Clean sweep of teachers in Senate parent trigger bill

Take a look at this Google doc of the newly revised Parent Empowerment bill, notable for the clean sweep of any mention of teachers or educators. See my blog yesterday on the odd changes to this bill.

Sponsored by House Majority Whip Edward Lindsey, R-Atlanta, the bill initially had been called the Parent and Educator Empowerment bill, but you can’t find the words “teacher” or “educator” any longer. (I have sent Lindsey a note for comment, but have not heard from him.)

In its original form, House Bill 123 allowed a majority of teachers and parents in a low-performing school to petition to the school board for new management of their schools.

The bill, which passed the House, was discussed in a Senate subcommittee today. However, the subcommittee could not vote the bill out as it lacked a quorum at the time.

State Sen. Fran Millar, R-Dunwoody, explained why he excised teachers from the bill. He noted that teachers are not part of the parent trigger laws in the seven states that have such legislation, which is correct. Legislatures in Florida and Oklahoma are also now considering parent trigger laws

The existing parent trigger laws speak only to parents triggering a takeover of a failing school. However, those existing laws also don’t speak to parents at any schools, even high performing ones, seeking management conversion to charters, which is a key provision in the proposed Georgia law.

One point that Millar raised would seem to have some validity: If teachers go to the school board to petition for a management takeover, they could be subject to retaliation if the petition fails and they have to go back to work for the same bosses.

Lindsey addresses that possibility in his bill by allowing the teacher vote to seek a management change to be a secret ballot. However, the bill requires that a majority of teachers support the petition. The argument can be made that the school management would be angry at the entire staff or, at the very least, suspicious of all of them.

Some theories making the rounds in the Gold Dome for why teachers were struck from the bill:  The bill has opposition, and this issue could be volatile enough to derail it. Teachers were only included in the bill initially to gain passage in the House. The teacher petition takeover smacked too much of teacher unions so the Senate eliminated it.

–from Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

102 comments Add your comment

Dunwoody

March 20th, 2013
10:36 am

I can speak only for my kids’ schools. No way would I want their teachers taking over the school. DeKalb has done a poor job of hiring the past three years. If this Bill passes and parents take control of the school, at least 1 in 3 teachers will be replaced with better quality educators. Lots of dead weight in the classrooms, unfortunately. Thanks to the Senate for changing the Bill.

Astropig

March 20th, 2013
10:43 am

Maybe , just maybe, the teachers didn’t give both political parties a seat at THEIR table and this is the blowback. Hint- Paybacks are…Well, you know what they are.

Eddie Hall

March 20th, 2013
10:58 am

It seems we are changing the WHOLE state because metro Atlanta cannot manage it’s schools properly.

Just A Teacher

March 20th, 2013
11:03 am

What does “new management” mean? I’m not sure I understand how this is supposed to work.

catlady

March 20th, 2013
11:14 am

Astropig–what table do teachers have?

Captain Kirk

March 20th, 2013
11:17 am

I agree with Astro. The teachers have given the Repubs the back of their hands for decades and now that the political winds are blowing a different way, they are screaming foul. The next time they have the levers of power they may want to remember that with a few notable exceptions (slavery, racial equality), there are no permanent political victories in our form of government.

Maureen Downey

March 20th, 2013
11:18 am

@Just, I wrote about the bill earlier this year and here is how I explained it:

Georgia House Bill 123 allows a majority of the parents or a majority of the teachers to petition for a complete overhaul of a school by converting to charter school status or another turnaround model. The bill specifies that the parents can remove school personnel, including the principal, or mandate the complete reconstitution of the school.

The bill requires school board approval, but Lindsey erected a high wall for a board to reject a parent trigger petition; a two-thirds majority of the school board must vote to deny a petition coming from 60 percent of parents.

However, the yea/nay power accorded school boards in the bill led Sen. Fran Millar, R-Dunwoody, former chair of the Senate Education Committee, to ask, “What’s the point?”

“Remember, these are locally created public schools created by the local boards, ” said Lindsey. “Given that fact, I do not believe we should cut these local boards out of the process. The purpose of the bill is to create a process for direct communication between a local board and the parents and students it serves. I respectfully disagree with my friend Fran Millar. I believe that elected school boards will listen to parents and teachers on the operation of their local schools.”

In feature unique to Lindsey’s bill, even parents of high performing schools may apply for their schools to convert to a charter school.

