Here are state’s AP merit schools: 20 percent of students took AP exams; half or more exams earned 3 or higher

Congrats to Georgia’s AP Merit Schools, which are high schools with at least 20 percent of the student population taking AP exams and at least half of all AP exams earning scores of three or higher.

Special shoutout to Fulton (9), Gwinnett (9) and Cobb (8) for having so many high schools on the list.

ALAN C. POPE HIGH SCHOOL COBB COUNTY

ALPHARETTA HIGH SCHOOL FULTON COUNTY

BERKMAR HIGH SCHOOL GWINNETT COUNTY

BROOKWOOD HIGH SCHOOL GWINNETT

BUFORD HIGH SCHOOL BUFORD CITY

CARLTON J. KELL HIGH SCHOOL COBB

CENTENNIAL HIGH SCHOOL FULTON

CHAMBLEE CHARTER HIGH SCHOOL DEKALB COUNTY

CHATTAHOOCHEE HIGH SCHOOL FULTON

COLUMBUS HIGH SCHOOL MUSCOGEE COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

DALTON HIGH SCHOOL DALTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS

DECATUR HIGH SCHOOL CITY SCHOOLS OF DECATUR

DULUTH HIGH SCHOOL GWINNETT

DUNWOODY HIGH SCHOOL DEKALB

FORSYTH CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL FORSYTH COUNTY SCHOOLS

GREENBRIER HIGH SCHOOL COLUMBIA COUNTY SCHOOL SYSTEM

GWINNETT SCHOOL OF MATH, SCIENCE, & TECHNOLOGY GWINNETT

HARRISON HIGH SCHOOL COBB

HENRY W. GRADY HIGH SCHOOL ATLANTA PUBLIC SCHOOLS

JOHN S. DAVIDSON MAGNET SCHOOL RICHMOND COUNTY

JOHNS CREEK HIGH SCHOOL FULTON

KENNESAW MOUNTAIN HIGH SCHOOL COBB

LAKESIDE HIGH SCHOOL COLUMBIA COUNTY

LAKESIDE HIGH SCHOOL DEKALB

LAMBERT HIGH SCHOOL FORSYTH

LASSITER HIGH SCHOOL COBB

MCINTOSH HIGH SCHOOL FAYETTE COUNTY SCHOOLS

MILL CREEK HIGH SCHOOL GWINNETT

MILTON HIGH SCHOOL FULTON

MOUNTAIN VIEW HIGH SCHOOL GWINNETT

NORTH COBB HIGH SCHOOL COBB

NORTH GWINNETT HIGH SCHOOL GWINNETT

NORTH OCONEE HIGH SCHOOL OCONEE COUNTY SCHOOLS

NORTH SPRINGS CHARTER HIGH SCHOOL FULTON

NORTHVIEW HIGH SCHOOL FULTON

OCONEE COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL OCONEE

PARKVIEW HIGH SCHOOL GWINNETT

PEACHTREE RIDGE HIGH SCHOOL GWINNETT

RIVERWOOD INTERNATIONAL CHARTER SCHOOL FULTON

ROSWELL HIGH SCHOOL FULTON

SAVANNAH ARTS ACADEMY SAVANNAH-CHATHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS

SOUTH FORSYTH HIGH SCHOOL FORSYTH

SPRAYBERRY HIGH SCHOOL COBB

STARR’S MILL HIGH SCHOOL FAYETTE

UNION GROVE HIGH SCHOOL HENRY COUNTY SCHOOLS

WALTON HIGH SCHOOL COBB

WEST FORSYTH HIGH SCHOOL FORSYTH

54 comments Add your comment

[...] where at least 20% of students take AP exams and half or more exams earned 3 or higher Here are state’s AP merit schools: 20 percent of students took AP exams; half or more exams ea… AP exam participation and pass-rates are excellent metrics for parents wanting to find more [...]

Bernie

February 20th, 2013
11:28 pm

Only 20% of the Student Population? This is a Very SAD statistic and if anyone is happy with such an achievement, should have their Head examined.

I would say this is a good start. However, an extreme amount of improvement is in order by the ALL of the Schools current Adminstrative Leadership.

Centrist

February 20th, 2013
11:29 pm

Agree – congratulations.

