Teacher power: Key education votes elsewhere in America

While there’s been a lot of attention in Georgia to the charter school amendment passage, there were major education issues decided elsewhere in the country.

John I. Wilson, a long-time special education teacher and former executive director of the National Education Association,  wrote about some of them in his Education Week blog.

In his essay, Wilson says these votes show that the public trusts its teachers.

Here is an excerpt but please read the full blog over at Ed Week.

To illustrate this, let’s look at one of the reddest states in America, Idaho. The voters were not fooled by misleading slogans like “Students Come First” or the rhetoric of Tom Luna, state superintendent of public instruction. They rejected three recently passed state laws that rolled back collective bargaining rights, implemented merit pay based on standardized test scores, and established laptops and online credits at the expense of teachers and reasonable class size. Voters listened to teachers’ concerns about being excluded from decision-making, using student testing inappropriately and at the expense of quality instruction, and pitting teachers against technology instead of seeing it as a teaching tool rather than a teacher replacement. Teachers exposed the shady business practices of those who were using taxpayer dollars to drive personal agendas as well as the out-of-state financiers of the proposed teacher-bashing laws. Idahoans stood by their children’s teachers.

Now let’s review the returns from one of the bluest states, California. The voters there rejected a blatant attempt to silence teachers from participating in our democracy. The billionaire Koch brothers channeled millions into supporting a proposal that would disallow teachers’ political contributions through payroll deductions. Sadly, even some folks who tout themselves as education reformers participated in the effort to silence teachers. They lost because the voters respected the teachers. Efforts to curtail political activity among teachers have usually come from politicians who didn’t receive the teachers’ political endorsements, and the public can see that. Because the public supports fairness, voters in California sided with teachers.

Finally, let’s go to Indiana. This was a stunner. Glenda Ritz, a 33-year teaching veteran and a National Board Certified Teacher, defeated Tony Bennett, State Superintendent, who had led Chiefs for Change, a conservative group that promoted anti-teacher policies. Ritz took the teacher voice to the voters. She made the case for using standardized tests appropriately rather than for high-stakes decisions on pay, evaluation, and professional development. She also promoted a great public school for every child. The voters trusted her and elected her. The new governor and legislators in Indiana would be smart to work with her on an agenda that truly advances a quality education for every student.

There were many other places where voters listened to their teachers.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

85 comments Add your comment

bootney farnsworth

November 12th, 2012
9:18 am

and then there’s Georgia, the major player in the anti education wave not sweeping the country.
Mao’s Cultural Revolution lives, with red meat Fran & co leading the charge.

but to be fair to red meat Fran….we the people did elect one of the shadiest members of congress to the governor’s office. this is the government we asked for, and the government we deserve.

to quote Pink Floyd “we don’t need no education”

Mountain Man

November 12th, 2012
9:27 am

Bootney – actually, people voted for Amendment 1 becuase they WANTED better education. Whether you think it will or will not RESULT in better education, it was a reaction to the existing status quo that ushered in the Amendment. And don’t give me a load of crap about “people didn’t know what they were voting for”. This has been big news and a big controversy for a long time. You would have to have lived in a cave not to have heard this discussed. People of all persuasions, Democrat and Republican, Black and White, poor and rich – ALL voted for the Amendment, because they thought it would give parents at least an option of a better education. If they had been perfectly happy with their high-performing school systems, this would have been another T-SPLOST.

Mountain Man

November 12th, 2012
9:29 am

Just like T-SPLOST lost because of the Ga. 400 Toll Debacle, I believe that Amendment 1 passed because of the reaction to the APS cheating scandal.

Mountain Man

November 12th, 2012
9:34 am

And lest anyone think otherwise given my support for Amendment 1, I have ALWAYS supported teachers. I believe that the failures in our current school systems are failures of the ADMINISTRATION, not of teachers. So let’s start doing ADMINISTRATOR evaluations and tie ADMINISTRATOR pay to performance: specifically – handling of discipline, attendance, social promotion.

Mountain Man

November 12th, 2012
9:36 am

“She made the case for using standardized tests appropriately ”

Yes, like determining which GRADE a student should be in!!!!

