Most pro charter amendment money coming from outside Georgia. Most against from state educators. Does either worry you?

The AJC has been following the money in the high-powered, high-profile campaign for the charter school amendment, which would give the state the power to overrule local school boards and approve and fund charter schools. Presumably, that would lead to more charter schools in Georgia. Voters will decide the question on Nov. 6.

The AJC reports:

Groups backing the charter schools constitutional amendment have again pulled in far more money than amendment opponents, the most recent campaign filing statements show.  Families for Better Public Schools, which supports the amendment, raised $1.28 million during the filing period that ends 15 days before the election. Families’ haul was 70 times more than the $18,164 the main opposition group, Vote Smart! No to State-Controlled Schools, raised during the same period.

A second amendment supporter, Georgia Public School Families for Amendment One, raised $55,000. Despite the group’s name, all of its money came from a single donation made by PublicSchoolOptions.org of Arlington, Va.

Indeed, most of the money that has gone to amendment supporters came from outside Georgia. Families for Better Public Schools’ filing, for example, shows that 71 percent of the money raised during this filing period came from outside sources.

As she did earlier in the campaign, Wal-Mart heiress Alice Walton of Arkansas contributed another $350,000. J.C. Huizenga of Grand Rapids, Mich., gave $250,000. Students First of Sacramento, Calif., also gave $250,000.

“Wow, ” said Jane Langley, campaign manager for the Vote Smart opposition group. “This gives new meaning to ‘families.’ Those out-of-state corporations, more than two out of every three contributions, must badly want to change permanently our constitution.”

Many traditional public school officials — superintendents, board members and teachers — have opposed the amendment, arguing that it would lead to the creation of more charter schools that would sap money from traditional public schools. Supporters argue that passing the amendment would protect from legal challenge the state’s ability to authorize charter schools, which are public schools that are granted flexibility as they pursue specific education goals spelled out in their charter.

Traditional education officials and those tied to school systems dotted the Vote Smart contribution list. Jeanne “Sis” Henry, executive director of the Georgia School Boards Association, gave $3,000. Victoria Sweeney, an attorney who represents the Gwinnett County Public School District, donated $1,000.

Families for Better Public Schools collected $250,000 from Home Depot co-founder Bernie Marcus and $100,000 from Richard Gaby, chief executive officer of Peter Island Resort and Spa. Real estate developer Tom Cousins gave $20,000.

My AJC colleagues Jay Bookman and Kyle Wingfield each followed the money pouring into the charter school amendment and ended up in a different place.

Bookman wrote:

Reading the list of out-of-state contributors to the campaign to pass Amendment 1, the state charter-schools amendment, you get the sense that an old-fashioned gold rush would begin in Georgia the moment the amendment is approved.

J.C. Huizenga, founder of Michigan-based National Heritage Academies, a for-profit charter school operator, has contributed $25,000; his company contributed a matching $25,000. Charter Schools USA, based in Florida, contributed $50,000 as well. D.A. Davidson, a financial services firm based in Great Falls, Mont., that touts itself as “a recognized leader in charter school financing, ” has so far given $5,000. And K12 Inc., a for-profit provider of online classes and “full-time online public schools, ” has kicked in $100,000.

Those account only for contributions made through Sept. 21; the final campaign-disclosure reports may include additional big-dollar donations from companies eager to enter Georgia’s public-school marketplace. Now, there’s nothing inherently wrong about for-profit companies operating in the education sector. However, despite the fervor of those who preach that competition solves all problems, there’s nothing inherently good about it, either. No countries that outperform the United States in education, for example, do so through the for-profit model.

In addition, the overall shoddy performance of for-profit colleges and universities here in the U.S. provides stark evidence that when the profit motive conflicts with academic standards, profit takes precedence…There’s every reason to worry that similar dynamics will play out in k-12 education. Take K12 Inc., the company that has so far contributed $100,000 to opening up the Georgia market. In Florida, where the company operates in 43 school districts, a typical K12 high school teacher may have as many as 275 online students per class, which enhances profitability if not education. Last month, Florida officials launched an investigation into charges that K12 also uses teachers uncertified for the classes they teach and that company officials asked employees to cover up that fact.