Parent Revolution, the California-based advocacy group that created the parent trigger, sees the parent trigger as both an action plan and a negotiating tool. Recently, the specter of a parent trigger takeover led administrators and teachers in one Los Angeles school to sit down with parents and begin a collaborative effort to improve the school, according to Parent Revolution spokesman David Phelps.

But, if a parent takeover is required to transform the school, Parent Revolution opposes the reins of a school being handed to for-profit education management companies as could occur under Lindsey’s bill. “We take a very strong position that it should only be a not-for-profit charter school that will continue to involve parents, ” said Phelps.

Also, Parent Revolution wants an appeal process spelled out in Lindsey’s bill. “Because school boards can be very political, very divided, the law ought to make sure that if a school board rejects the parent petition, that there is some appeal process that can be in place, ” said Phelps.

Phelps said it was unusual for a parent trigger law to address schools that are not failing, as does Lindsey’s bill. The case for a change to a charter school is weakened if a school is performing well. The point of parent trigger is to give a voice to parents in schools where children are not succeeding, he said,

“When you can see that there is a consistent history of failure, then you are able to say that this is a school where we would like to help parents organize for a change, ” he said. “It narrows the universe with which you are able to work.”

MiltonMan

March 20th, 2013
11:20 am

“Maybe , just maybe, the teachers didn’t give both political parties a seat at THEIR table and this is the blowback. Hint- Paybacks are…Well, you know what they are.”

Given that teachers are in the back pocket of democrats, the above statement is hilarious.

MiltonMan

March 20th, 2013
11:22 am

“It seems we are changing the WHOLE state because metro Atlanta cannot manage it’s schools properly.”

Keep the high performing schools of North Fulton out of the conversation there chief.

Brasstown

March 20th, 2013
11:24 am

The new management team will be made up of all of those talented people who can run schools to perfection, but don’t get a chance because of the choke hold unions, communists, blacks, immigrants, foreign cars and rock and roll have on the public schools. Did I miss any in the Ga Republican mythology?

Not Afraid to Say So

March 20th, 2013
11:29 am

The tide is turning in GA public schools and I couldn’t be happier.
Parents and tax payers are now empowered to make real changes for their children other than move out of State.
This statement from Get Schooled particularly excites me:
“Recently, the specter of a parent trigger takeover led administrators and teachers in one Los Angeles school to sit down with parents and begin a collaborative effort to improve the school, according to Parent Revolution spokesman David Phelps.”
The parent trigger.
Teachers and schools will either respect it or — POW!

Astropig

March 20th, 2013
11:29 am

“The new management team will be made up of all of those talented people who can run schools to perfection, but don’t get a chance because of the choke hold unions, communists, blacks, immigrants, foreign cars and rock and roll have on the public schools. Did I miss any in the Ga Republican mythology?”

-EXACTLY the attitude that I mentioned earlier. You people are slow learners. This is a political battle.In politics,your friends come and go,your enemies ACCUMULATE. Why would any Republican legislator listen to you when you have this “my way or the highway” attitude? Yeah, it makes you feel good and puffs up your self esteem ,but it ensures that when you are on the wrong side of the voting equation,the other side is going to bring the pain.

But, hey, keep on telling yourself that you’ll win with vitriol instead of collaboration.It makes it easier for the reformers when they read your posts.

Private Citizen

March 20th, 2013
11:35 am

Ms Downey,
If I can interrupt your opinion shaping and comment deletion for a minute, your title seems to be superimposing one concept “Clean sweep of teachers” upon another unrelated concept. I can reduce my commenting but it gives me concern regarding the idea-herding that may be occurring by deleting commentary. Basically, your sin is thus: you introduce a topic and then delete commentary (at least mine) that provides context. This creates a situation like a ping pong ball bouncing around inside a refrigerator. Certainly that is not the legacy you intent. Have a good day.

Private Citizen

March 20th, 2013
11:39 am

Brasstown, they created a choke-hold exception for “Kia.” It’s part of the new “peasant-tech” intitiative. In other news, sales of Pearson Education UK (owner of Georgia certification tests) has doubled to $6 billion annual. although I do not seem to recall that being featured in this “education” blog with appears to have an allergy to anything involving big business.