Centrist

November 12th, 2012
9:42 am

This sure highlights Mr. Wilson’s opinion of: “not fooled … using student testing inappropriately and at the expense of quality instruction, and pitting teachers against technology instead of seeing it as a teaching tool rather than a teacher replacement …Teachers exposed the shady business practices…proposed teacher-bashing laws…attempt to silence teachers from participating in our democracy…conservative group that promoted anti-teacher policies”.

I guess that must be the last word and all states like our backward one should follow him (and I guess Ms. Downey who seems to support his opinions).

GCAE President

November 12th, 2012
9:42 am

People voted for a better system that they can have for their children. Yet in every instance, they are the ones that voted in the school board, they are the ones that don’t participate in the PTA, they are the ones always ready to blame everyone else, especially the school and the teachers.
When they get the school of their dreams, I truly hope that they can afford the time committment they will have to make, that they can deal with the staff and faculty that may or may not be certified in subject matter nor educational/developmental pedagogy. I hope that we don’t waste10 years and realize that our students know less, can not do any more and are not ready for real life. I hope that society, the Koch Brothers, Ms. Walton, and the countless other ALEC contributors realize that profit making does not equate to competition, that money can and will not make schools better. Teachers, administrators, parents,students and money, make schools better; all working together to make the future real and prosperous for all of us.

bootney farnsworth

November 12th, 2012
10:09 am

@ mountain

you may be right, time will tell.
but that’s not the point of the blog. the point of the blog is most states heed the input of teachers, not dismiss it and them as the enemy.

bootney farnsworth

November 12th, 2012
10:13 am

in my personal opinion, people voted for A-1 mostly due to two reasons.
again, my opinion only.

1-red meat Fran and co have done a great job of creating the image of educators as being the focus on all evil, while hiding their multiple failures on the educational front.

2-a whole lot of people voted what they think will allow them to continue to be un-involved in their children’s education.

again, my opinion. time will tell

MiltonMan

November 12th, 2012
10:13 am

“I hope that society, the Koch Brothers, Ms. Walton, and the countless other ALEC contributors realize that profit making does not equate to competition, that money can and will not make schools better.”

What a false statement. Please come back with facts as opposed to some rehearsed message that is used ad nauseum by those is the education sector. Look at how much in spent per student in the APS system vs. North Fulton.

bootney farnsworth

November 12th, 2012
10:17 am

@ mountain

as long as administrators continue with their political backing, the major issue -and we agree here-
will not be solved. and charter or not, the problems will continue

cris

November 12th, 2012
10:35 am

wait a minute @Mtn Man…did people vote for Amendment 1 “becuase they WANTED better education” or “because of the reaction to the APS cheating scandal” ? Maybe so MANY posts have confused you?

Private Citizen

November 12th, 2012
10:36 am

A Chinese writer has written a new book on the Mao era and it is even worse that we have been told.

“”Documents report several thousand cases where people ate other people,” Yang says. “Parents ate their own kids. Kids ate their own parents. And we couldn’t have imagined there was still grain in the warehouses. At the worst time, the government was still exporting grain.”

“At the epicenter of the famine, Xinyang in China’s central Henan province, the post office confiscated 1,200 letters sent begging for help. The level of energy expended on covering up what was happening is chilling.”

worth a look – http://www.npr.org/2012/11/10/164732497/a-grim-chronicle-of-chinas-great-famine

Private Citizen

November 12th, 2012
10:38 am

I wake up wondering about the saturation testing and chain of command. Who is ordering this and why?

Beverly Fraud

November 12th, 2012
10:39 am

Bootney – actually, people voted for Amendment 1 becuase they WANTED better education. Whether you think it will or will not RESULT in better education, it was a reaction to the existing status quo that ushered in the Amendment.

Yes Mountain Man, the voters basically invited Somali pirates into the mix, hopeful they would mitigate the effects of dealing with the North Korean government. Time will tell if it helps.

*Apologies for unfairly comparing the North Korean government to APS, Dekalb and the rest of The Four Horsemen of the Incompetence

Beverly Fraud

November 12th, 2012
10:55 am

From Mountain Man

“I believe that the failures in our current school systems are failures of the ADMINISTRATION, not of teachers.

