State names executive director of revived Charter Schools Commission — Bonnie Holliday

Bonnie Holliday is the new executive director of the state Charter Schools Commission, the agency resurrected by the November charter school amendment vote.

Bonnie Holliday

Bonnie Holliday

She had been with the Governor’s Office of Student Achievement.

Here is her bio from the GOSA site:

Bonnie Holliday was appointed Executive Director of the Governor’s Office of Student Achievement in October 2011. Prior to joining the GOSA team, she worked for the Office of Planning and Budget as the Accountability Manager for the Race to the Top Innovation Fund and for the Georgia Charter Schools Commission as the Program Manager for Accountability. She also worked previously for GOSA as the Planning and Policy Development Specialist where she coordinated the implementation and evaluation of the agency’s education policy initiatives.

Holliday received both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Georgia. She is currently a doctoral candidate in UGA’s Educational Administration and Policy program, where she is completing a dissertation on school choice coalition building in Georgia. While completing her doctoral coursework, Holliday held research assistantships in the Learning and Performance Support Laboratory and the Educational Policy and Evaluation Center. She also taught English at a public high school in Banks County prior to returning to graduate school.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

31 comments Add your comment

Thurston Howell IV

February 20th, 2013
4:28 pm

Very qualified. She’ll be fair and honest. A worthy choice.

begin character assassination by status quo warriors in the education cartel in 3…2…1…

Google "NEA" and "union"

February 20th, 2013
4:49 pm

Perhaps DeKalb’s savior in waiting?

Astropig

February 20th, 2013
4:55 pm

Good luck Ms. Holliday.We’re behind you and wish you great success!

Now roll up your sleeves,get to work and make us proud!

Centrist

February 20th, 2013
5:05 pm

Just maybe she will get the Karen Handel treatment from the AJC – favorite non-Democrat. Being a female is a good start.

You’d think her qualifications would help, but Karen Handel didn’t need to even have a college degree to get kid glove treatment when she ran for Georgia’s chief executive position (Governor).

d

February 20th, 2013
5:53 pm

Not bashing Ms Holliday, but 1) this commission is unnecessary and a waste of taxpayer dollars and 2) probably wouldn’t have been resurrected were it not for the ballot language. Best of luck to her in this new unaccountable to anyone bureaucracy.

Clutch Cargo

February 20th, 2013
6:07 pm

“1) this commission is unnecessary and a waste of taxpayer dollars and 2) probably wouldn’t have been resurrected were it not for the ballot language”

1) No it’s not.
2) Probably 95% of the people that voted for the ballot measure were educated in public schools. Doesn’t say much for the teachers,does it?

Get over it.

Centrist

February 20th, 2013
6:07 pm

d posted “probably wouldn’t have been resurrected were it not for the ballot language.”

Your blind partisanship is getting in the way. It passed by huge margins – unlike the T-SPLOST which had majority party and Chamber of Commerce support – along with extremely supportive ballot language.

I will give you the fact that the AJC was on the losing side of both of the above issues, which only highlights its lack of gravitas with voters unless it only works in a negative way.

d

February 20th, 2013
6:20 pm

Let’s rephrase what the ballot language said to what is really happening. Shall the Constitution of the State of Georgia be amended to authorize the creation of an appointed bureaucracy that can override the decision of your elected local board of education? Yes or No. That’s not what the ballot language hinted at. It said shall the constitution be amended to allow local boards of education or the state be allowed to authorize the creation of charter schools at the request of local communities. The local boards of education and the state board of education already had the power to authroize the creation of public charter schools at the request of local communities. So why, then, was this amendment necessary? Don’t point to DeKalb on this one – they have a lot of charters – and even approved one that the previous commission had to approve when they were denied the first time. The amendment was unnecessary. I cannot vote against these people like I can vote against (and have voted against) my elected board of education.

Clutch Cargo

February 20th, 2013
6:31 pm

@d

Why don’t you just clap real hard and believe (Like in Tinkerbell!) and it really will happen!

