Guest column: Charter schools amendment is cash cow

The charter schools amendment on the Nov. 6 ballot has generated record numbers of op-ed submissions across my desk. I published one here yesterday in support of the amendment. I am running an opposing view today.

This is by the Teaching Georgia Writing Collective, a group of educators, parents and citizens who engage in public writing and public teaching about education in Georgia. The group had its impetus in Athens and includes UGA faculty.

The writers contend that charter schools are now being seen as a business opportunity,  and the amendment will increase those seeking to make money off charters. To that end, Reuters had an interesting story about the flow of foreign money to charter schools.

According to Reuters: (This is an excerpt. Please read full piece before commenting.)

Wealthy individuals from as far away as China, Nigeria, Russia and Australia are spending tens of millions of dollars to build classrooms, libraries, basketball courts and science labs for American charter schools.

In Buffalo, New York, foreign funds paid for the Health Sciences Charter School to renovate a 19th-century orphanage into modern classrooms and computer labs. In Florence, Arizona, overseas investment is expected to finance a sixth campus for the booming chain of American Leadership Academy charter schools.

And in Florida, state business development officials say foreign investment in charter schools is poised to triple next year, to $90 million.

The reason? Under a federal program known as EB-5, wealthy foreigners can in effect buy U.S. immigration visas for themselves and their families by investing at least $500,000 in certain development projects. In the past two decades, much of the investment has gone into commercial real-estate projects, like luxury hotels, ski resorts and even gas stations. Lately, however, enterprising brokers have seen a golden opportunity to match cash-starved charter schools with cash-flush foreigners in investment deals that benefit both.

Now, here is the piece by the Teaching Georgia Writing Collective:

Opening the floodgates to for-profit charter schools across the state of Georgia will have devastating long-term effects on our state’s public education. Vote “no” on Amendment 1, but don’t do it because we want you to. Vote “no” because you know the facts.

Without the approval of local districts, Georgia will open its educational system to a stampede of charter school corporations and real estate brokers who see this bill as a cash cow. These out-of-state corporations are funneling dollars into Georgia right now to get this amendment passed, and if we pass the amendment, we will funnel those dollars and many more right back into their corporate pockets.

Charter schools appear to be about money and politics and influence peddling. Why, with the state Department of Education reporting that charter schools don’t perform as well as traditional public schools and their graduation rates are no better, is the Legislature is so bent on changing the state constitution to allow charters to be created by an appointed state commission?

The Supreme Court of Georgia ruled that doing so is unconstitutional – which is why we are now faced with a vote that would change the constitution.

Charter schools in other states do not compete favorably with traditional public schools. Why this big push for more charter schools?

The Miami-Herald did a study of charter school operators in Florida, and found that charters are nearly a half-billion dollar business, and one of the fastest growing industries in Florida. According to the newspaper report, charter school industry is “backed by real-estate developers and promoted by politicians” and “rife with insider deals and potential conflicts of interest.”

In Florida, management companies run almost two-thirds of charters. The management companies charge fees that sometime exceed $1 million per year per school. On top of such fees, these management companies frequently own the land and/or the buildings where the school is housed, and charge either the state or the local school system rent.

Our political leaders have turned what started out as a good idea—the creation of charter schools to meet particular local needs—into a political battleground where money takes precedent over education. Lurking in the fringes of this battleground are corporations that see public education as a new market in which to make bets and money – on the backs of our Georgia children and youth.

Be on the right side of history  and on the right side of our children and their futures. Vote “no” on Amendment 1.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

84 comments Add your comment

yuzeyurbrane

October 17th, 2012
9:18 am

Absolutely correct.

catlady

October 17th, 2012
9:32 am

Anyone surprised? We shall soon have it verified if Georgia voters are too dumb to think.

More

October 17th, 2012
9:37 am

Link to a recent story in the Miami news on this very topic!
http://www.miamitodaynews.com/news/121004/story1.shtml

” A group of Chinese investors have put $30 million into [Florida's] charter school program to date and are looking to invest three times that amount in the next year…”

teacher&mom

October 17th, 2012
9:44 am

indigo

October 17th, 2012
9:55 am

Charter schools are not about education. They are about money, politics and fundamentalist Christian views.

Teacher Reader

October 17th, 2012
9:59 am

And our current schools aren’t cash cows for those running them or in the Administrative offices? We have secretaries making more than teachers, secretaries!!! We have administrators making a six figure category and don’t get rid of them when new people are added and they really aren’t needed any longer.

