, they would make it happen, and likely in a fashion that didn’t cost billions and screw everything up. Just look at what the free market has done with the internet with things like Facebook, Youtube, etc. Yes, I know that Al Gore and the government invented the internet, but it was the free market that actually did something useful for it.

Its FAR PAST TIME to get every last shred of government regulation, money and price manipulation, licensure laws, drug regulations, etc. out of medicine COMPLETELY.

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Bob Wells, executive in healthcare technology

July 10th, 2011
10:30 pm

I agree that there is an artificial monopoly in creating the number of physician seats in medical schools. I have seen this through medical college associations (American College of Radiology). Keeping supply down intentionally increases costs for everyone. The healthcare system needs to devise an approach of increasing the supply of physicians, maintaining a high level of education standards and reducing the cost of education. I believe physicians should be compensated well for their commitment to years of education and serving others. We want to attract the best and brightest minds. One of the keys to reducing the cost of healthcare and discouraging inappropriate behavior of some individuals is to develop a means for physicians to reduce their cost of education. If physicians feel that they are being appropriately compensated for their commitment, they will focus their energy on how to grow their business and serve the community through ethical means. There will always be a few individuals that decide following an ethical path is not sufficient. For those individuals and others that even consider unethical practices an option, we need to have strong regulation, oversight and penalties in place. Therefore, physicians thinking about inappropriate behavior will assess if the benefit justifies the risk.

As payment reform is starting to take hold and a culture of change within healthcare, we want to create an environment and reward systems for those that innovate in a manner that everyone benefits. The patient’s issues are addressed in a timely and high quality manner with the best outcomes at the lowest cost. I want physicians motivated to use their intellectual capacity to do the right thing and excel the advancement of medicine versus try to figure out how to drive up their personal income at the cost of patients’ health and society.

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[...] bloggers on HealthFlock like Mark Reiboldt have also noted the expected wave of consolidation in a recent post.  With so much talk about the topic, I think it worthwhile to pause and ask ourselves what value [...]

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MrLiberty

July 12th, 2011
10:13 am

Any reduction in competition is a BAD thing for consumers. But then the health care industry hasn’t cared about consumers since the advent of 3rd party payer insurance, government managed care, HMOs (another government created mess), Medicare, Medicaid, and the like.

Competitive advantage is a relative term. What we are really discussing is the relative advantage in this virtually fascistic medical economy that we currently have. Consolidation makes dealing with the overbearing burden of regulations, paperwork, etc. more managable, yet in truth, sound consolidation that makes sense comes about when REAL market forces promote its happening.

What we need is a TRULY free market in health care. No government money, no government licensure, no government regulations, no government drug cartels (essentially what BigPharma is), no state restrictions on care, no laws against self-medication, no restrictions on information or labelling claims (beyond fraud), no tax incentives one way or the other for 3rd party insurance, no interstate restrictions on insurance purchases, no state mandates on insurance coverage, no restrictions on medical savings or expenditures. In other words – REAL FREEDOM.

Yeah, I know that such a thing SCARES everyone reading this. Too bad. We consumers of health care are fed up and we will restore our freedom someday.

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JeromeMJ

July 22nd, 2011
10:19 am

This is the exact reason that America is in the trouble it is in.There appears that the predominant thinking in hiring is that you get what you pay for. That is absurd and has always been proven incorrect and immeasurable. How do you know that paying a doctor $1,000,000 makes him/her better at doctoring. there is never a correlation between income and quality or productivity. This is one way that wealthy board members justify there salaries of 70 and 80 times that of the personnel who actually perform the work.

Secondly, if the hospital were to perform poorly as Grady most often does is the additional compensation refundable? I have never heard of a case where an overly compensated official has returned compensation for poor performance. It appears that the author is another over compensated incompetent defending the status quo.

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Eddie Phillips, Shareholder, Pershing Yoakley & Associates

July 22nd, 2011
10:28 am

My belief is that the market works effectively over time. If an executive fails to perform, the board of directors should replace him. Arbirtrary controls on compensation will not work. Over time, the most qualified and talented individuals will gravitate to other fields where they will be appropriately paid. Tax-exempt hospitals are highly regulated, complex businesses with a social mission. Do you really want the low bidder running your community hospital?

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Long Beau

August 3rd, 2011
11:15 am

Mr Oliver is just pimping his clients. This should be in the advertising section. Or in the children’s section… “Prescription medications are only effective when they are taken.” Seriously?? Duh.

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MrLiberty

August 4th, 2011
12:29 pm

That’s 125,000 Americans who die unnecessarily each year because of not taking their medications as directed by their physician and pharmacist.

And another 45,000 die BECAUSE they took what they doctor prescribed.

Sounds like the best approach is a naturopathic/homeopathic approach. But of course folks like you lobby the FDA every day to make sure that these highly effective alternatives are driven out of the marketplace and their purveyors locked up. Just another of the failings of current western medicine and the corrupt industry-FDA relationship.

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Wayne Oliver - vice president, Center for Health Transformation

August 4th, 2011
12:49 pm

Thanks Long Beau for your comment. The problems associated with medication non-compliance cost needless lives and billions of dollars. In the post, I tried to highlight real-world solutions that are working. Mirixa and MWV are doing great work at saving lives and saving money. In my opinion, highlighting programs where patients have better health outcomes at lower costs is not “pimping.”

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Wayne Oliver - vice president, Center for Health Transformation

August 4th, 2011
12:57 pm

MrFreedom, thanks for your comment. I largely agree with your comment. Often, a holistic approach to healthcare is appropriate. However, when medical interventions are necessary and a physician (or other prescriber) prescribes one or more prescription medications, patients should know why that therapy was selected, how to properly take the medication and understand the consequences of not taking the prescribed therapy.Patients, physicians and pharmacists must work together to advance the health, welfare and safety of the patient. In short, we need a major cultural shift.

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Wayne Oliver - vice president, Center for Health Transformation

August 14th, 2011
4:39 pm

Well written, Dr. Mack! We must stimulate innovation by fundamental FDA reform and by developing incentives for individuals (and patients) to remain healthy. Regardless, preventive medicine is the best medicine.

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susan

August 26th, 2011
4:46 pm

I like the financial reward suggestion because I believe better outcomes result from the patient being involved, motivated and inquisitive. Also on this list should be a requirement for doctors to educate and engage with the patient and develop a trusting relationship so the patient feels supported when asking questions. These are some questions I think about: http://whatstherealcost.org/video.php?post=five-questions

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Bob Wells

August 27th, 2011
12:03 am

Susan I agree with you, and good feedback regarding the role of the physician. I have found that when incentives which everyone cares about are aligned, it’s amazing the results that can be produced. The present system drives misalignment and behavior that may not be in the best interest of all parties involved. I look forward to other creative ideas or suggestions.

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susan

September 7th, 2011
12:58 pm

Patient involvement is certainly one of several ways to tamp the cost of health care. Even better is that by asking our doctors questions, we begin to understand what is happening with our health and learn about alternative options and treatments that are based on evidence. http://whatstherealcost.org/video.php?post=five-questions

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Dr Nathan

September 8th, 2011
11:03 am

Stories that demonize the AMA are just cheap shots by self-absorbed “experts” who are either bashing physicians to promote a narrow agenda or who are too lazy to discover the truth.

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Wayne Oliver - vice president, Center for Health Transformation

September 8th, 2011
11:15 am

My intent was not to “demonize” the AMA. It was my hope to create an awareness that the AMA is out-of-touch with their members. When healthcare professional organizations do things based on their income stream as opposed to doing what is in the best interest of physicians and their patients, both lose.

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Dr Nathan

September 8th, 2011
2:15 pm

It’s unfair to demonize the AMA for taking direction from the majority view expressed by the representatives of the nation’s grassroots physicians.

I was there when physicians representing every state and specialty voted by a two-third majority to affirm the AMA’s commitment to health reform and endorsed bedrock principles encompassed in the Accountable Care Act.

I was there again when physicians representing every state and specialty voted by a two-third majority to affirm the requirement to purchase health insurance.

These votes regarding the course of the AMA’s health care agenda were intense. The opinions were passionate and the debate was sometimes fierce. Ultimately there was a clear final product – a shared vision for health reform.

This broad-based, representational-style policymaking process is what makes the AMA, without question, the umbrella organization of American medicine.

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Wayne Oliver - vice president, Center for Health Transformation

September 9th, 2011
8:29 am

Adain, Dr. Nathan, while I appreciate the role of organized medicine (I started my career with the Medical Association of Georgia), I was reporting a nationwide survey of physicians about THEIR perception of the AMA. No demonization. Just reporting the beleifs of real physicians dealing with real frustrations with the organization which purports to reporesent them.

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John

September 9th, 2011
11:14 am

I read the survey results: It has a 1.44% response rate. There is no reason to put any confidence in the results when 98.56% of those sent survey invitations did not respond. Authors do not go into how they selected people either.

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Tom

September 9th, 2011
11:26 am

The majority of respondents are people who dropped their AMA membership. Seems to be a bit biased, wouldn’t you say? I appreciate the breakouts by membership status, but you’d be doing more of a service if Total results were weighted to national distribution of AMA member status.

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id_doc

September 9th, 2011
11:28 am

I do research at the AMA and I also care for patients at the University of Chicago – so perhaps that gives me 2 strikes by your anti-AMA, anti-academic reckoning. But there is some value in knowing something about survey research.

The survey you are ‘reporting’ on is worthless as research (regardless whether you see it as useful for propaganda against health reform). Check out slides 13 and 20. The response rate was 1.44% (slide 13) and the geographic distribution is very skewed towards the south (see slide 20). There is no indication of how this firm chose physicians to send the survey to or whether the data have even been weighted to account for the skewed respondent population.

The bottom line is that there are over 600,000 physicians in the US, and of these, a very select 1,600 replied to this survey. So the only thing these results show is that it’s easy to find a cluster of docs who both oppose AMA positions and don’t understand how the AMA works (i.e., that is is a representative assembly with every state and specialty society voting).

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American Medical Association

September 9th, 2011
11:33 am

Physicians in our nation face a variety of challenges and opportunities – they hold a wide range of views that reflect the diversity of the profession and are not easily summarized from this small group: less than 1.5 percent of those who received the survey chose to respond. The extremely low response rate and the type of survey conducted make it hard to say this is representative of all physicians.

To suggest a quid pro quo on the AMA’s support for health reform and CPT is absurd – since the Reagan Administration chose the AMA’s Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) in 1983, not a single taxpayer dime has been paid to the AMA for the use of CPT in the Medicare and Medicaid programs.

The AMA recognizes that physicians’ attitudes around health system reform are diverse. The AMA is leading the charge to address flaws and repeal problematic parts of the legislation like the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB) during the implementation of the health reform law and to advocate for policies that help physicians and patients thrive as we keep moving medicine forward together. The AMA continues to have concerns about other issues in our health care system and we are leading efforts to pass comprehensive medical liability reform, repeal the broken Medicare physician payment formula, and improve care coordination and quality while addressing cost through new models of care delivery. We have long had policy in favor of covering the uninsured and are pleased that the new law extends insurance coverage to more Americans while retaining our uniquely American system, which includes a private and public mix of insurers.

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Dr Merthin

September 9th, 2011
2:17 pm

The membership numbers of the AMA speaks louder than any survey. I think about only 20% of physicians in the USA belong to the AMA, and of those, many are medical students/residents who are given free or reduced membership and retired physicians.

The AMA represents itself. It does not represents the best interests of medical doctors or their patients. Support for Obamacare by the AMA is proof positive. Obamacare invites the most invasive, malignant bureaucracy ever devised by man into the physician patient relationship…the Federal Government.

American Medical Association…a joke. Real name…Association of Medical Asshats.

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awmd

September 9th, 2011
2:19 pm

“To suggest a quid pro quo on the AMA’s support for health reform and CPT is absurd – since the Reagan Administration chose the AMA’s Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) in 1983, not a single taxpayer dime has been paid to the AMA for the use of CPT in the Medicare and Medicaid programs.”

This is a non-sequiter. The AMA needs its CPT monopoly to reap dividends from private insurers. The government guaranteed that monopoly. It is not “absurd” to believe that the AMA’s backing of health care reform was tit-for-tat.

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Maggie's Daughter

September 9th, 2011
2:28 pm

The AMA is a sellout pure and simple. Note how they repeatedly post the same message time and again. No other individual doctor writes in here. Why did they agree to a bill that cuts Medicare and hurts the elderly? Why haven’t they done anything to move along tort reform with the Obama Administration? Always follow the money. Pure and simple.