Are Lindsey, Morgan, et. al. willing to stop the charade and start to repair public education?

Give each school an anonymous survey. If a certain number of teachers say they aren’t supported in matters of discipline, mandate the principal be removed. Mandate that for each school the staff rates discipline as out of control the superintendent loses ten percent of their yearly salary.

Now let’s be fair about it. Don’t even make it 50/50. Make it a supermajority of teachers-in other words if a full 65% say, anonymously (without fear of RETALIATION) that the school is out of control, then you hold the leaders of the school and the system accountable, in a way they can fullyunderstand.

How long do you think, Rep. Lindsey and Rep. Morgan, it would take for discipline would finally get the attention it deserves if you made administrators pay and not just the teachers?

catlady

November 12th, 2012
10:57 am

So what have we educators here in Georgia done to “merit” the treatment as lazy, incompetent teachers, but those in other states are actually listened-to?

Just Sayin.....

November 12th, 2012
11:14 am

The voters there rejected a blatant attempt to silence teachers from participating in our democracy.

Since we do not live in a democracy, that single sentence illustrates what is wrong with the whole article. It is an opinion piece with very little factual information. It does no good to reiterate liberal/progressive tripe.

Question

November 12th, 2012
11:14 am

@ Private Citizen, 10:36 am. What on earth does does the famine in China under Chairman Mao Tse Tung have to do with this blog topic?? It’s been well-known among historians and the lay public, whether or not you knew anything about it. You post so often on totally irrelevant subjects–such as Ezra Pound in the thread about Ann Coulter–that it seems you’re just trying to display your knowledge.

Private Citizen

November 12th, 2012
11:19 am

catlady, Georgia is still stuck in the plantation system. I had a labor representative tell me (and I quote), “They treat teachers terribly here. If they tell you to kick the building before you walk in the door, do it.” I have never seen anywhere a situation where workers have so little power as teachers in Georgia. And it’s worse than that, they hold teachers hostage. A day laborer can walk off a job and find another job in a day. In Georgia, corrupted managers can hold teachers hostage based on that the teacher has signed an annual contract. I recall this clearly when once the school year started, some screwy review person came around and started messing with me. I was just kind of speechless when I realized what they were doing. It wasn’t just me. They picked out three people in the building and just started harassing us. Maybe with the budget tightening some of this has been cleaned out, the “extra management” who go around and harass people. And the thing is, if a teacher does anything except obey to the letter what some screwball is telling them to do, they risk getting their work review trashed and if they change districts, being labelled a bad apple. What a great situation combined with the economy being down. That teachers have no representation and no rights and no ability to stand up to abusive management definitely yields a certain result.

I might be drifting in topic here, but in Georgia, I think there are two things that merit attention. One is the saturation testing. Why is this happening? The other thing is what I will call a “crisis in management” and how is it that district management can vary so widely throughout the state? There are 200-something-odd school systems in Georgia and every one of them is run differently.

oldtimer

November 12th, 2012
11:20 am

I do think the strength of the union in CA made a difference.

Michele

November 12th, 2012
11:45 am

And Gwinnett County and Georgia continue their assault on teacher inclusion in any major decision. The Beat Goes On! Where are the teachers who will stand up to all the foolishness in Georgia education. Oh, I forgot. They are all retiring in droves.

Private Citizen

November 12th, 2012
11:49 am

Before they started treating teachers as obedience drones, they treated Bobby Fischer very badly. I see a pattern.

dahreese

November 12th, 2012
11:51 am

@Milton Man; There is nothing false about this statement; “I hope that society, the Koch Brothers, Ms. Walton, and the countless other ALEC contributors realize that profit making does not equate to competition, that money can and will not make schools better.”

It is a FACT that a lot of corporate money from out of state, and a governor willing to put down his own state’s educational system and insult his teachers in the process, went into the passage of the charter amendment issue.

This is a totally different issue;”Look at how much in spent per student in the APS system vs. North Fulton.”

You don’t have to be a blind conservative not to see it, just an ignorant one to deny it.