Looking at the same list of donors, Wingfield had a far different response:

After its latest report, filed Tuesday, the anti-amendment group Vote SMART! had a donor base comprising 146 people and eight companies that had given a combined $104,263 (along with almost $19,000 in gifts not itemized). Who are they?

Thirty-four of them are current or former superintendents. That group gave more than $16,000.  Another 30 are other types of school-system administrators: area superintendents, assistant superintendents, directors of some kind or another. These folks contributed an additional $14,000.

Eleven members of various school boards around Georgia gave almost $4,000. Ten principals shelled out $2,576. In all, almost 60 percent of the Vote SMART! donors and more than a third of its donations came from people who run our traditional public schools. That’s one bit of turf. Then there are the professional organizations: the Professional Association of Georgia Educators, Georgia School Boards Association and Georgia School Superintendents Association. Fifteen employees of these groups donated more than $15,000.

Now let’s look at companies that do business with school systems… In fact, 35 people or firms who do business with traditional public schools, from attorneys and consultants to architects and contractors, have given more than $32,000 to the anti-amendment campaign. Now, am I missing any job description in the education field? Hmmm, let’s see …

From what we can see, though, almost 90 percent of the donors and $4 of every $5 donated come from the people running our schools and the firms they do business with. It’s a campaign of the educational establishment, by the educational establishment, for the educational establishment.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

226 comments Add your comment

Eddie Hall

October 28th, 2012
9:47 am

Let’s see, what concerns me more, hundreds of thousands of dollars pouring in from OUT OF STATE millionaires and corporations that see the potential to get their hands on the millions in free money, OR the fact that a modern day “David” is taking them on with hundreds donated from people that have devoted a lifetime to education and truly CARE about our children? I will go with the “Davids”!
There is an article just today questioning the appointments of Gov. Deal. You want him to appoint the people to run this duel system? And who knows who the next one will be? KEEP LOCAL CONTROL! Keep your local property taxes down! VOTE NO!

Lenny

October 28th, 2012
9:58 am

I am more concerned about the out of state influence. This is a very bad amendment. Vote no.

Disgusted in Dekalb

October 28th, 2012
10:00 am

Thank you Eddie.

Why are so many out of state donors? Why are they so interested in our state and our constitution? I think thats the real rub here. I question why they’re spending so much money to change OUR state constitution.

It is truly pathetic and sickening that these for profit organizations are interested in coming to Georgia only if they have it their way. There is no concern for the children of Georgia here, its all about the all mighty dollar.

If Emperor Deal and his crooked cronies want to help education, there are ways to do it without this amendment. But then they wouldn’t get their kickbacks.

Uh

October 28th, 2012
10:09 am

They are interested in seeing the growth of charter school options while in-state educators have the most to lose if charters grow. I think it’s odd that many people in Georgia seem to be missing the point that with this issue in particular, “local control” virtually ensures a local monopoly. How many times have we seen parents and students happy with their charter school having to beg a local school system to renew them? Without the state level committee, those parents and student have no recourse when the local system dec zssqqqqqqqrt

Old timer

October 28th, 2012
10:16 am

I have voted no…primarily …I do not believe the constitution should be amended to provide for something that legislation could handle. I do support charter schools, but not for profit schools of any kind. I do not want another group of governor appointees to manage things that could be handle by elected officials.

Jim Chaput

October 28th, 2012
10:26 am

The Charter Schools amendment is badly flawed, but I voted for it because our public schools desperately need competition in any form we can provide. It is time to break the rigid assignment of children to the nearest public school, regardless of whether that school is excellent or sub-standard or even unsafe.

Public education is virtually the only monopoly market left in the US. When faced with a sub-standard public school, very few parents have the means to send their children to a private school and it is almost impossible to effect changes to a school from outside. With the current real estate market most parents don’t even have the ability to sell their home and move their children into a better district.

We need a voucher system where each parent can take their full share of the operating budget for the local public school district and use it to send their child to any public, private or parochial school that meets State-wide standards and will accept them. The Charter Schools amendment is a small step in that direction.