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Dr Nathan

September 9th, 2011
7:21 pm

The AMA’s support for the health reform law was based on it meeting a majority of strong principles approved by a forum of physicians representing their peers from every state and specialty. Expanding health coverage to all Americans is a top AMA priority and the AMA made it quite clear that the law, while historic, was a starting point and that Congress would still need to act on vital issues important to patients and physicians.

The year’s most bogus claim regarding the AMA’s support of health system reform involved conspiracy theories surrounding CPT. The linkage between CPT and health reform is a complete fabrication based on nothing but conspiracy theories and perpetuated as political payback.

It is a gross mischaracterization to claim that CPT generates $70 million in AMA revenue. This reckless estimate is based on a deliberate distortion of publically reported income generated by more than 100 books and products offered by the AMA, not just CPT-related products.

For 45 years, CPT has been a vital tool for physician autonomy. The physician-driven process of defining the codes used to report medical services has given medicine a cohesive voice in the changing realities of health care delivery. A voice that makes us stronger and louder than we are as individuals.

Without AMA administered CPT, medical communications between physicians, hospitals and health plans would break down. Groups far removed from hands-on patient care would fill the void and physicians would lose autonomy over procedure codes. Government or corporate bureaucrats should NOT be given responsible for setting a standard that defines medical services and procedures.

The AMA remains the nation’s largest physician organization and I’m sure it will continue to welcome diverse physician opinions, but falsehoods and conspiracy theories do nothing to advance the common goals physicians share.

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awmd

September 9th, 2011
8:34 pm

Dr. Nathan, please inform us,

1. What is the AMA’s CPT-generated revenue?
2. What percentage of the AMA’s revenue does this represent?
3. What percentage of of non-resident U. S. physicians are dues-paying members of the AMA?
4. Is this percentage high enough to make the AMA a legitimate representative of the medical community?

Please also explain you logic behind the following statements,

1. “Without AMA administered CPT, medical communications between physicians, hospitals and health plans would break down” (was there no medical care before CPT codes?)
2. “Groups far removed from hands-on patient care would fill the void and physicians would lose autonomy over procedure codes.” (have you no experience dealing with insurance companies?)
3. “Government or corporate bureaucrats should NOT be given responsible for setting a standard that defines medical services and procedures” (this comment leaves me agape. Have you practiced clinical medicine in the past 20 years? You really think physicians or the AMA defines medical services and procedures?)

Conspiracy theories wouldn’t exist, or wouldn’t be prevalent enough to irritate you if most physicians believed that the AMA’s decisions were made by “a forum of physicians representing their peers from every state and specialty”

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tom benzoni

September 12th, 2011
9:51 am

2 quick notes:

Although I’m not sure the AMA is irrelevant, I do think it could use some soul searching and, potentially, reform. (Disclosure: I am a member.) I think they/we are in trouble and I think the origin is not understanding clearly who we are collectively. The AMA needs to decide if it is the group that represents: a. physicians as individual physicians or b. societies of specialty providers. This is not a trivial difference; be an association of people united by their common physician-ness or a society of societies, but not both.

And, potentially related:

“Perception is reality” even though a common statement, is the precise definition of schizophrenia.

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Dr H

September 12th, 2011
10:07 am

Ok. Since the AMA is such a wonderful representative of America’s physicians, why have most dropped their membership? Please remind me, what percentage of America’s practicing physicians are paying (active) members of the AMA?

The fact that the majority are no longer members, speaks for itself. You can spin the results of the survey anyway you wish, the results represent the physicians I know.

For full disclosure – I am an academician with a private practice. I do research and also have an MBA. (I understand statistics).

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Maggie's love child

September 12th, 2011
10:41 am

What a political snipe hunt! Get your collective act together docs. Your adversaries are many and they are all laughing at your carping and fractious profession!

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Richard E. Sacks-Wilner, MD

September 12th, 2011
11:18 am

Regardless of how poor this particular study was designed…

Less than 20% of practicing Docs belong to the AMA – how can they say they represent us?

The RUC’s (a child of the AMA) skewed & ruinous undervaluation of Primary Care E&M services is resulting in its slow painful death – how can they say they represent us?

The AMA makes more from the ongoing disaster of reviled CPT codes (more progeny of the AMA) than from membership dues – how can they say they represent us?

The AMA & the ACP should be leading the charge & the NEJM should be rallying a call to arms, not a tepid “discussion”. They’re not, because the AMA has written off Primary Care – if you don’t think so, just look at all they’ve done to & for Primary care – or better yet look at how little they’ve done and/or backed that BENEFITED Primary Care.

After 21 years of Practice I can say it’s not added up to enough to keep me and ALL of my colleagues who practice medicine as it SHOULD be practiced in business. You can argue all you want about that, but those ARE the FACTS. I’m glad that other specialties/subspecialties had significantly greater margins, so they can tolerate the yearly pay cuts in the form of insufficient increases to match inflation/expenses; but that’s never been true of Primary Care, and the AMA never has & never will advocate a real revaluation of Primary Care that will cost these same specialties/subspecialties that can afford to continue paying dues.

Good luck finding a Primary Care Internist in the near future to take care of you complicated elderly mother or father – you simply won’t find one.

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Art, M.D., M.B. A.

September 12th, 2011
1:52 pm

The recent hiring of a failed academician, James Madara, as Executive VP and CEO of the business side of the organization reflects how out of touch the AMA is. He was canned from University of Chicago allegedly because of his dictatorial management style and because he wanted the poor to receive second-rate medical care through his Michelle Obama-inspired Urban Healthcare Initiative.

The AMA represents less than 20% of American physicians. I dropped my membership nearly 18 years ago because the AMA refused to stand firm on tort reform. The monthly journal, JAMA, is dominated by public health articles. It has fallen so far behind the NEJM in basic research publications, it is shocking. The cost of membership is simply not worth it.

The support of Obamacare is the straw that broke the camel’s back.

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Nosedoc

September 13th, 2011
9:51 am

The AMA has been just as bad at CLAIMING to speak for “the majority of American physicians” in support of Obamacare, where in fact the response rate was 3% in their survey as well. LOYALTY in business (and the AMA is a business at the end of the day) depends on where the “food source” (funding) comes in. If AMA funding is primarily dues, it is FACT that AMA profits have INCREASED during the past 5 years in spite of DECLINING membership. Most of the funding comes from CPT CODE BOOK SALES, PHARMA ADVERTISING, and SALES OF DATA MINING “LICENSURE”.

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Alternative1

September 13th, 2011
12:01 pm

How disingenuous of the AMA to comment on the unreliability of the survey because the results were based on responses from less than 1.5% of doctors, yet *they* “represent” less than 18% of practicing physicians.

The AMA has long since abdicted the role of representative of working physicians. They quit representing me many years ago, and I reciprocated. Support of ACA is just the culmination of bad decisions and misplaced energies by the AMA.

AMA JUST GO AWAY, D4PC IS 4 ME.

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Xiphias Team

September 16th, 2011
5:52 am

Great resource of healthcare kiosk……

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Electronic Health Record Solutions

September 17th, 2011
4:43 am

Hi, EHR is the new age tool that’s transforming the healthcare industry. There shouldn’t be any doubt that its the best tool for the healthcare industry available today.

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Greed has its rewards I guess!

September 21st, 2011
1:04 pm

Great article Bob Wells. Please continue to expose this practice in more detail as we need to determine our level of trust in the healthcare system, starting with our treating physician!

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Shawn McBride

October 13th, 2011
1:29 pm

Great summary of the carnage Wayne. Without such a turbulent, ill-timed and costly sideshow, I wonder what would have happened if Obama focused on the economy first rather than pulling the rug out from under many businesses and the healthcare sector. Will this be the legacy of the most damaging one-term President? Or does he somehow reverse the damage and realize what he’s caused? Or, do people still think there’s no connection between the continuing failure to recover and the timing of this costly legislation?

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Wayne Oliver

October 13th, 2011
2:56 pm

Thanks Shawn for your kind comments. Listening to the GOP candidates, it appears as though all of them are commited to repealing all or a good chunck of ObamaCare … both as a regulatory and financial nightmare. The good thing for ObamaCare opponents is that there is an election cycle between now and full implementation of health reform in 2014. How Americans view the president and his policies including federal health reform will have a direct correlation for the future of ObamaCare.

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Keith Diederich

October 14th, 2011
7:06 pm

the question is, “Which one?” I favor VistA. It is in the public domain, it has been successfully adopted worldwide, there are at least three Meaningful-Use certified vendors who provide support, and it has been under constant development for 30 years or more.

Because it has been released to public domain, it can be customized to meet the particular needs of any health facility; in fact, hiring a Clinical Application Coordinator to implement customizations is a normal part of deployment and usage.

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John G. Mager, MD, MBA

October 16th, 2011
11:32 am

hey AMA you get blustery because you’re wrong, and we all know it. I’m glad my fellow non-brain-washed docs have so ably refuted you, point by point. You and your minions ought to be ashamed of yourselves: because it’s the likes of you that makes me less proud to be an M.D.

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October 17th, 2011
4:33 am

I specially talking about there are not good enough infrustructure for ana good hospitals.The thought is good.

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October 22nd, 2011
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Onita Newnam

October 25th, 2011
10:20 am

Thanks for this

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Olevia Dummett

October 25th, 2011
11:03 am

Great, cheers!

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Bill Custer

October 27th, 2011
10:00 am

This is a very nice summary of a complicated regulation. Your last paragraph is exactly on point. The movement toward bundled reimbursement, reportable quality measures that focus on episodes of care, and integration of services predated the Affordable Care Act. That trend will continue regardless of the political fortunes of the ACA.

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October 30th, 2011
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Elizabeth Richards, healthcare attorney

November 11th, 2011
11:13 am

Very interested to see what happens with the Court!

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[...] site to another via electronic communications to improve patients’ health status.  As stated in past HealthFlock posts, examples of telemedicine at work today in Atlanta and elsewhere are prevalent:  emergency medical [...]

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ageofknowledge

November 16th, 2011
1:43 pm

Healthcare is a dismal failure in this country and something had to be done. Obamacare is the first step.

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D.Klocke

November 25th, 2011
2:17 am

Great article. Right on.

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Xiphias Team

December 5th, 2011
8:16 am

Excellent information about interactive kiosk,health care kiosk etc.

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December 13th, 2011
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January 25th, 2012
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January 25th, 2012
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Kenneth Pylant

February 3rd, 2012
2:43 pm

I wonder if the definition of unnecessary test/ultrasound/etc are those whose results are as hoped for as opposed to results that might have been feared. IF defensive medicine means promoting early detection and defending my health against delayed diagnosis, I have to admit to being in favor ot that. Of course, a single payer system aking to that in Canada would cut our total health care by some 30% in pure administrative costs. That assumes that American government could master the clerical requirements as well as the Canadians.

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February 4th, 2012
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Max Mendel

February 5th, 2012
10:12 am

When the consequences of misreading test results increase because of potentially being sued, the radiologist’s cost of doing tests like CT and MRI are higher. Most people would expect doctors to perform fewer tests if their costs are higher. If what you are proposing is true, then Newt Gingrich and the Center for Health Transformation should advocate taxes on EHR solutions to encourage their adoption. Maybe doctors just need a Xanax…?

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Jason Boies

February 6th, 2012
2:03 pm

Nice piece here, Bart.

You’re totally right about blending our real and digital worlds. I get together with friends for the bowl as well as the Oscars (this film fan’s version of the Super Bowl) and I feel like joining the conversation on Twitter only enhances the experience. I get to discuss the event not just with my friends, but anyone that’s interested. I love it.

Patients AND professionals only benefit when the industry gets more engaged online by joining health discussions in forums/comments sections and passing along quality, scientifically sound information from their Twitter/FB pages.

Good stuff

Jason Boies
Radian6 Community Team

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Elizabeth M

February 8th, 2012
8:48 pm

Though recognition and acknowledgment of mental illness(es) are becoming more heard of today, and as a society we’ve come a long way since the 1950s when the doors of mental hospitals and institutions were just opened and patients with illnesses ranging from “mild” to very severe were just let out into the streets more or less unsupervised and uncared for, there’s still stigma associated with the mentally ill. Even though mental illness are becoming more prevalent, people still don’t want to acknowledge that they have it or a family member has it or a friend to the extent that it should be. As a result, those people who are living in denial don’t get help and don’t tell others about seeking out help.

