UGA and Tech presidents: The fiscal cliff looms

Michael F. Adams is president of the University of Georgia. G.P. “Bud” Peterson is president of the Georgia Institute of Technology. With their football teams about to face off next week, the presidents co-authored a guest column on the fiscal cliff and its impact on higher education.

By Michael F. Adams and G.P. “Bud” Peterson

It’s no secret that our universities have a century-old rivalry in sports, but what isn’t as well known is that Georgia Tech and the University of Georgia are partners, collaborating in areas ranging from energy and health research, to teacher education, to strengthening local economies around the state.

Together, our two public research universities provide educational opportunities for 56,000 students and conduct $900 million in research each year, spanning everything from national defense to cancer treatments to Internet security. This research is not only critical to preparing students for good jobs and careers, it is essential if Georgia and our nation are to remain globally competitive while improving the lives of all citizens. But now, much of the federal funding for this important research is in jeopardy because of the so-called fiscal cliff, or sequestration, which is scheduled to go into effect on Jan. 1.

If sequestration becomes a reality, it will affect every major public research university in the nation — and this will impact jobs, the economy and, most importantly, our state’s future.

Nearly everyone agrees that sequestration would be a disaster. In 2013 alone, it would result in a $12.5 billion reduction in federally funded research and development across the U.S., causing an estimated 200,000 job losses, disrupting multi-year research projects, and hampering growth-inducing investments.

While we, as a nation, must get our fiscal house in order, we must do so in a way that helps ensure a prosperous future for our children and grandchildren. Our country faces some very difficult decisions over the next few months. The challenges will require us to set aside partisanship to hold a national dialogue around our nation’s priorities. We commend the leadership of Sen. Saxby Chambliss, former Sen. Sam Nunn and other national leaders who have been willing to work toward a long-term fiscal plan based on the bipartisan Simpson-Bowles Commission debt plan.

Last month, the Task Force on American Innovation, which includes private corporations, research universities and professional associations, sent a letter to the president and congressional leadership with a simple yet critical challenge: develop a plan for debt reduction while keeping the nation on the path to innovation and economic growth by prioritizing spending on science and technology. We support this challenge and urge our congressional leaders to act in a bipartisan way to address our nation’s fiscal challenges, while preserving the research and innovation that will allow us to stay competitive in the global economy.

Much of America’s competitive advantage in innovation can be linked back to university research. Lasers, the Internet, GPS, enhanced agricultural productivity, countless medical devices, life-saving breakthroughs in fighting disease in humans, animals and plants, and more would never have been developed without federally funded long-term research. In our increasingly global environment, if we reduce our investment in education and research while other countries increase theirs, we could compromise the very advantages that have made America strong.

Recently Georgia Tech and the University of Georgia were named by SmartMoney Magazine as No. 1 and No. 4 in the nation, respectively, for return on investment for graduates. It is a tribute to the University System of Georgia that two of its universities are in the top five in the nation in return on investment. The economic impact of both universities on Georgia’s economy is in the billions. And these are just two of America’s outstanding research universities. Imagine the regression in our economy — and in U.S.-based innovations — if sequestration were to result in the elimination of almost 9 percent of federally funded research and development in 2013 alone. Ripples would be felt here in Georgia and throughout the nation.

There is no doubt our leaders have tough choices ahead. We must courageously address the nation’s debt crisis, but we must also preserve the strength in America’s educational system. No other investment holds as much promise for providing the long-term solutions we need for economic growth and prosperity.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

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[...] UGA and Tech presidents: The fiscal cliff loomsAtlanta Journal Constitution (blog)Michael F. Adams is president of the University of Georgia. G.P. “Bud” Peterson is president of the Georgia Institute of Technology. With their football teams about to face off next week, the presidents co-authored a guest column on the fiscal cliff … [...]

Centrist

November 17th, 2012
11:53 pm

The fiscal cliff is a media event, and typical government brinksmanship. It is not going to happen – either a deal, or more likely a punt postponing tax changes and sequestration into the 2nd quarter of next year for the new Congress to play politics.