Mary Elizabeth

February 20th, 2013
11:47 pm

From the article, above, “Congrats to Georgia’s AP Merit Schools, which are high schools with at least 20 percent of the student population taking AP exams and at least half of all AP exams earning scores of three or higher.”
===============================================

The above sentence reads “at least 20%” – which means that in some, if not all, of the Merit Schools listed above, more than 20% of the student population could have taken AP exams, with at least half of all AP exams earning scores of three or higher.

Congratulations to all of the students who took the AP exams and congratulations, also, to the Merit Schools, above, that prepared their students to take, and score well on, the AP exams. Well done!

Dr. John Trotter

February 21st, 2013
1:15 am

The schools have this in common: Very little free and reduced lunch. Above average income and very active and supportive parents.

Starik

February 21st, 2013
2:23 am

There are a few high schools in DeKalb that are doing ok, but they’re deteriorating. I’m confident the school board and administration will destroy them.

Bernie

February 21st, 2013
3:14 am

Surely, The 20% must be the members of the LUCKY GENE POOL Club. The remaining 80% LOT must be the low achieving miscreants, who do not deserve the time of day and should be left behind to their own devices. When did we become a Nation of the FOR and BY the Few? This is not the Real America, I know and love. Long term these numbers must improve or we will fail as a society and as a Nation. Other industrialized Nations are leaving our kids in the dust and we seemed to be happily content with a 50% successful rate of 20%!

Long term the Math will discount even this mildly modest achievement. We must do Better in seeing that ALL of our children are better educated.

Private Citizen

February 21st, 2013
4:47 am

I’m speaking from experience and it took me a while to figure this out. I think in Georgia, there is a tendancy to build these 100% success private academy schools and then celebrate them as the shining jewel – again and again and again and again. It is like the school district is running a Pace or Woodward Academy or somesuch inside the school district. It is very seductive as far as news, but it really has a damn thing to do the other 80% of the students who are the ones with the mayhem, no textbooks, no eyeglasses, minimal cafeteria, crumbling buildings etc. And in my experience, the same district management making sure they’ve got their private school type academy tight and high-perming, the same local power and managers go around and put hard elbow down at workers at the other lesser schools and mess with them. And if from the lowly position of the lesser school, you give them scores to compete with their using public money to run a private academy, if you compete with them from within the same school district, the management will hit the roof.

I have absolutely no idea what is remedy for this, but maybe I am the first one to clearly see what is happening is with running the iconic private academy type school and using both for the free private-school type education for the elite sector (which is good – achievement is good) the problem is that they use it for a propaganda to say “we’ve done well / we do well” and then they abandon the rest of the district. And it gets weird when it seem everyone is expected to role play. Don’t go for the high performance scores if you’re not at the academy school, someone will get upset. At least that is the role playing going on and it is very real.

Private Citizen

February 21st, 2013
4:55 am

Bernie, at the academy type schools featured, one or two misbehavior incidents, and the student is gone. These academy schools tolerate no disruptive behavior of any kind. If there ever was a dual system or two-faced set-up, this is it. It is part of the drunken see-saw. Literally zero tolerance at the performance academy where the politicians and judges kids go to school, and then in the regular school teacher can do nothing about disruptive students who are able to dominate a classroom.

democracy

February 21st, 2013
5:16 am

Maureen Downey often writes elucidating education columns, but this one is, well, a real “downer.”

The clear implication is that Advanced Placement (AP) courses and tests are “better” than traditional fare. That may be the perception, but it’s a myth.

A 2002 National Research Council study of AP courses and tests concluded that they were a “mile wide and an inch deep” and they did not comport with well-established, research-based principles of learning.

Klopfenstein and Thomas (2005) found that AP students are “…generally no more likely than non-AP students to return to school for a second year or to have higher first semester grades.” Moreover, they write that “close inspection of the [College Board] studies cited reveals that the existing evidence regarding the benefits of AP experience is questionable,” and “AP courses are not a necessary component of a rigorous curriculum.”

A 2006 MIT faculty report noted ““there is ‘a growing body of research’ that students who earn top AP scores and place out of institute introductory courses end up having ‘difficulty’ when taking the next course.” Two years prior, Harvard “conducted a study that found students who are allowed to skip introductory courses because they have passed a supposedly equivalent AP course do worse in subsequent courses than students who took the introductory courses at Harvard” (Seebach, 2004).