Maureen Downey

March 20th, 2013
11:39 am

@Private, We have a mechanism by which readers can complain about comments. Enough of them complain with valid concerns and comments come down. That is what is happening. I disagree that all your comments meet the relevancy test.
Maureen

Astropig

March 20th, 2013
11:40 am

Milton Man-That was my very point.The teachers are in the pocket of Dems.Maybe you didn’t get that. I’d rather have two parties working for me at the capitol than just one.

This is crazy!

March 20th, 2013
11:48 am

Georgia parents….in another 2-3 years, who do you think will be teaching your kids? For the last 2-3 years I’ve watched the brightest and best teachers leave. Normal, grounded, well-educated people are over being treated so unfairly/poorly. Who do you think will be left?
It’s really easy to say to someone that if you don’t like your job, then leave. When this happens, who’s left? If you want to have a future where you’re kids aren’t sleeping on your couch at 30 it may be time to start respecting the teaching profession again (notice I said teaching, not the overly bloated beurocratic business model that seems to permeate our schools)

Brasstown

March 20th, 2013
11:50 am

This may help in some of the horribly run school systems such as Dekalb and Clayton. I agree with Eddie though that those situations are being used to push a much broader agenda.

Otherwise, Astro and others, you are fighting an “enemy” that just isn’t there. Teachers and administrators are members of your community that have the same hopes for your children that you do. You’ve bought a bill of goods from the Republican party. Most schools work amazingly well with kids and parents. You only hear about those cases where it isn’t going so well. There is no panacea out there that will miraculously “fix” education. Some kids don’t do well because of issues they bring to the table. Excellent educators can sometimes have a positive impact on that; sometimes not.

You’re boxing at shadows while they gut your child’s school. I’m saddened and angry to have a front row seat at this disaster. You think that new administrators or teachers will solve this problem and in a few cases it will. Mostly, it’s just more lies to reduce funding.

Maureen Downey

March 20th, 2013
11:58 am

@Private, There are many valid news stories that aren’t getting the coverage they deserve. But this blog is not the place to detail them. This is an education blog. We promise the AJC readers that if they come here, they will read about education policy, educators and schools. I suggest you create a blog where you can highlight the issues that you feel matter and aren’t getting adequate attention from the public. But you can’t do it here.
Maureen

charles

March 20th, 2013
12:06 pm

The bottom line is that it really does not matter. Parents are Parents not educators and Senators are not educators. I graduated in 1965 when teachers were respected and supported. Even my segregated school system prepared me for the world. Our students are not being educated – because everybody thinks they know how to HELP students learn. After all of this “change in whatever” Georgia Students will be ranked even lower. How can there be improvement, if the main operators are excluded. Remember the Students and forget about satisfying adult egos.

Astropig

March 20th, 2013
12:19 pm

@Brasstown

“You only hear about those cases where it isn’t going so well. There is no panacea out there that will miraculously “fix” education. ”

I have never seen or heard one responsible person in a policy making position ever ONCE claim that any one magic bullet exists.That is just NEA talking points stuff that I see repeated on a regular basis by people that are getting schooled (pardon the pun) politically. If there was a “magic bullet” approach,it would be the only reform attempted.No, school reform advocates favor a “toolkit” approach that realizes that no one answer is the only answer. Lots of teachers,educrats and their ilk are mad because their politics don’t work very well right now and it’s hard for them to adapt.That’s probably why the higher ups in the school systems have their own “my way or the highway” approach to new programs .Teachers are ungovernable.They think that they know better than their superiors in every situation. That’s why reform will have to be imposed on them instead of waiting for them to discover it.

Republicans Don't Lead

March 20th, 2013
12:20 pm

So Astropig.
Republicans have been in control of GA government since they changed their names from Dixiecrats…
But they dont own any of the states problems.. or the fix.
They just want to punish their political enemys.

Patrick Edmondson

March 20th, 2013
12:24 pm

Unfortunately the GOP seems to be eager to do any harm it can to education. They seem to feel they have private schools where they can control both who gets in and what is taught. (No danger your kid will ask uncomfortable questions because they will be too ill informed) Public schools are for training their servants, who only get “uppity” if they learn too much or have opened horizons. We won WWII because of our educated, thinking population who had the skills to jerry-rig a solution to most problems on the fly. The new generations are mostly lacking this skill because it “wasn’t on the test”.