Lee

November 17th, 2012
11:58 pm

“But now, much of the federal funding for this important research is in jeopardy because of the so-called fiscal cliff…”

Apropos analogy. The Dims and Repugs have been doing their best Thelma & Louise inpersonation of driving the economy off the cliff for years. The fact remains that the USA cannot continue this level of spending.

Maybe the UGA Athletic Association could toss a couple million your way. I hear they’re having a good year…

tjatl

November 18th, 2012
12:14 am

@Centrist – I do not agree. How long can they continue to punt? They have already done that.
Yoda: “DO, or DO NOT. There is no TRY.”

hal

November 18th, 2012
2:46 am

Centrist is correct; they will punt. The new Congress will be charged with re-writing the draconian laws governing the expiration of Bush tax cuts into a more palpable version most of the electorate can live with. That said, taxes will go up…and soon.

Beverly Fraud

November 18th, 2012
3:49 am

Why not just turn the Univ. of Georgia and Georgia Tech into charter schools? That should solve everything!

Pride and Joy

November 18th, 2012
6:13 am

Punt the football teams.
The myth that the footballs teams are profit making is a lie. The profit goes right back into football and the millionaires who run it.
Punt football and put all that time and energy used for an all-male sport back into REAL education.

Lynn43

November 18th, 2012
6:48 am

Beverly, That’s a great idea. Then they could pick and choose on the basis of “who looks like me”. Oh, yes. Make them all wear uniforms. Require parents to volunteer at the college or university. And they wouldn’t have to pay top notch salaries because they wouldn’t have to hire professors-just someone with a little “training”. We can’t have sports programs because that will cut into the profit the out-of-state management company will make. Yes, I guess charters are the answer to all education problems.

Bob

November 18th, 2012
6:58 am

We have been told for years that the Bush tax cuts were bad. Now that the middle will see the higher rate then people will understand how those cuts helped the middle class. Go ahead and raise all taxes and stick to the planned cuts, if not, the debt will continue to rise.

Jack ®

November 18th, 2012
7:11 am

Government grants are not tidy little sums of money the government “earned”. Those monies came from my pocket and all taxpayer pockets and it’s being wasted on those who contribute nothing other than loud voices saying they’re being mistreated while sitting on their butts doing nothing.

Frank

November 18th, 2012
7:14 am

Georgia Tech and Georgia State should be combined and save our struggling State and Taxpayers a lot of money. The State of Georgia has a money problem with our State University System even if the sequestration does not happen. Georgia Tech also has turned its back on Georgia Students, that the Georgia taxpayers are paying for, because only about 50% of GT students are from Georgia. UGA is now educating Engineers and GT’s Charter has always been to be the only Engineering School in Georgia. Now that is not the case and GT’s original purpose of being an Engineering Specialty College is too costly to taxpayers for the State to continue. Why should the State support a Specialty Engineering College when practically every major University within three hundred miles including UGA has Engineering Majors? Combine Georgia State and GT, good for the State.

Burroughston Broch

November 18th, 2012
7:33 am

Faux tears!
Both universities need to go on a fiscal diet and now is the time to start.
Checking employment records over the years, the % growth in adminstrators and bureaucrats far outstrips the growth in students and faculty.
If alumni have anough money to support athletic programs (and they have), then it’s time to financially support the universities.

Dc

November 18th, 2012
8:00 am

Going more in debt to spend money we dont have doesnt “create 200,000 jobs”….land these univ presidents know that. But they clearly would like to get more money so will say anything to get it.

Sadly it looks like the only solution to drive fiscal sanity by our govt is a balanced budget reqt in the constitution. Our pols obviously would rather play santa than govern in a rational responsible way, so their hand has to be forced somehow

Whirled Peas

November 18th, 2012
8:06 am

Michael Adams and Bud Peterson are two hogs who have been feeding at the taxpayer trough for a long time. Now that the taxpayer provided slop is about to be cut back, they are upset. We need a law that a college diploma can be returned and the amount paid for tuition refunded within 7 years of graduation. 80% of liberal arts degrees are not worth the paper they are printed on. But these two need to keep the slop coming.

indigo

November 18th, 2012
8:27 am

It all comes down to – too many people – not enough money.