Help is hard to find in any situation, and when you add a mental illness into the equation, finding help can become even more difficult. But when people don’t even try, that is sad. When people know or suspect that they or someone that they know is mentally ill, he or she should seek out help for themselves or that person that they know as soon as possible, in order to start receiving psychological treatment.

If you don’t know where to start looking for help or referrals, sometimes the Internet can be a place to start.You can find articles and websites that have positive messages that can get you started looking in the right direction. I know of such a website, which is Living Fit, Healthy and Happy. This website is run by a caring, intellectual, educated, young man who cares about his readers, and has plenty of helpful information on many different subjects, including mental health.

I saw a nice article there entitled “Be Happy To Be Alive”, found at the url of http://www.livingfithealthyandhappy.com/2011/09/be-happy-to-be-alive.html. This article speaks positively to people regardless of their state of mind. It encourages people to be happy, because being positive about life is a start to helping to thwart mental decline and mental illness.

It’s a nice article and website. It won’t be time wasted. So check it out:)

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Wayne Oliver - vice president, Center for Health Transformation

February 9th, 2012
10:58 am

Kenneth, the results of the Gallup Poll of physicians were very revealing: Physicians order unnecessary tests not for the purposes of ruling out a diagnosis or condition … they order unnecessary tests to protect themselves from meritless, frivilous lawsuits. Plain and simple.

In terms of our healthcare system vs. the Canadian system, I would prefer that medical decisions are made between me and my physician (or other appropriater healthcare professional) rather than established by some national board of bureaucrats. Thanks for posting you comments!

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David Mason

February 9th, 2012
3:02 pm

Wayne, this is well put and the comments reveal little knowledge of the US healthcare situation. Of course as noted there are other drivers, while single source systems run by the government, e.g. the VA, are not necessarily cheaper or more efficient. Tort reform must be part of any overall of the system, or test costs will continue to rise. I am not hopeful of this being achieved since the plaintiffs bar essentially runs Congress and most State legislatures, and they have no incentive for such reform, your observations aside.

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Janelle

February 17th, 2012
10:52 am

If you need ready-to-use integration, a modular solution to fill in gaps across the care continuum or reports to keep-up with “moving target” of requirements, check out ACO Accelerator: http://medda.com/aco-accelerator.htm Best Regards.

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[...] CMS Changes in the Conditions of Participation Requires Hospitals to Act [...]

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Odell

March 7th, 2012
10:45 am

Ron, interesting thoughts you share. We are working on a panel to share ideas on this topic. How can we get you possibly as a speaker to share your thoughts.

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[...] Atlanta Journal Constitution: HHS’ Open Data Initiative Great for Consumers & Healthcare System The Health & Human Services (HHS) Department has been actively promoting a major new project under the “Open Government” umbrella called the Community Health Data Initiative (CHDI). CHDI’s core strategy is to publicly release government health data and actively promote the availability of this data to private and public businesses to encourage production of products, platforms, applications, and services that will serve our citizens and overall healthcare system. The basic idea is that knowledge and education can empower citizens to action (Bart Foster, 6/7). [...]

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[...] Atlanta Journal Constitution: ACOs, EHRs And Small Practices Many health care providers are wondering about the new Medicare shared programs for Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs). For the patient, ACOs could promise more “Accountable” medical care that may lead to improved Health outcomes. However, it is important that ACO guidelines are comprehensive to prevent things like “cherry picking” by providers. This means a provider would choose the healthiest patients in order to obtain panels that will have better Health outcomes. This defeats the purpose of health reform which is to expand coverage to patients with chronic diseases who have traditionally had bad outcomes. But let’s say that no one is able to do those kinds of things. Then this could be a win for the patients (Dominic Mack, 6/13). [...]

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[...] Atlanta Journal Constitution: Accountable Care: A Culture And Payment Change In today’s environment, Providers are generally paid a fee for each service rendered. Therefore, Providers increase revenues by increasing patient visits and working longer hours to see more patients a day. However, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”) policy and program initiatives have been driving to a new model, Accountable Care. Accountable Care takes the old model of fee for service and turns it upside down (Michele Madison, 6/22).  [...]

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March 19th, 2012
4:05 pm

Is the Challenge going to be opened again?? We have an entry..
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April 5th, 2012
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Debbie

April 6th, 2012
9:01 am

Many people in our country would not be on disability if they could have sought medical care in the beginning of their illness. This also includes people with mental illness. Our country would be much better off if it citizens were healthy. One out of three people in our country will die from heart disease. This is not true of other countries that live a much healthier lifestyle.

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April 18th, 2012
3:38 pm

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Choppy

April 27th, 2012
8:18 am

And one of your first arguments is that the adverse risk groups cost should be born by me? Medical workers frequently try to play god spending close to a million dollars to save one premature baby, or hundreds of thousands of dollars only delaying the death of a terminally I’ll child who is, if fact were anyhow important, without hope.

I resent the idea that the million dollar ego rub of some practitioners, or the vast wealth that insurance companies rake in are my duty and burden.

The fact is certain people cannot let go in the face of death of a loved one and want to employ all means possible to attempt to cheat death. Fine, pay for this if it is what you want to do. Don’t expect it to come out of my salary.

Bravo to everyone of the spreme court justices that do not blindly accept the idea that the vast majority must support the unbridled spending of the healthcare machine. The American medical association is the most powerful lobby in America and they wish more bucks in their pocket.

I don’t want your socialism. Doctors are not gods. Nor is the fear used in every argument to pass this bill founded.

Insurance isn’t medical care. It is a private business that ONLY exists for profit. They can keep their greedy fingers out of my life.

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Aila

May 4th, 2012
12:02 pm

I can’t state the insurance laws of Georgia but pterty much the rules and regulations with most of the major insurance companies are alike. First of all your a fool for not getting a lawyer if you were involved in a auto accident. The lawyer works for you in getting top notch dollar in sueing the insurance company on your behalf. True you probably could settle without an attorney but the insurance can take advantages of you of all kinds and not even tell you about it. They may make you an offer where as if your greedy, you will sign an affadavit of not taking them to court. Someone who acts as their own lawyer is a fool. They can even sue the opposing party to which you had an accident with. They can get you lost wages as well if your out of work for any length of time. Do not make demands upon any major insurance company as for it wouild be like sticking a knife in your own heart. As far as paying for your medical bills, yes under the no fault act which all drivers must carry, they are responsible to pay the hospital and the doctor directly for your medical bills. Don’t be greedy and stay cool and get an attorney as for he is there looking out for your well being and your best interests.

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Glenn

May 15th, 2012
11:54 am

So which of these businesses mentioned is competing against the four providers left . None ? . Yeah innovation is needed but it won’t be the healthcare providers picking up most of the tab will it . Providers seem to get the profits at the expense of everyone else except for the bought politicians .

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Richie

May 15th, 2012
1:47 pm

Excellent information. At a recent event a strategist from Eli Lilly echoed the call for innovation across the health care offerings. Health care is too important to our national economic engine. I look forward to hearing more!

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May 16th, 2012
11:53 pm

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Baby Boomer Writer

May 19th, 2012
3:30 pm

I recently quizzed two doctors about this: One a surgeon, the other an internist in Virginia. Neither had joined or contracted for the specialized software. One plans to retire in a year to avoid the whole process of health care delivery. The other told me it cost too much for a small practice to set up such specialized healthcare software programs. He estimated the cost at $90,000 and worried about potential liability if a mistake was accidentally made on a patient’s record.

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May 31st, 2012
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[...] are dedicated to using data and performance measures to further advance patient safety efforts. (Read column.) This dedication to driving quality through health IT has resulted in zero errors in the each of [...]

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Ron Bachman

June 8th, 2012
2:28 pm

Wayne, good blog. Are you willing to volunteer your skills to help pass Georgia reforms in 2013?

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jw

June 13th, 2012
9:29 am

I moved to a different State and had to get a new primary care Doc. A young Doc with a good credentials. It’s been three years and he has never given me a physical exam. He sits at his lap top and asks questions and orders test. I once told him I had spots in my eyes and he never look at my eye’s just referred me to an specialist. This is the new way to treat, physical exams no longer apply. I could go on line and answer questions and get referred why do I need the Doc??

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Wayne Oliver - Healthcare Consultant

June 13th, 2012
10:50 am

Dr. Mack, you are right on target with this post. Health literacy is so vitally important … especially as we move toward an individually-centered model of care where the individual (patient) has roles and responsibilities like medication adherence and self monitoring (diabetes). Physicians and pharmacists are usually on the front line of patient edication but we need models where the entire healthcare team understands the importance of health literacy.

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Marc Olsen - Executive, Hospital Administration

June 13th, 2012
4:48 pm

Thanks John for the comment. Sorry to hear about your experience; doctors still have a responsibility to communicate and practice good medicine with their patients, even if a computer sits between them. Hopefully, we will see that technology is encourages better medicine and not less communication. Thanks again.

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June 16th, 2012
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Otis Curry

June 26th, 2012
9:02 am

All what you have said is fine. But what about making ( Insurace Company) lower there payments such as a rebate to the amount of $1.2 Billion if the law is upheld thats about $151 to each American.

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Otis Curry

June 26th, 2012
9:04 am

All what you have said is fine. But what about making (Insurance Company) lower their payments such as a rebate to the amount of $1.2 Billion if the law is upheld that about $151 to each American.

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Eddie Phillips

June 26th, 2012
10:03 am

In general, insurance companies want as many individuals as possible in the pool of covered lives. What insurance companies do not want is for individuals to wait to purchase insurance until a health care event is imminent for the insured individual. Assuming the law is upheld (including the individual mandate), I believe competition among insurance companies will cause premiums to adjust to a fair level.

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June 29th, 2012
2:00 pm

Certainly we need to use technology to our advantage, to help doctors work more efficiently. However I also found that there is a lot one can do for one’s self in dealing with pathogenic stress and disease, especially those like cancer, diabetes and heart disease. I am posting on my blog about my findings on disease at http://kyrani99.wordpress.com/

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July 1st, 2012
10:54 am

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Kurt Ronn

July 2nd, 2012
12:30 pm

As a successful entrepreneur, small business owner and employment industry expert, I agree with Mr. Foster’s assessment. The medical device tax is a tax on an innovative, thriving growth sector. There is no way that taxing a growth sector will spur more innovation and create jobs. It has a chilling impact.

The healthcare mandate can be debated by both sides as to the impact of the new “tax.” Tough choices need to be made, but what we need is great policy and the current compromise Obamacare bill is not great policy. However, I am doubtful that we will see any great healthcare policy any time soon, regardless, most everyone agrees healthcare and healthcare costs need to be addressed. But taxing healthcare innovation is hard to understand from either side of the aisle.

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[...] best practices. I have written in this space about creating a new system of health justice (“Let’s Get Serious About Healthcare Costs,” February 3, 2012) … one that creates a new model for compensating legitimate medical errors. [...]

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[...] best practices. I have written in this space about creating a new system of health justice (“Let’s Get Serious About Healthcare Costs,” February 3, 2012) … one that creates a new model for compensating legitimate medical errors. [...]

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[...] from others.  Even on HealthFlock, we have bloggers on have differing opinions (pro vs. con).  While no one I can find believes that the the Affordable Care Act is perfect, I personally [...]

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keith

July 10th, 2012
3:46 am

Yes,the obama’s bill is approved now and it will only lead to better health facilities in US,Although i agree that all the problems wouldn’t solve in a year but this will only lead to further improvements and this is a very positive point.

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Carrie Montagna

July 18th, 2012
4:29 pm

Michele – whats your twitter handle? Great article on how neither solution solves everything.

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Joyce Metzer

July 25th, 2012
11:21 am

I agree with everything you mentioned in your article especially remembering that I as the patient am your customer so treat me in that manner. And remember I am a professional with a job whose time is just as important as the nurse, physician, and front desk personnel, if the Doctor is running late tell me when I check-in please.

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Bob Wells

July 25th, 2012
2:23 pm

Joyce well stated and to the point. It makes you wonder why such a basic and simple practice isn’t standard instead of the exception.

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Art Fougner MD

August 2nd, 2012
11:02 am

Once again, the term reimbursement is conflated with payment. Payments from third party payors to physicians are NOT reimbursement. If you want a real reimbursement system, then the patient should pay for services rendered and get “reimbursed” by the payors.