RepublicansLead?LOL

March 20th, 2013
12:28 pm

So Astropig,
Even though Republicans have been in control of GA state government for decades. The only responsibility they have is to punish their political enemies?
No wonder GA schools and Government are terrible… They are both products of each other. Ignorant GA children grow up to be ignorant GA republicans… *still* hating their teachers, just like middle school.

Bernie

March 20th, 2013
12:31 pm

Welcome to The State Of Georgia and Education – Where Nothing IS as it appears to be. Where Education is viewed through a prisim of only a select few should be entittled to a Quality Education.
Where the vast majority of students are viewed as field hands or as cogs in a wheel. To be used in that wheel as an interchangable tool, to be managed by the successful educated ones.

A modern day Plantation system of implementation if you will, unlike the Plantation of old this new one, is no longer a system specifically based on the color of one’s skin, but a system based on economic accessibility.

If you have the economic where with all, the chances of a Quality Education is greater than 70%. if you are from the latter the chances one Receives a Quality Education decreases to 20%.

A system that is being currently established right before our very eyes in the bright light of Day by our own political Leaders. As we sit by quietly and watching it being built brick by brick. To our own and our own Childrens detriment.

Clutch Cargo

March 20th, 2013
12:31 pm

“We won WWII because of our educated, thinking population who had the skills to jerry-rig a solution to most problems on the fly. ”

No. We won WWII because of our vast,immense industrial capacity and access to petroleum.Our soldiers were not nearly as well educated by todays standards (because of the draft) as they are with our all volunteer military.And our president at the time even had Republicans in his cabinet (Secretary of War Henry Stimson and Secy’ Of The Navy Frank Knox were Republican stalwarts),so why can’t teachers and educrats work WITH the other party for the good of all? Why does every comment toward the GOP have to be laced with partisan invective? I guess that ideaology (as it pertains to education) has become a blood sport.

Mary Elizabeth

March 20th, 2013
12:38 pm

Theory for the removal of teachers from House Bill 123, as stated in the article, above: “Teachers were only included in the bill initially to gain passage in the House. The teacher petition takeover smacked too much of teacher unions so the Senate eliminated it.”
=========================================

I will restate that House Majority Whip Edward Lindsey (R), and state Sen. Fran Millar (R) are both members of ALEC. I will let readers judge for themselves how much influence ALEC might have had regarding this bill’s existence, either directly or indirectly.

Hey Teacher

March 20th, 2013
12:42 pm

@This is crazy — I agree completely. I work in a desirable school, but even we have trouble filling certain positions. I can’t imagine what the applicant pool would look like in a school that had been taken over by a parent trigger.

RepublicansLead?LOL

March 20th, 2013
12:43 pm

Yo Clutch,
GA is a red state. The GOP is and has been in charge for a long time. So. why cant the majority party work with anyone on education?

Because they don’t need intelligent voters to stay in office. In fact, just the opposite.

Teacherrollinghereyes

March 20th, 2013
12:43 pm

Dunwoody…if bad teachers were hired in Dekalb, they were hired by BAD ADMINISTRATORS. How do you think bad teachers end up in schools?

Astropig

March 20th, 2013
12:44 pm

“Republicans have been in control of GA government since they changed their names from Dixiecrats…”

Every governor in Georgia from Reconstruction through Sonny Perdue (2002) was a Democrat. (Perdue was a former Democrat).The GOP took over the state senate in ‘02 and began control of upper and lower houses this year. Sorry, what you assert is just not true.

Typical

March 20th, 2013
12:47 pm

Perhaps this concept ought to be expanded in all directions. If I don’t like my cable service, I can have a petition circulated to have everyone at the cable company replaced. If I am unhappy with Congress, I can with one referendum have the entire congress replaced en masse. If I don’t think the local hospital is performing, with one referendum we can remove all the doctors. What, you don’t think I’m qualified to make that judgment? Forget you. I’ve been in a hospital, used cable for years, voted in elections and sat in a classroom. I deserve empowerment!

Private Citizen

March 20th, 2013
12:52 pm

here are many valid news stories that aren’t getting the coverage they deserve. But this blog is not the place to detail them. This is an education blog. We promise the AJC readers that if they come here, they will read about education policy, educators and schools.