No easy way to solve this.

crankee-yankee

November 18th, 2012
8:28 am

Burroughston Broch
November 18th, 2012
7:33 am

Please cite the source(s) for your claim of admin growth and give us the numbers so we may see for ourselves.

Perhaps you missed the point “Recently Georgia Tech and the University of Georgia were named by SmartMoney Magazine as No. 1 and No. 4 in the nation, respectively.”
http://i.mktw.net/_newsimages/pdf/college-rankings-20120925.pdf

I’m not sure how well your unsubstantiated claim stands up against the ROI numbers put up there.

The bottom line is never a straight line from investment to fruition. Your way of thinking reminds me of those who opposed the STEM initiative in the ’60’s, Kennedy’s Race to the Moon. Although the basic aim of getting to the moon has yet to fully materialize 50 years later, the resulting spinoffs from the research conducted for the project far outweigh the investment we made (i.e. computers, GPS devices, water filters, memory foam, invisible braces, cordless power tools, cochclear implants, safety grooving in roads & sidewalks, MRI & CAT scans, firefighting breathing apparatus, modern kidney dialysis, smoke detectors, satellite TV, dust busters, tele-medicine, virtual reality, ear thermometers…). I could go on and on but the point is that investing in research results in far more than the original focus creating much progress & wealth.

I, for one, would rather see my tax dollars support my local research universities than, say, seminars on alleged UN mind control efforts to advance “Agenda 21.”

JDawg

November 18th, 2012
8:42 am

Who is John Galt?

santa

November 18th, 2012
8:43 am

The best thing that could happen is if Congress allowed the current plan to proceed. Some fiscal discipline is what is sorely needed. Our government must stop printing and borrowing money only to squander it on mostly worthless research by these glorified welfare recipients called institutions of higher learning.
UGA is basically a house of ill repute corrupted by money it does not deserve. It is totally unaccountable to the people, run by appointed cronies of governors. If most Georgia citizens know of the mostly secret activities going on behind closed doors in this cesspool, they would demand it be shut down.
Do you see our two Senators reject any of that easy federal money sent to Georgia while they give the same government the middle finger?
Not one more dime of federal money should be wasted and sqaundered on UGA welfare.
If we do not get our fiscal house in order there will no longer be any country in which any university or any citizen can exist. We will degenerate into anarchy.
Selfish is the best adjective to describe these two corrupt hypocrites who care only for themselves, just like our corrupt Congress.
Soon our financial situation will be totally out of any control and nature will take its course as our Country self destructs into oblivion.

Private Citizen

November 18th, 2012
8:51 am

“…Everyone is moving or thinks they are moving toward a humanity transparent to itself, toward a world citizenry.

Marney

November 18th, 2012
8:52 am

I read that Smart Money article carefully, as I will have to put two kids through college in the next few years. The premise of the article was on how the costs to attend a given college stack up against the future earnings potential for the student. What the analysis showed is that in many cases private liberal arts colleges will put the student and his family in dept to a far greater degree than the difference in pay will give back. Most public institutions are much more cost effective for the student, especially if they are respected and churning out students into high paying fields with many jobs available in this job market. This should be a obvious, but the cachet of the Ivy League name often causes families to stretch way beyond what makes sense–Smart Money just did the math.

On the other hand–what is an extremely good deal for the student can also be so good that it is more than the taxpayer can bare. Some of Tech’s ranking, I’m sure, is because practically all of their student body is channeled into segments of our economy that pay well for the skills that they produce. How much “skin in the game” should the State Gov, Federal Gov. and lottery players each going to put in here?