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Daniel

August 22nd, 2012
3:29 pm

CMS, OIG, and HHS will closely moontir ACOs entering into the program in 2012 through June 2013, and plan to narrow the waivers if they result in the unintended effect of shielding abusive arrangements.a0 The waivers could be narrowed by modifying the waivers to add or substitute conditions to the waivers; limiting ACO arrangements involving referral sources to those that are fair market value or commercially reasonably or involve services performed by the referral sources; preclude waiver protections for arrangements that involve individuals or entities that are not part of the ACO; or include a requirement that ACOs submit reports regarding their arrangement.a0 CMS and the OIG seek comments on these approaches to narrow the waivers.Source: omwhealthlaw.com

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Suchita

August 22nd, 2012
11:35 pm

Diego Garcia for crew swap? Good lord, I thought that Rota, Spain was bad for lietrby on crew swap in the 70s. From experience on a Polaris SSBN, I know that the missile hatches and a lot of other stuff need maintenance between patrols. Are they going to bring the Frank Cable to Diego Garcia for these refits or just put off maintenance for a year until returning to Kings Bay (not a good idea).

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Asha

August 23rd, 2012
5:01 am

A lot. More today than a year ago.Because of Obamacare, no company in America orfefs stand alone children’s health insurance.Why? Obamacare dictates that it is guaranteed issue, without rate ups, regardless of health. Therefore, there is no reason to purchase it until there is a claim needing to be paid.That’s not health insurance. That’s a confiscatory tax on health insurance companies. Fortunately, they aren’t slaves yet, so they exercised the F U clause in the contract with the purple bellies from Washington and just refused to do business where they are guaranteed to lose money.How do you fix the problem of un- and under-insured? By making health insurance affordable.How do you make it affordable? By removing ALL government mandates, loser pays tort reform, encouraging competition between providers (enforce existing anti-trust laws), eliminate the AMA monopoly on billing codes, and eliminate the connection between employment and health insurance.Do these things and we’ll see health insurance cost less than auto insurance. More people will be covered, more people will be healthy.

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Juanes

August 23rd, 2012
11:20 am

it’s really not thuogh. I suffer from arthritis, and going to a conventional doctor i was given Naproxen, at the age of 14. I started developing stomach ulcers from the Naproxen. My doctor gave me the option to have stomach ulcers or suffer through arthritis. My naturopath has worked with me for 4years now. And my arthritis has gotten incredibly better. I no longer am bed ridden for days on end when there are barometric pressure changes.

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Gilbert

August 23rd, 2012
12:55 pm

Run and run fast from these companies.I can’t tell you the nuembr of complaints on here about them.They only take your money, tell you not to pay your bills, they don’t pay your bills, and you end up in court anyway.Please google debt negotiation complaint to see how it all works.If it works, you will have paid thousands of dollars that you could have paid to the credit card companies yourself.Get a book on debt.It will teach you how to negotiate, reduce interest, or settle.Or google NFCC.orgnational foundation for consumer credit councelling.click on an office near you, and make an appointment.There is no fee for this federal program.You can do this yourself don’t get taken by horrendous crooks ..

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Giovina

August 23rd, 2012
1:00 pm

I did the Sat in trfaifc. Sat in trfaifc. Sat in trfaifc. thing one Monday morning at around 0745 as I was driving through Atlanta one day. I don’t recommend it, but sometimes, there just isn’t any other way.Glad you’re back safely.

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Scott Ragsdale

August 23rd, 2012
1:16 pm

It is conceivable that taxes on households that earn $250,000 will increase to 43.4% if they don’t have health coverage. I think such a household not having health coverage is unlikely. In addition the payment for health coverage is deductible.
The real disproportion here is that the tax rate for $250,000 and above has been 15% for the years when the rest of us paid much more for the wars and for the bank bail out.
Time has long since passed to even out the investment burden in what makes it possible for our “job creators” to make money in the first place – a well educated civil society.

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Nadia

August 23rd, 2012
5:23 pm

No, it has the best screen in the bseniuss, it’s an IPS panel, non-Apple laptops use the cheaper panels, that’s why they are so grainy. There’s lots of cases that move it into various positions if you want to turn it into a laptop. What? there are 170,000 3rd party programs for the iPad, so you clearly don’t know what you are talking about.You just don’t like quality products.

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Claudia

August 25th, 2012
12:41 am

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Dadang

August 25th, 2012
4:09 am

Thanks Haggisbasher ..this is a great story:This was an article from the St. Petersburg Times Newspaper on Sunday.The Business Section asked redreas for ideas on How Would You Fix the Economy? This was possibly the BEST idea. Has this guy nailed it?Dear Mr.President,Patriotic retirement:There’s about 40 million people over 50 in the work force; pay them $1 million apiece severance with stipulations:1) They leave their jobs. Forty million job openings Unemployment fixed.2) They buy NEW American cars. Forty million cars ordered Auto Industry fixed.3) They either buy a house or pay off their mortgage Housing Crisis fixed.Remember : Cheaper than giving away the taxpayers money to rich people! It’s so simple eh? Just ask the people and get a straightforward answer, that just might work. Politicians? Who needs em?

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Melaine

August 30th, 2012
9:27 am

Lance Armstrong’s decision not to fight the doping charges anymore has not changed my perception or trust in his credibility. He has been fighting these accusations longer than he has been fighting cancer. If there had been proof that he was taking any enhancements they should have shown up long ago. The USADA’s pursuit of him for so long and then stripping him of his wins just looks like a vendetta. If i were him, I would have quit protesting too. The money and time spent defending against charges for years has to have been prohibitive. The USADA has”won” but they have also lost. Is his credibility damaged? Maybe, but the world still knows he is a winner in cycling, against cancer and his passion for helping others.

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Fred Pira

August 30th, 2012
3:01 pm

Wow! Good location to really push the product… Waiting
!!!

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Bonnie Cech

September 11th, 2012
2:46 pm

Thanks for quantifying the significance of patient waits! While your example focuses on ERs, which have their unique challenges, 95% of patient visits in the outpatient setting are predictable. Why, then, do so many physicians and clinics struggle with the “running late” challenge? I believe it’s because we don’t have clear visibility into the visit process – we lack a quantifiable understanding of where the delays and inefficiencies occur, and what the underlying root causes for inefficiencies are for each provider. To understand this requires that we accurately track and analyze patient flow. Armed with the right information and tools, I’m always impressed with the improvements physicians and staff make to their processes to run on time and reduce patient waits (while at the same time improving productivity). While providing updates about the length of the wait can help reduce patient angst, I echo your conclusion. Long term patient satisfaction and retention is dependent on improving the patients’ experience – and it starts with reducing patient waits.

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ghoaweke

September 11th, 2012
11:02 pm

This is the accurate What Consolidation Means for the Future of Healthcare in America | HealthFlock journal for anyone who wants to seek out out almost this issue. You note so such its nigh exhausting to represent with you (not that I really would want…HaHa). You definitely put a new acrobatics on a subject thats been backhand roughly for life. City bunk, simply outstanding!

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Bernie

September 14th, 2012
11:57 pm

What most People do not realize is that if you are a patient of a small medical practice you are more exposed than ever. More than 80% of the medical offices in ATLANTA’s Medical offices, the physician employer has never performed a background check of their employees and unaware of any and all criminal offenses. This is the area where your private and medical is most vulnerable. The employee turnover is far more prevalent and these employees rotate from office to office, specialty to specialty with very little real information known by the individuals that have been hired.

More than 90% of these physician employers do not ask or require of their new hires
to have a pre-employment physical exam and virtually no DRUG SCREENING at ALL. There is no type of random drug screening once they are hired.
Think about that for minute. Really scary!

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September 16th, 2012
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Marc Olsen - Executive, Hospital Administration

September 16th, 2012
2:23 pm

Thank you Bonnie for the comments! I do think you are absolutely right – much more can be done to provide visibility into the entire patient visit, not only for administrators but more importantly the entire staff. I think that all staff (front office, back office, etc), armed with the right information, could be a powerful force in improving the overall experience for patients.

Thanks for sharing!

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Bernie

September 18th, 2012
10:24 am

The Common Sense Approach is to implement and utilize the services of a Physician Assistant and/or Nurse Practitioner especially in General Medicine,Family practice and Internal Medicine primarily, as well other specialties. To further expand their services to work independently in those areas of the State that has greatest shortage of physicians would prove to be prudent and smart.

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Bonnie Cech

September 18th, 2012
3:29 pm

Mark – can you provide the source or link to the national survey that “found that 40% of the variance in patient satisfaction can be explained by the amount of time a patient waits to see their doctor” Thank you!

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devonshire insurance

September 20th, 2012
3:53 am

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[...] Bill Custer does a good job of digging into Georgia’s health insurance nitty gritty in his latest blog.) Now if we could just put a financial and clinical team together to fill in this pit with [...]

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Bernie

September 23rd, 2012
12:15 am

A Very Good Place to start is with the Governor’s OFFICE. A reversal of the medicaid expansion would go a long way into expanding medical care for those among us who are in need of it the most.

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Kelly Crofton

October 1st, 2012
8:02 am

http://www.collegeinfo.com/american-sentinel-university.aspx
Oh! such a huge amount is going away, Government should take proper steps to overcome this pits.

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Westwood College Degree Programs

October 3rd, 2012
1:52 am

http://www.collegeinfo.com/westwood-college.aspx
Recession hits badly for the people in almost all the ways. having health insurance is very important and a good concept too. It is good to see that at least Georgians are getting their insurance by private or from offices or somehow.

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icons package

October 4th, 2012
2:07 pm

icon pack

October 4th, 2012
8:06 pm

[...] by Wayne Oliver – Vice President at RxAlly Originally published in the Atlanta Journal Constitution on October 5, 2012 http://blogs.ajc.com/health-flock/2012/10/05/did-you-brush-your-teeth/ [...]

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Marc Olsen - Executive, Hospital Administration

October 8th, 2012
1:16 pm

Sorry for my delay Bonnie. It can be found in the article, “Can Physicians Improve Satisfaction with Long Waiting Times?”, Feddock et al., Eval Health Prof 2005 28:40. Hope that helps!

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icon pack

October 8th, 2012
11:43 pm

icon set

October 10th, 2012
4:22 am

catlady

October 13th, 2012
1:20 pm

So, you think it would take care of the elderly as well as they are taken care of now? Right now seniors have a guaranteed basic benefit, and pretty reasonable options to extend their coverage. But instead we will give them a “credit” so they can purchase their own, admittedly at a higher price than now? (and at the same time “your guys” want to repeal the Affordable Care Act so that pre-existing conditions can make your ability to get cheap insurance untenable?)

Sorry, but this is a crock. The smaller government crowd wants to insert yet another middleman (profit-seeking) between elders and health care. Anyone over the age of 40 who is not a millionaire or a member of Congress should see this for what it is–an attempt to pay off those contributors in the health insurance industry on the backs of the elderly, and not only refuse to vote the R/R ticket but to encourage young folks to stay away from these clowns as well.

Are there ways to improve the cost of Medicare? Sure. Put an end to paying for folks to go to the ER for a sore throat. End stupid “perks” like gym memberships. Negotiate for better drug prices. Continue to seek out cheaters, such as doctors who claim to see hundreds of patients a day. But don’t reward insurers with this proposal that slaps seniors in the face!

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catlady

October 13th, 2012
1:21 pm

BTW, Elizabeth Richards, for whom do you litigate?

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Elizabeth Richards, healthcare attorney

October 14th, 2012
8:08 pm

Catlady, thank you for your well written comment. I do not think the voucher program is the end all be all answer to the Medicare problems. However, I do think it at least deserves some unbiased consideration no matter what side you are on. Your points are well taken. There is some valid fraud in Medicare, which must be addressed. Additionally, the overuse of the emergency room by all patient populations continues to be an issue. As to your question regarding my background, please see my bio.

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[...] Jennifer Dennard of AJC recently shared three ways that poor Data Governance can hurt healthcare. She writes, “We’ve all heard the age old expression, “One bad apple spoils the bunch.” But, have you ever stopped to wonder whether this is actually true? Digging deeper, we discover this idiom is not only rooted in common sense, but also in science. When apples mature, they give off a gas called ethylene that accelerates the ripening process. However, if released too early, this gas has the ability to over-stimulate the ripening process, thus proving that one bad apple can, indeed, ruin all the others. You may be thinking, what do apples have in common with healthcare?” [...]

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Ana

October 25th, 2012
7:06 am

well if your hot just come by my place and i’ll take you out to some cool places in GA(I live in srnyma)I’m from NY but ATL is my favorite place to be. I’ve been there so many times and I still havn’t done everything.