Phillip Sadler said in 2009 that his research found “students who took and passed an A.P. science exam did about one-third of a letter grade better than their classmates with similar backgrounds who did not take an A.P. course.” Sadler added this in the 2010 book AP: A Critical Examination: “Students see AP courses on their transcripts as the ticket ensuring entry into the college of their choice…there is a shortage of evidence about the efficacy, cost, and value of these programs.”

AP has become “the juggernaut of American high school education,” but “ the research evidence on its value is minimal.” AP may work well for some students, especially those who are already “college-bound to begin with” (Klopfenstein and Thomas, 2010). As Geiser (2007) notes, “systematic differences in student motivation, academic preparation, family background and high-school quality account for much of the observed difference in college outcomes between AP and non-AP students.” College Board-funded studies do not control well for these student characteristics (even the College Board concedes that “interest and motivation” are keys to “success in any course”). Klopfenstein and Thomas (2010) find that when these demographic characteristics are controlled for, the claims made for AP disappear.

Please, stop with the “shoutout” nonsense for a program that is of dubious value.

Private Citizen

February 21st, 2013
5:41 am

Every plantation has a big house. You walk inside and you think you are in a church, but there’s nothing too holy about it. The thing about these places is that the students do not necessarily have developed or advanced vocabulary in the humanities because Georgia has no organised sequential system of teaching / building vocabulary. But in a closed system, these students who have been nowhere else think they are creme de la creme and maybe their parents do, too.

Another significant aspect of evaluating how to apprise these academy schools is that in Georgia it is optional for a school district to use national norm-based annual comprehensive testing, and naturally, you guessed it! There is a push to not use national norm based testing. Without it, you don’t know where these schools stand, even though they may perform at double performance of the poor kids who have no eyeglasses and as a far as big power is concerned, only need shoes for school. Breakfast? Get one of these plastic wrapped nutrient bars and a carton of growth hormone milk. That’s a whole other issue, the evolution of pre-fab food for the school kitchens, cut the boxes open and heat it up. Been a long long time since anyone stirred a pot in a school house kitchen.

That you (?) for the list of where the courthouse and city hall folk send their kids to school. Portfolio application not required. I mean, required for the regular kids. There’s two lists for applicants, those who are pre-approved and those who have to apply. You will not find this in the public rule book.

Beck

February 21st, 2013
5:53 am

Dr. Trotter –

You may want to recheck your statistics. Centennial is succeeding DESPITE becoming more economically diverse and I’m speaking from personal experience. If you’re mistaken about one, there could be more.

Private Citizen

February 21st, 2013
5:54 am

very active and supportive parents

The parents are “very active” because they have a strategy to max-out the Hope scholarship monies and any other automated performance-based grants that make it where they do not have to pay the cost of college. It’s ten of thousands of dollars for them to be “very active.” Being high achievers, they do their planning and work in advance. And I have seen at least one example of these courthouse parents will not hesitate to mess over a teacher to achieve their strategy, having as much regard for the teacher (who is teaching their kid well) as they might have for a pin at a bowling alley.

Performance based college student funding puts the K-12 teacher in a bad position. Just like healthcare, people should pay their cost of college. If it is expensive for everyone else, they should pay their cost and stop skiing on top of the heads of everyone else.

Chris T.

February 21st, 2013
6:03 am

@Dr. John Trotter. Some of these schools are achieving this without having an affluent population. Berkmar HS has a free and reduced lunch rate of 80% and Duluth HS is over 50%.

Private Citizen

February 21st, 2013
6:12 am

Something that is notable about the Hope Scholarship enthusiasts is that is decidedly a middle ground perspective in that they are not planning on their kids having college school “choice” on a national level. It leads to a kind of weird state-level inbreeding. People who strategise for “Hope” do not recognize schools like Stanford or M.I.T. or University of Michigan or Bloomington, Indiana, or TX A&M or UT/Austin, or CalTech or… or… or… Middle Tennessee State University! (said to have a very good music program) Or even that school in the mountains of North Carolina where Michael Gregory (also known as schmoyoho) went to school. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDQTvuP1Dgs

MiltonMan

February 21st, 2013
6:20 am

“Performance based college student funding puts the K-12 teacher in a bad position. Just like healthcare, people should pay their cost of college. If it is expensive for everyone else, they should pay their cost and stop skiing on top of the heads of everyone else.”