Marney

November 18th, 2012
8:54 am

I meant to add “How much of that cost belongs to the family and student?” to the above post.

Private Citizen

November 18th, 2012
8:58 am

“These ideals are on the wane and in general attitudes in what we call developed nations. The discourse of the political class continue to use the rhetoric of emancipation. But it does not seem to be able to heal the wounds inflicted on the “modern” ideal over some two centuries of history. It was not a lack of progress but, on the contrary, development (technoscientific, artistic, economic, political) that created the possibility of total war, totalitarianisms, the growing gap between the wealth of the North and the impoverished South, unemployment and the “new poor,” general deculturation and the crisis in education (in the transmission of knowledge), and the isolation of the artistic avant-gardes (and for a while now, their repudiation).”

-Lyotard / 1992

Ron

November 18th, 2012
9:06 am

Maybe this is an opportunity to be more selective is what and how much is being researched. There are a lot of frivolous studies out there.

Also, universities could cut expenses by eliminating fancy dormitories and wi-fi and every new amenity or gadget. Such expenses and frills were non-existent 20 years ago. So guess it’s time to cut back after all . . .

Private Citizen

November 18th, 2012
9:26 am

My personal theory is that U. S. healthcare is operating at 25% efficiency. I arrive at this because the U. S. has double the health care costs of any other country – if you look at a comparison chart, when you get to the U. S. the cost graph goes straight up, combined with that the U. S. is only covering half their citizens. If you consider that university administrations and workers are among the health “insured” what this means is that this inordinate cost of health coverage is impacting the cost of running education institutions, hence the conspicuous increase in tuition and costs for students who, through their tuition and fees, are paying for the upper end of the caste system. I am not sure how “Obamacare” is going to effect this and I am not optimistic regarding the cost efficienct of this new system, as it still seems set to feed huge monies to existing cost structure of insurance companies, pharmaco, and hospital administrations (this is not my idea, it is stated that Obamacare will be a windfall for these three groups), Therefore, until the U. S. citizenry wishes to stop having their brains scrambled by opinion makers FoxNews and magic stories about who is attacking them, until the U. S. citizenry wishes to come back down to earth from the clouds of propaganda and literally mind-control, …. until the public mind demands relevance for their own well-being – and there are plenty of good models for them to reference, until then… we will amble along in the debtor’s colony like what many of us have experience with a bad credit card.

And by the way, out of all of the consumer credit cards, British bank HSBC is the worst.
_____________

errata: Would education be better if we do-coupled the states from the fed? Who is the source that has “normalized” saturation testing?

Another Voice

November 18th, 2012
9:41 am

What I’d like to see as a stat: of the students who attended state-subsidized universities and colleges — how many actually stayed in this state? Especially pertinent for recipients of HOPE scholarships, since that was a driving reason behind the scholarships.

Fred ™

November 18th, 2012
9:54 am

JDawg

November 18th, 2012
8:42 am

Who is John Galt?
++++++++++++++++++++++

He is a mythical character of a dysfunctional book written by a tramp who spen ther adult life amped up on a methamphetamine high. She had no morals and slept with anyone’s husband she could because of her lack of self worth and ethics. She wrote the book Atlas Shrugged which is based in no realistic world that ever has or ever could exist. She is the druggie queen to the Druggie King Rush Limbaugh, the the far right wing nutcase republicans worship.

What does that have to do with education other than the fact that educated people know better than to subscribe to the crap the meth ho Ayn Rand spewed?

