Another great Georgia teacher: Justin Sealy of Pelham City Schools

Justin Sealy of Pelham City Schools

Justin Sealy of Pelham City Schools

University of Georgia professor Peter Smagorinsky has been writing a Great Georgia Teacher series for the blog. Here is another installment, Justin Sealy of Pelham City Schools.

(His earlier profiles include David Ragsdale of Clarke Central High School in AthensTravis Ellington of Toombs County and Angela Dean of Gwinnett.)

(I am out of state at a funeral of a high school classmate and without computer access.  If you are stuck in the filter, I won’t be able to free you until Saturday when I get back to the land of the wired.)

By Peter Smagorinsky

Georgia, like many states, has a large rural population where farming remains a central part of community life. The family farm has lost a lot of ground to Mega-Ag, Inc. over the years, but providing a sound and fundamental hands-on experience with the earth and the food that people produce from its soil is a noble and important contribution to the quality of life in areas far removed metropolitan congestion. High School Agricultural Courses are subject to End of Pathway Testing and some are available for 4th-year science credit, which will surely make the edupreneurs.

In places like Mitchell County, the Ag curriculum may well be the most important part of a good many students’ academic experience and professional futures.

Justin Sealy is an Agriculture teacher and Sponsor of the Future Farmers of America program at Pelham City Middle School, and one great Georgia teacher. Justin states that his instructional mission is “to provide career preparation for secondary agricultural education students and teachers that is exemplary, including courses and curricula, supervised agricultural experiences, and learning opportunities through the FFA.” That sort of hands-on, practical, and purposeful learning is the sort of experience that might just keep a kid in school if he or she finds the abstract learning of “core” classes to be of questionable value and the incessant bubble filling of standardized tests to be a ridiculous waste of valuable time.

Agricultural Education prepares students for careers and informed choices in the global agriculture, food, fiber, and natural resources systems, as the FFA puts it. As someone who feels a strong connection to the earth and how we live in balance with it, I have a great admiration for those educators who help young people understand what it means to work with nature to improve the quality of human life.

The FFA “envisions a future in which all agricultural education students will discover their passion in life and build on that insight to chart the course for their educations, career and personal future.” Passion and education seem to be headed in different directions with the new corporate values governing public education. Just as Mega-Ag, Inc., has no soul because it is driven by profit at the expense of people, public education is headed toward an era where the whole purpose of learning—to make life a richer and more fulfilling experience—has been sacrificed to provide a veneer of accountability that places students on a par with the tasteless tomatoes produced at the highest volume and lowest investment by the machinery of Big Ag: assembly-line, uniform products whose individuality and spirit get standardized out of them so that they appear to have no unique character or flavor of their own.

Justin’s teaching is designed to foster the relationship between students and their environments so that they can develop the knowledge to make both their lives and the earth more rich and productive. Justin is a graduate of the Pelham City School system (class of ’98). He knew he wanted to be an Agricultural Education instructor since his high school days. He understood that his career as a teacher could help students find opportunities similar to what was available to him as a student, when he was an active FFA member in a chapter for which he served a term as president, was involved in forestry career development activities, and exhibited livestock.

Justin then headed off for college. Like many people who aspire to be teachers, he was a highly respected and accomplished student all along the way, as his role as FFA chapter president should indicate. He was awarded a C.M. Stripling Forestry Scholarship and a Georgia Feed and Grain Scholarship to support his studies, which he began with his post-secondary education at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College in Tifton, where he earned his Associate’s degree. He then transferred to UGA for his B.S., which included certification to teach Agricultural Education. At both Abraham Baldwin and UGA, he was awarded Presidential Scholarships.

He has since completed his master of arts in leadership with a focus on Agricultural Leadership (UGA) and an Ed. S. in Agriscience Education from Auburn, and is scheduled to complete his Ph.D. in Career and Technical Education from Auburn next year. His average GPA across this impressive range of studies is 3.8 out of 4.0, and his graduate research has focused on studying ways of attracting and retaining young people into agricultural professions.

Justin’s teaching career has not followed the linear school-to-college-to-classroom sequence that traditionally has provided the pathway for young teachers. Justin taught at Screven County High School from 2002-2005, then worked in Georgia Agricultural Education as an Area Forestry Teacher for seven years, providing classroom resources, facilitating FFA career development events, developing statewide curriculum, and evaluating performance evaluations for agricultural instructors in South Georgia, working closely with 130 agricultural teachers.