Good God your typical liberal on here bashing the high performers and their “unfair advantage”. My son is pre-dental at UGA on a full ride for his success in high school which consisted of him studying 4-5 hours each day, every day – also had scholarships from Vanderbilt, GT, Auburn, etc., etc. He/we choose UGA because of the reward of his hard work on the MCOG being associated closely with UGA.

mountain man

February 21st, 2013
6:31 am

Why are we switching subjects to AP merit schools on the day that Dekalb has its hearing? Are we cutting off debate about the “smoke” or does Maureen just think we have beat a dead horse to death? I hate it that some subjects stay up for three or four days and some get superseded after only a few hours.

mountain man

February 21st, 2013
6:36 am

What percentage of these schools are charter schools vs. what percentage of overall schools are charters? Seems like people are saying charters are no better than regular schools.

Private Citizen

February 21st, 2013
7:24 am

Milton Man, You think I’m liberal because I think people should pay their own tuition instead of using the state for a gaming business and bilking the rest of the public who pays their way? If you want to disagree, well and good. If you want to call it Pluto or a tomato, well… ? ? Liberal, huh. Did you get your vocabulary from Fox News on the tv set, from the people who tell you the reason solar power works in Germany is because they have more sunshine than the USA (this is a quote). Is that where you learned what a “liberal” and a “conservative” is? If I’m a liberal, what do call a conservative, someone who knows how to bilk the system? I think you’ve got it backwards, Bubba.

Hey, congratulations on your kid.

However, consisted of him studying 4-5 hours each day, every day. OMG, studying 4-5 hours each day? Whoa, stop. the. train. Pay his tuition!!! And then AFTER you pay his tuition, he can make $200-300k a year and charge you $200. for a 20 minute teeth cleaning. Hey Milton Man, the whole system in the US is messed up. Actually, I’m a big fan of dentists and we need more of them, like 5x more of them, although something tells me your kid will likely not be pulling teeth down at the local correctional facility (and that’s all the dentistry you get! that and a couple of advil).

Subtext: I don’t like scholarships and don’t use them. I pay my way or else accept standard funding per the school. That way I know what’s what and “live it.” Studying 4-5 hours a day? Huh? You’re kidding, right? This is, ugh… pretty standard? in the civilised world? But we don’t live in the civilised world. We live in the Georgia role-playing world, where some people are “special” and other people are “dirty” and “worthless” and the special people get special things paid for for them, too.

AP Teacher

February 21st, 2013
7:28 am

‘Grats to all the schools. I know its a lot of hard work to meet this goal.

However, look into “Gatekeeping” policies at these schools. How many of these schools screen students to only ensure the best get to take the test? How many apply to be in the AP courses vs. how many are accepted?

Check out Grady HS policies here. A bit extreme IMHO.
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=grady%20high%20school%20%20ap%20classes&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&ved=0CDgQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.atlanta.k12.ga.us%2Fcms%2Flib%2FGA01000924%2FCentricity%2FDomain%2F3120%2FAP_Guide_2011.pdf&ei=aRImUa_5JI209gS53oCgDw&usg=AFQjCNFGpc9XnxEd8KYA3CBiQa78SAhHQw

Interested Participant

February 21st, 2013
7:31 am

The other significant thing about this list beyond socioeconomics is that these are all very large high schools. I know for a fact that we have some outstanding Single A and Double A high schools with similar demographics and parent involvement. I am thinking that these schools don’t have the budget/resources to offer enough AP sections to have at least 20% of their students enrolled. If this is the case it really shows how badly the budget situation is for smaller schools – even VERY GOOD smaller schools.

Inman Parker

February 21st, 2013
7:33 am

There is a good ddeal of jealousy in some quarters of students who do well academically. It is often characterized as “un-cool”, or playing “up” to the “man.” Such silliness is not only sad, but is downright dangerous to our society. The so-called “millennial generation” is in danger of becoming the first proudly ignorant generation.

