DeKalb moves to shorter summer, more breaks during the year under new balanced calendar

Back to school will come sooner next year for DeKalb students. (AP Image)

Back to school will come sooner next year for DeKalb students. (AP Image)

As does neighboring Decatur, DeKalb schools will now follow a  “balanced” calendar, which means a shorter summer and more breaks during the year for the system’s nearly 100,000 students.

And like Decatur, DeKalb is adopting the new calendar even though surveys show parents prefer the longer summer. DeKalb will move to the balanced calendar next year.

According to AJC reporter Ty Tagami:

The school board voted 6-2 Monday for the new calendar. (Board member Sarah Copelin-Wood was absent.) It will clip nearly two weeks from summer break and sprinkle those vacation days in fall and winter.

Superintendent Cheryl Atkinson has said students forget too much during the traditional three-month summer break. She proposed the new calendar after a survey showed most teachers wanted it.

School will start Aug. 5 instead of Aug. 12 and will end May 29 instead of May 23. This will allow a three-day fall break from Oct. 7 to Oct. 9 and a four-day winter break — Feb. 18 to Feb. 21 — tacked onto President’s Day.

In a recent online survey taken by about 4,300 parents, 59 percent favored the traditional calendar versus 41 percent for the balanced calendar, said Deputy Superintendent Kathleen Howe.

Teachers, however, overwhelmingly wanted the change. Howe said a survey was distributed to all teachers, and nearly 5,800 took it: 68 percent wanted a balanced calendar.

That led board members including Donna Edler to support the change. Teachers bore the brunt of budget cuts this year, and Edler said this was a concession she was willing to make.

–from Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

63 comments Add your comment

calka

October 8th, 2012
10:41 pm

Finally Dekalb County Schools got something right. Let’s hope for more of that.

Dunwoody Mom

October 8th, 2012
10:53 pm

Superintendent Cheryl Atkinson has said students forget too much during the traditional three-month summer break

#1 – How does shortening summer break by 2 weeks address the issue of “forgetting too much”?
#2. What about the students who are in a high school on a 4×4 block who can go 8 months between Math courses? They don’t “forget too much”.

This whole calendar “exercise” took up too much time and energy for a district that has some major issues – issues that are not going to addressed with 2 fewer weeks during summer break.

Cobb History Teacher

October 8th, 2012
10:57 pm

We loved it in Cobb well at least 82% of us did. Too bad the minority 16% overruled us and we had to go back to the “traditional” calendar. Maybe Dr. Hionojosa will get us back to a schedule that helps students and staff for that matter reduce stress.

bubba

October 8th, 2012
11:18 pm

@CHT
Certainly glad you aren’t a Math Teacher or Poly Sci Teacher or an Administrator

So, 82% of Cobb County loved it? That is a lie.
82 +16 =98; what did the other 2 % want?
Exactly how did this mythical 16% overrule the mythical 82%?
I thought the school board had the sole authority to vote on the calendar?
(Representative government – ever heard of it?)
If you need help reducing stress – try this: quit, you will be replaced in hours
Interesting, the Majority of those Polled in Dekalb and Decatur did NOT want it
- The board admitted cow-towing to whining teachers
Who is Dr. Hionojosa? If you mean Cobb’s supt., he doesn’t vote on the calendar – the board does.
I believe the super has come out against the whiner committee’s “balanced” calendar also.

just another teach cha

October 8th, 2012
11:45 pm

The Queen B gets what she wants. How much longer does she have in her contract. We will end up starting later because we will have a gazillion more furlough days. Lets get this straight, I will not be decorating my classroom any earlier. Next year, a few posters and that’s it.

alm

October 8th, 2012
11:57 pm

I missed the meeting. What happened with the vote on legal fees for Lewis?