But he felt a void from not directly affecting students in the classroom on a daily basis. “I firmly believe that teaching is like preaching. It’s a calling,” he says, a sense of mission that I often find in people aspiring to teach. If you accept the media-promoted stereotype of the public school teacher as a lazy, selfish underachiever, then you’re not looking to teachers like Justin for your examples. In fact, you’re probably not basing your opinion on actual teachers, who tend to share his passion for cultivating the growth of young people and intelligence for making it happen.

Justin’s return to the classroom became available when the Pelham City Schools established a new middle school agricultural program, which he saw as a way to serve his community and build a legacy. That legacy is well under way. I’ve studied high school agriculture classes, and have been impressed to see how they synthesize a variety of disciplines, including math, literacy, history, nutrition, and a host of scientific sub-disciplines, from materials science to meteorology to horticulture to chemistry to just about anything else involving natural phenomena in conjunction with human commerce. This synthesis comes in the course of immensely practical activity that is explicitly related to the lives that the students hope to live. The activities are also amenable to a range of literacy practices, not only the design of agricultural spaces and report of scientific studies but, in Justin’s case, an exploration of plant poetry.

In other words, even though Agriculture courses tend to be lower in status than “core” academic courses, they often provide greater intellectual stimulation, because all work is fundamentally interdisciplinary and has real implications. Students who calculate a feed mix need to understand nutrition, health, chemistry, mathematics, and other disciplines in order to keep a farm animal healthy and productive. If a student misses a math problem in a math class, he or she gets a red mark on the paper. If the same student miscalculates a feed mix, a horse might become weak and infirm. Now that’s accountability I can stand behind.

Like many great teachers, Justin’s day does not end at the ringing of the closing bell. He has worked with his students to help the city’s local electrical co-op re-landscape a city park, planned a fishing rodeo for a local church organization that provides youth camps, encouraged his program to volunteer to help with the Pelham Wildlife Festival, partnered with the chamber of commerce on several activities, and planned several adult classes that promote local businesses and environmental stewardship. To assist with these diverse activities, he has helped to secure a $10,000 grant from Mitchell EMC to develop a community garden at his school, one that is equipped with composters and rain barrels to promote awareness of conservation.

As FFA faculty advisor, Justin oversees a large program of over 300 students that includes every student at Pelham City Middle School, using fund raisers to cover the students’ dues and putting on events and activities from meats evaluation to floral design. Each student that he teaches is responsible for either a placement, research, exploratory, or entrepreneurship project, and from these activities several students have become young entrepreneurs through such endeavors as developing fashionable ear-rings from fishing lures, becoming poultry producers, serving as landscapers, and otherwise putting their knowledge to practical use. Justin has found a range of community businesses with which his FFA chapter partners, including the Pelham Flower & Gift Shop, the Do It Best Home Service Center, and the Pelham Banking Company, each with a clear relationship to the sorts of teaching that Justin provides.

As Justin’s high educational levels and organizational skills might suggest, he is a leader at the state and national levels in a variety of agriculture-oriented associations, having served as president of the UGA Agriculture Leadership, Communication and Leadership Advisory Committee; as a member of the National FFA Forestry CDE Committee; and as Executive Secretary of the Georgia Vocational Agricultural Teachers’ Association. He has also been instrumental in developing a better sense of continuity in his local FFA chapter by reactivating their Alumni group for mentoring, networking, and other developmental opportunities.

One theme to which I continue to return in writing about Great Georgia Teachers is that great teachers are the heart and soul of every school. Justin Sealy meets that description perfectly. In a county where agriculture both historically and currently has been a way of life, Justin makes sure that every student in his school is versed in a wide range of farming activities. Every student won’t become a farmer, although many will. Even those who don’t will have an appreciation for the work that has sustained their families and neighbors for many generations. They will learn how to live in relation to their environments in ways both scientific and spiritual, and will see school as a place where their beliefs, values, interests, and needs are met and brought into harmony through the agricultural curriculum.

That curriculum was not created by an outsider with a curriculum and assessment product to sell, but by a dedicated teacher whose altruistic commitment of time and energy to his community and school has produced instruction and assessment sensitive to the needs of the local people. To me, that’s what school is all about, and great teachers like Justin Sealy are the ones who make it happen.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

43 comments Add your comment

Pride and Joy

October 25th, 2012
6:39 am

Lovely to hear. My father loved his FFA time and still speaks about it as one of the best experiences in his young life. thanks for the positive post.

