Archive for November 3rd, 2012

In response to AJC editorial, Gov. Deal says charter amendment deserves voter approval

The AJC editorial board comes out Sunday with an editorial urging the defeat of Amendment One, citing the cost of creating a new bureaucracy to approve charter schools when one already exists.

Here is a counterpoint to that opinion from  Gov. Nathan Deal.

By Nathan Deal

Georgia parents enjoy a multitude of choices when shopping for a pair of jeans, a car or a bag of potato chips.

And when it’s time to go off to college, their children can choose a campus that fits them best.

The diversity of options in the marketplace shows that competition and choices drive innovation and improvement. It demonstrates that one size does not, in fact, fit all.

We would abandon a grocery store that didn’t give us options, so why don’t we demand the same from the public education system?

All parents want their children to do better than they did, but that can’t happen if they don’t have access to high-performing public schools.

When they go to the polls this November, Georgia voters …

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New AJC analysis: Fewer poor kids attend charter schools in metro area. Does that matter to you?

A new analysis by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution finds fewer low-income students enrolled in metro area charter schools.

Whether these new findings alarm you will depend on whether you believe charters ought to focus on areas with high poverty and low opportunity or whether they ought to be an option even for parents in areas with high performing public schools. The trend nationwide is for charters to open in middle-class communities where parents want more specialization for their kids.

Having watched this movement from the very start, I can attest to the shifts in both goals and definition. I attended a charter school conference 20 years ago where the purpose was defined as creating good options for kids who didn’t have any. Charters were seen as an antidote to failing inner city schools.

Now, charters are seen as a way to create different options for parents who may prefer their children in a school that focuses on math, offers Mandarin or is single gender. Charters have …

Continue reading New AJC analysis: Fewer poor kids attend charter schools in metro area. Does that matter to you? »