Fred ™

November 18th, 2012
9:56 am

Beverly Fraud: Your 3:49 is an instant classic. Good job. :lol:

Rik Roberts

November 18th, 2012
10:01 am

I don’t have any numbers to support it, but every time I have stepped onto a college campus in the last few years there has been major construction going on. When I drive around, the only real construction I see is at government facilities. These people talk about how cash strapped they are, but they seem to be the only ones with the funds to keep building and growing. Something has to end. I say let us fall off that cliff and begin to pick ourselves up once we hit the bottom.

lance manion

November 18th, 2012
10:07 am

Frank, your idea to combine our three top research universities is ridiculous. First, UGA has a small, very limited engineering program, that will never approach the world class program Tech has created. You view having students from other states as a negative, while it is a major positive for our state. The research money, along with the top talent that comes here is incredible. And, many of these students stay here and help support and create businesses in Georgia. Tech has helped to distinguish Georgia from other rural southern states and that is not going to change. Tech also keeps our top tier students at home, rather than having them attend top schools in other places, never to return to offer our state their talents. Second, UGA is a fine state university and it attracts many of our better students who will bcome our teachers, lawyers and business leaders. Georgia State is a great school with a focus on urban issues. GSU serves a very diverse group of students, many of whom are the first to attend college in their family. GSU provides a first rate edcuation and provides access to a wide audience. The business school has been a huge benefit to the growth of Atlanta as a business hub. None of the schools have a mission that is similar to any of the others. Watering down Tech’s international reach, or changing UGA or GSU’s focus is not a path we should or will follow.

mountain man

November 18th, 2012
10:19 am

“Why not just turn the Univ. of Georgia and Georgia Tech into charter schools? That should solve everything!”

Uh, Hello! They are equivalent to charter schools already. We could have them mimic regular traditional schools and be forced to take all applicants, give grades that are not earned, promote kids to higher grades where they do not belong, have kids thresatening their professors and do nothing about it, and, in the end, give a diploma that means absolutely nothing!

The federal “fiscal cliff” (which has actually been looming for years) just means we need to take a look at our federal spending and decide if it is worth it. If it is worth it, we need to tax ourselves more to pay for it. (note I said “ourselves” – not “everyone else but me”). If it is REALLY “worth it”, then the 47% who now pay no federal income tax should agree to pay a small amount, say, 2% tax.

mountain man

November 18th, 2012
10:22 am

I had a daughter at UGA for four years – I saw a Taj Majal of a student center, and I saw fees increased outrageously. Cry me a river about the “fiscal cliff”

lance manion

November 18th, 2012
10:27 am

Mountain Man, good points. We have some very competitive colleges like Tech, State and UGA, along with others. We also have colleges that have a more open adimission. All of these serve our kids, who have a varety of needs. One of our key strengths as a state and nation is our post secondary education. It sets us apart from the rest of the world. We should spend our money wisely, but do everything we can to foster these great institutions.

Beverly Fraud

November 18th, 2012
10:37 am

@Fred ™ I’m not sure is quite as classic as Kathy Augustine’s “We see no need to investigate; we expect outliers every year” but still, thank you.

crankee-yankee

November 18th, 2012
10:39 am

Rik Roberts
November 18th, 2012
10:01 am

The same could be said for what was going on in the 1930’s under the New Deal. The bottom line is we are just coming out of the worst financial mess we have had to endure since 1929. Back then, it took 15 years & a world war to set us back on the road to prosperity. I submit we are ahead of schedule and it is because of government intervention in the crisis that we are doing better.

Ayn Rand’s premise of laissaiz-faire capitalism has been debunked with this latest crisis as it is a result of the deregulation started by Reagan and allowed to continue through 3 more presidents of both parties. Her childhood remembrance of the Russian govt. takeover of her family’s business colored her from seeing the same forces would work through corporate avenues as well. The systematic dismantling of the regulatory apparatus put in place after the Great Depression only points to the culpability of the decision-makes who have failed to learn from or ignored our own recent past.

“Those who cannot remember the past, are condemned to repeat it.” George Santayana

mountain man

November 18th, 2012
11:00 am

“Back then, it took 15 years & a world war to set us back on the road to prosperity”

I remember a post on another blog where they said government spending did not get us out of the Depression – WWII did. HELLO! Do you not think that defense spending is not “government spending”? I just hope we don’t decide that another war will be the only way to get us out of our current recession – so we go manufacture one.