Teacher Reader

November 12th, 2012
11:53 am

As a former teacher, parents, teachers, administrators, and students are all to blame for the lack of education. More money does not equate a better education. Teachers need to be willing to speak out about other teachers that aren’t teaching, discipline that is not happening, and teaching to tests that are utter BS. Parents need to be demanding that their children aren’t taught to a test, that the new math goes, that our students are taught real history and not the watered down and often wrong stuff in our current books. Parents need to demand that their children are challenged to think, draw conclusions and use their brain and not be useful idiots. Administrators need to call out those that won’t allow them to suspend children who are bullies, get rid of teachers that aren’t teaching, and other ills that affect the quality of education that is available from their school.

Instead, those involved with education keep quiet when they are let go because they have high moral standards and won’t be bullied by those in charge.

Amendment 1 passed, because parents want a better education for our children. We realize that districts like DeKalb, Atlanta, and others aren’t going to change quick enough to help our children and we want our kids to have a better choice. Charter Schools aren’t a magic pill and no not all are good or give quality education, but it gives parents like me a chance to try and get their children a quality education.

jess

November 12th, 2012
12:01 pm

If Georgia had a population similar to Idaho, There would be a lot of things people would consider differently.

Prof

November 12th, 2012
12:04 pm

@ Teacher Reader. “Amendment 1 passed, because parents want a better education for our children. We realize that districts like DeKalb, Atlanta, and others aren’t going to change quick enough to help our children and we want our kids to have a better choice.”

You forgot the school districts of Fulton County and Clayton County also. I can certainly understand their wish. The public schools there are truly disheartening. But this is now an amendment to the Constitution for the entire state, that has a lot more counties than just those four; and it will be state tax funds from everyone that go to support these new state charter schools. This doesn’t seem just to me, somehow.

NWGaMathScienceTeacher

November 12th, 2012
12:06 pm

Anyone here know the meaning of non sequitur?

mountain man

November 12th, 2012
12:29 pm

“wait a minute @Mtn Man…did people vote for Amendment 1 “becuase they WANTED better education” or “because of the reaction to the APS cheating scandal””

They are not mutually exclusive; in fact they are one and the same. I am sure that parents who are worried about the APS cheating scandal want a better education for their children. The APS scandal just represents the worst facet of our current underperforming system. THAT is what was driving people’s vote.

catlady

November 12th, 2012
12:31 pm

NWGA: They wouldn’t know it if it bit them on the…

mountain man

November 12th, 2012
12:34 pm

NWGA – you just supplied an example.

Private Citizen

November 12th, 2012
1:02 pm

NWGa Great cities are built on a terrain of ideas and Atlanta is the leadership location for the state, although many south of Atlanta do not particularly recognize this idea. It is possible that you are not aware of overall conditions. I wonder, can any be informed of conditions state-wide? North Georgia has educated yankees and well built homes. South Georgia has trailers and kids without eyeglasses.

non sequitur Latin for It does not follow) is a conversational and literary device, often used for comedic purposes. It is something said that, because of its apparent lack of meaning relative to what preceded it, seems absurd to the point of being humorous or confusing.

Let us not forget that in Shakespeare plays, it was the idiot commenting from the sidelines who usually revealed what was going on.

Prof

November 12th, 2012
1:03 pm

@ NWGaMathScienceTeacher. Point taken.

Anotther comment

November 12th, 2012
1:09 pm

What parents want is to get out from under the dysfunctional large school district. They want out from the family and friends jobs program. I am not a Raciest, but especially from the black districts. The black districts where the PHD’d and Ed’d are fake. How can an educator hold an on-line doctorate (small letters used on purpose) ? It is shocking as a parent to find teachers and administrators in your child’s school who can not speak or write correct English. How can they teach the children reading, writing and public speaking if they fail. I correct them, including the principal when they say Ax to me. I also do it to the McDonald’s girl. Then when I get up to the drive through window, I tell the girl, you are a beautiful young women, you need to speak proper English so you aren’t stuck at McDonalds your whole life. They usually smile and say thank you.