Eddie Hall

October 28th, 2012
10:29 am

So just to be clear, if you hold an election in your county and elect a school board, and that elected school board decides it is not in the interest to open a charter, ( notice I did not say build, because a lot of these schools are just computer terminals) AND upon appeal the state school board headed by an elected official either uphold or reverse that decision (and they have done both) it is a bad thing compared to an appointed committee in Atlanta making that decision? That committee will have little reagard for the fact that the “pie” is only so big for education funding, and yes, no local funds may be expended for THAT school, none than less another “slice” is gone, so that ELECTED local board will have no choice but to raise LOCAL property taxes to compensate. That is so the children that can’t go to the charter school will recieve the education they are promised. I say again, if you are unhappy with your local situation, CHANGE it by electing a new BOE, don’t give up the right to vote and decide locally. This is something MUCH easier ot give away than get back! VOTE NO!

fjeremey

October 28th, 2012
10:31 am

A question: If charter schools are such a very excellent plan, why then don’t we allow “traditional” schools the flexibility of charter schools? Why do we need an expensive and cumbersome process, rife with concerns beyond education? Why not let the professionals in the classroom determine the direction of the education? That is, after all, the difference between a charter school and a traditional school. Perhaps instead of continually painting over the problem we need to dig into the structure of education and consider where we want to go, how best to get there, and how to construct a system that will allow that to happen. It’s basic instructional design and it is what good teachers do everyday.

Eddie Hall

October 28th, 2012
10:36 am

@ Uh,
local contol, local monopoly = majority rule? That is a bad thing?
Also consider those “educators” that are fighting for the most part are either retired or close to it. They know OVERALL we are making strides here in Georgia, and with a little legislative reform,(and sometimes a little less) we can get there, this is not the way!

indigo

October 28th, 2012
10:47 am

Many of these groups supporting this ammendment have the word “families” in their name. This means they are far right Christian groups who support the teaching of creationism and the unerring truth of The New Testament in schools. They also want evolution and astro-pyhsics to be branded “lies from the gates of hell”.

When it comes to levels of endeavor that truly matter, Georgia is almost always either in last place or close to last. Passage of this ammendment will go a long way to keeping us in a solid last place position.

d

October 28th, 2012
10:58 am

Competition wasn’t what made Finnish schools the best in the world.

MANGLER

October 28th, 2012
11:15 am

If companies want to open and run a K-12 charter school using their own money on a for-profit model, then let them. Why are they only interested when they get to use tax dollars to do it? Parents voting yes need to ask themselves why their childrens educations are only important when other people’s money is being used to provide it.

Mom of 3

October 28th, 2012
11:19 am

The way I read this is that most of the people fighting the amendment make their livings within the current establishment. They are scared. They are scared for for their jobs. They are scared of change. If you are unhappy with your current public school system, why in the world would you continue to support these folks. Change is good! People adjust! There may be bumps along the way- but the PEOPLE are rising up and saying enough is enough. We are not happy with the current public schools. Don’t hunker down and feel scared of what some say may happen. Most of the people behind the amendment want it for the students. They want change. I can not say that I see that same attitude with the administrators or the school board in my county. The only other option I see is if the legislature would get a back bone and allow cities to form their own school systems. The current system is antiquated and I believe that the people who fight that- are truly not in it for the students.

Centrist

October 28th, 2012
11:31 am

Government taking tax dollars from citizens and hiring employees to make rules on how those dollars are spent without taxpayer input is a gross conflict of interest. It is telling that people running our schools (Superintendents, Principals, administrators, teacher groups) and the firms they do business with are the primary opponents of Charter schools. The Charter school amendment is a chance for taxpaying voters to finally weigh in.

