In black and white: Segregated proms continue but students at Georgia school trying to make history with first integrated prom

The concept of segregated proms in the South shocked people when the AJC and other newspapers wrote about it a few years back. The first question from readers was how this could still be happening.

It happens because the proms are not officially school events, although a great deal of promoting and planning by students occurs within schools.  Since the proms are private parties held off campus without any school funds, schools disavow any control over the events, which are organized by parents and students and reflect historic and lingering racial divides.

In the news this week is an effort by students in Wilcox County High School to finally end the tradition there of segregated proms. Homecoming dances are also segregated there.

The teens are trying to raise money for an “Integrated Prom,” which would be the first ever in the rural Georgia county. They began a Facebook page yesterday to garner support. When I began this blog this morning, they had 300 “Likes.” They now have 5,000 at 4:45 p.m. and people are donating to their cause from around the world and cheering them on. This story is being spread worldwide through media and social media.

Here is the Facebook page about the teens’ campaign.

Here is a wonderful piece of journalism about earlier efforts to unify the prom. (Long piece for those who want to get a deeper understanding of why this goes on.)

In some places, schools have attempted to stop separate proms by hosting an official prom, but the event failed to gain traction with the students. The challenge is making the school prom a must-attend event, a party so good that no one would want to miss it.

But the schools are stymied on funding.

Clearly, some star power would help. The Wilcox students could use  a teen idol willing to make an appearance at their prom and change history in the process. Or make a large donation. The kids are holding a chicken dinner fundraiser to raise money for the prom.

When news came out in 2009 about separate black and white proms in Montgomery County  in Georgia, former GOP legislator Matt Towery was outraged. In a piece for the AJC, Towery, who is CEO of the national polling firm Insider Advantage, wrote:

While it might be impossible to prevent private parties — indeed, I would fight for the right for individuals to invite whomever they wish to their own events — there is still plenty that could be done to end this practice in Montgomery County, or anywhere else it might happen.

Don’t tell me that part of the “organization” of these private proms doesn’t occur on campus. Such activity should be disallowed. Not on my dime or on that of millions of other taxpayers. Don’t tell me the segregated proms don’t use the name of Montgomery High School when they create invitations or make announcements for these events. The use of a “brand name” paid for with tax dollars that promotes a “separate but equal” policy in this day and age should be forbidden.

And don’t tell me the county’s school officials can’t attempt to do what most schools in America do — help arrange a school prom that every student can attend. We have elected an African-American president of our nation, but a school system in a rural county that is in no way representative of the state of which it’s a part wants to keep things like they were in 1960. Surely Montgomery County can join the 21st century.

WGXA/NewsCentral in Macon reported this week on the effort by the Wilcox students to create one integrated prom: This link has a good TV report on the student effort that you ought to watch.

Here also is the Facebook page about the teens’ campaign.

Here is an excerpt of  the WGXA TV story:

“We’re embarrassed, it’s embarrassing,” exclaimed Stephanie Sinnot, Mareshia Rucker, Quanesha Wallace, and Keela Bloodworth.The group has been friends since the 4th grade and they say they do everything together, except prom night.

“We are all friends,” said Stephanie. “That’s just kind of not right that we can’t go to prom together.”

Stephanie and Keela are white and Mareshia and Quanesha are black. They’re seniors at Wilcox County High School, a school that has never held an integrated prom during its existence. “There’s a white prom and there’s an integrated prom,” said Keela.

The rule is strictly enforced, any race other than Caucasian wouldn’t dare to attend the white prom. “They would probably have the police come out there and escort them off the premises,” said Keela.

That was the case just last year as a biracial student was turned away by police. It’s been that way for as long as anyone can remember and it doesn’t stop at prom. Homecoming is also segregated. Normally, there would be a court for each race, but for the first time the school decided to elect only one homecoming court, Quanesha won.

But there were still two separate dances.

“I felt like there had to be a change,” said Quanesha. “For me to be a black person and the king to be a white person, I felt like why can’t we come together.”

Quanesha wasn’t invited to the white homecoming. In fact, the pair took separate pictures for the school yearbook. “When people around here are set in their ways, they are not to adamant to change,” said Marishia.