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Haha

October 25th, 2012
7:25 am

I was blown away by Leaving Atlanta. It really tocuehd me partly because I am a native Atlantan but also becuse it is a well written highly entertaining book. I have recommended it to anybody that would listen. I read it about six weeks ago and had conversations with friends and family about the MMC cases. I have my own opinion about Mr Williams guilt but I do beleive that there was some cover-up of information. I think officials found the people who committed the crimes and either killed them during an arrest or locked them up on other charges. I think that because of the group or people involved it was decided that the city and country couldn’t handle the real truth. Then along comes Mr. Williams to give them exactly what was needed. I look forward to seeing what new information comes out. I also look forward to reading Ms Jones’ comments in the AJC.

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Edgar

October 25th, 2012
8:56 am

Hi Vivian,I saw the article about CHFP on Finance @ Work. I’m itenresetd in joining the Healthcare Financial Management Assosication, though I may not take the exam for this year. Could you connect me to the organization? Do you need any information from me? Please let me know. Thank you very much for your help.

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Daniel

October 25th, 2012
8:59 am

Usually insurance cnoapmies will not let you start a policy until you actually own the vehicle. But you can still call or talk to an agent to get a quote and then once you are actually purchasing the vehicle, you can call them and start the policy. Since you are buying a car for the first time and insurance as well, I would recommend you go to a local insurance agent and sit down with them and talk with them about the various coverages and whatnot as many cnoapmies that you call over the phone will try to sell you the cheapest insurance which does not provide good protection in the event of an accident. Also, check several different cnoapmies for quotes and make sure you get a quote with the same coverages so as to see who can offer you the best rate.

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Rajesh

October 25th, 2012
10:18 am

above (maybe it was me :-) ?… the guys who really know they can go hang with the other guys any time they want, tend not to have such rigid “no girls aollwed ever!! attitudes.One woman golfing with them every now and then, or joining them for coffee, doesn’t change the whole group dynamic where they suddenly can’t be themselves or act regularly. She is a guest at their table, so to speak. These men, I’ve found, also don’t express sadness or sympathy to a guy whose wife maybe bears a daughter either. (To me, there’s nothing sadder than the insecurity shown when that whiff of sexism comes out… like your whole life/lifestyle as a man will change because you didn’t transmit that extra chromosome. It’s more underground now, but I’ve it seen it there up close in those more insecure in their maleness.)My favorites are the guys who have their guy times, but also have family time too: hunting together on Thanksgiving Day after the meal ends. Pond skating on the holidays with the family after the inside festivities wrap up. Teaching the boys and girls good hunter safety rules, even if the child — of either gender — ultimately decides to pursue something else, concentrate on another sport say. And fishing too — that’s one that plenty of individuals like, girls and guys. If you’ve made room for same-sex bonding traditions in your schedule, and respect family together times too, chances are you’re better balanced, healthier for being outside, and more likely to raise strong sons and daughters. Ironically, with enough same-sex times built in, there really does seem to be less stereotypical comments and attitudes spawned in making generalities about the opposite sex, I’ve found. Which is natural, really…

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Matheus

October 25th, 2012
12:11 pm

Does your website have a canotct page? I’m having problems locating it but, I’d like to send you an e-mail. I’ve got some suggestions for your blog you might be interested in hearing. Either way, great site and I look forward to seeing it expand over time.

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Miriame

October 25th, 2012
1:54 pm

something to the afefct of a request to raise the debt ceiling was caused by a failure of leadership. It also needs to be pointed out over and over again that there was not sufficient time allocated for review of the legislation prior to the vote as he promised there would be on all bills. And I have yet to hear any press inquire about the waivers being granted.

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Mayra

October 25th, 2012
4:06 pm

Thanks for taking the time to disucss this, I feel strongly about it and love learning more on this topic. If possible, as you gain expertise, would you mind updating your blog with more information? It is extremely helpful for me.

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Petpet

October 25th, 2012
8:20 pm

Ann is right. The fact that you are still a nurse in the NHS and that you know what you are talking about is a duloisiln. In reality you are funded by big business, the CIA and green men for another planet.Ann on the other hand works for free. As a nurse who believes that healthcare should be devoid from profit and monetary consideration she does not soil her pockets with financial benefit. Instead, she lives on fresh air!Even better than this, she really trusts politicians and the state! Wow, what a girl. Glad she is to be listened to!!!

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Barman

October 25th, 2012
10:24 pm

说:House we are staying at suedsopply has internet, although do not know until we get there what the quality will be.Any suggestions on what I can do to remedy situation if I cannot get on via house internet.From what I understand internet is shared with home next door.. Any information would be appreciated..

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October 26th, 2012
12:37 am

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Talita

October 27th, 2012
12:55 am

说:I never run without my Amphipod hahnledd water bottle. I have the 12oz for short runs and the 20oz for long ones. I carry water for races of all distances, and love the zipper pouch for some extra Gu and/or key storage!

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Andrew

October 27th, 2012
2:03 am

说:Mich: OMG !!!! Now that is so scarey. I have not heard any of that. Not that I dont bvielee it, I just have not heard that. We need to get this out to the public. Has no one asked, Who wrote this bill? WOW we are like puppets.

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Rachma

October 27th, 2012
2:36 am

HMO’s suck for doctors, but are cheap for you if you get a good one, you just have to be cohsoy about the doctor, the doctor has to be in network. if you can afford it, go with PPO, POS, QPOS, etc. because doctors get paid better, and you wont have to pay them as mucha as a result. Talk to some doctors around that you like, and ask them, some doctors will not charge you much if you have an HMO, but some will, and other way around with PPO and such.

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Marko

October 27th, 2012
4:17 am

Hey Amir,Kyle, of Panacea, has been helping me in the way of best cotactning the DMV area artists. I was just hoping your schedule was open enough for a phone-in interview on my radio show. It is titled ManWomanBoogie and focuses on hip hop and jazz. The show runs Fridays from 8-10PM on 90.7 KJHK, Lawrence (Kansas). Let me know if this holds any interest to you.lstall@ku.edu

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Amanda

October 29th, 2012
12:51 am

Great article. Sadly, you are so right. I can’t say that I am any different since I always have my phone (shameful, I know)! You bring up a good point, so we’ll see how it impacts our healthcare.

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icon package

November 2nd, 2012
5:36 am

Bonnie Cech

November 3rd, 2012
1:40 pm

Thank you, Mark!

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icon pack

November 4th, 2012
11:35 am

Kelly McLendon

November 9th, 2012
11:53 am

As one who has benefited from Mr. Oliver’s mentoring, I have learned all of the lessons above from him. Relationships with mentors live long after the formal relationship ends. Even now, when there are times that I am in unfamiliar territory, I pick up the phone and call Wayne and other mentors in my life. They help me clear away the clutter, and find the perspective I need to take the next step. Many thanks to Wayne and all of the men and women who have stood with me as I learned the lessons of life. I am working hard to pay this lesson forward!

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We Need More Mentors in America Today

November 10th, 2012
2:02 am

[...] 11:20 am November 8, 2012, by Wayne Oliver – Vice President at RxAlly http://blogs.ajc.com/health-flock/2012/11/08/we-need-more-mentors-in-america-today/ [...]

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[...] by Wayne Oliver – Vice President at RxAlly Originally posted in the Atlanta Journal Constitution on November 8, 2012 http://blogs.ajc.com/health-flock/2012/11/08/we-need-more-mentors-in-america-today/ [...]

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Mari

November 28th, 2012
12:49 pm

This is exactly what I am doing, scheduling appointments with doctors. Thanks for the insight.

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Living With Open Eyes

December 21st, 2012
9:33 am

It would be cheaper(and more effective) for the patient to just go to any licensed general practictioner and let a trained medical professional-the doctor- decide where the patient needs to go for treatment.And then the insurance companies should just pay the bills: they spend more money trying to get out of paying than if they just paid up. Of course more than two thirds of the pencil pushers would have to join the real labor market then, and compete with the illegal aliens for real “jobs” that everybody swears are out there.

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Rocky Odell

December 30th, 2012
2:23 am

I believe Obama could care less about Americans, our Physicians and other healthcare providers. He is hell bent on destroying our economy and making us a Socialist nation. One day, when people who voted for him realize what he truly is and is doing, someone, somewhere will find a way to get to him, and I think Biden would be the lesser of two evils. Just like when Kennedy was assinated, it wasn’t only one person involded but a conspiracy, and I honestly believe there will be people who will eventually snap, form their own conspiracy and get to Obama. He is the absolute worst President this GREAT COUNTRY has ever had to deal with. And Romney is right, those with their hands out for a handout, will soon find the door has shut down. If only we could find a legal way, i.e. Benghazi Gate to impeach Obama, and impeach him soon.

He knew what was going on in Benghazi, but had one of his lackies take the hit for it, so thatit took the light off him and him in Las Vegas, one of America’s hardest hit cities on his campaign trail. I don’t think he even knows how to put a Budget together, nor realize people will soon be rioting, burinng homes, doctor’s offices. any way they can to “get even” when they now see him for what he truly is and what he is doing to our Country. I don’t believe in violence as the answer, but there are a lot who absolutely hate Obama and at some point, they will snap, and he will be taken down either by our government itselt of some people who have lost a loved one or even they will face dying due to a disease, because they will now be off the Medicaid rolls and tossed into the street.

All I can say is God help America when that happens, as we will all suffer because of Obama.

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Charles

December 30th, 2012
12:07 pm

Maybe we should tax Lawyers more!

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Importance of Technology

January 2nd, 2013
1:35 am

Thanks for sharing this useful info.ents here

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[...] 2013 Top Ten Trends for Healthcare & Wellness [...]

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MyidealDOCTOR

January 2nd, 2013
1:03 pm

Telemedicine will be one of the fastest growing segments in healthcare due to these issues. It is cost effective and saves a tremendous amount of time. Telemedicine for your common and acute ailments is essentially a phone call or a web video diagnostic consult 24/7/365 by a U.S. based licensed physician. Prescriptions may be prescribed if deemed medically necessary. Telemedicine will be one of many changes needed in healthcare to control costs while increasing access.

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Bob Wells

January 2nd, 2013
2:13 pm

I agree with the comments regarding Telemedicine. This is a service that has been proven to be a cost effective means of delivering high quality healthcare throughout the world. The U.S. population will need to start embracing these types of healthcare service offerings that is less in-person though just as effective as an office visit.

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Kapil

January 4th, 2013
5:31 am

Hi,

We have included your post in our latest blog post “List of Trends, Ideas, Predictions for 2013″ http://www.futurescape.in/list-of-trends-ideas-predictions-for-2013/

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Jennifer Dennard

January 8th, 2013
11:16 am

What a timely post, Wayne. Georgia already has a number of ACOs – those serving Medicare patients and a slightly different kind serving private insurance patients. A quick Google search finds Medicare ACOs in Athens, Savannah, Atlanta (via the Piedmont Physicians Group and Wellstar).

Anyone else familiar with others in Georgia?

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ChrisR

January 9th, 2013
12:30 pm

Same thing here in South Florida, many ACO’s have been formed and many more on the works. It’s the way of the future.

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[...] Read Ms. Madison’s full blog post: “Election Impact on Integration Strategies” [...]

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[...] – 2013 Top Ten Trends for Healthcare & Wellness [...]

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Detria

January 16th, 2013
4:11 am

This article is very informative, however, I would like to add another piece that I see as an issue in my profession as Transitional Care Coordinator. When my client is scheduled for discharge, I have noticed a communication breakdown between patient,, family/ caregiver and where the patient is returning home. I had a situation where the family was so tired from sleeping uncomfortably in hospital recliners for days at a time, while it was touch and go for their loved one. Being exhuasted and overwhelmed can cause some problems. For example:
1. The prescriptions had not been signed by the discharge physician. The family did not notice until they were home.
2. The family did not know what medications were given the day of discharge so they had to contact hospital to find out so their loved one was not over or under medicated.
3. The assisted living facility is not equipped for two assists so the family had to hire an outside home health agency to provide around the clock care for their loved one would have to leave his home.
4. The assisted living facility did not appear to be as proactive in getting prescriptions signed by discharge physician.
The purpose of giving this information is to show another disconnect between hospital, in home care etc. There are gaps that need to be filled to help keep re-admissions down.
But hospitals and outside resources are not working together as much they could. Let us ( Transitional Care Coordinators) in by accepting our information and how we can be of service to their patients from the initial process of discharge. We see the affects after discharge, they see the patient being readmitted in less than one week.