Private Citizen

February 21st, 2013
7:36 am

hey Milton Man, just an FYI. They changed the name of the “MCOG” you mention. I don’t like name changes of this kind and I don’t know why they did it. I’ve attended two universities that have changed the name since I attended them. For example, fictively, let’s change Georgia Central College to Central College of Georgia. That sort of thing, as if people have nothing else to do with their time and officialdom. We used to have grand names for airports. A lot of those have been changed, too. That’s a real abuse of power when they change autonomously named major airports to name them after living people / politicians. This is from the era when Cheney shot the lawyer in the face with his shotgun and then expected the lawyer to apologise. This all started with that con man Reagan who role-played “grandpa” while he was changing the federal laws that used to protect the public from too much consolidated corporate power. You probably didn’t notice that, you Bush-votin’ radical liberal, pre-programmed to seek a scapegoat while you’re wreckin the country. Ahhh, but you’ve got that “10 minute memory” thing to deal with that. If it didn’t happen in last 10 minutes, hey leave me alone, it doesn’t matter who I voted for and what they did. But they did change the name of major airports and name them after themselves. And that really sux.

Mountain Man

February 21st, 2013
7:37 am

It would be interesting to see a map with these schools shown on it. Mostly North Suburbs of Atlanta.

Private Citizen

February 21st, 2013
7:38 am

Inman Parker, Expecting people to pay their way is not jealousy. And yes, there is caste system resentment and probably for good reason.

Private Citizen

February 21st, 2013
7:46 am

Inman Parker, And a lot of that arrogant ignorance has been role modelled on the US tv set. There are people who track this stuff, and apparently the Disney Channel is a treasure trove to role-model know-it-all kids talking back to everyone. Like I said, there are some sources and people who track this stuff, what is being put through the tv programming and the effect on kids. I know the second you leave the US, tv tends to be very different, much calmer and informational, sciences, arts, artisans.

Tom

February 21st, 2013
7:52 am

How about a ’shout out’ to Forsyth County Schools, which had 4 high schools on the list?

That’s 4 schools out of the total of 5. (80%)

Fulton – 9 of 17 (53%)
Cobb – 8 of 17 (47%)
Gwinnett – 9 of 20 (45%)

Truth in Moderation

February 21st, 2013
7:54 am

Way to go Gwinnett and GSMST!
“Several GCPS schools were recognized in more than one category. Berkmar High and Gwinnett School of Mathematics, Science, and Technology made the list in four of the five categories. In addition, Gwinnett’s newest charter school, Gwinnett Online Campus, which opened in the fall of 2011, made the list the first time it qualified for the honor.”

GSMST qualified for 4 categories:

AP Challenge Schools:
Schools of 900 or fewer students with students testing in four of the core areas (English, mathematics, science, and social studies)

AP Merit Schools:
Schools with at least 20% of the student population taking AP exams and at least 50% of all AP exams earning scores of three (3) or higher

AP STEM Schools:
Schools with students testing in at least two (2) AP mathematics courses and two (2) AP science courses (AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC, AP Statistics, AP Biology, AP Chemistry, AP Environmental Science, AP Physics B, AP Physics C, AP Computer Science)

AP STEM Achievement Schools:
Schools with students testing in at least 2 AP math courses and 2 AP science courses and at least 40% of the exam scores on AP math and AP science exams earning scores of three (3) or higher
http://www.gwinnett.k12.ga.us/gcps-mainweb01.nsf/679353575364565885257B18005F3775/$file/Gwinnett-high-schools-make-AP-Honor-Schools-2-20-13.pdf

Maureen, how does Georgia compare with New Jersey, New York, Mass., and Conn.?

Mary Elizabeth

February 21st, 2013
8:05 am

Readers may be interested in the below article from “USA Today” regarding the disparity in the populations of those students who take AP courses. Poverty and race are factors, according to this article. See below:
===================================================

“As more students take advanced placement classes, a new report finds that access can vary strikingly by race.

More students than ever are taking Advanced Placement courses in high school – about one in five earn at least 3 out of 5 possible points on an AP test before graduating.

In 2002, 471,404 students took an AP exam of any sort. By last year, it was 954,070.

A new report by the College Board, a non-profit group that creates the tests, finds that opportunities to do advanced work are uneven across the USA. More than 48% of high school students in Maryland took an AP test in high school, for instance, but fewer than 15% in Mississippi did.

The new findings come a day after a Department of Education panel released its own report on educational opportunities in the USA. The Equity and Excellence Commission said, ‘While some young Americans — most of them white and affluent — are getting a truly world-class education, those who attend schools in high poverty neighborhoods are getting an education that more closely approximates schools in developing nations.’ ”

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/02/20/advanced-placement-high-school-classes/1928913/

Another view

February 21st, 2013
8:10 am

Most universities require 4 or 5 on the AP test, so reporting the 3 score is a bit misleading.