So the girls are taking matters into their own hands. “If we don’t change it nobody else will,” said Keela. They’re part of a group of students organizing a prom for everyone to attend, called the “Integrated Prom,” but everyone is not fond of the idea. “I put up posters for the “Integrated Prom” and we’ve had people ripping them down at the school,” said Keela.

The group says they will continue to make progress even though there doesn’t seem to be much motivation to change. “We need to stick with the tradition,” Quanesha said mockingly. “This is a traditional thing we don’t need to change and stuff like that, but why? No one can answer my question.

There will still be two proms this year. Neither proms are financed by or allowed to take place at Wilcox County High School. The students said that when they pushed for one prom, the school offered a resolution to permit an integrated prom that would allow all students to attend but not stop segregated proms.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

242 comments Add your comment

Inquiring Mind

April 4th, 2013
10:04 am

There was a movie about this. Students won! I can’t believe this is still going on in 2013!!!

William Casey

April 4th, 2013
10:11 am

Proms are an anachronism, integrated or not. As Van Morrison put it 40 years ago, “the girls get dressed-up for each other.”

Pride and Joy

April 4th, 2013
10:15 am

Judging merely by the overweight nature of these young girls wanting an integrated prom (very obese), my guess is that they are not the “cool kids” and likely if they organized an integrated prom it would not be well attended.
They are likely going to need either a cool kid to advertise they are attending and bringing their friends or..they will need a star to show up and make it a hit but…
which star?
My high school had three proms:
A private black prom to which only blacks were invited.
A private white prom to which only whites were invited.
An integrated school prom which hardly anyone attended.
The issue wasn’t about race specifically. The issue was the music.
White kids had their own music and blacks had their own.
Our theme was “We’ve Got Tonight…” It was elegant and very couple-centric with lots of romantic music to which we could slow-dance as couples.
The black prom was more of a loud fast dancing celebration.
And no one complained. Both races liked one another and were friends during the school day and after school activities but we didn’t then, as is still likely the case, date outside our race.

Maureen Downey

April 4th, 2013
10:18 am

@William, I am with you except that proms still seem popular judging by the number of photos sent to the AJC prom galleries. I still see limos picking up kids for prom. Three years ago, we were en route one weekend to visit friends in Tennessee and stopped at a local diner along the highway for dinner. It was not a fancy place at all, but it must have been all there was for evening fare in the area. Because 10 prom couples came in and sat down for their pre prom dinner. And the young women were dressed in spectacular dresses. I used to be stunned when people spent $300 for a prom gown, but now that seems the norm. (Especially when a friend told me her 24-year-old stepdaughter spent $6,000 on her wedding gown.)
Maureen

Private Citizen

April 4th, 2013
10:22 am

In Europe they have a saying, that Americans “need a lot of attention.”

Segregated proms should be illegal.

Pride and Joy

April 4th, 2013
10:26 am

Maureen makes a good point. Proms are very important to teenagers. It is a coming of age ritual. It is the first time many young girls have a chance to wear a full length gown and feel like an elegant lady. Other than proms, our weddings and a few formals in college, women rarely have an oppotunity to dress up in formal wear and we really relish it.
I dated a bonafide country boy my senior year. He got all dressed up in a tuxedo for prom night and I still remember it fondly and look forward to seeing him at my next high school reunion.
There were no limosines and there were no pre prom dinners. A friend’s mom scheduled a prom after party and it was a good idea — it prevented many of us from drinking alchohol and having sex. That’s how good parents did things back in those days — they provided a safe place for us to be after the prom.

Pride and Joy

April 4th, 2013
10:29 am

Private Citizen says “Segregated proms should be illegal.”
School-sponsored segreated proms which use school facilities and school money and school planning time should be illegal but what private citizens do on their own time on their own dime is none of our business.

Poor Boy From Alabama

April 4th, 2013
10:29 am

Are the levels of segregation at high school proms any different that what you’d find if you walked through neighborhoods or went to local houses of worship, social club events, or places where people gather to relax?

How well do the kids get along at school? That’s a lot more important than how they spend their free time.

NW GA Math/Science Teacher

April 4th, 2013
10:33 am

Come on now! “We just can’t do anything about that” doesn’t fly! Do the right thing. Refuse any association with, name usage by, students out of class to work on, teachers sponsoring or attending, etc. anything still segregated. How dare you abet this with tax dollars?

Private Citizen

April 4th, 2013
10:36 am

NW GA Math/Science Teacher, Thank you!