Yes, this makes sense. One a different note, since we have a brief dialogue at the moment, seems like there is a lot of big business involved in education, yet is it possible for this weblog to address “big business” or is this weblog a part of “big business?” I know little about the editorial independence of the AJC in this matter, but it seems like it would be material to the vitality or relevance of education topics. For example, Pearson’s profit doubling in the last year is a pretty big deal since so much of their effort goes to the US market. Where did that money come from? How much of it came from Georgia? Is education policy in Georgia being effected by Pearson? They’re certainly no stranger to pulling out the checkbook and paying people off, lobbying monies etc. That sort of thing? Talking about Deal, Walker, and Jester is a great thing, but meanwhile what of these intitiatives and trainings teachers have to choice to take part in? Activities attached to these companies getting education monies.

If you “follow the money” on Walker, you might find some ancillary family jobs?
If you “follow the money” on Jester, you’ll probably find a Kroger receipt?
If you “follow the money” on Deal, you probably find a golf cart receipt?

Follow the money on Pearson in Georgia, and ??

RexDogma

March 20th, 2013
12:56 pm

Who took down my earlier comment? The bill is still garbage.

RexDogma

March 20th, 2013
12:59 pm

Oh Sorry never mind. That was a comment on your earlier story about this bill.

Brasstown

March 20th, 2013
12:59 pm

“Teachers are ungovernable.They think that they know better than their superiors in every situation. That’s why reform will have to be imposed on them instead of waiting for them to discover it.”

Note to self-Never engage with this person again. Also, double check the dead bolts before going to bed.

Oscar

March 20th, 2013
1:05 pm

Politicians should never make decisions that impact education. Sadly, they have great problems just keeping our state (and national) governments in check and they always have a “special interest” or motive…Politicians rarely are able to solve any problems, especially in education. The past 20 years should prove that. It is easy for Politicans to point fingers at teachers and administrators – maybe it is time the taxpayer points a finger at the politicans (state and national) and get them out of the decision making process for education — they really have no clue!!! Just trying to get votes!!

Jeffrey

March 20th, 2013
1:23 pm

All the folks who have kids at the local charter school are very involved and work well together. I honestly believe that these folks could have organized without a charter school. They could have all joined the PTA and I believe be just as effective. My point is we need to stop looking for reasons to blow up schools and make them charters. See Sarah smith or Mary Lin. And lastly I feel sorry for people who have to deal with bad teachers. My sister was always a public school teacher who taught in award winning and inner city schools. I met hundreds of her fellow educators and never came across a single bad on. Guess I’m lucky.

bootney farnsworth

March 20th, 2013
1:26 pm

when I see comments like these, I’m actually sorta glad GPC laid me off. it gave me the incentive I needed to start looking for work outside Georgia. only a fool or someone held prisoner by years of service would remain here

bootney farnsworth

March 20th, 2013
1:29 pm

the more I look at this bill, the more I’m coming to the opinion its smoke and mirrors. looks nice, makes people think they are getting something they think they want when in fact

its nothing at all

Attentive Parent/Invisible Serfs Collar

March 20th, 2013
1:32 pm

Private-I write a good bit about Pearson using their own documents and Michael Barber’s own words. As well as most recently John Behrens on where they see digital assessments going. Not surprised their profit is up.

But Pearson is not the point of story. I left a comment on the earlier version of this story on why I think teachers are no longer included. The fact that they are excluded in other states makes sense given the NEPC report i cite.

On the being able to convert even if a school is not failing, that actually makes sense in Georgia given that the new definition of student achievement under our NCLB waiver is tied to factors that parents may find troubling. As both a state official and an APS admin said in a public meeting I attended last year, these definitions will make us look better. So you could easily have parents correctly convinced the schools are doing nothing for their children apart from manipulating them psychologically and letting them play video simulation games and doing politically motivated projects.

And if manipulating them psychologically sounds unduly harsh, you should see the Response to Intervention PBIS for all kids report that hit my desk this morning.

I know where this is all going and parents are going to want options apart from what is being planned. And not tied to either student achievement of growth because they do not have a normal dictionary meaning in Ed World.

bootney farnsworth

March 20th, 2013
1:36 pm

I’m curious: is this legal/constitutional?

Wondering

March 20th, 2013
1:37 pm

I live in Cobb and don’t see the types of issues going on here that I read about elsewhere. We have relatively low taxes. We pass our SPLOSTs. We exempt those over 62 from school taxes. And, we educate our kids. When I ask the schools why we don’t have the issues I see in other systems they give credit to the parents. Likewise, the parents give credit to the schools, both teachers and administration. What I see elsewhere is frankly reflected in most of the Boards. A complete refusal to work together towards the education of the children.