Phil from Athens

October 25th, 2012
8:31 am

Slow news day.

Lorenda Smith

October 25th, 2012
8:49 am

What a blessing it is to have Justin! He is awesome in the classroom, his students love him and the community has benefited from the many projects he has started

How refreshing it is to hear the great things that are really going on in public education.

Thanks… Maureen, Pelham City School System and Justin! Great Job!

skipper

October 25th, 2012
8:59 am

Sorry for your loss, Maureen…….tough to lose a friend.

Proud Teacher

October 25th, 2012
10:00 am

Yes, Justin is a great teacher. There are many more out there like him who have been in the trenches for years. They will go unrecognized because they are too battle worn to be attractive for the media.

Beverly Fraud

October 25th, 2012
10:39 am

Yet how many COMPLETELY IGNORANT educrats would say he’s not a good teacher because he doesn’t have a “word wall”? A “self-esteem” poster? Or a full supply of ERASERS?

Private Citizen

October 25th, 2012
11:13 am

first thought: “he began with his post-secondary education at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College in Tifton, where he earned his Associate’s degree. He then transferred to UGA for his B.S”

-Good strategy. Set the hook at a real university, a top one.

second thought: having served as president of the UGA Agriculture Leadership, Communication and Leadership Advisory Committee; as a member of the National FFA Forestry CDE Committee; and as Executive Secretary of the Georgia Vocational Agricultural Teachers’ Association

-He’s going to put a lot of miles on the car. Georgia is a big state, deceptively big until you drive it.

third thought: “word wall”? A “self-esteem” poster? Or a full supply of ERASERS?

-solid point underlying your comment, about teacher harassment and teacher’s having to post gack on the walls. there is also significant boundary issue, intrusion, when the work review person comes in and expects the teacher to follow a presentation of “opening, lesson, closing.” Who says one should do this every day? What’s wrong with saying “Hey, look at the clock, we’re done today, resume tomorrow.” When kids are deeply involved in their work, they do not need to be put through these rituals. I worked under one principal who several times said, “and the review person will not ever pick up the marker and demonstrate how it is done, how to teach a lesson.” The principal was really firm that you will not ever see this, ever. There is a lot of systematic harassment of teachers, review rituals based on required wall-gack and demand of formula process rituals.

Old Physics Teacher

October 25th, 2012
11:57 am

And Beverly,

You forgot he doesn’t have the standards up on the wall, either! Give him an NI! Get rid of him. He’s probably teaching about cloning and the world’s really, really, really older than 10,000 years too!! How dare he teach facts that are NOT in the Standards!!!!

And he didn’t shave, either!!! He’s a Radical!; Get out the tar and feathers!!!

Private Citizen

October 25th, 2012
11:58 am

In other words, it is standard in Georgia public schools for an outside person to come into the classroom and tell the teacher what to do and how to teach according to a formula. If the teacher does not respect and follow this specified formula, they can and will be fired in these circumstances. In the least, they will be made to attend retraining on how to implement the formula. Retraining is additionally burdensome to a teacher who is working full time teaching children. This type of treatment leads to very fast burnout and departure from field. No intelligent person can work very long in these circumstances without significant risk to their health and well being.

Michael Moore

October 25th, 2012
12:20 pm

Clearly, what Peter is trying to do, with obviously limited success, is to change the narratives that have permeated our state education culture. The one or two teachers in many schools who should lose their jobs comprise the negative narratives that we mostly hear. The whole accountability movement is fueled by these negative and stereotypical narratives that permeate our legislature, and society. We don’t need to continue to burden the many Justins who exist in our schools with increasing work and measures to tie their performance with student achievement. Never mentioned in student performance or teacher evaluation is all the experience and extras Justin brings to his school and job. We should be creating a culture in the state that supports the Justins in every school. Unfortunately, we focus on the few losers and cheaters to generate headlines.

Private Citizen

October 25th, 2012
12:28 pm

Phil, Slow day? Read a book. Find something challenging. I recently spent five days reading one paragraph, trying to get the gist of it. I learned this method from a lit. crit. teacher in university.

