House and Senate talk past each other on transportation


The Legislature sometimes speaks in signals and non-verbal ways. 

Today the Senate again tried to coax the House into a conference meeting to talk about state transportation issues. The House responded in its own way. 

Here is what each chamber did:

The House changed one of its bills, House Bill 277, calling for a state-wide penny sales tax for transportation improvements. It added a concession to the Senate. The new version of House Bill 277 would ask voters to approve a statewide penny sales tax. If that failed, the legislation would then allow contiguous counties to band together and tax themselves for transportation projects, something the Senate favors.

“If it succeeds, the voters have spoken,” said House Majority Leader Jerry Keen (R-St. Simons). He said the Senate should agree to the House compromise and put Georgia towards a solution to gridlock and other transportation problems. 

It will be up to the Senate to agree or disagree Thursday. If no agreement is made, each chamber could then appoint representatives to a conference committee to work out a deal as soon as Thursday.  

Earlier in the day, the Senate took a bill that had come over from the House, and stripped it, putting in its place a bill to remake the entire Department of Transportation.  

“We’re trying to get a conference committee on the DOT governance,” said Sen. Jeff Mullis (R-Chickamauga) chairman of the Senate Transportation Committee and sponsor of the Senate’s regional penny sales tax legislation.

“Even though there’s many fine people over at DOT, the system is still broken,” Mullis said. 

If the House responds in any manner to what the Senate has done — by agreeing or disagreeing — it will send the issue to a conference committee where the real deals will be worked out. The House took no action on that bill Wednesday.

 

 

 

4 comments Add your comment

campnbare

March 25th, 2009
5:10 pm

ho hum – sin tax alcohol, sin tax tobacco… add extra fine to speeding, create micromanaged laws (seatbelts) to drain citizens of their hardearned wages… all to add money to selfrighteous psuedo christian coffers to supplement their inane programs. How about shifting some of these nuisence taxes/fines to religious organizations for their properties and income and increase the fines for preachers that get caught up in the devils deeds or better yet any state official caught out of their moral bounds add 25% to their fine and put it toward revamping the Georgia legislature or to fund programs on how to write unbiased, fair and balanced laws.

campnbare

March 25th, 2009
5:19 pm

sorry wrong blog, meant for the super-speeder bill blog – but if the show fits….

jboy

March 25th, 2009
9:10 pm

Hold still! I think I’m gettin the signal, yes there it is, it’s, it’s the Sonny won’t Cher show coming in live from the Dome. Cagle’s singin “Why can’t we be friends” Sonny’s singin “I did it my way” Hold it, I’ve got the cramps, I think it’s the “bad day”. OOps the House is loosin the signal, I think they are tuning in some Hip Hop with Glen “scribble” Richardson crankin some Akon and blaring out the Sonny don’t want to share show. Wow what a ride! I wonder if they have BAN roll-on with Sonny & Cagle applicators? There is nothing wrong with the DOT, except that it gets drug through this cess pool called Legislature each year for another round of “why can’t I get my road built” crap. While Sonny is re-making Agencies i.e. DHR, why don’t we change the House of Reps that way Sonny can puppetize the whole Government to suit his “larger than a Grain elevator” ambition. Georgia Politics SUX. Look at the hassle that will ensue by totally changing an Agency that has been around for decades and since the DOT is one of the largest and most complex Agencies by itself, it makes total sense to add (2) more Agencies to the equation and give the total power to SONNYCAGLE to run. Wow – good move – makes sense to me. What Govenor wouldn’t be proud of that ball of fishin line?

[...] House and Senate are talking past each other on transportation. [...]