Dcb

November 12th, 2012
1:12 pm

Hey Mountain Man – how about getting off your high horse and vendetta against administrators. Put the blame if you must squarely where it needs to go – on the shoulders of our entitlement parents. All of them … Rich, poor , moiddle class, white, black, Latinos, whatever. All want to absolve their kids of any blame because its now our right to get good grades and rewards for work done whet here done well or not. Most important about your issues with administrators – let’s go ahead and cut their numbers in half. And let’s say we can reassign half of their work to other administrators. That still leaves a bunch of responsibilities that would either not be done or have to be picked up by teachers. Hmmm – who would cry loudest about that? My bet is it would be the teachers led by their union closely followed by the parents claiming the school system unresponsive.

Private Citizen

November 12th, 2012
1:26 pm

Another comment getting a little topic drift here, but just to say I think it is impossible for a person to change or be expected to change their speech of formative origin. I understand your consternation about phonetics ask/axe but I think it is wholesome to accept and not be critical. I’ve taught students who were deeply imbedded with speech patterns counter to standard subject/verb agreement. Ah yes, now I recall, a turn of the (prior) century William Faulkner story where he distinctively features the type speech you mention, and they “wuz white” in the story, too. So don’t get too carried away with yourself.

As far as the funny mail order degrees, you will be gladdened to know that someone passed a law so that advanced degrees not specific to job are no longer recognized for purposes of elevating pay. There was quite a loop-hope there for a while, with different pay grade based solely on degree level. At the same time, there are a lot of good work-a-day folk who have teacher jobs and want to intellectually and professionally advance themselves. It is not possible to attend brick and mortar advanced degrees above masters level while working full time as a teacher. In my own examination of advanced degrees, the best programs require the students to be full time, no outside job goes with it. Anyway, just a note to tell you that the degree mills, Phoenix etc. may have lost some of their standing. There has also been federal attention to this as many of these were looting the education funds. It is a huge huge topic, with huge huge monies and corporate ownership tendrils, a whole separate matter.

As far as ask / axe, in my reading forays, I noted that in some places U. S. “black” people were prohibited from going into public libraries as recently as 1962. So if some older black person is a little bitter about it, I can resonate with that. Obviously, there is a fallout on speech patterns and such. What a great thing that motivated students can camp out at the library today, and it is such a thrill to see some of them there on their own time, doing their thing.

Once Again

November 12th, 2012
1:31 pm

What these votes really show is that parents fundamentally LOVE the socialist funding mechanism that allows their children to attend school at costs WAY lower than they would have to pay themselves if they were held to be personally responsible for the children they CHOSE to have. They are willing to blindly put their faith in a system that has been shown time and time again to be grossly inferior to private educational choices and homeschooling. They are willing to defer to the establishment that has failed them time and time again because to reject the establishment in favor of freedom would require personal responsibility, actual parental involvment, and an actual sense of responsibility if the choices they make for their children are less than optimum. By sticking with the status quo, they can absolve themselves of responsibility, put the bulk of the financial burden on their neighbors and local businesses, and put all the blame on the failed government when their children cannot read or write after 12 years of imprisonment in the government system of “education.”

If teachers really want to see how much support they have among parents, then get out from behind the protective wall of the state, help dismantle the govenrment “education” appartus, start and run your own private schools, reward great teachers and fire crappy ones, and show the parents what tallent can actually deliver when finally unharnessed from the government bureaucracy that enslaves it today.

You can blame special intersts, deceptive wording, etc. for the presence of ballot initiatives accross the country aimed at educational reform. The bottom line is that these measures ended up on the ballot because enough parents and voters are fed up with the status quo that they sought change. Tragically they too see tweaking at the edges of a broken system as a solution rather than embracing wholesale replacement, but even that is a product of the brainwashing they got during their time imprisoned in the system.

Private Citizen

November 12th, 2012
1:34 pm

Dcb There is no teacher union in Georgia. This is a “right to work” state, which means a worker works “at the pleasure of their employers.” Teachers have no union representation and if anyone attends a “union meeting” it is completely powerless and symbolic. Probably the most “powerful” teacher union activity is sitting around stuffing envelopes. If a labor dispute happens for a Georgia teacher, the “union” can no nothing for them. If coal meets fire, teacher has to hire their own private attorney, like that lady in north Georgia who got fired because she posted a Facebook picture of herself holding up a beer stein while she was on vacation in Germany. A parent complained and she was promptly fired. So much for your complaining about “unions” etc. Maybe there should be a “basic facts” sidebar.