Mountain Man

February 21st, 2013
8:12 am

The schools with good students with good parents scored high. In other news, we have proved conclusively that water is wet.

Yankee Prof

February 21st, 2013
8:25 am

There is indeed some well-deserved praise to be shared with this news, particularly for those whose test scores earn them college credit.

As higher numbers are drawn to AP courses, let me again remind parents of a parallel opportunity: dual enrollment with a local college. Students scoring over 450 on SAT Math and Verbal (in my area, anyway) qualify to take dual enrollment courses at my college, earning both high school graduation credit and college credit: pass the class, earn the credit. Plain and simple.

This is particularly worth considering for those kids who are not competing to be one of the top ten graduates in their high school of those, like me way back when, who fell into the strong B category.

Some folks claim that AP courses are more stringent than your average freshman-year college equivalent course, and they may be right (compare a classroom of 20 top 5% high school seniors with a public college first-year classroom featuring a mix of recent college grads, non-trad students returning after years away, etc., and that shouldn’t be surprising or particularly problematic)).

Simmer Down

February 21st, 2013
8:27 am

If Private Citizen (PC) had their way the “private academies” would be dissolved and all of these great students would be thrown back into the general population with the rest of the inmates. We would be dumber but we would be equal. Get a grip – with the system the way it is now at least some of kids are able to find their way out versus your idea where we lose everyone. At least I am willing to state what you are saying in clear terms without all of the fancy words.

Mountain Man

February 21st, 2013
8:27 am

A good “Get Schooled” article would be to post the salary of every position in Dekalb County Schools with a chart of who is related to whom, and who has political (or church) connections to whom. That would be informative. (and possibly evidence for today’s hearing – not smoke). Include in the chart average salaries for comparison from another school system – say Cobb County.

Gwinnett Mom

February 21st, 2013
8:28 am

Dr. Trotter, please check your statistics. Berkmar High School in Gwinnett made the list. That school is 80% free/reduced lunch and has a VERY diverse student population. It undermines the hard work of these kids when statements like yours are made.

Atlanta Mom

February 21st, 2013
8:37 am

Dr. Trotter, pray tell, what’s your definition of “Very little free and reduced lunch.”?
Buford 40%
Centenial 29%
Decatur 26%
Grady 48%
Wheeler 46%
And those were the obvious ones to me. There are probably more.

Mountain Man

February 21st, 2013
8:46 am

“Berkmar High School in Gwinnett made the list. That school is 80% free/reduced lunch and has a VERY diverse student population. It undermines the hard work of these kids when statements like yours are made.”

Interesting you should bring up Berkmar – even though they (barely) made the list, they trail the National Average in SAT scores as well as the Georgia Average AND the Gwinnett County SAT average.

Also – Dr. Trotter said NOTHING about diversity, yes, he mentioned free/reduced lunch, but he also said the schools listed had involved, dedicated parents (at least for the 20% that take the AP tests).

Truth in Moderation

February 21st, 2013
8:47 am

The sum is greater than its parts. GSMST outperforms ALL other Georgia schools because tracking works. Gifted and motivated students perform better when grouped together. Their energy and focus increases exponentially because they experience an intellectual camaraderie and aren’t drained by being bullied and considered the “nerd” outcast. A socially accepting climate frees these students to fully utilize their intellectual prowess and to challenge one another. A school full of engaged students has far fewer discipline problems by default. Gwinnett’s leadership had a vision for such a school, NOT the state. They should be commended.

Home schooling works on the same principal. Parents track their child into courses that support their child’s strengths and interests. If you must do the work of teaching and funding your child’s education yourself, you will NOT waste your resources on worthless pursuits! Unfortunately, traditional public schools don’t have that freedom.

Mountain Man

February 21st, 2013
8:50 am

Wheeler 46%

Atlanta Mom – why did you include Wheeler?