Simmer Down

April 4th, 2013
10:37 am

I have read P&J’s post above a couple of times. There are so many blanket statements and stereotypes in that post it makes my head spin. Really – “not cool kids because they are overweight”? The white kids are “couple centric and romantic” while the black kids are all “loud and fast”. Maureen – really – that one gets by the filters. P&J – get a grip.

johnny too good

April 4th, 2013
10:39 am

It’s said and unfortunate that this still goes on. I just watched the Lincoln movie two nights ago and it was a reminder of how things once were, or so we thought. Additionally, their excuses are reprehensible and insulting. Maybe things will change within the next couple hundred years

johnny too good

April 4th, 2013
10:41 am

This is actually kinda not surprising, I mean this is Georgia, and Wilcox is out in the woods, so naturally their behind on the times lmao

Private Citizen

April 4th, 2013
10:44 am

Pride and Joy, a prom is a coordinated event, not what “private citizens do on their own time on their own dime (time).” I am a little taken about at your instinct to support racism. We’ve got plenty of it in play. Frankly, you are UNAMERICAN. This is supposed to be the land of fairness, equality, and opportunity. And you may be a little naive as to the realities of what is seeded by segregation, such as a mixed race couple being attacked in public and the boy being beaten almost to death. If you are unaware of such things, so be it. My opinion is that it is a bad thing to seed a culture of racism. Maybe you have not dealt with crafty young people caught in this miserable binary of “black / white judgement” thinking, were every issues, their little mind switches back and forth like a circuit trying to sort out the black / white of it, a combination of advantage or threat. It is a bunch of wiley garbage.

Private Citizen

April 4th, 2013
10:47 am

Segregated events are an example of territoriality, a particularly low form of functioning. It’s what dogs do.

territoriality: A behavior pattern in animals consisting of the occupation and defense of a territory.

johnny too good

April 4th, 2013
10:47 am

Where do the mixed go? Is the “one drop” rule in effect? what about the latinos, arabs, and asians?

Maude

April 4th, 2013
10:50 am

I thought that seprate proms was something that happened in the 1950’s and 1960’s not in 2013. How has this happened all these years?? I find it offensvie and wrong on both races to hold seprate proms.

Maureen Downey

April 4th, 2013
10:51 am

@johnny, Not sure where they would go for prom, but they probably couldn’t hold their own based on Wilcox County demographics:

The racial makeup of the county was 62.61% White, 36.21% Black or African American, 0.09% Native American, 0.16% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.48% from other races, and 0.43% from two or more races. 1.62% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Digger

April 4th, 2013
10:53 am

When not told what to do, people do what seems natural to them.

Private Citizen

April 4th, 2013
10:55 am

In PJ’s world, white teachers are treated as objects of ridicule and distrust by black students, and black teachers are treated as objects of questionable quality by white students and families. Meanwhile, Indians, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Mexican, South American, Arabs, Mongolians, Spaniards, (real) Africans, (real) French / German / Scandinavians, there are treated as ? or enigma.

Except the Mongolian actor Charles Bronson, who was used in American movies to play parts as both Mexican and American Indian, since he fit the role of “heart exotic.”

and then there’s the Canadians – the people who have health care.

SPARKY

April 4th, 2013
10:56 am

Nice parody post, P&J.

“A friend’s mom scheduled a prom after party and it was a good idea — it prevented many of us from drinking alchohol[sic] and having sex.”

God forbid HS students have sex!

Private Citizen

April 4th, 2013
10:58 am

typo correction: fit the role of “hearty exotic.”

Private Citizen

April 4th, 2013
11:00 am

I skipped the prom. And the senior year, too. Either way, racism was not allowed at my high school. It just didn’t happen. The place was so evolved, if anyone even acted that way, students would take them aside and talk to them about it and inform them “we don’t do that here.”

niecey

April 4th, 2013
11:00 am

when i look at the negative comments some of you have made about races mixing. the comments you make on other blog topics make sense.