Sorry, but our public schools are a cash cow to everyone who doesn’t have direct contact with our children on a daily basis.

If a charter school fails or mismanages money, it closes. Our public schools constantly give children a poor education, lower standards, and don’t hold anyone but teachers accountable for a child’s learning, and also mismanage money while constantly asking for more, and the public cannot close them or stop this madness. How is this in the children’s best interest? It’s not.

If the charter school amendment doesn’t pass our children will forever be at the bottom, as our school boards and administrators do not seem to care about raising the bar and giving our children a better education or holding our children, parents, and teachers equally accountable for a child’s education.

Teacher Reader

October 17th, 2012
10:02 am

http://www.usnews.com/education/best-high-schools/national-rankings/charter-school-rankings

Read about the best charter high schools in the country and tell me that your child’s high school is this good.

Dr. Monica Henson

October 17th, 2012
10:22 am

“[M]oney and politics and influence peddling” = business as usual for any sizeable district board of education. There is no public school district, charter school, or private school in the entire United States that doesn’t do business with a variety of for-profit corporations. I have yet to find a technology vendor, textbook publisher, or construction contractor that is incorporated as a nonprofit enterprise. Schools are big business for the suppliers that provide goods and services to them, and charter schools are no different.

While charter schools in the aggregate may appear to perform “no better” than district schools in the aggregate, drilling down and comparing, for example, charter schools serving urban, high-risk kids to their local district counterparts is quite revealing. Using the aggregate to make comparisons is a technique that public schools used to use for decades to hide pockets, often sizeable, of failure within individual schools and within the district. NCLB, for all its flaws, ended that practice and highlighted the fact that many “good” school districts do not provide an equal educational opportunity within their geographic boundaries, and sometimes within the walls of individual school buildings.

teacher&mom

October 17th, 2012
10:28 am

@Dr. Henson: What are/were the start-up costs for your charter school?

DeKalb Inside Out

October 17th, 2012
10:37 am

The Educational Industrial Complex is as much to fear as the Military Industrial Complex. Let me know when you guys are ready to fight educational profiteering … I want to be on the front line.

The author neglected to mention that Educational management organizations (EMOs) run less than a third of the charters across the country. The author lays out a lot of circumstantial evidence, but nothing tangible except the EMO fees. I just don’t see where educational profiteering is going to surpass the same thing traditional public schools.

living in an outdated ed system

October 17th, 2012
10:52 am

This letter unfortunately exemplifies the status quo in public education reform. As Jay Greene wrote in a recent post on “EducationNext” referencing the tactics used by the teachers union members such as Randi Weingarten and Diane Ravitch, “They are more accustomed to crushing opponents with ad hominem attacks or distracting the audience with emotional and irrelevant appeals.”

This amendment is NOT about for-profit charter schools or big business. There is already big business in public education, and it’s called “textbook publishers.” Unfortunately, opponents of the amendment will continue to use scare tactics to get you to vote “no.”

It’s not going to work, and Georgia’s voters will do the right thing for our children and support the amendment on November 6th.

10:10 am

October 17th, 2012
11:12 am

The teachers’ unions, represented locally by the Georgia Association of Educators, are steadfastly against education reform and parental choice.

If the amendment passes, the union strategy of fielding phony “Republicans” in local school board races to doom all charter school applications—will ultimately prove less fruitful.

Rent the film WAITING FOR SUPERMAN to learn more.

Then do a Google search on “NEA” and “donations” and you’ll see that the National Education Association, GAE’s parent union, is also a cash-cow for Democrats—and for every liberal-left
pressure group in the news.

Finally, vote “YES” on the Charter School Amendment ballot Initiative!

Kris

October 17th, 2012
11:12 am

I have said it many times this charter School Boondoggle is a political pocket lining (or SHADY DEAL) SCAM.

Save our children and grand children..
.
VOTE NO ON Charter School SCAM

TimeOut

October 17th, 2012
11:17 am

I find it frightening to think of Foreign investors assuming control of any educational resource in this country. I am ill at ease with the entire process of foreign immigration by investment. How long will it be before such investors own so much of this country that their values replace our own? How much of this is already the case? Is it true that most of us are just fodder for the use/abuse of the ultra rich of the world? Do Chinese, Russian, and other Foreign investors share our values or just our greed?

Metro Coach

October 17th, 2012
12:00 pm

Indigo-stop trying to equate charter schools with private schools. They aren’t even close to the same thing. As for charters being a “money making” venture, there is specific language in the amendment to prevent “for profit” schools.