Get over it. Being bitter is no way to go through life.

Ray

February 20th, 2013
6:37 pm

Yeah d, get over it. Pointing out things that are true is no way to go through life.

Captain Kirk

February 20th, 2013
6:48 pm

” The local boards of education and the state board of education already had the power to authroize the creation of public charter schools at the request of local communities.”

And they still do. But now, they can’t deny them under political pressure from : The NEA, teachers,local educrats.

I love teaching. I hate what it is becoming...

February 20th, 2013
6:55 pm

@Captain Kirk And they still do. But now, they can’t deny them under political pressure from : The NEA, teachers,local educrats.

LOL! Do you honestly think TEACHERS have the kind of power it takes to put anyone under ‘political pressure’ in this state? Heck. Don’t worry, we big bad teachers (folks that one might think could ACTUALLY present some good, solid ideas about what might or might not work well when discussing the creation of an effective school) have been effectively neutered…

Captain Kirk

February 20th, 2013
6:59 pm

“have been effectively neutered…”

You talk like that’s a bad thing. All of you people need to move on. You lost. Better get with the new program. Crying in your beer on this site just prolongs your denial of the new reality.

I love teaching. I hate what it is becoming...

February 20th, 2013
8:31 pm

@Kirk… I was addressing your mistaken assumption that teachers in this state have any sort of political power. I wasn’t crying in my beer over anything. I don’t even like beer. :P

P.S. Addressing folks as ‘you people’ isn’t particularly polite – and “Captain Kirk” if anything, was always charming.

Captain Kirk

February 20th, 2013
8:40 pm

“I was addressing your mistaken assumption that teachers in this state have any sort of political power.”

But you conveniently did NOT address the other two thirds of my statement:The NEA (of which you are surely a member) or local educrats (which I am certain you would like to be).

I will,however,acede to your assertion and amend my statement as follows

The original read : “All of you people need to move on”

I will now change that to: You politically impotent,obviously bitter people need to move on.

Kirk out…

Charles Douglas Edwards

February 20th, 2013
8:42 pm

CONGRATULATIONS and good luck to Bonnie Holiday as executive director of the State Charter School Commission !!!

Private Citizen

February 20th, 2013
9:48 pm

Kind of odd how a charter school post would bring out the blame-the-teacher bozos. I’ll say this, this newly appointed person has better credentials that the entire chain of command at my last teaching post, and I mean from AP to principal to superintendent, not to mention the side mob of connected busy-bodies and extra admin with 100k salaries all calling each other “doctor,” so it is good to see and welcome news.

Private Citizen

February 20th, 2013
10:10 pm

I think the title “director” would be sufficient. If we take an example from the arts, even successful movies have “directors,” they do not have “executive directors.” Seriously, I think there is a real problem with pomp and posing and “executive” culture being copied by government to the point that the service mission is lessened and as many of us know, lessened to the point of being gone, and then in reverse to the point of graft, but I am not saying that is happening here.

As of 30 January, “No salary parameters have been set for any of the staff positions” http://www.ajc.com/news/news/local-education/charter-schools-commission-holds-first-meeting-sin/nWBQD/ I certainly hope is not above $150k and I do not even want to know, because my highest aspiration in education is doing the work directly with students, and to tell it plainly, I do not like a system that pays other workers, that are not so differently educated from myself, a multiplier of my earnings. I also don’t think that is the way it is done elsewhere. In Austria or Finland, I doubt the educatiion boss is paid 3-5x the rate of pay of the credentialed professional actually doing the work with the students.

Currently, this position has an eight word title? Someone did a comedy piece based in reality of lond worded military titles. If you think there is something wholesome about this level of pomp, I sure don’t. It would be nice to see someone with enough “COMMAND” to change their job title, DIRECTOR! How about if I just call you “Captain.” Oh, wait a minute, you have something to do with Race to the Top, where 3rd graders are required to fill out 20 question evaluations of their teachers? Maybe I shouldn’t talk to you. I don’t traffic in that sort of thing.