Private Citizen

November 12th, 2012
1:46 pm

Once again where did you learn to be so condescending and judgemental of people, of families? The whole world educates their children.

Sandy Springs parent

November 12th, 2012
2:22 pm

I really don’t understand why Teacher’s are so protective of only having teachers who have gone through education schools. There are so many of us who as a second career have so much more to offer and I hate to say it were the top students. Let’s face it the majority of teachers these days since women have other career choices. I went to Engineering school, and the top engineering school in my field. I was a teaching assistant for two classes. I could teach at Georgia Tech or Southern Tech with my Master and Bachlors combination. Ironically, I am not able to teach in Georgia Public Schools.

What makes this even more outrageous is that the schools are importing unqualified east asians, from India, for subjects such as Physics. I was shocked last year when the counselor tried to steer my daughter who wants to do something in the health field away from physics, into Earth Science for junior year. I was like no she needs Physics, and every other high school teaches it at junior year.

Well, we soon found out why, the counselor was trying to steer us around Physics. The sheer incompetence of the teacher. You literally had to hire your child a private tutor at $50 hr or so to help your child. My child was proud and didn’t come to me for several weeks. The first tutor sent by a tutoring service was a biology major, not physics. I eventually got a refund, but three weeks wasted. I ended up hiring a private school physics teacher who said that this teacher obviously missed teaching basic concepts and then her scantron tests were screwy and did not allow for extra credit. You can not teach physics by a,b,c,d; you need to give partial credit for the work. Lazy, lazy teacher. Then she gives a project to do a model of a highway truck run off ramp with, calculations. The way she tells them to do it is incorrect. Guess what my masters is in Civil Engineering. I as nicely as possible, try to tell this woman she is telling the students she is doing this correctly. I then went to several states Highway design standards and printed out the design standards including the calculations to be used for truck run away ramps. Off course they are all identical, the designs and standards in the USA, because they must meet federal standards. I sent this teacher all the DOD information from several states along with the proper calculations. Does she thank me, no, she screams at me, retaliates against my child and her team. One of my daughter’s teammates was rich and had a tutor 3* a week @ $50 hr. One should not have to pay for a private tutor at public school.

Today my daughter works part-time at a coffee shop near the school. One of their better customers is a Physics tutor he says due to Ms. B He only has tutor part-time one on one and makes a lot more money than teaching full time. Why doesn’t Fulton fire this mess, who they know is a mess.

Top School

November 12th, 2012
2:25 pm

I know John Wilson personally. I served as the North Carolina State Student NEA President during the 1980’s while I attended college. Wilson was President of NEA. and served

The Georgia Association of Educators is not a union. Your membership does little to protect you from your employer. GAE promotes teacher rights in a state that has no UNION.

@ private citizen is exactly right…

MACE can help you make a scene…GAE will write you a letter.

Basically in a right to hire right to fire state …you have no protection. Any individual wishing to challenge the “system” will need to hire their own lawyer …and spend their own money. $150,000 + here.

As seen at http://www.TopPublicSchoolCorruptionAtlanta.com

From School house to the Federal Court house….with the help of Government Accountability Project and the National Whistle Blowers Association out of Washington DC. and still Buckhead was able to manipulate the judicial system to narrowly apply the laws.

Georgia Association of Educators has NO POWER in the state of Georgia. The only power they have is to promote “change” in the lack of support for teachers.

Teachers with a membership in GAE…NEED TO DO THEIR RESEARCH. You are a member of an organization that has very little power in the state of GEORGIA.

d

November 12th, 2012
2:32 pm

@Sandy Springs – if your qualifications are indeed what you say, and I have no doubt that they are, you most certainly may teach in a Georgia public school – you must first pass the GACE in either Math or Science to prove that you do have the content knowledge, but then a system can hire you and obtain a 5-year non-renewable certificate. During that 5-years, you must complete either a teacher education program or an alternative certification program to ensure that you have the pedagogical skills necessary to actually be successful. The only program I do have a problem with is the 5-week boot camp that thinks that they can get everything in that either a traditional program or an alternative program.