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Detria

January 16th, 2013
4:47 am

I think it is a good transition, as a Transition Care Coordinator I see more of our elderly patients choosing to live at home. Sometimes getting them to the Dr. for a medication change or a check up can be difficult. Being able to communicate in this form is good for the patient in mind.

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Kathy

January 16th, 2013
7:27 am

Unfortunately letting patients go to any provider created some of the mess we have today with poor quality outcomes and unsustainable costs. Managing an aging population with many chronic illnesses requires different skill sets. As an RN community care manager, working with many physicians and post acute providers, coordinating care and cost along the continuum is a necessity. This process requires elements of project management as well as care management. It is about team and that team is directed by a qualified, primary care physician. That is when the system works well for patients, families and all of us.

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Tom McDougald

January 21st, 2013
10:57 am

Stupid is as stupid does. The longer we kick the can down the road the longer & worse the consequences
will be. Why would anyone do this to our children and grandchildren whom we supposedly love & care for ?
The obvious common sense solutions are lost on liberals & extremists such as academics & most media.
So we will continue to be bombarded with B.S. in their hopes that we will eventually become their lemmings.
To them there is no price to pay to “have it all” now and forever in the future !

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[...] The HIPAA Privacy, Security, and Enforcement Rules, provide guidance by which patient information can be shared in a secured environment.  Failure to do so can lead to a range of penalties, thus incentivizing organizations to ensure that proper compliance and IT standards are met.  Today, however, there is a new generation of channels by which information can be shared and delivered.  My HealthFlock colleague Elizabeth Richards covered this in a recent blog post about HIPAA and Electronic Devices. [...]

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Rick LaPlante

February 2nd, 2013
10:27 am

Second what Tom said. The solution that is studiously being ignored is that everything is NOT fixed. Those nice graphs show expenses as a percent of GDP. Most of the expenditures are based on numbers of people, which is fairly fixed, although may suffer some more under the onslaught of immigration “reform” that is being pushed through regardless of whether we have jobs for all these additional people, or even if they are able to work (doesn’t help the curve to keep adding to the food stamp and welfare roles). What is not fixed is GDP. It is clear that it is not helped by government subsidies in unproven technologies being run by donors to the current administration or by increased regulations hat benefit large existing businesses by making it much more difficult for startups. But it is equally clear that every time in our history that the government has gotten out of the way of the free market that our economy has boomed. And when that happened in the past unemployment went down, welfare went down, and the GDP dramatically increased. Since government tax receipts always hover around 19.5% of GDP regardless of rates (Hauser’s Rule), the only good solution is to increase GDP. The world is desperate for a safe haven for investment with everything seeming so dangerous everywhere else. There is $13 TRILLION of money sitting in hiding outside the country that could be here if we weren’t a hostile business environment. We have the highest taxes on business of any country in the world and the most regulated and most litigious. No company in its right mind should want to startup here. But that is fixable if our leader would but lead. We could grow ourselves out of these problems. A stronger economy and increasing GDP makes it all easy. Almost all of our economic problems, which have gotten substantially worse in the past 4 years are BECAUSE of our government. And the biggest problem, the cause of the overwhelming debt, is our government that persists in not getting itself out of the way in hundreds of ways but instead makes pretty speeches. We have a Senate that cleaves to party instead of representing the states OR the people. We have a House that worries about reelection more than their oath of office. And we have a president that….. sounds good. None of this is likely to help our GDP at all.

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Jim O'Hare RPLU AIC AIS

February 11th, 2013
9:09 am

A few things from a med mal claims pro since 1985. – Medical professional liability insurance, and the kind you buy from Humana or blue cross have zero relationship.

Physicians that spend 4 years of their career in court should find another profession. Mike Tyson hasnt spent anywhere close to 4 years in court.

A fact- 87% of med mal is generated from 13% of physicians. Focus on the 13 choices are retraining or remove from the system.

The cost of health care is its own problem. Profit causes the provider to provide the least. You get McDonalds when you should have Ruths Chris. Less is better from the business guy right?

Maybe you are talking about defensive medicine due to the fear of med mal. These test , that are considered extra, should be the standard if they reveal a diagnosis.

Get Rid of Mccarron Ferguson which allows a federal OK, since 1949, allowing anti trust for med mal companies, the humanas and baseball. Open the markets over state lines and see the rates drop. Competition for our dollar.

Kudos to the lobbyists to defer focus from the real problem. The license to steal and coining the term healthcare. Is it really?

It is catastrophe coverage at best. It aint Healthcare. you pay a huge premium to satisfy a huge deductible so you can them figure out a copay- The Doc gets screwed to boot. What a deal?

Want to cut med mal? – more nurses, better staffing, shorter shifts, better communication and lose the 72 hour weekend resident shifts. This arcane hazing ritual is stupid. lets address the gorillas in the room first. It is EZ

There is too much med mal, much unreported. From my view, 90% related to fatigue, communication and staffing inefficiency. We as Americans dont fix things on the front end, we are reactionary. Get more nurses.

Re caps – they are needed for pain and suffering,( only) argue the amount. It is subjective and cant be measured with a ruler nor weighed.

The fixes are easier than stated.
regards Jim O’HAre RPLU AIC AIS

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[...] solution that is very promising is tele-psychotherapy.  I have written blog posts in the past on the value that telemedicine—technologies that provide care at a distance through telephone and [...]

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irompurtume

February 12th, 2013
1:04 am

I’d need to check with you here. Which just isn’t something I frequently do! I appreciate reading a post that can make men and women feel. Also, thanks for permitting me to comment!

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Zooey

February 18th, 2013
12:26 pm

If health insurance companies like BCBS actually paid for people who seek help it might actually allow people to get the help they need. We have insurance with BCBS, yet when my son goes to a therapist there is such a run-around with BCBS to pay the provider or reimburse us (should the provider be out of network) that we hesitate to get the help needed. We have been told by healthcare providers that BCBS is the worst company to deal with – they should be forced to provide the coverage people are paying for. As we all know having insurance is not cheap to begin with.

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[...] ICD-10 for reimbursement and reallocation within their health systems. … Continued here: A Good Time for ICD-10? | HealthFlock ← Daily Kos: The New, Real Simpson-Bowles Plan: Less Revenue, More [...]

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Bernie

February 24th, 2013
10:14 am

The Republican Governor of Georgia, does not care about these figures nor does The Republican Party. The Health & Welfare of the American People is not high on their list of concerns. Actually, its not on the List.

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Drik

March 1st, 2013
7:08 am

If sequestration is just a 2.6 % decrease in the rate of increase spending, then why is there all this talk about massive layoffs and cutbacks? With QE3 and the continuing creation of an extra trillion dollars a year having been printed and being flushed into circulation by the FED, at a rate of $85 billion a month, the new effective rate of inflation is now over 20% a year. Unofficially, since the cost of energy and food are not counted and the value of everyone’s house has crashed. Officially, they are trying to pretend that it is way less, just like they are no longer counting most of the unemployed as unemployed, because it makes them look bad. So, with a 20%+ annual rate of inflation now built in, there are massive cutbacks that are required everywhere anyway. Sequestration is the excuse to blame the crunch caused by the inflation that they have created. And the inflation that they have created is the only thing that has kept the dollar from collapsing in value.

Can you spare a couple thousand for a cup of coffee?

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Bill

March 7th, 2013
12:37 pm

This ia a ‘bold idea’ whose time has come. We are bankrupting this state and country with medical costs that do not enhance medical delivery or outcomes. Everyone, please wake up and demand action!

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Organic home business

March 7th, 2013
11:09 pm

Great post. I just located your blog and wished to let you know that I have certainly loved reading your blogs. At any rate I’m going to be subscribing to your feed and I really hope you are writing again soon.
Organic home business

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affordable health insurance

March 9th, 2013
11:01 am

Individual health insurance and the plans and individual health insurance quotes you need and want at a cheap price.

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Theresa

March 17th, 2013
10:45 am

Excellent article. I work with elderly people, most of whom are 80 and older, and in talking to them, most realize extraordinary measures such as CPR are not what they want. What they do want is a peaceful death, surrounded by their loved ones if possible. In the case of a heart attack or other painful condition, it is possible to make them comfortable. We forget that death is a part of life. Health resources should be spent more responsibly.

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Theresa

March 17th, 2013
10:57 am

As an older person with pre-existing conditions and a job with no health insurance, I have found the Affordable Care Act unaffordable. I have been turned down by numerous insurers for coverage because of my health issues, which are not major. The next step after being turned down is to go to the the preexisting health conditions insurance plan (PCIP). In Georgia (each state’s cost is different), I would have to pay between $477 and $633 a month for health insurance, with the usual out-of-pocket deductibles and co-pays. I simply cannot afford to pay that amount, so I remain uninsured. I go to a sliding-fee scale health clinic and the health department. I worry about needing surgery or getting cancer. My health care is patchy at best. I have no dental coverage and going to a dentist is laughable, an experience akin to purchasing a new car. I’ve worked hard all my life and have no decent health care. How did we get this way in America???

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Theresa

March 17th, 2013
11:08 am

It’s interesting that the only reason we are looking at the problem of poorly funded mental health care is the gun registration issue. As a nation, we should consider mental health en par with other chronic health conditions, such as cancer and diabetes. Would we ostracize a person from the system who has cancer? No! We’re still in the Dark Ages about mental health in this country, blaming the mentally ill for their conditions and considering them responsible for being schizophrenic or bipolar — or even being “evil.” I”m not surprised Georgia is behind in its treatment of the mentally ill. With this Republican governor, who turns down Medicaid funding from the federal government that other states (some of them red states) willingly accepted, we are merely digging ourselves a deeper hole. It’s nothing short of draconian.

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[...] A Case for Improving Mental Health Services in Georgia Atlanta Journal Constitution Marc Olsen — Executive, Hospital Administration February 11, 2013 [...]

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Kermit Cardinali

April 3rd, 2013
7:47 am

Hello everybody, I hope to have good time with you

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steven moore

April 6th, 2013
6:28 pm

Please add me to your web updates.. Thank you!

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Bernie

April 7th, 2013
7:49 pm

We All know the reasons given are politically motivated and do not hold Water. Sady it is the Children of Georgia who woll suffer the most because of this denial of CARE.

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[...] http://blogs.ajc.com/health-flock/2013/04/05/the-importance-of-innovation-in-healthcare/?cxntfid=blo... Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Categories: Uncategorized Comments (0) Trackbacks (0) Leave a comment Trackback [...]

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nealabea

April 23rd, 2013
3:38 pm

I like the part about people “taking better care themselves through diet, exercise, and lifestyle.” That seems to be one major benefit of this.

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Nicole Hames

April 28th, 2013
10:12 am

This is an eloquent discussion of reimbursement models designed to create positive reinforcement for patient engagement through positive patient outcomes. I found myself inspired by the upcoming technological advancements and new strategies being used to improve the doctor-patient partnership that drives healthcare improvement forward. Nevertheless, with any change to a system as large and complex as health care, it is important to consider the potential pitfalls that can occur with any intervention, no matter how promising.

First, to reveal my potential biases, I must share my feeling regarding the argument that the deficit in patient engagement is secondary to a lack of physician incentive given current reimbursement models is at least incomplete. Perhaps as young physician in training, my glasses are still tinted rose; however, my experiences in medical school and residency training have had a very different focus. I learned that without engaging my patient, I will not be equipped with a so called therapeutic relationship. I will be less able to arrive at the appropriate diagnosis and prescribe the best treatment plan. I will fail to partner with my patient, and I will fail to become the kind of physician that inspired my decision to pursue medicine.

In the context of this article, I would agree that most physicians may not do a good enough job of engaging their patients and that an outcome-based reimbursement model is one way to facilitate improvement in this arena. However, I would propose that this reimbursement model is not the driving force behind recent efforts to improve patient experience and customer service, but rather that it too is the effect of our larger awareness of this great deficit in our health care delivery system.

Outcome driven reimbursement may seem like the perfect model to make physicians accountable for excellent cost-effective care; however, where are the limitations? How can we best adopt this model in areas of preventive health that are driven by lifestyle and patient decisions which are made outside our office? While patient engagement is necessary for positive outcomes and the improvement ideas discussed in this article are nothing short of excellent, I would still argue that engagement isn’t always sufficient. What happens when patient engagement and motivation are strong, yet the desired outcome is not achieved? How will this model impact the relationship between a provider and their smoking patient who is not yet ready to stop despite efforts at smoking cessation counseling? Or the obese patient who despite their best efforts, is unable to lose weight? We must think carefully about how to best implement this model in areas such as weight loss, diabetes control, sexual health, and smoking cessation.