d

October 28th, 2012
11:39 am

The only problems have with the idea of city schools is the fact that we are using an antiquated funding model and that won’t change if we allow the formation of new districts. I don’t recall these discussions when times were good and schools actually had the funding they needed to fulfill their mission, but in the last decade, in the name of austerity, billions were cut from public education, and with the local funding tied to property values, we are further in the hole. Before we create crony-filled bureaucracies, let’s examine our tax structure to see where we can insulate our core priorities (and constitutional priorities at that) from fluctuations in the economy unlike what we have done in Georgia. Let us focus on allowing teachers to show that they are the professionals and get the corporate interests out of this equation. Where we need corporate support is in telling us what they need in their workforce – and the college-for-all idea where we can’t hurt Johnny’s and Suzi’s feelings and the idea that children can talk back to their teachers without consequences reality that is the current generation has to go the way of the dodo.

d

October 28th, 2012
11:44 am

Centrist – as a taxpayer, I do have a say in the running of our local districts, and I can (and have done so) vote against those who are not doing what they need to or should be doing with my tax dollars. A yes vote to Amendment One is a giving an appointed, unaccountable bureaucracy control of tax dollars. Who do I complain to when they either approve a school I oppose or deny one I support? Who can I vote out? Talk about taxation without representation.

BehindEnemyLines

October 28th, 2012
11:48 am

Not particularly bothered by it. There really isn’t anything that could produce worse results with more money thrown down the drain than what we’ve been doing. Anything that provides more alternatives is a good thing at this point.

Gail

October 28th, 2012
11:56 am

I guess this is like seeing the glass half full or half empty. Same data seen entirely differently.

The Director of the Board of PublicSchoolOptions.org is from GA. They and other proponents of the amendment are misleading people by saying that there is currently no appeals process. However, as I understand it, if a local school denies a charter application, they can appeal to the State BOE

Why do we need an appointed commission to do this? The commission supposedly is to be unpaid except for travel expenses. However, this as with anything, can be changed by the state legislature. (ala the old HOPE scholarship) The previous Executive Director of the GA Charter Schools Commission made over $100K in the FY 2011. Despite the denials, it seems to me there is money to be made.

Spartacus

October 28th, 2012
12:00 pm

@BehindEnemy….

Exactly, seems like the people who vote no appear to be perfectly OK with throwing good money after bad and getting the same results….

d

October 28th, 2012
12:07 pm

Spartacus, I will not say we don’t need change, but Amendment 1 won’t fix what is wrong. We need a back to the drawing board approach like what Finland did to become number one in the world….. And that didn’t include charters unaccountable to taxpayers or manipulative ballot language.

Centrist

October 28th, 2012
12:07 pm

The AJC and most of the posters on these blogs are against the amendment. Despite an inaccurate biased AJC poll falsely claiming the vote will be close, the amendment is going to pass easily – even the Cox WSB poll has had to admit it now that the election is near.

Instead of all the acrimony, working on fixes in areas of concern would serve us all better than partisan bickering.

Atlanta Mom

October 28th, 2012
12:38 pm

Over a million dollars coming in from out of state or $100,000 coming from people within the state. Why are all these folks from out of state so concerned about what we are doing in Georgia? You think they are concerned about the children of Georgia? Methinks not.

Lady GaGa

October 28th, 2012
12:42 pm

I am voting yes. My daughter attends a sub-par school that we are zoned for. Right now we are unable to move to the more desirable schools in our district due to the Great Recession. Having a choice to attend a local charter school that is doing VERY well is VERY appealing to me. I think parents should have more choices in situations like mine. I don’t have time to wait until her current school gets better (if they ever). So my vote will be yes. Thank you and good night.

DeKalb Parent

October 28th, 2012
12:50 pm

The DeKalb school administration is so corrupt and wasteful, I cannot imagine that anyone could do a worse job running it. Besides that, it is so big that the argument of “local control” hardly applies. Charter schools truly offer local control. It is hardly a surprise that the “Family and Friends Jobs Program Establishment” is against the Amendment. The Amendment is not a cure-all, but a needed first step towards improving education. This gravy train in DeKalb needs to be stopped. Vote YES if you want change.

Reality_Check

October 28th, 2012
12:51 pm

Don’t any of the proponents of the amendment see a problem with an appointed state board accountable only to Gov. Deal? If you think it can’t get any worse, just wait. Also, I saw an ad for the amendment this weekend which showed an African-American child talking about the amendment. If you think this is the goal of these right-wingers, you are really naive. I believe the long-term goal of these groups is take public education in Georgia back to 1970 {separate but equal (?)}.