Mr. Georgia

February 20th, 2013
10:42 pm

Wow another young inexperienced female from the Deal camp! I wonderif she related to our Gov.? Let’s hear it for diversity!!!

d

February 20th, 2013
10:52 pm

By the way all – I fully support charters. I thought (and still do), for example, think that Ivy Prep was an awesome idea. That being said, I do not like appointed bureaucrats overruling my elected representatives. This isn’t bad blood or whatever you want to think – it’s me worrying that people voted to give away their own power – and the reality that many did not realize what they were voting to do. There was no questin about TSPLOST – it asked do you want this tax for this purpose. My sole argument is that if the state was honest about what the ballot question was, we may have seen the same or different results. That is my only concern.

Mary Elizabeth

February 20th, 2013
10:52 pm

From the article above: “. . .where she is completing a dissertation on school choice coalition building in Georgia.” To have chosen “school choice coalition building in Georgia” as the subject of her doctoral dissertation indicates, to me, that Bonnie Holliday has a fervent interest in school choice promotion throughout Georgia.

I believed that the Consitutional Amendment to Georgia’s Constitution, which re-established Georgia’s State Charter School Commission, was highly political in nature, and from the selection of Ms. Holliday’s doctoral subject, I believe that the choice of Billie Holliday to be the Executive Director of Georgia’s State Charter School Commission was, also, a highly political choice, although, obviously, Ms. Holliday comes to her new postion as Executive Director with substantive credentials within her particular educational vision.

Citizens throughout Georgia should watch closely the future directives Ms. Holliday will choose to promote in her new position, through which she will attempt to lead Georgia’s State Charter School Commission, and citizens should further pay close attention to how those directives will effect the status of traditional public schools throughout Georgia.

Cindy Lutenbacher

February 21st, 2013
6:15 am

I’m not willing to pass judgment on Ms. Holliday, but her choices of working with GOSA and with Race to the Top, as well as her dissertation topic, suggest a certain bias in her approaches. I may be wrong about that. However, I would not have expected Governor Deal to appoint anyone who did not have the kind of bias her choices suggest.

Captain Kirk

February 21st, 2013
7:16 am

@Mr. Georgia, Cindy Lutenbacher, Mary Elizabeth,d

The only “bias” here is the heapin’,family size buckets of it that you people have for this lady. She got a job that you would KILL for and you’re (naturally) jealous. That’s why she got it-she doesn’t want to sabotage the chartering of schools to protect the status quo. You do. You’re politically opposed to the charter school movement and that puts you way out of step with the wants and desires of the people that matter-the taxpayers and parents. Again, I ask you (like Harvey Keitel in Pulp Fiction) “pretty please with sugar on top” start thinking about someone other than yourself.

Mary Elizabeth

February 21st, 2013
8:37 am

@ Captain Kirk 7:16 am

You are wrong in your assessment. I am simply using my mind to analyze what I see as probably happening politically in Georgia, and I post on this blog in order to alert others to what I see happening to public education in Georgia, which often is the result of political ideological leanings.

On the other hand, you, through the words in your post, have projected childish, negative emotions unto others that evidently only exist in your own mind. I, in no way, am “jealous” of Billie Holliday, or of her position. I am a retired teacher in my senior years who was totally fulfilled in my educational career in working directly with young people, who greatly blessed my life. I was also fulfilled in my career to be given the opportunity to function as a school leader who promoted the academic growth of all students enrolled in the elementary/middle school and high school in which I had worked.

Moreover, readers – who have followed my comments over months and years on this blog – recognize that I am an advocate for Georgia’s traditional public schools’ not being dismantled, but instead being improved and sustained, often with the help of excellent public charter schools which will work with, not against, Georgia’s traditional public schools, for the benefit of all students in Georgia.