Additionally, if physicians are rewarded only for positive outcomes, will we pursue more aggressive treatment strategies with higher success rates and higher associated risks earlier in management? As you mention, the desire to reduce cost while delivering the positive outcome may curb decisions to pursue such aggressive treatment options. The subtleties of how we define our positive outcomes may impact what the physician considers successful management of a patient problem. If we are reimbursed for weight loss, will physicians have the patience to give lower risk treatment options time to work knowing we will achieve better “success” with a referral for bariatric surgery? How do we account for exposing the patient to potential post-operative complications, nutritional deficiencies, and other long term consequences of bariatric surgery?

Lastly, where does this system leave the “high-risk” patient? Though surgery is not my specialty, I can imagine the spectrum of emotions one might experience when a family, fully informed of the risks, desires what may be a high-risk surgery or perhaps a simple surgery in a patient with other health problems which make them a high-risk patent? Will our surgeons perform the same surgeries knowing that the nuances of this decision will ultimately be reduced to an unexplained increase in his or her reported complication rate? I’d like to think that most of us will still decide together with our patients and families what is best for the patient in each unique scenario, but the skeptic in me is doubtful.

Again, make no mistake about it, I believe strongly that we should be demanding better outcomes from our doctors. I believe physicians practicing the best medicine should be rewarded for their efforts and expertise. I believe in transparency of medical error and that physicians should be held accountable for their mistakes. Nevertheless, I think we should treat each proposed health care model with similar scrutiny. No doubt, there will be no perfect health care reimbursement model, but we must make ourselves keenly aware of each potential adverse effect.

Nicole Hames, MD

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[...] often-complex health care world is moving towards a model where doctors will be paid based on the quality of outcomes – instead of the volume of patients [...]

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Evette Simmons

May 2nd, 2013
10:46 am

Health care is a billion dollar industry and, governmental regulations of the cost of medical care should aim to reduce the lay persons medical costs. As an adult practitioner I teach patients the benefits of health education and healthy life-style changes resulting in reduction of hospital admissions, less dependency of prescibed medications and, reduction of mortality rates.

http://www.invest4wellness.com
Evette Simmons ANP, R.N., M.S.N.

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Irma Brison

May 3rd, 2013
12:04 pm

An entrepreneur is an economic agent who unites all means of production- land of one, the labour of another and the capital of yet another and thus produces a product. By selling the product in the market he pays rent of land, wages to labour, interest on capital and what remains is his profit. He shifts economic resources out of an area of lower and into an area of higher productivity and greater yield.,”

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May 11th, 2013
11:56 am

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Beth Friedman

May 15th, 2013
9:53 am

Greetings. HealthPort (one of HIT’s top 100 and an Atlanta-based HIT vendor) has an article for submission to HealthFlock. What is the process for submitting our article and having Rita Bowen, MA, RHIA, CHPS, SSGB, Senior Vice President of HIM and Privacy Officer, HealthPort, to your “voices”. Rita is a former president of AHIMA and VP of HIM at Erlanger Health System. She now works for HealthPort, based in Alpharetta.

Please let me know how we can submit her recent article on HIPAA Omnibus Changes for Business Associates to AJC HealthFlock.

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Geraldo Svedin

May 20th, 2013
1:02 am

Insurance is the equitable transfer of the risk of a loss, from one entity to another in exchange for payment. It is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent, uncertain loss. An insurer, or insurance carrier, is a company selling the insurance; the insured, or policyholder, is the person or entity buying the insurance policy. The amount of money to be charged for a certain amount of insurance coverage is called the premium. Risk management, the practice of appraising and controlling risk, has evolved as a discrete field of study and practice.`,;-

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Margert Seedborg

June 3rd, 2013
3:52 am

Market research is a key factor to get advantage over competitors. Market research provides important information to identify and analyze the market need, market size and competition. Market research, which includes social and opinion research, is the systematic gathering and interpretation of information about individuals or organizations using statistical and analytical methods and techniques of the applied social sciences to gain insight or support decision making.^”-^

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what job makes the most money

June 5th, 2013
10:36 pm

I’ll be actually warm the certain theme/design of one’s respective planet wide internet internet site. Do you come across just about any browser getting compatible troubles?

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Claudine Patricio

June 9th, 2013
10:11 am

..’`*

Look into our own web-site as well
<http://wellnessdigest.co/If, while monitoring your blood pressure, you get a systolic reading of 180 mm Hg or higher OR a diastolic reading of 110 mm HG or higher, wait a couple of minutes and take it again. If the reading is still at or above that level, you should seek immediate emergency medical treatment for a hypertensive crisis. If you can’t access the emergency medical services (EMS), have someone drive you to the hospital right away.

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Bernie

June 9th, 2013
8:28 pm

We already have had that Discussion. its called ObamaCARE!

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Conventional insurance

June 14th, 2013
1:29 am

Thanks for explaining the Affordable Care Act (ACA) . Great,valuable & knowledgeable information .

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Hermosa

June 21st, 2013
2:24 am

Whenever the health care program will get to the stage that it’s leading to perverse final results for example protective medication, it’s time for you to obtain seriously interested in daring alter.It’s really too bad that people who wants things to get better often have the least support. Medicine has too many powerful special interest group interfering the physician/patient relationship.

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Bryon Hubiak

June 21st, 2013
8:19 pm

Migraines and other types of headache — such as tension headache and sinus headache — are painful and can rob you of quality of life. Migraine symptoms include a pounding headache, nausea, vomiting, and light sensitivity. Headache remedies include various types of pain relievers. Migraine treatments may also include antinausea drugs and medications to prevent or stop headaches.^*-`

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Monty Redmon

June 22nd, 2013
12:39 am

health and wellness should be our top priority so that we can live longer and have a good quality of life….;*

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Hershel Baves

June 22nd, 2013
12:42 am

i always like to read health news because they keep me updated about the newest food supplements and health tips.^^..’

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Luke Samia

June 22nd, 2013
12:49 am

High Risk Insurance Pools – Some states can decline health insurance applications if you have a pre-existing medical condition. However, many states offer health plans that are similar to the coverage in comprehensive individual health insurance plans. ;”-.

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Moshe Mandi

June 22nd, 2013
12:59 am

health insurance is very important because it gives us a level of security during times of need.’:^-

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Rosario Engelhardt

June 22nd, 2013
8:05 pm

Cholesterol is a waxy substance that’s found in the fats (lipids) in your blood. While your body needs cholesterol to continue building healthy cells, having high cholesterol can increase your risk of heart disease.’^,:

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Kacey Joynson

June 22nd, 2013
8:11 pm

Hypertension is classified as either primary (essential) hypertension or secondary hypertension; about 90–95% of cases are categorized as “primary hypertension” which means high blood pressure with no obvious underlying medical cause.:.;”

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Archie Lange

June 23rd, 2013
12:24 am

home health is of course very very important because we want to ensure that our kids and family members are disease free. ^,.-

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Santiago Perrigan

June 24th, 2013
6:55 pm

Malaria is typically diagnosed by the microscopic examination of blood using blood films, or with antigen-based rapid diagnostic tests. Modern techniques that use the polymerase chain reaction to detect the parasite’s DNA have also been developed, but these are not widely used in malaria-endemic areas due to their cost and complexity.:..:..

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Vashti Chisler

June 24th, 2013
11:46 pm

Medicare offers all enrollees a defined benefit. Hospital care is covered under Part A and outpatient medical services are covered under Part B. To cover the Part A and Part B benefits, Medicare offers a choice between an open-network single payer health care plan (traditional Medicare) and a network plan (Medicare Advantage, or Medicare Part C), where the federal government pays for private health coverage. -”“

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Joost

June 28th, 2013
9:01 am

Transparency may also help to bring down health care costs; differences in costs can be quite large. Inpatient Medicare costs across states/hospitals are visualized here:
http://www.terainsights.net/www_medicare/

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Merideth Beel

June 29th, 2013
10:33 am

There is no known cure for multiple sclerosis. Treatments attempt to return function after an attack, prevent new attacks, and prevent disability. MS medications can have adverse effects or be poorly tolerated, and many people pursue alternative treatments, despite the lack of evidence. The long term outcome is difficult to predict; depending on the subtype of the disease, the individual’s disease characteristics, the initial symptoms and the degree of disability the person experiences over time.`..”‘

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Brigida Shadid

June 30th, 2013
1:46 am

Being extremely obese means you are especially likely to have health problems related to your weight. The good news is that even modest weight loss can improve or prevent the health problems associated with obesity. You can usually lose weight through dietary changes, increased physical activity and behavior changes. In some cases, prescription medications or weight-loss surgery may be options. “-“

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Cecil Dus

July 1st, 2013
1:37 am

The resulting patient safety knowledge continually informs improvement efforts such as: applying lessons learned from business and industry, adopting innovative technologies, educating providers and consumers, enhancing error reporting systems, and developing new economic incentives.:-`:

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Colton Blank

July 4th, 2013
11:26 pm

Antibiotics are not usually prescribed for a sore throat, unless it is particularly severe or you are considered at risk of a more serious infection.-^..`

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Imogene Rank

July 5th, 2013
9:41 pm

Many substances can bring on withdrawal-an effect caused by cessation or reduction in the amount of the substance used. Withdrawal can range from mild anxiety to seizures and hallucinations.Drug overdose may also cause death..^;^

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Whitley Feinen

July 7th, 2013
12:34 am

In common speech, ‘vaccination’ and ‘immunization’ have a similar meaning. This distinguishes it from inoculation, which uses unweakened live pathogens, although in common usage either is used to refer to an immunization. -,*`

See ya soon
<http://healthdigest101.com

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Mack Salz

July 9th, 2013
6:55 pm

Several Microblogging platforms help perform business activities with utmost ease. They include tools to assist in attracting business. Tools such as Twitter Adder, BufferApp and HootSuite help build a strong customer relationship and have support for all major browsers and mobile phones. They also help find potential customers according to geographical locations.;-.;

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Verona Spike

July 9th, 2013
8:00 pm

Microblogging; it may sound small due to the “micro” word; but I tell you; it’s one of the giants on the internet when it comes to traffic, promotion and sales for your blog. You must know which microblogs can give you the best benefit. Without even visiting the web-page, a good Keyword Analyzer will have a module that will tell you whether or not links on the page use “NoFollow” tags. This lets you avoid you from wasting your time on building links from sources where you receive no search engine benefits. It’s otherwise known as Follow or No follow.-`”;

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Nancy Curdy

July 11th, 2013
9:09 am

Thank you for continuing to shine a light on the work that is so important in healthcare, for our patients. I need to revise one of your comments, however.- ‘In healthcare, however, we blame physicians, nurses, pharmacists and other professionals. We don’t interview the healthcare professionals after an error to devise processes and systems to prevent future medical errors’
Healthcare actually has a very robust system of investigating events (both errors and near misses) in healthcare systems, called Root Cause Analysis or Intense Analysis. We also have a robust system of assessing a change in process, for instance, in advance of implementation called a Prospective Review or Failure Modes and Effects analysis. We look for all of the areas where failure can/may occur and put processes in place to help mitigage those failures. We’re certainly not always perfect but its important to note that US Healthcare, as well as, worldwide, is working stringently to become safer and more highly reliable. We study the High Reliability Organizations, such as the airline industry and the nuclear industry, in order to learn how to translate that to Healthcare. I wanted to make it clear that we are not standing still. There is nothing more important than the safety of our patients transitioning through our systems from the hospital to home, to the outpatient setting, etc. In fact, its safe to say we are pre-occupied with failure with the intent to prevent it and if that doesn’t happen, learn from it.

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Cleveland Sasser

July 14th, 2013
10:59 am

Thanks Dr. Mack.
What are the top three specific actions needed in order for Mental Health in Georgia to benefit from healthcare technology?

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Dominic Mack - Co Director, National Center for Primary Care, Morehouse School of Medicine

July 16th, 2013
2:07 pm

Thanks for the question. I can’t set the agenda for the state but I think we can all contribute to the solution. I believe we should change how we prioritize implementations from a systems perspective and begin to see behavioral health as a priority. We need funding opportunities that recognize the need and direct more support to these behavioral health practices. Improve policy and reimbursement to help sustain operations and their ability to support HIT systems.