A Teacher, 2

October 28th, 2012
12:52 pm

Why can’t I be against the amendment on the merits of the amendment without being accused of being “against” change???? I am for change. I am not for an amendment that is worded in an attempt to influence the vote. I am not for creating any more state agencies. I clearly see that charter schools are not a magic bullet.

I am for charter schools, IF they are, in fact, allowed to effect change. Sorry, but I do not believe that the state will allow the change we all desire. If they would allow change, why not allow high-performing schools who have their act together function the same as these charter schools everyone says they desire???

MANGLER has an excellent point, also!

FairLady

October 28th, 2012
1:00 pm

Many other states and the nation are looking at GA as we pass Amendment One!!! I am so excited about change in the status quo. Many of us parents cannot wait until more money is thrown at school districts to try to fix our problems. I am frustrated at our children being tied to a low performing school based upon their zip code. Many parents would love the option of a charter school. There are not enough and there are waiting lists. School Districts have been unwilling to approve more Charter Schools in GA. I voted YES as a concerned parent for more school options in GA. I am excited I could have a part in this change in the educational landscape in GA. I personally am not concerned where the money comes from as long as we are finally moving in the right direction. Charter Schools are just one more tool in the educational tool chest to help rebuild our educational system in GA. Please vote YES for the children, and for positive options in Ga.

Claudia Stucke

October 28th, 2012
1:02 pm

For many voters, I think, the “yes” vote is essentially a vote of no confidence in their local school boards. Some people also believe that each charter school’s teachers and administrators will spend allotted funds more responsibly than district board members would, based on evidence of misappropriation and mismanagement (such as criminal charges filed against previous administrators). These voters–parent and non-parent taxpayers alike–want change and what they perceive to be more local control, even though that means taking some decision-making power away from local school boards and giving it to the state. If the taxpayers are disgusted enough with their local schools, school boards, etc., they may not care about the sources of the campaign money in support of the amendment.

@d–What works in Finland won’t necessarily work here. As appealing as it is to read about its success in education, the United States is not Finland. According to a recent Smithsonian article, “It’s almost unheard of for a child to show up hungry or homeless. Finland provides three years of maternity leave and subsidized day care to parents, and preschool for all 5-year-olds, where the emphasis is on play and socializing. In addition, the state subsidizes parents, paying them around 150 euros per month for every child until he or she turns 17. Ninety-seven percent of 6-year-olds attend public preschool, where children begin some academics. Schools provide food, medical care, counseling and taxi service if needed. Stu­dent health care is free.” Furthermore, there are no standardized tests (!), but there is a strong teachers’ union. I just don’t see our country embracing this type of structure, especially with our national debt; but even without it, I’m not sure that we value education as much as we say we do.

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/people-places/Why-Are-Finlands-Schools-Successful.html#ixzz2Ac78vHF0

Mom of 3

October 28th, 2012
1:06 pm

d- it is not correct that in good times people were not asking for smaller districts. When you have districts that are so large and so diverse- no ones needs are truly met. I don’t see how this is any different from when the US wanted to be free from England’s control. We are not happy- let us be free! Right now we truly have taxation without representation in the large districts. Charters are one possible way out.

bootney farnsworth

October 28th, 2012
1:06 pm

lets see….

people on this blog were outraged when unions bussed in teachers from out of state to Wisconsin because union outsiders where trying to sway internal Wisconsin issues.

now most of these same people endorse out of state money coming in to sway Georgian politics.

hypricites, table for them all.

DeKalb Parent

October 28th, 2012
1:09 pm

My YES vote is absolutely a vote of no confidence in my school board. Tha state board is not going to be responsible for running charter schools, only authorizing them. As the saying goes, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it….” Dekalb schools are broken, and after November 6th, there will be panicked Administrators that will have to face that fact.

bootney farnsworth

October 28th, 2012
1:10 pm

@ A teacher, 2

I’ve said more times than I can count, I have no issue per se with charters, but have some serious concerns about the mechanics of funding and accountability.