Mary Elizabeth

October 17th, 2012
12:17 pm

For any who have not read Jay Bookman’s excellent column in today’s AJC regarding the Constitutional Amendment on state charter schools, and also posted on his blog, entitled on the blog “State-chartered school proponents show a lot of brass.” I highly urge readers to read his column in full. Below is the link to his column, and also below are my comments on his blog regarding his column.

http://blogs.ajc.com/jay-bookman-blog/2012/10/17/state-chartered-school-proponents-show-a-lot-of-brass/?cp=1#comment-1115321
===============================================

Jay Bookman’s words: “They aren’t being upfront about their motives, and they aren’t being honest about what they hope to accomplish.”
————————————————————————————–

Mary Elizabeth’s words on Jay Bookman’s blog, 10/17/12, 12:03 pm:

“Thank you very much for this column, here, and in today’s AJC.

The legal steps Republicans have taken to curb dissent. The subterfuge. The intensity to pass this amendment. These should all alert voters to the fact that proponents of this constitutional amendment have ulterior motives and, in my opinion, those motives are that they have an intense aversion to anything ‘government’ and, in addition, they want to turn public schools into a quasi-private profit-making industry to benefit the already well-heeled. This will destroy public education as we have known it, in which all children in Georgia are educated, equally. Improve public education with the help of charters that are approved by the local school districts or the state Board of Education. Defeat this constitutional amendment. Vote NO in NOvember to Amendment 1.”

Mary Elizabeth

October 17th, 2012
12:21 pm

NOTE: Scroll upward from where the link I provided “hits” on the page – to read Bookman’s article in full.

vince

October 17th, 2012
12:34 pm

I do not really care about whether Amendment 1 passes or not, but I am incensed that the ballot measure includes a very biased preamble.

How, in a democratic society, could a ballot be written with such a clear bias to it? Proponents of the charter amendment should be incensed as well as the opponents. The preamble provides a very clear legal challenge should the amendment pass.

What does the future hold if the state can write ballots in such a way that the voter is swayed by the wording.

It’s incredible and it’s embarrassing.

mountain man

October 17th, 2012
12:35 pm

By all means keep the money out of the Commie Chinese hands and out of the greedy, profiteering business community and keep it in the hands of the corrupt BOE members the way it is supposed to be!!!

Look at the investigation going on now in Dekalb, part of which is their “friends and family” policies.

Keep the money flowing to schools that are failing, which refuse to address the real problems of absenteeism, discipline, student (and parent) apathy, overspending on SPED, and social promotion. Heaven forbid that we allow schools which WILL address some of these problems.

I am voting YES, as a reaction to local BOE’s refusal to allow competition, to further parental choice, and maybe to get traditional schools to admit there are problems and design effective means of addressing them.

mountain man

October 17th, 2012
12:45 pm

“in which all children in Georgia are educated, equally.”

The problem is that our current system is that all children in Georgia are educated equally badly.

Except for those whose parents decide to send their children to private schools, or homeschool them, or where students are good students and so it looks like the schools are good.

mountain man

October 17th, 2012
12:49 pm

If the U.S. state department is selling visas, then that is a separate issue that needs to be addressed. Don’t muddy the waters by saying we don’t want foreign money running our schools. If foreign money creates better schools, then the amendment should pass so parents would have the choice to send their kids there.

Right now our children are imprisoned in a third-rate educational system that ignores its problems.

gsmith

October 17th, 2012
12:51 pm

im voting YES…… education should be about pushing our smart and high achieving kids not trying to make everything equal …. im all for educatinng low income , low achieving kids but not at the expense of our smartest and brightest

BehindEnemyLines

October 17th, 2012
12:55 pm

Since “local control” has been working out soooooo well. I’m pretty sure even the Chinese are no less trustworthy than the average local school board. Virtually anything is a better option than the current system that continues to pour money down a dry hole.

Big Al

October 17th, 2012
1:11 pm

The reason for-profit schools are in high demand is because the public schools have failed. Public schools failed because politicians ruined them by trying to use the public schools as forums for their political agendas and their out-dated cultural beliefs. Public schools also failed because they could not attract the best and brightest teachers who can actually make a difference in the classroom. The best schools make headlines for their student’s achievements. But Georgia’s public schools make headlines because many of them fail to meet the minimum requirements required for accreditation and because school boards want to teach myths like Creationism and other religious non-sense that adds no value to students. I think the last straw occured when Georgia phased out the high school graduation test.