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Healthcare Worker

July 19th, 2013
9:09 am

Remember there will continue to be indigent and charity care even under the fully implemented ACA if everyone were insured. There will be as long as patients share financial responsibility. Hospitals collect less than 5% of self pay responsibility and only 50% of copays and deductables.

Also remember that Medicare and Medicaid are programs designed to pay hospitals less than cost to provide care. That missing margin is replaced by higher commercial payments driving up those rates through a “hidden tax” peopole with insurance have been paying for years.

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Tom

July 19th, 2013
1:42 pm

While the Affordable Care Act promises that everyone will have insurance it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see that won’t happen anytime soon. Not-for-profit hospitals provide much more than just free care. They are heavily involved in education of health professionals, subsidized health services like emergency transport services, emergency rooms and underpaid or uncompensated programs essential to their communities. All of their income goes back into goods and services to support healthcare in their communities. A big distinction from the private benefits stockholders get from the for-profits.

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Bob Wells, executive in healthcare technology

July 19th, 2013
9:50 pm

Points well made. I agree that the impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) providing insurance for everyone will take time. It is a safe bet that government healthcare costs will also rise at a faster rate than calculated. These excess costs will need to be funded, and it is not a stretch for the government to justify the elimination of these tax benefits in exchange for providing these new additive insurance payments. Here are specific responses addressing the other points made that support my point that Not For Profit hospitals will no longer exist in the future.

I also agree that Medicare and Medicaid payments are limiting. The challenge is for healthcare providers to manage their costs and clinical outcomes allowing them to break even and potentially generate a profit. I have worked with hospitals modeling and implementing changes where they can make a profit at Medicare rates. The argument of reimbursement fees not sufficiently covering the costs for healthcare is weakening. The foundation of this argument will continue to erode as new models of reimbursement successfully demonstrate how healthcare providers can generate a profit by taking on more risk and managing their business differently. For example, Bundled Payments implemented properly can have a positive impact to reduce costs, drive consistent high quality outcomes, and reduce variation in treatment by physicians. This was proven in the early 1990’s with a HCFA (now CMS) demonstration project.

Very few hospitals truly understand their cost of services. Therefore, pricing reflects some level of arbitrary calculations. This is one of the contributing factors of why pricing is so disparate across healthcare organizations and not reflective of the real cost.

The ACA is designed to help address the gap of self-pay patients that don’t pay for healthcare services. These are typically low-income families that earn too much income to not qualify for Medicare, and not enough to afford insurance. Healthcare providers will see an influx of income they have been writing off in the past. This weakens the argument that the special tax privileges justify the reduced write off of healthcare services fees.

Subsidization of medical services is a business decision by healthcare providers. By managing their business differently, the costs are covered with the appropriate level of service delivered to the community.

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I Work In "Not For Profit"

July 22nd, 2013
12:47 pm

I have to agree with Tom, that there’s much much much more going on and behind the scene than “free” care. NFP hospital serve a much greater capacity and I think will be around a long time before extinction. I work on the finance side of things, which is huge in and of itself and we only have NFP Hospitals in our portfolio. Yeah, extinction will be a long time coming…if anything at all.

That’s about all I can disclose. Very surface but you get the picture.

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[...] and technology. For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://blogs.ajc.com/health-flock/2013/08/05/5-ways-healthcare-marketers-can-succeed-in-today%e2%80%... This entry was posted in Uncategorized by ruselmyg. Bookmark the [...]

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Max Sizemore

August 12th, 2013
7:32 am

“Hospitals are greedy and ruthless and shady”? Oh no, surely you jest. They’re just in business to help people, right? Stockholders be damned.

Incidentally, what part of the health care industry do you represent, and how much do those folks pay the AJC to give you a voice? No comments for three days. I guess you are not considered much of a factor.

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Elizabeth Richards, healthcare attorney

August 12th, 2013
8:14 am

Thank you for your comment Max. I neither pay, nor am I paid to write for Healthflocker. Healthflocker is a blog written by Healthcare Executives for Healthcare Executives. I’m sorry that you missed the point of my post, which was that a few people give the entire industry a bad name.

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Max Sizemore

August 16th, 2013
6:34 am

The health-care industry should be a single-payer, not-for-profit industry. And those of us earning decent salaries should be happy to pay more in taxes to pay for such a service. And then you, Bob, wouldn’t have to worry.

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Steve

August 16th, 2013
6:03 pm

If i talk about on the whole then as far as i concern and know In Georgia and Florida, bills are being prepared to completely revamp the medical malpractice litigation system. For Fair Compensation, the Patients are treated equally.
http://www.elite-accident-claims.co.uk/

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Bob Wells, executive in healthcare technology

August 19th, 2013
9:29 pm

Socialized medicine is a flawed model that does not work. That is why Canada has people waiting for medical services months after diagnosis while we can access them immediately. Their personal freedoms are impinged because they are dependent on government bureaucrats to make healthcare decisions.

I have visited various countries and studied the healthcare business model of what works and what does not. Some of the flaws in a single payer socialized model are that bureaucrats make decisions of how healthcare is funded, who will receive care, and the rationing of healthcare services. This model also suppresses innovation due to the lack of competition. People inherently want freedom of choice and not be controlled by bureaucrats who think they know better.

The great opportunity in this country is that we have competitive markets. What will help drive down costs and improve quality is a consumer driven market. Arm this market with statistically sound measurements of cost and quality outcomes, and you will drive market behavior to be a more efficient system. The American system has a lot of opportunity for improvement. We do not want to destroy the positive aspects. Just build upon the areas that require improvement.

We also do not need to pay more taxes to make a difference. You can donate money to medical charities helping advance medical research or taking care of those less fortunate. I would rather direct where my money goes to help others than trust it to a politician. The other great news is that the donation is tax deductible. You direct the benefit to a worthwhile cause and receive a tax deduction.

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Terri

September 24th, 2013
2:58 pm

My experience with not-for-profit hospitals is that they are much less willing to negotiate discounts to self-pay patients. Some of these patients are self-pay because they can’t afford insurance,not because they are rich or foreigners. These working poor have to pay 2 or 3 times what medicaid or insurance companies pay for the same services. This is unethical and it is disturbing that these organizations get financial incentives to call themselves not-for-profit. Not-for-profits are in bed with large corporations and the government.

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September 25th, 2013
2:32 pm

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Across the Globe, Similar Challenges and Solutions Exist in Healthcare | HealthFlock…

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Elena Merino

September 28th, 2013
6:55 pm

In fact, our representatives and their staffers will be the ONLY individuals that can use pre-tax dollars to purchase individual insurance through a 125 Plan. On 9/13/13, the IRS (with the HHS and DOL) issued Notice 2013-54 that closed the last hope for individuals (not working for Congress) to use pre-tax dollars to purchase individual insurance. PPACA and later regulations began to shut down the ability of employers to use HRAs, 125 plans and FSAs to fund employees’ individual premiums. Now, for the first time since 1961, employers will NOT be able to contribute to their employees’ individual health premiums even through Premium Reimbursement Account! Unfortunately this comes at a time when many small employers (with less than 50 employees) will likely terminate their group insurance plans due to sky-rocketing small group premiums as well as the complex compliance requirements the must meet if they do offer benefits. Why should Congress and their staffs be able to use employer moneys and pre-tax their portion of the contributions for individual insurance, when private individuals can not? Small employers and their employees should be outraged!

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Bernie31

September 29th, 2013
7:14 pm

I would say having 10,000 plus working physicians working in a (25) twenty-five mile radius and a Net worth of 1 million dollars plus or more for more than (50%) of them makes Atlanta Perfect.

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Beth Friedman

September 30th, 2013
10:01 am

Jennifer – thank you so much for summarizing all the many reasons A-town is the top spot for HIT. You make us all proud!

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October 4th, 2013
12:50 pm

Great I’ve employed this brief article

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[...] progress and success Atlanta and Georgia have achieved in the area of healthcare IT.  Fellow blogger Jennifer Dennard went in detail on many of the city’s HIT successes. According to the Metro Atlanta Chamber, there are more [...]

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vikas kumar

October 21st, 2013
8:08 pm

a2zdoc mobile application can reduce patient waiting time upto 70% .

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[...] What I’d really like to highlight is the fact that Georgia’s health information exchange – formally know as the Georgia Health Information Network (GaHIN) – went live at the beginning of the month thanks to the hard work of folks at the Georgia Department of Community Health. (You can read more about the mission and goals of GaHIN here.) [...]

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s

November 2nd, 2013
5:34 pm

I think ya’ll must be drinking the cool-aid!!! Patient engagement???!!! Have you SEEN any of the AFC requirements?!? A 90 year old man forced to pay for matierney benefits?? Rates going up and deductions through the roof??!! Losing policies we like and doctors we like and know??? How is this Patient engagement?? Not sure what ya’ll were drinking at this conference, but good luck! Let me know how it works for ya’ !

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Monica

November 23rd, 2013
6:28 am

Hi!

I´m a swedish nurse student and I´m doing a study on waiting time at the doctor. Read your articel and I wonder what the study in full name is called that you reply to as research 2009. My questions is how long does a patient want to wait in a waiting room before seeing the doctor. Thank you in advance.

Best regards Monica

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[...] you may know from previous Healthflock blogs, the industry of health IT in Atlanta and beyond is growing, helping us to attain the title of the [...]

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Jef Lieberman

December 19th, 2013
9:24 pm

actually only the HIT people or people with a vested interest in their success ( not good patient care ) attest to a benefit of EHR in the present form .
Except for the most self contained of specialties, ( Ortho , Derm etc ) few specialties can do a good job of “point and click medicine”. Few specialties can practice as ” well and efficiently and intelligently ” with current EHRs as they were prior to them. I have spoken to hundreds of physicians regarding their systems and the comments range from horrendous to tolerable …nothing better .
In 7-10 years , the systems will be better , but until then many great doctors will choose to retire rather than submit .

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MHSmith

December 25th, 2013
9:29 am

Fourth – The Non-profit Option which allows states to establish health care insurance Co Ops that compete against for-profit-health-care-insurers to deliver medical services to their members. This is most constitutional part of Obamacare in my opinion and likely the useful part in bending health care cost curve downward. Presently 23 states have these Co Ops, unfortunately Georgia is not one of them.

http://nashco.org/members-co-op/

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Karen

January 19th, 2014
1:11 pm

How many of us are out there who cannot afford the premium? Then add to that the annual deductible that is to be met before the cost sharing kicks in…and the out of pocket per year. If we could afford the deducts and out of pocket if something came up, we would probably be on the higher premium in order to lower our up front costs. How many people understand that the basic services are covered, but anything above that which might be requested by the doctor, are100% out of your own pocket (the deducts!). You might go in for basic preventive care only to have the doctor require blood tests or x-rays. Those two are out of your pocket, and you don’t get to discuss payment options before services. You get to take the time to call patient services or the accounting department to discuss payment options. They will require their minimum, not what you know you can honestly afford. We might not be forced to buy a plan, but if we don’t we still have to pay something for not having coverage. This will start low and slowly increase. I assume the idea is to ‘force’ one into paying the lesser of two evils. I do not like that I am being told I have to take money from my living expense, which are very modest just to have a roof over my head and minimal groceries per month, to pay fore something I have used twice since losing health insurance. I paid for those services over a time frame that was determined by what I could afford to pay. I am looking for a way to voice my perspective in this government mandated program in hopes of adding my voice to revisiting this issue that will eventually bring a lot of stress into my life.

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Conscious

February 2nd, 2014
9:48 am

There is a big disconnect between HIT education and HIT career opportunities in Georgia. In 2012, I graduated from two HIT programs offered by Atlanta Technical College and passed two AHIMA certifications; yet there were no opportunities for an apprenticeship or access to HIT careers. I am glad that I completed the education and certifications, but it was disappointing that there was no bridge between the awesome education and certification to employment.

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[...] and fellow blogger, Wayne Oliver, give a harsh critique of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) / Obamacare.  I felt compelled to respond and add my thoughts to the conversation, from the perspective of an [...]

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Dominic Mack - Co Director, National Center for Primary Care, Morehouse School of Medicine

February 13th, 2014
3:02 pm

I definitely agree with your comments. It may not be what we want but it is a little of what we need. I don’t think any president, congress, political party, etc. could have gotten this all right at first try. It is going to take time and a collective effort to get our health system to where it needs to be. That said, all you have to do is look at the millions of Americans without insurance and the morbidity and mortality that has been associated with being uninsured (or underinsured) to realize that we need to expand coverage. I think we would have to live in the shoes of many of the uninsured to really understand the need. Great points and thanks for responding.

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