Dr. Monica Henson

February 21st, 2013
9:58 am

Mary Elizabeth, it’s “Bonnie” Holliday, not Billie. ;)

Question for you: why do you ascribe “politically ideological leanings” to the school reform movement, but you appear not to feel the same way about the status quo’s effort to keep public education as is? Are they not both politically ideological?

What I perceive in your posts is that you believe that the status quo (and attempting to improve it) is the correct view, not politically influenced at all, and that the education reform movement is some nefarious Republican plot to dismantle public education altogether.

Captain Kirk

February 21st, 2013
10:03 am

Mary Elizabeth, what’s happening politically in Georgia is a sea change in the way people perceive the value they are extracting from their traditional public schools.They spoke loud and clear last November that the status quo won’t do. Not any more. That world that existed a decade ago is over.The taxpayers and parents that are motivated for change know that in order to compete in a cruel,unforgiving marketplace,their kids need a better education than they are getting in their zip code schools. And they frankly don’t trust the current educational establishment to deliver that critical product. I agree with them. You may find my writings childish,ignorant or whatever.Fine. Diff’rent strokes. But there’s a war between a broken system and its users going on in Georgia (and other states) and there are not going to be any prisoners taken by either side.The education cartel wants total control over our kids and their futures. We don’t trust them with that future because we know (in our heart of hearts) that without reforms and accountability,there would be a lot more Dekalb counties out there- dysfunctional,cynical and wasteful,with a 24/7 blame game that shortchanges the kids. The education establishment could have worked WITH the proponents of the charter amendment and maybe have gotten a better outcome for themselves.But they decided that they would “take no prisoners” and the result is what you see. So now it’s become a game of absolutes. Parents are (mostly) convinced that the education cartel won’t change and the educators think that the voters and their reps are bozos. It’s become bare knuckle politics-the very thing that you people should seek to avoid. But you go right on thinking that it’s your way or the highway and you may be surprised how far some parents/voters are willing to go to ensure that the system we have is only remembered in the history books a few years hence.

Dr. Monica Henson

February 21st, 2013
10:15 am

“…what’s happening politically in Georgia is a sea change in the way people perceive the value they are extracting from their traditional public schools.They spoke loud and clear last November that the status quo won’t do…now it’s become a game of absolutes.”

Well said, and absolutely true.

anti-coulter

February 21st, 2013
10:52 am

Here’s the lady leading the fight to decimate funding to public schools and to help reinstitute segregation in Georgia schools. Charter schools in this state will lead to a dearth of diversity in our schools statewide.

Captain Kirk

February 21st, 2013
12:10 pm

” Charter schools in this state will lead to a dearth of diversity in our schools statewide.”

The good thing is that every charter school student, every private school student that maybe gets a voucher someday will become a crusader to expand charter and other non traditional zip code schools and finally put a stake through the heart of the vampire that is bleeding our public schools dry-The Educrat Cartel. When they get off the education plantation and get a look at a better way to educate…There will be no going back. I used to think I wouldn’t live to see it,but now I have hope that I will.

I love teaching. I hate what it is becoming...

February 21st, 2013
6:39 pm

@Captain Kirk But you conveniently did NOT address the other two thirds of my statement:The NEA (of which you are surely a member) or local educrats (which I am certain you would like to be).

No. Not a member of the NEA and no interest in becoming an “educrat”. I have been told many times I should move up the food chain because I have the abilities necessary to do a good job, but I am happy in my classroom. I have zero desire to move into adminstration or central office – the only reason I would ever do so would be in hopes of making things better for students and teachers, not for personal gain.

So, your assumptions are incorrect on both accounts.

Dr. Monica Henson

February 21st, 2013
8:03 pm

Question for I love teaching. I hate what it is becoming…do you pay dues to GAE? If so, you are a de facto member of the NEA, as a percentage of GAE’s dues go to fund its parent organization.

It’s true that there are no teacher unions permitted in Georgia. Nevertheless, every GAE member supports the NEA education employees union, the NEA. It’s not a “teacher union,” as it enrolls anyone employed in a school, including classified staff such as cafeteria workers and custodians.