Hmmm. This is a little out of sorts. Should I get the paragraph for you? I will copy over a sentence or two. Yes, this is the one sentence that got me:

He could not hear either: the galloping mare was almost upon him before he heard her, and even then he held his course, and if the very urgency of his wild grief and need must in a moment more find him wings, waiting until the ultimate instant to hurl himself aside and into the weed-choked roadside ditch as the horse thundered past and on, for an instant in furious silhouette against the stars, the tranquil early summer night sky which, even before the shape of the horse and rider vanished, stained abruptly and violently upward: a long swirling roar incredible and soundless, blotting the stars, and he springing up and into the road again, running again, knowing it was too late yet still running even after he herd the shot and an instant later, two shots, pausing now without know he had ceased to run, crying, “Pap! Pap!”, running again before he knew he had begun to run, stumbling, tripping over something and scrabbling up again without ceasing to run, looking backward over his shoulder at the glare as he got up, running on among the invisible trees, panting, sobbing, “Father! Father!”

translation: Daddy went and set someone’s barn on fire and the boy told the barn owner, and the barn owner rode by on a horse to get to the barn and he killed the boy’s crooked daddy.

Private Citizen

October 25th, 2012
12:30 pm

-a couple spelling typos: herd/ heard. you get the idea.

Private Citizen

October 25th, 2012
12:37 pm

Old Physics Teacher Why is that guy wearing a tie? A tie is a pain in the neck. He sure won’t be wearing the tie around any farm machinery. PS My personal opinion, male teachers should not necessarily wear ties. It sets up a false proxy with both the kids and parents. I was surprised to find out that in a lot of places poor parents are scared of teachers as a powerful form of authority, hence “the tie” and looking like you’re the District Attorney. In the city, teacher is viewed no different from grocer, but in the hinterlands there is a lot of role playing. I do not like to play the role and would prefer to keep it a little more real – which also requires the kids and parents to do their part and stop relying on and playing off of stereotypes.

Private Citizen

October 25th, 2012
12:51 pm

Michael Moore A lot of places in Georgia, if a male teacher doesn’t wear the tie, put up the wall gack, and role-play required daily sequence and process, they will come after you with pitchforks. There is also an aspect where kids get so hynotised by the routine that they freak-out if anyone does anything different. I’ve been through this. Kid freaks out and pulls rank on the teacher, then kid figures out the teacher is for-real, then kid really digs in and starts doing real work as if they have broken free from the mold. It is a dangerous game for the teacher to veer from the ritual. People complain. And when the super high scores come in, no one even nods in your direction, but wants to re-train you instead. That is part of the problem of this gigantic hypocrisy going on. Arne Duncan is on video saying to pay high performing teacher $100k+ a year, but he is writing no law to make this happen. No one is. There is all of this downward pressure and negative compensation but there is nowhere in the state of Georgia where a teacher can hold up their test scores and get paid for it. The opposite is occurring. Why everyone is so allergic to writing any clear legal code is a mystery to me.

Pride and Joy

October 25th, 2012
1:33 pm

Private Citizen you take the prize for turning a positive post into gack of your own.
You would be much wiser and better respected if you celebrated the good in your profession and praised the positive post instead of taking every blogging opportunity to complain and throw dirt on everyone.
He wears a tie. He looks professional and respectable. One’s demeanor and speech will disarm and make comfortable anyone who may feel intimidated and word walls are not gack. I have them on my own walls at home. Word walls and other things you call “gack” are amazingly easy to do so if any teacher doesn’t have one, he or she is just plain confrontational. if all the administrators care about is word walls and other easy to accomplish tasks, then every teacher should get an easy evaluation.

Earnestly

October 25th, 2012
3:33 pm

Good for Justin! His is a subject that will have a real world application for many of his students. That’s in contrast with the vast majority who take physics and calculus and other “advanced” subjects that are meant to look good on student transcripts and school system ratings but will be useless to the average grad.
Every day in every school there are great teachers making a difference in children’s lives. They should all be recognized. Most of us are more interested in hearing about the few that don’t do well. Teachers have one of the highest responsibilities in society, taking care of and educating our children. We pay them back by disrespecting them and complaining about them not catering to our every whim. What a backward and mixed up society we have.

Phil from Athens

October 25th, 2012
3:43 pm

“Phil, Slow day? Read a book. Find something challenging. ”

I know you’re obsessed with me but please get a life.

Proud Teacher

October 25th, 2012
4:16 pm

I agree with you, Beverly Fraud. Please the educrats before you tend to your students. That’s the real trend in education!

Old School

October 25th, 2012
7:42 pm

Pelham is fortunate to have a superintendent with guts and vision, principals who support their teachers, and teachers who are allowed to teach.