Private Citizen

November 18th, 2012
11:09 am

Rik, Somewhere else I read the observation about when the only construction occurring is government and peoples are constructing little. A little abstract, but it’s a good point. I also note this in food distribution and fast food restaurants. I went on a car trip errand, 550 miles each way and when I stopped in remote towns the only food venues were the corporate fast food, and there were many closed cafes. I should have photo documented. It was weird and this was especially true in poorer areas. I had to stop and get some tires, in coal country, meanwhile I had a talk with a savvy convenience store area manager who described the McDonald’s (I forget the name of what it is) the potato hash brown oval thing, described it as a flat piece of cardboard before they inflate it with heat and cooking oil. Sociology book I have from mid-1970’s describes the whole thing as result of deregulation, Reagan removing laws against monopoly. This results in centralized power and employees who simply do not care and have no reason to, hence “Why Nothing Works.” The author’s prescription was to return to independently owned business and niche high quality manufacturing as the sole way to bring the country back to standing.

Some other notes, back in the Eisenhower era, wasn’t the tax rate 40% for guys like Romney? Meanwhile, today they cry like a baby over 15%. For their own survival, UGA and Georgia Tech would do well to support academics who are making observations about the recent transfer of wealth from the middle class to the top 10%, even top 2%. The numbers are big and real, and it is not opinion or hearsay. Deregulation removed, requirement for competition eliminated. For example, the top five guys at Comcast together are paid $100 million a year. At my address, they’re the only wired internet provider and I have to listen to advertisement for paid tv programs on the front end of their telephone number before I even get to the menu to speak to a phone bank employee that they openly call “customer service executives.” Why are these five persons able to take $1 billion of money as personal pay over ten years, and to do so with no competition? Why is the official FCC statement about internet is that they (the FCC) “encourage competition” and do so in a stagnant monopoly no-market for same? Another effect of the deregulation is centralized ownership of major media who now set and repeat “the script” for the people. As soon as the deregulation occurred, in the media distribution companies, the big entities went around and gobbled up the little frogs. Comcast has enough to buy NBC and then fire 75 staff from The Tonight Show to save money. This is the result of deregulation. Will the U. S. ever come out of it? It certainly is not on the discussion – anywhere.

crankee-yankee

November 18th, 2012
11:12 am

mountain man
November 18th, 2012
10:19 am

“They are equivalent to charter schools already. We could have them mimic regular traditional schools and be forced to take all applicants…”

So you are saying charters do pick and choose their population and keep out those who “do not belong” just like Tech & UGA?

Prof

November 18th, 2012
11:17 am

I love it. I hope that these two University presidents are reading the blog entries here that tear into both their assumptions about the Washington “fiscal cliff” and their schools. I’m sure they co-authored this guest column thinking that their names and positions would cause instant “shock and awe” and agreement with their position.

Private Citizen

November 18th, 2012
11:23 am

I just hope we don’t decide that another war will be the only way to get us out of our current recession – so we go manufacture one.

Only if you let them. Probably the best thing about Obama is that he is not a war hawk. PS Bush already did that and it sure didn’t take us out of any recession! Seems the new “high tech” wars do not stimulate the same manufacturing as the old pre-tech ground wars. Seems the only economic result of current war mode is to do it on a credit card and put the people in debt.

crankee-yankee

November 18th, 2012
11:25 am

“Do you not think that defense spending is not “government spending”?”

Absolutely, and, like you, I hope we do not choose war to correct the recession, I would much rather the govt spend tax dollars on our infrastructure, education, research, etc. than on guns & bullets.

Private Citizen

November 18th, 2012
11:48 am

If you go to visit University Lumiere in France, there are seven campuses, each with specialities Lumiere I, V, VII, etc. Each campus has one building in the middle of the campus, looks like all the other except that it is where the bathrooms are, with the bathrooms in the basement. You go down stairs to get there. The men’s stalls are on one side of the building and the women’s stalls are on the other. The 3-4 story buildings on campus do not have elevators. They must do a lot of teaching there since Lyon is a center of fine arts.