I know some of our citizens complain about artificial turf in our stadiums and new theaters in our schools but mostly I hear pride in our kids. We also look at our weaknesses and expect our leadership to find solutions. The one thing I would note is that it doesn’t take long for a school to fail but it takes a lot of work to right the ship. It’s best to keep them on course.

Pride and Joy

March 20th, 2013
1:57 pm

This is Crazy makes an interesting point — in 2-3 years who will teach the kids?
It depends.
When parents control schools, good teachers will flock to them because parents want to select the best teacher for the school, not the one who is the race of the board members.
In that regard, good teachers will flock to those good schools.
With a few expections, for failing traditional public schools, the same old “lifers” who just want to clock in and check out, those kinds of people breed like rabbits and will continue to flock to the failing public schools where they can make excuses for failing to teach kids.
Let’s face the facts.
With very few exceptions, the brightest and the best didn’t leave schools because they never became a teacher. Twenty years ago many more opportunties opened for women and instead of the usual teacher, nurse, secretary jobs, they entered medical school, law school and other more prestigious roles.
Afterward, men did not become teachers. So who was left? A few honest soles and a whole lot of people just killing time and collecting a pay check.
When women who are truly educated and have the best interests of the school and children in mind and come back into teaching, respect for the teaching profession will improve. Until that time, it’s the bottom of the barrel, with some notable exceptions, of course.

Pride and Joy

March 20th, 2013
2:05 pm

Jeffrey, you’re flat out wrong about Mary Lin. The PTA doesn’t make the school better. They raise money and do a good job of that. That money is limited in what it can do. The PTA cannot raise money and hire a better teacher. They can raise money and buy better playground equipment and buy Promethean boards for the teachers and have school festivals and none of that impacts learning.
What DOES?
The parents themselves. They are educated and they value education. They send their kids to school on time, with good food for breakfast and appropriate clothing and an appropriate amount of sleep and they do homework with their child and don’t need to be taught to read to their kids.
None of that improves the quality of the teachers or affects the quality of the administration of the curriculum.
Mary Lin was a sinkhole until white, middle-class families moved back into Inman Park, Candler Park and Lake Claire.
The school was horrible until the white, middle class sent their kids there. The PTA is awesome but their hands are tied in what they can do and how much they can influence what goes on in the classroom.

richard rothey

March 20th, 2013
2:17 pm

Teachers are a major component of the problem. They cannot be trusted to improve our schools. If they could, American education wouldn’t be in the sorry state that it is.

Private Citizen

March 20th, 2013
2:25 pm

I suggest you create a blog where you can highlight the issues that you feel matter and aren’t getting adequate attention from the public.

Can I get a url from the ajc, “the knucklehead on the side?”

But you can’t do it here.

Doh. Yes it is a productive idea / suggestion.

Me

March 20th, 2013
2:28 pm

This all looks good on the surface until you have to put in the work. Even in the homeschool community when you have things like co-ops that involve other peoples kids, you have parents that tend to either not want to be involved or get fatigued. This is generally what will happen with parent triggers. Most parents only want what is best for their own kid o kids. They eventually stop wanting to or caring to put in the work for a child or children they are not responsible for. What happens then? Let’s face it folks. Like anything else, once they take over and the glory is all gone half the people involved will disappear…. on to the next attention grabber.

Private Citizen

March 20th, 2013
2:29 pm

Serf’s Collar,
And if manipulating them psychologically sounds unduly harsh, you should see the Response to Intervention PBIS for all kids report that hit my desk this morning

I think I’ve been a party to about 20 of those. I’ll have to look in on your weblog, and thank you for your clearly identifying all of this weird stuff going on. It is difficult to see from ground level.

Attentive Parent/Invisible Serfs Collar

March 20th, 2013
2:37 pm

I do not monitor it at a ground level. Most of the interesting and actually binding stuff in education is actually coming from directions hardly anyone monitors.

Sometimes it is sitting on servers in other countries but describing what is going on here.

Some of it is in other related policy areas that people do not appreciate is related.

As I have said before, these policies will not work. They are not designed to work but destroy whatever aspects of schools do work and then obscure that fact behind poorly understood group performance assessments.