Charter schools breed competition. Competition is good because it means the best survive and grow while the worst die and go away. While public schools loathe graduation testing, the best charter schools are continoulsy testing their students, and the students do not advance until they pass the tests.

Mary Elizabeth

October 17th, 2012
1:30 pm

To try to dismantle traditional public schools instead of improving them through charter schools (and other means) that will work with, not against, them is folly. Some have, obviously, bought into the intense propaganda.

disappointed

October 17th, 2012
1:53 pm

The issue is not charter schools! Choice is great, but it is absurd to believe that giving an ungoverned body in the state legislator the power to approve these charter schools changes absolutely anything. And yes, they ARE cash cows. Just like the testing groups and textbook groups, and yet we don’t get too fired up about those issues. Georgia HAS charter schools; some are preforming well, while others are still figuring out how to go about their business. Keep the power for approval in the hands of the local boards made up of elected officials that YOU actually have the ability to hold accountable. I don’t want the status quo any more than many of you; however, it is foolish to believe that allowing the state to approve more charters is the solution. The solution is in teacher training and quality, which begins at college and universities. Until we change how we train our teachers, we will not see the increases we want in the performance of our students or our schools. Remember, once we allow them to amend the constitution, it is nearly impossible to reverse.

old teach

October 17th, 2012
2:19 pm

“disappointed”’s response should be copied and pasted everywhere, everyday until the essence of the Amendment is understood by EVERYONE! There has been so much misdirection by the amendment’s proponents that even Blackstone would be jealous!

dc

October 17th, 2012
3:07 pm

The Empire Strikes Back!!!!! with a hilarious accusation that charter schools are all about the money…… meanwhile, the reason the amendment is needed is because local school systems are so focused on keeping control of our tax dollars.

What a bunch of hypocrites…..but of course, “it’s all about the children”

Clarity

October 17th, 2012
3:15 pm

Bookman’s article is exactly right – the whole purpose of this amendment has nothing to do with Charter Schools and everything to do with getting around the Supreme Court decision. All of you talking about failed public schools has yet to bring up the fact that since 2003, the legislature has not funded the formula that is in law to provide a basic education. There is a formula based off student count. Right below the amount to be funded is an “Amended formula adjustment”. This line has amounted to almost $5 billion since 2003. That doesn’t even include the fact that operational costs have not been changed for inflation since QBE started in the 1980s. So it is a real slap in the face of every educator when they are massively underfunded and then told you aren’t doing well enough so we are going to create a parallel school system not responsible to the local tax payer. People are so anxious to read the word charter and think this is about charters (with the cherry on top being the opinion in the preamble). It is also amazing that comparing statistical data, the results are even with public schools – yet EVERY charter school has been found to have a significantly lower percentage of free and reduced meal students as compared with the county they are in. Factor in this fact that admission is selective, I wonder how even the stats would be. Systems have approved many charters – I repeat, it has nothing to do with charters. In our county, one reason why a charter petition was denied was because they did not include payroll taxes in their financials, which would have made them run red. The State charter commission doesn’t care about feasibility.

There should be two questions everyone should be asking. First, with every department at the State level massively cut (10% a year for most, $1.1 billion for education this year), where in the world do the funds come from to start a new state school system? The closest answer found is that the funds will follow the students – which would be fine if students came in packages of 30. But they don’t so the scattering of students that would be lost would change an existing class from 32 to 30 (which are high due to the massive cuts), the transportation costs would be there, the teacher would be there, and the maintenance and utilities would still exist. Second question – if you have an issue with one of these schools, who would you go to? The charter commission is appointed by the Governor. Why in the world would they care what you have to say? With this amendment, one person can get your local tax dollars for their school in a time when every other agency has been massively cut. Where is the money for this?

DeKalb Inside Out

October 17th, 2012
3:17 pm

disappointed
If you say the solution is better trained and higher quality teachers, then ‘Amen’ … let’s do it.

Until then, many people would like public chartered schools and not necessarily state chartered schools. Unfortunately many local boards refuse to commission or even consider local charter schools. 75% of the state chartered schools are in districts that refuse to commission local charter schools.

Can we give parents a choice?