Georgia coach

October 25th, 2012
7:51 pm

Private citizen is still trolling

CTaE Supporter

October 26th, 2012
7:07 am

What a great teacher! Career, Technical & Agricultural Education offered in our Middle Schools and High Schools is absolutely the way to go. These important classes teach rigorous academic standards through real-world hands-on relevant instruction. Why do some think that only the Technical College System of Georgia teachers this type of education? Folks, our middle school and high school teachers have been doing it a lot longer and honestly a lot better. Go Justin!

Jameson

October 26th, 2012
8:15 am

If Sealy drops by to read this article and then reads the comments, his next lecture will be on AJC turnips.

Michael Moore

October 26th, 2012
8:55 am

For a blog that usually has hundreds of hits on most topics…this one has fewer than twenty. No one appears to want to comment on good teachers doing well. Nor do they wish to tell their own stories of teachers doing well. Put up a story about a teacher scamming the system and getting paid to do very little and comments will appear out of the woodwork. I’m beginning to think, Peter, that this is frustrating work and to little avail.

Kudos from Screven County

October 26th, 2012
9:00 am

Justin certainly is a fine teacher. During his time in Screven County, he was a wonderful asset to the local school system down here in Southeast Georgia. Screven County is known for its agriculture programs that are led by splendid, thoughful and knowledgeagle educators. Justin and the other teachers guided the Screven County students to high honors in FFA, not only statewide but nationally. Screven County continues to excel in FFA recognition thanks to the dedication of its teachers and the community definitely is proud of Justin’s high praise he has earned in Pelham. Screven County educators — both present and former — must be commended for their diligent work.

Michele

October 26th, 2012
9:31 am

It is incredibly rewarding to hear about an agricultural education teacher on this blog. It is usually all about the city teachers. This gentleman has touched lives in ways many of us could never do. I congratulate him on his unbelievable achievements in this corner of the overall educational system in Georgia. What a teacher!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

3schoolkids

October 26th, 2012
10:59 am

My kids have always enjoyed any lesson that included learning about plants, animals and food. Especially if it involved actually digging in the dirt, caring for animals or preparing food. We have become so far removed from this. They should use this program as a model and copy it all over the state, and not just in rural school districts. Seems like “innovative” science to me!

Mary Sawyer

October 26th, 2012
11:32 am

Wonderful article, Peter. We need this “Another great teacher” series for all our states. I loved the focus on the authenticity and “locally sourced” curriculum, but I also think it doesn’t serve us to draw stark either/or comparisons with the Common Core effort. I think we are talking about “BOTH-AND” rather than “EITHER-OR.” Thank you for this inspiring series. I need to get this started for our state of New York, which has incredible teachers too!

I love teaching. I hate what it is becoming...

October 26th, 2012
6:54 pm

It is great that Mr. Seal is working to help foster the connection between man and environment. Too many of us feel far removed from the earth and what she provides. We associate the grocery store with “food” and tend to forget that, ultimately, it is the land that provides us with our nourishment, not the store. I think it is this distance that makes it easy to overlook the long term effects that damage to our environment can do.

South Georgia

October 26th, 2012
7:11 pm

Justin is a great asset to both agriculture education and promoting the agriculture industry in Georgia. He is a motivated young man and the students in his classes will learn many wonderful things. Thanks AJC for recognizing good teachers…it probably doesn’t attract as many readers as the cheaters, crooked school boards and charter school scammers.

Private Citizen

October 27th, 2012
7:03 am

Georgia Couch Well, yes I teach academics and don’t make kids run laps. If that’s trolling, so be it. I’m interested in training economists, doctors and judges. What do your students do when they grow up? This is a rhetorical question, but yes, my idea of fun is not getting called a troll at 7:00 AM.

Pro Tip, Coach: Kids can run laps without eyeglasses. Something tells me you’ve got health insurance and some of your students don’t. But you “love the children” etc. etc. just keep a blind on lack of services, USA only modern country without health care distribution for citizens. Brazil has better distribution of health care. So if want to represent “Georgia” as “Couch” I think this requires some responsibility.

FYI

October 27th, 2012
11:16 am

@ Private Citizen. According to the online Urban Dictionary, a “troll” is “an individual who sits in front of a computer all day and posts flames of a pseudo-intellectual nature on public forums and private websites.” You have been doing this over and over on “Get Schooled” for the last few weeks, and are doing it again here. What does your rumination on U.S. health care have to do with teacher Justin Sealy?

Fine if you give us fellow bloggers your ideas about the topic posed by Maureen; not fine when you constantly send long posts about Somali pirates, healthcare in Bordeaux, France, and, here, an attack on coaches.