I have even listed several instances where I think charters would be a great thing.
and no one who teaches needs to be lectured on the myriad of problems in our profession

but that’s using logic, not making political points

bootney farnsworth

October 28th, 2012
1:24 pm

I’m voting no for the following reasons:

-I remain unconvinced this is anything other than an attempt by the state to deflect how they have failed their constitutional requirements to support PUBLIC education in Georgia.

-as a long time part of the USG, I know a trap when I see one.

-none of the parties involved: parents, legislators, red meat Fran have shown any indication at all they will do anything different, and the current problems in traditional education will just migrate to this current trendy quick fix.

-all this is is a trendy quick fix. its new math, nothing more.

-remember prop 82 back in the 80s? a trendy idea caught on in California to willy nilly cut taxes without considering the effects. it ended up gutting public facilities so badly the state was paralyzed, and opened the door to the socialist government it has now. good intentions are the road to hell, and this is an express lane.

-I have no desire to spend public monies to make life easier for the so called fair lady and those like her. while I do understand there are parents who are stuck by circumstance, most parents who whine for charters are too lazy to exercise the multiple choices already available to them

sorry fairlady/pridejoy/goodmother/name of the week, you gotta pluck your own chicken

bootney farnsworth

October 28th, 2012
1:26 pm

@ d

Finland has two advantages we don’t. one functional, one societal

functional: Scandinavian countries are very, very, very, racially and culturally homogenous.
social: they believe in education. Americans do not.

bootney farnsworth

October 28th, 2012
1:28 pm

@ mangler

you’re just talking sense. not permitted in this discussion.

This is Mrs. Norman Maine

October 28th, 2012
1:51 pm

People who do not live in our state are spending thousands of dollars to influence OUR state constitution? That’s unacceptable. I find that far more disturbing than the educators “protecting their turf”. This is further validation that I did the right thing when I voted NO.

DeKalbParent

October 28th, 2012
1:59 pm

@FairLady Remember where we are posting, we are preaching to the choir.

Pride and Joy

October 28th, 2012
2:07 pm

Just a couple days now…I can hardly wait to vote YES YES YES!

ChartersStarter, Too

October 28th, 2012
2:42 pm

Um…..Eddie, I am pretty sure the Ms. Walton has enough money…which is why she is able to give to causes important to her (like improving public education in our nation). Also, do you REALLY believe that 67.4% graduation rate is “making strides.” Really?

@ Disgusted in DeKalb… the 3 for-profit management companies donating to the campaign already work in Georgia and have Georgia based staff. They are simply supporting the schools with whom they are affiliated (similar to the architects and attorneys working with the school districts who have donated). What other for-profit organizations are beating down the doors, as you say?

@ Fjeremy….the truth is that school districts have ALWAYS had the ability to provide this flexibility. Since 2003, they could convert schools to charters. They’ve been asking the State Board for waivers for years. And now they have charter systems. The fact is that what REALLY sets start up charters aside is not only the flexibility, but the autonomy to make decisions about flexibility. The districts will never give away their central control to the school level. To do so would make many of the central office jobs obsolete.

@ Indigo and your other 99 screen names…. give it a rest. Charters teach the state’s curriculum just like any other traditional public school does. If you dislike the curriculum, lobby the legislature. Otherwise, take your paranoia elsewhere. It’s an ignorant and grossly uninformed argument against charters AND traditional schools.

@ Mom of 3, I agree completely.

@ d… so you are saying that with your 1 vote…for 1 board member…every 4 years…you can really, truly have any impact on the functioning of a whole dysfunctional district board in a timely enough way to impact your own child? Seriously, you believe that? You should ask Clayton County parents if they agree.

@ Atlanta Mom…. the majority of out of state money comes from people who have already made their fortunes and are trying to give it away. These people, over and over, give to public education reform initiatives all over this country. Do you want Gwinnett and APS to give back their large grants to Broad and Gates? Reason through this. Crappy education in our states leads to a crappy national economy. It’s a bigger issue than just Georgia.