Maureen Downey

April 4th, 2013
11:00 am

@Maude and all, When I looked at the Integrated Prom Facebook page this morning, it had 300 Likes. It is now at 900. This story is getting a lot of attention and the effort is getting a lot of support, but the question is whether the kids at the school will buy into the idea. I think these separate proms are part of the culture in their town so they never even think about it.
Maureen

https://www.facebook.com/IntegratedProm2013?ref=ts&fref=ts

Dr. John Trotter

April 4th, 2013
11:03 am

Pitiful. This is all that I can say, and I am writing this with a smile on my face because it is so backward that it is comical…sort of like Honey Boo Boo who lives right around the corner.

hssped

April 4th, 2013
11:04 am

Doesn’t the Junior Executive Board plan the prom for the seniors? Does Wilcox County have both a black and white Ex. Board?

Private Citizen

April 4th, 2013
11:10 am

Side comment: Once time (not in Georgia) I attended a black college step team performance event, and then went to the after party at an apartment complex. I was the sole white person there, in the very belly of a super-black cultural event, standing around outdoors at 3AM with my cup of keg beer, with these “Omega” fraternity guys who had arm bicep muscles as big as a spaghetti pot, with the Omega sign branded on the side of their arm, like this http://postimg.org/image/4g00kb77b/ Maybe these guys were in the feeder-system to the NFL or something. Like most parties, sort of dullsville, but pleasant enough. Yes, I’d rather be at home reading Plutarch.

Mountain Man

April 4th, 2013
11:12 am

I am confused here. Are proms now “by invitation only”? Are only whites invited to the white prom? What if a black couple showed up at the white prom? Would they be denied entry? What if a white girl showed up at the white prom with a black date – again, would they be denied entry? What if a mixed race person who had a black father and a white mother wanted to go to either prom – would they be able to? They are technically both black and white so they should be able to go to either. What about the Gay prom? The Christian prom? The Muslim prom? What about the rich-only prom (oh, that has been going on forever)?

Chamblee Dad

April 4th, 2013
11:12 am

Talking about the ideas of “attention” for teens & proms – the accompanying expensive dresses, limos, etc. – especially the “popular” kids – in the 70s & 80s girls in my hometown also had “debuts” with a full set of dresses for many events, culminating in a formal cotillion. This was in Dalton, GA & you had to go to Chattanooga to do it.

NOW that was pricey & back then & essentially segregated based more on the economics of the time (although I do remember at least one black girl), as we had homecoming Kings & Queens during the same time, following our desegregation in 1976. Before that we d/n have 2 proms, we had 2 systems. After the merger of systems I never remember any true race issues at the proms & dances, other than white dudes like me fearing dancing in front of our peers!

Stereotyped? Yeah, but I’m just glad noone had cell phone cameras back then.

Anybody else have debuts where you were from? they actually wore white gloves.

But back to these kids, in 2013, really sad to hear. But sadly, as born & raised in GA, not surprising to me.

zeke

April 4th, 2013
11:15 am

Why should segregated proms be illegal? Regardless of the current socialist agenda, the Constitution gives us all the right to associate with whom we please, or, not to associate with others! Has nothing to do with racism or perceived bigotry! It is the freedom under the Constitution to do as we please as long as we do not injure someone else! Sure, there are blacks and latins I will not associate with, but, there are as many whites that I will not associate with! Why? Because our morals, ideals, and, the way we live our lives are totally different! THAT IS MY CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHT AS A U.S. CITIZEN! there is nothing wrong with segregated anything! Black and white proms! Black and white beauty pageants! Male only or female only schools or classrooms! You morons need to get over youselves and your lame brain ideas of what is good and bad! Then, leave the rest of us alone!!

Dr. John Trotter

April 4th, 2013
11:18 am

Plutarch aside, perhaps Superintendent Smith will live out the school system’s motto of “We Believe in You!” and let the students have a prom (come one, come all!) on school property. I think that the students will rise to the occasion! They have been going to school with each other since Pre-K and playing ball together for years. I am quite confident that the students will handle a prom for all quite admirably. But, as always, it’s really the adults who are the problem. A few old fogies just want to hang on to some segments of segregation.

Chamblee Dad

April 4th, 2013
11:18 am

@Mountain Man In Dalton- I think I remember buying tickets to dances back then, maybe the prom too, maybe that’s how you could keep people out – don’t sell them tickets. But in this case I can only assume police there to “keep the peace” & enforce “natural law.”

Mountain Man

April 4th, 2013
11:20 am

The other thing I am confused about is this: I thought that the prom when I was in high school was a school function – it was held on school property and chaperoned by school personnel, and planned during the school day – when did it become a “private event”? (I skipped the prom at my high school).