Fred ™

October 27th, 2012
12:36 pm

Sorry for your loss Maureen.

Lee

October 27th, 2012
1:38 pm

I’m sure Mr Sealy is a very good teacher. I wish schools wouldn’t have an either/or mentality about vocational education. Just because you are in a college prep curriculum doesn’t mean that you couldn’t benefit by having a few Industrial Arts or other vocational classes. Also, the agricultural vocation does not take a backseat to other career paths in terms of the level of knowledge or sophistication. Don’t believe me? Talk to a farmer about fertilization and soil management activities they are involved with.

We Americans have to get over this notion that working in a field that requires you to get your hands dirty is a bad thing.

Been There

October 27th, 2012
2:04 pm

Mr. Sealey is fortunate to have a principal, Ben Wiggins, who has some common sense (which, these days, is not so common). I can say that since Ben was one of my students in Colquitt County when he was in high school. Imagine that–having an admin who actually has relevant teaching experience–it makes all the difference.

Just Wonderin'

October 27th, 2012
3:07 pm

I know that this is completely unrelated to the topic but I hope you folks can provide me with some guidance. My county is considering converting its only high school to a charter college and career academy. Since this is a blend of a conversion charter and a college and career academy our petition is also a hybrid. It stated that our school would be organized as a georgia non profit organization when state law clearly says that this is not the case. When I asked our “consultant”
(for profit, by the way) about his he told me it is required by the state college and career academy guidelines. I have multiple statutes, SBOE, and GADOE rules, policies, and guidelines defining college and career academies and giving the requirements for petitioning for a conversion charter but I am unable to find anything giving guidance on the specific requirements for a college and career academy charter, i.e does it have to be organized as a non profit, make up of the board of directors, etc. Can anyone here point me in the right direction? Thanks in advance

Lee

October 27th, 2012
3:18 pm

Interesting. After you read a feel-good story about a teacher like Mr Sealy, you come across this:

http://www.ajc.com/news/news/boy-does-right-thing-school-suspends-him/nSnwD/

Yep. Another case where a student accidently takes a bb gun to school in his backpack, discovers it, does the right thing by telling his teacher, police get involved, boy gets suspended, parents now wonder if the lunatics now run the asylum.

If I had school age children, I’d tell them if this ever happened to them, just keep their mouths shut and tell NO ONE.

Zero tolerance = zero thought process.

Georgia coach

October 27th, 2012
8:09 pm

I taught English troll-private citizen.

Truth in Moderation

October 27th, 2012
10:21 pm

Hmmm. Let me gaze into my crystal ball…
Fred ™ and “private citizen” seem to be related. “Brazil has better distribution of health care.” “I learned this method from a lit. crit. teacher in university.” “I’m interested in training economists, doctors and judges.” My Ouija Board is now spelling out E…M…O…R…Y…..

Fred ™

October 28th, 2012
10:23 pm

ruth in Moderation

October 27th, 2012
10:21 pm

Hmmm. Let me gaze into my crystal ball…
Fred ™ and “private citizen” seem to be related.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

not that I know of. Don’t give up your day job.

Jones Dayson

October 29th, 2012
8:24 am

Just Wondering,

You ask a very good question. You might want to contact Jennifer Hackemeyer (jhackeme@doe.k12.ga.us) the attorney for the Georgia Department of Education. Jennifer is very good and can answer this question. Hopefully you will get it worked out. I am not sure you need a career academy to accomplish what you want to do with your CTAE programs. Once the grant money is spent there is nothing different than what you already have in place and get funded from DOE.

Proud Teacher

October 29th, 2012
7:13 pm

Isn’t Laron Smith the principal at Justin Sealy’s school?

Private Citizen

November 1st, 2012
12:28 pm

So Coach, You sound for-real to me. Maybe all of your students have eyeglasses. Do you ever have students without them and there is no recourse? I think maybe some teach where all of this is taken care of. Plenty of places (in Georgia) it is not taken care of and it just goes on and on for years. Rough situation for the kids in this predicament.

FYI Thank you for the excellent explanation re: trolling etc. -’appreciate it.

PS Internet has been out for a week / reason for not replying to you more promptly.

One of Justin's Homies

November 8th, 2012
11:33 am

When Justin was the area forestry teacher for the Georgia South Region, he was very helpful. Thanks for all the help, Justin! You have always wanted all of Georgia’s students to do well.

If you guys want to see someone interested in student success, look at the dude in the photo with a tie on.