@ Reality Check…. charters serve the SAME demographic as traditional schools – about 50% minority and economically disadvantaged. Check the facts for yourself. And before you get to talking about segregation, you might want to look at the census data in some rural south Georgia schools compared to their nearly 100% minority systems that are FAILING these children. Don’t get me started on this.

@ Bootney… the amendment just affirms the state’s authority to approve charters on appeal. If you dislike the funding or the Commission, that is a separate matter that you should take up with your legislator. They are not one in the same.

ChartersStarter, Too

October 28th, 2012
2:43 pm

@ fJeremy – my apologies, it’s been since 1993.

d

October 28th, 2012
2:52 pm

@bootney…. I work in southern DeKalb…. Homogeneity isn’t an issue. As far as caring – we need to focus on our goals here. Why does Georgia have one of the highest percentages of students taking SAT? I think it is because we’ve gotten in our minds that college is the ony way to achieve the American dream, and in doing so, we’re likely to kill it for many of our students.

Eddie Hall

October 28th, 2012
2:59 pm

@ charters, you make the numbers what you want. In my district the percentage is 87%

ChartersStarter, Too

October 28th, 2012
3:03 pm

What district is that?

And I don’t “make” the numbers anything. Go look them up yourself. And BTW, we have districts that are nearly 100% caucasian. Outliers for either districts or charters are not useful to the conversation. South Georgia is not an outlier – it’s a whole region.

Former Ivy Dad, current Chamblee Magnet Dad

October 28th, 2012
3:07 pm

Two yes votes over here.

Beverly Fraud

October 28th, 2012
3:15 pm

Voting yes is the equivalent of voting for privateers who make Somali pirates look as benevolent as a search and rescue team.

Voting no is like voting to maintain a status quo bureaucracy that make the North Korean government look progressive in comparison.

Inviting Somali pirates into North Korea in order to destabilize to government monopoly? Doesn’t the fact that this actually MIGHT lead to some improvements let you know just how bad the educational monolith has become?

Beverly Fraud

October 28th, 2012
3:16 pm

Excuse the typos…

Beverly Fraud

October 28th, 2012
3:26 pm

“Do you want Gwinnett and APS to give back their large grants to Broad and Gates?”

In a word YES. Any organization (like Broad) that begats Beverly Hall in APS and Edmund Heatley in ClayCo (two of the charter members of The Four Horsemen of the Incompetence) is an organization that any school system, despite the millions the Broads offer, would be better off TOTALLY distancing themselves from.

If they want to supply school SUPPLIES fine; expertise? Looking at Hall and Heatley (tip of the iceberg) not so much.

catlady

October 28th, 2012
3:45 pm

Thank you, Bootney!

Folks, take any other issue, and tell the Rs that the money supporting it is coming from companies and “families” with a vested interest in the passage, people from outside of Georgia, and even outside the USA, and they would run screaming away from it. “OMG, Yankees? Them dammed Chinese? Them rich SObs? No way are THEY going to tell US how to teach OUR kids! No way are THEY gonna get their hands on OUR tax money! Tell them to go HOME!” Yet, on this issue, there is so little outcry.

I’ve said this before : Hey, people we don’t have to be just SHEEP! Perhaps if we quit acting like sheep, our “leaders” will quit picking our pockets for their own enrichment.

catlady

October 28th, 2012
3:50 pm

I doubt too many teachers are ponying up their money. Who can afford it? As of this school year, I will have lost 34 days of pay–about $15,000, plus its effect on my retirement. There IS no money to give from regular worker bees.

And as for those of you who say teachers are afraid of competition: Good teachers will be in demand by these charter schools, just as they are by “regular” schools.

Lady GaGa

October 28th, 2012
3:51 pm

Another thought I have about charter schools….I would think educators would be in favor of more charter schools so that class sizes can start to come down. It makes sense that if fewer students are in our traditional schools, class sizes can come down. Educators have said repeatedly that part of the problem is overcrowded classrooms. With charter schools, you get fewer kids in traditional schools and possibly, more motivated students with involved parents in charter schools. Those in traditional schools would have more freedom to do all of those things they want to help the struggling kids with no parental involvement. Anyone ever thought about that?