Private Citizen

February 21st, 2013
8:52 am

hey everybody, the hearing is being streamed in real time right now. You must have Real Player software installed to stream it. The hearing accessed via the “Basic Webcast” link: http://www.doe.k12.ga.us/External-Affairs-and-Policy/State-Board-of-Education/Pages/Live-Webcasts.aspx

Or, install Real Player and go to “open location” and paste in this url: http://real.doe.k12.ga.us:8080/ramgen/encoder/gadoewebcast.rm

Private Citizen

February 21st, 2013
8:53 am

To see the hearing that is being streamed right now, install Real Player software, go to “open location” and paste in this url: http://real.doe.k12.ga.us:8080/ramgen/encoder/gadoewebcast.rm

GCGN

February 21st, 2013
8:56 am

Congratulations to Oconee school system, both high schools made the list.

In case you are interested in whether there is a link between income and school perform, here is the link for where highest earners in GA live.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/nation/census-high-income/

AlreadySheared

February 21st, 2013
8:58 am

@Dr. Trotter:

“Very little free and reduced lunch”
The exception tests the rule; do you regard 48% free and reduce lunch @ Grady HS in Atlanta as “very little”?

http://reportcard2011.gaosa.org/(S(xsvuhfrlldfcz4fvlwatlmrw))/k12/demographics.aspX?ID=761:4560&TestKey=EnR&TestType=demographics

I don’t know about the current year’s results, but one year when I checked, Grady essentially posted more passing AP results than the rest of APS combined (I realize that is sort of damning them with faint praise).

Texas Pete

February 21st, 2013
9:00 am

This article is full of lies. I’ve heard for so long that public schools are not capable of producing good students, especially Georgia public schools. Therefore it is not possible for any student to do well on an AP exam.

MiltonMan

February 21st, 2013
9:06 am

“However, consisted of him studying 4-5 hours each day, every day. OMG, studying 4-5 hours each day? Whoa, stop. the. train. Pay his tuition!!! And then AFTER you pay his tuition, he can make $200-300k a year and charge you $200. for a 20 minute teeth cleaning. Hey Milton Man, the whole system in the US is messed up.”

Please check in with our European friends anfd ask them aboiut their “wonderful” dental availability.

MiltonMan

February 21st, 2013
9:47 am

“hey Milton Man, just an FYI. They changed the name of the “MCOG” you mention.”

Tell them that – they still refer to themselves as MCOG

http://www.georgiahealth.edu/medicine/

Truth in Moderation

February 21st, 2013
9:53 am

Right on! Milton Man:

Why are British people’s teeth so bad?
“As an American who has lived in the UK for the last 4 years, I can tell you it isn’t a stereotype.

They really do have bad teeth. It isn’t really their fault though – their healthcare system (NHS) is incredibly lacking in the way of dental care. In some areas there aren’t even any NHS dentists, only private ones.

Where most NHS services are free, dental isn’t. It can take months to get in to see a dentist, they will only do the easiest method of treatment (i.e. remove a tooth with a bad cavity rather than fix it) and any treatment that isn’t immediately and completely necessary isn’t covered, and is very expensive. They will not do *any* procedures considered to be cosmetic, and that includes white fillings and crowns. For those you have to either pay extra to the NHS dentist, or more often, go to a private dentist.

Because of the difficulty in access to decent dental care, many Britons aren’t terribly concerned with seeking it. The NHS is trying to change this, but it has a long way to go.”
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090924061923AAv3VxM

Atlanta Mom

February 21st, 2013
10:01 am

Milton Man,
My bad. I tend to confuse Wheeler and Sprayberry (and there’s no logic behind that). I can’t get through to the DOE website right now, but found another which stated that Sprayberry’s free and reduced lunch percent is 32.

Truth in Moderation

February 21st, 2013
10:14 am

GWINNETT HAS TOP PERFORMING AP SCHOOLS, BUT IS BELOW AVERAGE FOR TOP 5% of INCOME!
THEY DO MUCH MORE WITH LESS!

Gwinnett County, Ga.
Ranked 282 of 3,143 counties

12,449 households, or 5% of households, are in the national top 5% of income.

Where top 5% of income starts
U.S.
$191,469
Georgia
$179,837
Gwinnett County
$188,503
This county’s top 5% accounts for 18% of the county’s income.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/nation/census-high-income/

Private Citizen

February 21st, 2013
10:13 pm

Truth / Milton know-it-alls. You really make me fall out of my chair. Britain is not Europe.

Buy some snow skis. Spend some money on airfare. People around the Alps have beautiful teeth. FYI it’s covered in the government system in Germany and Austria.