Tuition: “A basic fee for an undergraduate course in 2010/11 is €174 ($250.?) per year; for a masters course it is €237 ($375.?) per year; for a doctorat it is €359 per year ($500.?). …In addition, you will be expected to pay a charge of around €200 ($300.?) per year for health cover.” http://www.french-property.com/guides/france/public-services/higher-education/fees/

Private Citizen

November 18th, 2012
11:56 am

Looks like it’s been reorganized into three schools:

“The three main universities in this center are: Claude Bernard University Lyon 1, which focuses upon health and science studies and has approximately 27,000 students; Lumière University Lyon 2, which focuses upon the social sciences and has about 30,000 students; Jean Moulin University Lyon 3, which focuses upon the humanities and law with about 20,000 students.”

Just think, every one of those 77,000 students graduates with little to no debt.

UGA system will put debt on your head like pouring tomato sauce on a pizza.

Private Citizen

November 18th, 2012
12:16 pm

Germany: “For a many years there have been no tuition fees in Germany. In the case of undergraduate studies, such as degree (or bachelor) courses, at many universities this is still true today. Students pay only a small enrolment or confirmation fee.” http://www.internationale-studierende.de/en/prepare_your_studies/financing/cost_of_education/

Britain: “Students from England studying in England. Students will pay variable annual tuition fees (up to £3,375 for 2011-12).” = $4295. http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2011/may/17/university-guide-2010-tuition-fees

UGA: GA Resident Off Campus tuition and fees $9,842.

Norway: NTNU does not charge tuition fees. http://www.ntnu.edu/livingintrh/livingintrondheim/costs-and-fees

In Austrian universities there are no tuition fees for students from EU-EEA member countries.

University education in Denmark is free for students from the EU-EEA and Switzerland.

Finland – No tuition fees are charged for Bachelor’s and Doctoral programmes, regardless of your nationality. The same applies to many Master’s programmes for Finnish, EU-EEA and Swiss students.

In The Netherlands study fees for EU students are EUR 1,771.

Norway

Higher education in Norway is considered to be free of charge for everyone, although in state universities students have to pay for a small semester fee of NOK 300-600 (EUR 39.00-79.00 approx.). Students are granted a student card that gives them the right to have health care and transport for free, as well as reductions for cultural activities and events.

UK – After offering low tuition fees for long time (no tuitions were paid until 1998), the UK government has recently decided to allow universities to raise study fees. It is important to note, that Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are independent from this decision and pursue their own strategy on tuition fees. In Scotland for example, Scottish and non-UK EU citizens do not have to pay any tuition fee.

Europe is going for more.

Fight fire with fire, some say. That is why despite financial crisis the European Union is going to invest more money in education. Recently, the European Commission has presented its multi-annual financial framework (2014-2020) that proposes 70% funds increases for training and education. http://www.mastersportal.eu/students/articles/tuition-fees-for-students-in-europe/

bootney farnsworth

November 18th, 2012
12:25 pm

I’ll calling massive BS across the board here. having been in the USG system for a couple decades, I can tell you the staggering amount of fiscal waste and cronyism which goes on in Georgia higher ed is what is driving those two schools towards any sort of fiscal cliff.

the idiots in the Board of Regents and under the gold dome will give UGA anything it asks for. anything. case in point: Tech already has a well established, well regarded engineering school. so what does Red Meat Fran and co do? decide UGA needs one as well. why? UGA must have everything it wants, despite the impact it has on the rest of the system.

how many useless majors are there at UGA and Tech? women’s studies, minority studies, things designed to make sure you’ll never get a job in the real world. hell, Tech has a music minor. why?

if you go through the course offerings at both places, they have so much crap its stunning. and the constant insistence for Ph.D.s to teach, while better teachers without the Ph.D. (BTW: cheaper, too) struggle to get decent positions. and most of the Ph.Ds pawn the teaching off to grad students.