Ned

October 17th, 2012
3:20 pm

Much as I’d hate to ally with the outright liars,who assert FALSEHOODS about charters such as– all about money, or religious indoctrination, or segregation, or pick & choose who attends (Gene Walker has repeated this LIE), this post brings me back to my central concern with this amendment:
Charters are about education–about trying something new (and if it doesn’t work the charter, unlike the traditional school, closes); about giving parents input; about kids. This amendment, I fear, is motivated by something else–put another way, does anyone really believe that the sponsors of this amendment on this one occasion suddenly became interested in education? If so, you’ve spent some extra time at Sonny’s Fishing Hole. I really think the motivation behind this amendment is not a love for charters, for education, or even for kids. If it were, there would be more restriction on for profit charters (which is possible–for profit charters are restricted in other parts of the US). If ,for example, legislators cared about education in DeKalb they wouldn’t be sending DeKalb $ to Gwinnett via QBE, (this is NOT to say that DCSS cares all that much about education in DeKalb either). This smells like an effort primarily motivated by $, not educational improvement, and I’m leaning “no.”

Get Educated

October 17th, 2012
3:36 pm

Since the state can – and does – already approve charter schools not approved locally, you have to wonder why we need to change the constitution and expand government. GA has more than 200 charter schools and more are in the pipeline. . If amendment 1 passes, there are only two ways to pay for it- gut public schools even more or raise property taxes. Or both. Too bad if you don’t like it because 7 ppointed people will hold all the power. Who appoints them? The gov, lt gov and speaker. People didn’t trust politicians pushing t-Splost to build and repair roads and bridges and they trust them with our kids’ education? You’re kidding, right?

WhiteWolf of the Bones

October 17th, 2012
3:43 pm

I agree with Teacher Reader, among others on here. The government is selling entry into the US for big bucks, and they are allowing the infiltration of foreign influence on our schools. This is deliberate, and I would be very cautious about which charter schools we choose, as parents. But on the other hand, I am for charter schools, as I see the public school system as a cash cow that is enriching every one’s pockets at the top, while failing our teachers and children. Of course they couldn’t do what they do without government agreement…and the policies coming out of DC are deliberately enabling this scam. It is all intertwined, and is all a scheme to continue the dumbing down and take over the minds and bodies of the citizens in this country for their own nefarious reasons. The take over of America is real, and those who fail to see it coming will be the ones that will cry the loudest in the future.

As always, I say, take care of your own. You can not trust the government or the schools to do what is best, and right, for you or your children. We still have some great teachers, who are also aware, and they are doing the best that they can do, while being stifled in every way possible by administration and government policies. It is our responsibility to monitor what and how our children are being taught, and we are also responsible for making sure they get the education we want them to have. So many folks are ignorant of the real facts behind the educational system, and are simply clueless. But this is also true about the real truth behind the entire governmental system. Simply put, history does repeat itself. But history. as many of us learned it, is not being taught in the schools anymore. Propaganda is surely propagating, and most people are just as surely unaware of it all.

Clarity

October 17th, 2012
3:46 pm

If you would like to see how much your school system is currently being cut, go to this link: http://app.doe.k12.ga.us/ and click on QBE reports. This is what systems use to get their allocations. Choose the year you want to see (current year is 2013). Press Set FY, then a dropdown box appears. Click on QBE003 System Allotment Sheets. Choose the county you are interested in seeing. Blow the sheet up to be readable, look for the line QBE Formula Earnings in bold. a couple of lines above that is Amended Formula Adjustment. This is the amount in the current year where the legislature says we are not going to fund the law by this amount. These have occurred since 2003. It’s not hidden. Again, the question is – with massive cuts, where is the money to create a new system? Were the cuts intentional to try to be able to say your system isn’t doing well, so lets create a new system?

Beverly Fraud

October 17th, 2012
3:47 pm

Privateers like the ALEC crowd vs bureaucrats like the Errol Davis crowd.

So what do the voters get?

A chance to vote Yes, and open the floodgates for privateers that make Somali pirates look like benevolent mariners.

Vote No and support a monolith that makes the North Korea government look like it has the wisdom of King Solomon.

It’s 3 am, last call at the bar and the last two dames left are Joan Rivers and Aunt Esther.

Yippee!

WhiteWolf of the Bones

October 17th, 2012
3:58 pm

Wanted to add…our public schools are cash cows already, as teacher reader and others have stated. Our government is wrong to sell entry to our country in this way, but we can’t stop them. But we can choose who we want to fund these schools. Due diligence is almost as lost in this country as common sense, but it is what is needed. There are those who truly understand, and are just as appalled at what is happening in our schools, and are willing to fund the education of those willing, and able to learn. The government, on the other hand, is only interested in a few of the best and the brightest, and the rest will be schooled to be the willing slaves, and happy workers as needed. 1984 is here, and hasn’t gone, no matter how often they spew the words, “21st century”.