Don't Tread

November 12th, 2012
2:44 pm

Conservatives are anti-teacher…ok :roll:

I suppose those conservatives who ARE teachers need to question their existence now.

DeKalb Inside Out

November 12th, 2012
2:46 pm

Prof,
This is now an amendment to the Constitution for the entire state, that has a lot more counties than just those four; – If you take a look at the Georgia Secretary of State’s website, you’ll notice that many counties across the state wanted this and not just those four.

It will be state tax funds from everyone that go to support these new state charter schools. This doesn’t seem just to me, somehow. – State chartered schools exist primarily on QBE funding. That’s not disconcerting. I’m not sure why the supplemental money for state charters would vex you so. It’s not even a drop in the bucket. And, let’s not pretend that all counties are tax neutral. Rural counties receive a lot more than they pay already. That doesn’t seem just to me.

Private Citizen

November 12th, 2012
2:53 pm

Sandy Springs parent I really don’t understand why Teacher’s are so protective of only having teachers who have gone through education schools.

This is not coming from teachers. When I first started out and was trying to make heads and tails of things, it was a person from Clayton County schools who got where I was at and explained it to me. He said “you have to enrol at (an approved?) teacher training program to get your certification.” Allow me to say “thank you” to whoever it was in Clayton County who get real with me and spelled it out. In other words, passing the certification tests are not enough. There is an “observe” and “approve” process and you’re expected to pay some tuition to the borg, too.

Anyway, never met a teacher who had the slightest agenda whatsoever re: who should be a teacher or how. Once you’re in the grid, you’re pretty much fully occupied meeting demands, then you’re pretty much fully occupied getting reviewed, then you’re pretty much fully occupied chasing demands and worrying about review, and there are many who have much occupation keeping it this way and they’re not the ones teaching in the classroom. As far as colleagues, Georgia teachers don’t protect anything. They can’t even protect themselves.

Private Citizen

November 12th, 2012
2:56 pm

During that 5-years, you must complete either a teacher education program or an alternative certification program = same thing.

Prof

November 12th, 2012
3:17 pm

@ DeKalb Inside Out.

Of course more than the 4 counties voted for the amendment. I was answering TeacherReader who, like you in many previous posts, bases his/her support primarily on having alternatives to the terrible school systems of those 4 counties. I also note that it was the rural counties and some of the Northern ones who blanket-voted against it. I guess they too had my reservations.

As many bloggers who are educators have stated here, for a long time the state has not fully given the public schools the QBE funding that was due them. Why doesn’t the state repay these schools the past QBE funding that’s due them? And why do you think they’ll be any better about paying these state charter schools?

But let us remember the sage question of NWGA Math Teacher at 12:06 pm, for our blog topic today is about “key education votes ELSEWHERE.”

d

November 12th, 2012
3:20 pm

@Private Citizen – I was a career switcher myself, and went through Georgia State to earn my masters and certification, but some of my colleagues who did the same thing went through programs through the county – which were not the same thing.

DeKalb Inside Out

November 12th, 2012
3:42 pm

Prof … ah … OK …
Obviously I live in DeKalb, so it’s hard to say what the state of education is in rural Georgia. Anecdotaly I hear the Superintendents are potentates which might explain the greater support in metro Atlanta … or not. No less than 1 in 3 people in any given county wanted state charters. That’s a lot of people who want state charters even if they are a minority in their county. I just don’t think these rural counties are getting the short end of any stick.

QBE funding is a conversation in and of itself. People equate QBE to “fully funded”, but I don’t think that was ever the intent. The QBE formula is relatively arbitrary and hasn’t been fully funded since its inception. I don’t know what “adequate funding” is, but I haven’t seen any studies saying it is a fully funded QBE. State charters are subject to the same QBE austerity cuts, so everybody is in the same boat.

Beverly Fraud

November 12th, 2012
3:59 pm

From Prof

We realize that districts like DeKalb, Atlanta, and others aren’t going to change quick enough to help our children and we want our kids to have a better choice.”

“You forgot the school districts of Fulton County and Clayton County also…”

Ah yes…Armageddon has FINALLY come for The Four Horsemen of the Incompetence