so you’ve got too many useless majors, spread over too many schools, allegedly “taught” by too many unnecessarily high paid instructors, the people who actually teach said courses, and the support staff and infastructure to feed their egos.

then you’ve got the massive throwing away of money on pet projects which have no real bearing on the the Rs. at GPC we excelled in spending 100s or 100,000s of dollars promoting Tricoli and Belcher’s social agendas.

and frankly, how fancy does the exterior of most of these buildings need to be? there is a big gap between soviet style mustard yellow block buildings and the latest John Portman daydream, but the USG can’t seem to figure this out. having been on campus repeatedly, the opulence of the buildings is massive, and unnecessary. its college, not club med.

on bloody Monday at GPC, well over 282 people were let go due to fiscal mismanagement. the vast bulk hourly paid, bottom third of the ladder staffers. if you were an Assistant Director or higher, you were just about untouchable. in short, a higher paid, top heavy work force. if GPC is that out of control, just image what goes on at UGA and Tech.

and despite what the athletic associations tell you, the schools endure -yes, endure- a major fiscal outlay to have the honor of the presence of the football and basketball teams. custodial, security, utilities, tutors, scholarships, loss of paying student seats taken by athletes who will never graduate.

if we were serious about education, we -the state and citizens of Georgia- would be spreading this around for the benefit of the entire system. if a new engineering school was really needed, put it in Georgia Southern, or Middle Georgia, or Ft. Valley. bring more industry to different parts of the state, help to make everybody more effective and profitable.

but the point of the business of higher education in Georgia is self perpetuation, and the housing of football teams, not education of Georgians.

bootney farnsworth

November 18th, 2012
12:28 pm

comparisons of us and Europe are stupid and pointless.
like apples to air conditioners.

lance manion

November 18th, 2012
12:31 pm

Private Citizen, where do you think the money to pay for those student’s come from? It comes from a heavily taxed public. We already have heavy taxes, and do not need more. A student in Georiga can go to school for very little money, if they get and keep th Hope scholarship. You can live at home, and go to school for the cost of books and fees. I know you can do it, because that is exactly how I attended GSU. I got a great edcuation for next to nothing. Yeah, if you want to live on campus, join a sorority and study in London, it is going to cost you. But look at the tens of thousands of students who attend Georgia schools for very little money. Look at the facts.

Private Citizen

November 18th, 2012
12:39 pm

bootney, you win the generalization award, you’ve thrown several schools into the same pillow case. Georgia Perimeter College does not = Georgia Tech. I, for one, am glad of Georgia Tech’s distinction. As far as putting an engineering program in middle Georgia, well – nobody wants to live there !!! and they’ve got the same palaces and cronyism, maybe worse due to remote location. Georgia Southern has billboards describing themselves as winning popularity polls. That’s their folksy concept of academics. It’s a really conspicuous example of “good times” marketing.

Why are you allergic to comparing U. S. and Europe? That doesn’t really make any sense, unless you’re just a nasty old xenophobic hillbilly. :-) Stings, doesn’t it? Well, look here my dear egomeister, it doesn’t sting anywhere near the sting of unmanageable student debt. and UGA system is in the business of doing debt system redelivery onto students.

Private Citizen

November 18th, 2012
12:45 pm

Lance, The fact is that your lottery money scholarship does not scale to all students. As far as paying taxes, why do other countries receive health care and paid-for higher education for taxes, whereas we do not. We get medical bankruptcies and student debt crisis. And citizens objecting to anything else. It’s weird, unless the people with the good life just prefer a caste system, a plantation system, as anything else threatens their superior level of comfort. Europe smashed all of that.

Private Citizen

November 18th, 2012
12:49 pm

I think they should bury that ill-named “Hope scholarship” fiasco in the grave next to the “Georgia Standards.” If the people want gaming, open casinos.

Private Citizen

November 18th, 2012
12:52 pm

Lance, I’ve never used a “scholarship” in my life and do not want one. I think there should be a level playing field. I’ll accept an in-school grant or fellowship, as is standardly applied.