If it is a “private event” – why even limit it to just one high school – or even high school – invite some college students. H*ll, open it up to married 40-year olds! Probably a lot of people who would like to have proms later in life.

Dr. John Trotter

April 4th, 2013
11:26 am

Yes, the multi-racial children like my own would have a bit of a dilemma. Ha! Wilcox County really needs to come into the 21st Century. I really think that it is a few old fogies who are just trying to hold onto the past.

I had classes over 30 years ago with two guys who were elected as superintendents down in Rochelle. There were nice guys, witty, and very smart. I am sure that Wilcox County is full of good people who are somewhat embarrassed by this practice and wish it would end this year. Come on, Superintendent Smith. Show some mettle.

Simmer Down

April 4th, 2013
11:31 am

@zeke – It is not the association part that is the problem. It is the fact that they exclude a group in their entirety. Here – let me help you understand by putting it in context you might understand. When you go down to your sheep pen for a little trist. How would you feel if the sheep gathered together and said you were no longer allowed through the gate because you smell bad. See – that does not seem right now does it.

Wiserwoman

April 4th, 2013
11:32 am

Welcome to the real south that has not died after the Civil War. LOL

Maureen Downey

April 4th, 2013
11:32 am

@Mountain, These private proms emerged in the 1970s as a response to school integration. White parents started to hold off campus “private” proms to ensure their kids didn’t go to prom with black kids.

Here is an excerpt from a NYT story about the segregated proms in Montgomery County, Ga.

The senior proms held by Montgomery County High School students — referred to by many students as “the black-folks prom” and “the white-folks prom” — are organized outside school through student committees with the help of parents. All students are welcome at the black prom, though generally few if any white students show up. The white prom, students say, remains governed by a largely unspoken set of rules about who may come. Black members of the student council say they have asked school administrators about holding a single school-sponsored prom, but that, along with efforts to collaborate with white prom planners, has failed. According to Timothy Wiggs, the outgoing student council president and one of 21 black students graduating this year, “We just never get anywhere with it.” Principal Luke Smith says the school has no plans to sponsor a prom, noting that when it did so in 1995, attendance was poor.

Students of both races say that interracial friendships are common at Montgomery County High School. Black and white students also date one another, though often out of sight of judgmental parents. “Most of the students do want to have a prom together,” says Terra Fountain, a white 18-year-old who graduated from Montgomery County High School last year and is now living with her black boyfriend. “But it’s the white parents who say no. … They’re like, if you’re going with the black people, I’m not going to pay for it.”

“It’s awkward,” acknowledges JonPaul Edge, a senior who is white. “I have as many black friends as I do white friends. We do everything else together. We hang out. We play sports together. We go to class together. I don’t think anybody at our school is racist.” Trying to explain the continued existence of segregated proms, Edge falls back on the same reasoning offered by a number of white students and their parents. “It’s how it’s always been,” he says. “It’s just a tradition.”

Earlier this month, on the Friday night of the white prom, Kera Nobles, a senior who is black, and six of her black classmates drove over to the local community center where it was being held. Standing amid a crowd of about 80 parents, siblings and grandparents, they snapped pictures and whooped appreciatively as their white friends — blow-dried, boutonniered and glittering in a way that only high-school seniors can — did their “senior walk,” parading in elegant pairs into the prom. “We got stared at a little, being there,” said one black student, “but it wasn’t too bad.”

Georgia, The "New Mississippi"

April 4th, 2013
11:33 am

Georgia continues to earn its reputation.

Pride and Joy

April 4th, 2013
11:34 am

Simmer down, The black prom was “loud” as in loud music with deep, loud bases and lots of fast dancing as opposed to a quiet elegant affair with soft lyrics and couples romantic dancing. Listen to “We’ve Got Tonight…who needs tomorrow…we’ve got tonight babe…why don’t you stay….(white prom)
And the black prom is: shouted lyric not soft whispering lyrics…
It’s not a judgement. It’s an observation, an accurate one. If you want to see racism you will find it whether it exists or not.

Wiserwoman

April 4th, 2013
11:36 am

Most Active Duty or Prior Service Military Personnel can show them a few things about diversity. Hope I don’t have to move out of the country to enjoy freedoms and liberties.