DeKalb Inside Out

October 17th, 2012
3:59 pm

Ned
Charters in Georgia must be non-profit. For-profit charters are not allowed. I understand your apprehension. I have had conversations with Jan Jones, Nancy Jester, Gene Walker and various other DeKalb BOE members regarding this issue. I believe Jan and Nancy, big charter advocates, are doing this for the right reasons. Gene believes that traditional public schools are doing just fine and we don’t need charters for anything. That’s my two cents.

Get Educated
This is a common misconception. In 2011 the Ga Supreme Court majority report says the 1877 Constitution of Georgia granted local boards of education the exclusive right to establish and maintain K-12 education. The state cannot therefore establish competing State-created general k-12 schools.

Barge estimated 7 new state chartered schools every year. Since the Supreme Court decision, no new state chartered schools have been commissioned.

A reader

October 17th, 2012
4:05 pm

Teacher Reader

October 17th, 2012
10:02 am

http://www.usnews.com/education/best-high-schools/national-rankings/charter-school-rankings

Read about the best charter high schools in the country and tell me that your child’s high school is this good.

Head up to north Fulton county and you will see traditional public high schools that are just as good. Any school that has a high percentage of parental involvement as well as parent that expect their children to behave and perform their best will be a good school, traditional public, charter, or private. North Fulton schools get no more money from the country and state than south Fulton schools, but the difference in achievement and discipline is staggering. In addition, the charter high school in North Fulton, Fulton Science Academy High School, is mediocre at best.

bootney farnsworth

October 17th, 2012
4:13 pm

this reeks of Billy Mays hawking Kaboom and Oxyclean. with a mix of the Nigerian prince who will regain his throne if you just allow him to use your bank account.

BT Barnum put it very well – suckers are born every minute. anytime anyone tells you such and such will be as cash cow, you are being conned.

charters are not a bad idea, but are not the magic bullet either.

bootney farnsworth

October 17th, 2012
4:18 pm

@ DeKalb Inside

parents already have choices.

private school, home school, no school, religious school, move to different districts, even some charter schools. this bit about choice is a myth.

hell, you can even found your own school if you wish.

choice as it is popularly and incorrectly promoted is the same as you wanting to say your taxes will pay for bullets but not artillery shells. or recycling but not garbage pickup.

bootney farnsworth

October 17th, 2012
4:21 pm

@ 10:10,

(which my gut tells me is somebody hiding their pseudonym behind the lack of one)

1- GEA is not a real union, it is an association. it has no power and less influence
2-Waiting for Superman is a propaganda piece.

but I sense you know this already

living in an outdated ed system

October 17th, 2012
4:37 pm

Before you lambast this post as coming from some “conservative think tank,” I suggest you all read Chester Finn’s well written op-ed today about why we need a brand new K-12 education system in this country. Georgia included.

http://educationnext.org/first-we-need-a-brand-new-k%E2%80%9312-system/

Midway

October 17th, 2012
4:55 pm

“Charters in Georgia must be non-profit.”

That doesn’t mean people won’t be able to profit from bloated salaries, unnecessary job titles, and awarding contracts to the connected.

We need to put a stop to this with the current structure. Why duplicate it?

Tony

October 17th, 2012
5:19 pm

If teachers’ unions are so bad for schools, why is it that the states with the strongest teachers’ unions have the highest student achievement?

Tony

October 17th, 2012
5:24 pm

Lee

October 17th, 2012
5:42 pm

So, a bunch of anonymous public school advocates, who see nothing wrong with paying premium salaries to PE teachers with PHDs, are calling charter schools “cash cows”.

The irony is amazing. Sorta like politicians voting against prostitution.

Beverly Fraud

October 17th, 2012
5:50 pm

Somali pirates vs. North Korean bureaucrats

Joan Rivers vs. Aunt Ester at closing time in the bar.

What WONDERFUL choices in Georgia!

Ron

October 17th, 2012
5:51 pm

What happened to the concern/rage about using public funds for private purposes, which is what happens with charter schools? I say it’s time to rid public schools of corporate values that have created this mess. Why so much hoopla over competition? Do we really want a society of winners and losers–how barbaric that is! If folks want to send their kids to private schools (supposedly so much better, but somehow I doubt it), then let them pay out of pocket, not my tax dollars!

Ron

October 17th, 2012
5:54 pm

Just like T-SPLOST, vote NO!

lahopital

October 17th, 2012
6:03 pm

Of course it’s about the money. Why do you think anyone is spending money to get it passed? Vote no.