Private Citizen

April 4th, 2013
11:38 am

Sure, there are blacks and latins I will not associate with, but, there are as many whites that I will not associate with! Why? Because

Zeke, Good honest post. You basically get into economic class issues. It’s nice to hang out with sophisticated wealthy people who have good food and drink and gracious manners. It’s no fun to hang out with angry people who can not pay their electric bill or pay for the dentist. We have pretty severe economic caste issues. Many people in the metroplex do not realise the extent of it.

because that’s why the other 99 out a 100 rich countries each have universal health care, if not college education (without debt), too, for those who want it.

Simmer Down

April 4th, 2013
11:41 am

P&J – I am thinking you should try to find @Zeke and have your own prom. BTW – I am not one that looks for racism under every bush. But when you stated that those girls were extremely obese an d then go on to say they are probably not the popular girls the rest of your statements are looked at a little more closely.

Pride and Joy

April 4th, 2013
11:43 am

Mountain Man, you must have went to school in the North or you went to school in the 60s before integration.
My mom had a prom just as you said — school sponsored and everyone went but she went to school prior to integration.
I don’t know the history of it exactly but in the South where we lived we always had PRIVATE proms which means both blacks and whites organized their own proms and they indeed were organized outside of school. The white prom was organized by a popular girl in school and she asked everyone to sell doughnuts to pay for the venue that we rented. We also hired a band and the tables were decorated with white linen tablecloths and vases of long-stem red roses. There were no balloons and no crepe paper, no confetti or streamers.
Think elegant, like a wedding.
Tickets were $40 a person. So that’s what it was like — a grown up elegant affair iwth soft romantic music off campus in a rented room with a hired band.
The black prom was also held off campus at the Elk’s Lodge.
The integrated school prom was held at the gym and almost no one attended.

Private Citizen

April 4th, 2013
11:46 am

Pride and Joy, You realise that Kenny Rogers and Lionel Ritchie are actually the same person, with character actors being used for the various markets?

PS One reason I like teaching black urban kids is that they generally have a pretty good sense of the value and utility of art, meanwhile at home, I have white neighbors on two sides of me that are actively hostile and rejecting to both reading and art. They’re sort of a sub-species in the system of production. They benefit from the work of others, and oh yes, they go running for the hospital when they need it, but see no requirement at all for their kids to learn vocabulary – but they’ll go running to the hospital and the learned in a minute, like in their object-mind it is a pizza stand or something, but their kids learn vocabulary? and contribute professionally? It seems the first block they run into is that this threatens their religion. Ideas are “bad.” Expressing them? Even worse.

white people in Georgia…

Pride and Joy

April 4th, 2013
11:46 am

Simmer Down, obese girls are rarely ever in the “in crowd.” In that way, life for teens hasn’t changed at all. The popular, influential kids are usually:
Athletes — football players
Cheerleaders
Good looking kids with charm.
I am sure you are familiar with this fact of life in American culture.
It’s not a judgement. It’s an observation, an accurate one.

Private Citizen

April 4th, 2013
11:51 am

Rural Georgia white people – professional services, engineering, design and production, these are just twinkling stars in the distant sky there to serve them upon demand.

alm

April 4th, 2013
11:55 am

@Mountain Man you’re not too old to go to the prom!
http://athenaswarehouse.org/moonlight-masquerade
Athena’s Warehouse is a great non profit that helps at risk teen girls. The adult prom is their biggest fundraiser.

Another comment

April 4th, 2013
11:56 am

My cousins children who are tri-racial would have a hard time, in South Georgia as they are 1/2 white, 1/4 african american, 1/4 asian. That is what you get from Military parents. My cousin’s son who was stationed at Ft. Hood in Texas wrote that he had the worse day of his life when he went in his Army uniform to Mississippi with a white woman. He had grown up in a NorthEastern small town were he and his sister were accepted as people not by their multi-racial identy. He is now serving in Afganastan. Both his mother and Father were in the Airforce before him as was his Grandfather.

Georgia needs to wake up and realize that our Children under 30 don’t care what color or nationality their friends are.

Patrick Edmondson

April 4th, 2013
11:57 am

Bet as a result it is an economically disadvantaged area. No one wishes to raise their kids in tense divided areas unless they have to or are in the top level of locally powered bigots.