Wheeler Mom

October 9th, 2012
12:13 am

Bubba – I’m guessing you’re either not in Cobb, or you’re not informed about the calendar issue. While Dr. Hinojosa doesn’t vote on the calendar, he did just recommend one to the board (one vastly different from the one designed by the appointed calendar committee – two of whom I know, and neither parent would be someone I consider a whiner). Two of our board members have suggested their own calendars in addition to the choices offered by the committee as well.

The calendar has been a contentious issue in Cobb, and a large reason it’s been contentious is because the board has handled every aspect of it poorly. The balanced calendar was forced down some people’s throat a couple years ago, voted on in November for the following year, prompting three of the “Gang of Four” to run for election.

Once the three were elected, they assumed they had a mandate, and changed the calendar back – in February. Guess their mammas never taught them that two wrongs don’t make a right. The problem with their assumption of a mandate is that none truly ran opposed – one ran unopposed; one beat a candidate in a primary (who votes in the primary?) but ran unopposed in November, leaving voters with no choice, and the other is a Republican in East Cobb – I think Christ himself could run on the Democratic ticket and lose in East Cobb. The total number of people who voted for those three is less than the total number of students in CCSD. And they wonder why people were unhappy? Of course, as an active voter myself, I like to remind people of the importance of the “little elections.”

Let’s stir the pot, and ask the people what they want…only let’s do it by a survey (and nothing against Survey Monkey – they are a fine company and do good surveys, but you know what Twain said about statistics…). Let’s make that survey a little easy to take multiple times and open it up to EVERYONE – including students. So, now the opinion pendulum swings the other way…(and I’m pretty sure that’s where CMT got the 82% from…statistics).

Needless to say, there is no way to make everyone happy. For every teacher that likes the balanced calendar for the break, there is another that doesn’t due to the way the kids get riled up. For every parent that likes the break because they can travel for cheap, there is another that worries about childcare. For every business like a movie theater that gets in more patrons during a Feb break, you have a business like Six Flags that complains about lost revenue (although I personally believe Six Flags issues go WAY deeper than Cobb’s calendar).

For the record, do you have kids? I do, and I know I need a break from them every once in a while – thank goodness for grandparents. I don’t think teachers are whiners for doing a job most of us don’t want to do. The Back-To-School ad using the song “The Most Wonderful Time of Year” was all about PARENTS needing a break. Nobody is calling them whiners.

Edwin Jeter

October 9th, 2012
12:50 am

The balanced school calender adopted by the Dekalb County School Board is welcomed by most teachers. The Superintendant feels it can be a tool used to enhance academic performance, since students forget too much over the summer under the current system. While it may cause some parents to make adjustments, the new school calender might lead to closing some achievment gaps that exist within the Dekalb County School System. Teachers are certainly enthusiastic, this may lead to enhanced teaching and improved student performance. The new school calender is worth a try.

bubba

October 9th, 2012
1:11 am

On your first paragraph, you are wrong on all accounts. I’m in Cobb, informed, and dialog with board members regarding the issue. You are not a very well informed “guesser”.

Regarding the second part of your first paragraph – I know all of that, not sure why you are mentioning it. It is what I said – Dr. H isn’t supporting the committee’s calendar – and of the committee members I know – my opinion is they are whiners (glad to know you know ones that aren’t).

re:: “The balanced calendar was forced down some people’s throat a couple years ago, voted on in November for the following year, prompting three of the “Gang of Four” to run for election.” —-The “Gang of Four” ALL beat candidates supporting the balanced calendar.

Stultz beat Cash; Sweeney beat someone else; and K. Angl. beat a primary candidate that supported the balanced calendar. They were ALL opposed by balanced calendar supporters and all lost. Just as the poll of parents in Dekalb and Decatur showed the balanced calendar as the loser against the traditional calendar.

re: “And they wonder why people were unhappy?” Well, apparently there wasn’t a majority of people to vote for balanced calendar supporters – that’s the way things work, or didn’t your mamma teach you that?

re: “Survey Monkey – they are a fine company and do good surveys” – they are a software package, they aren’t “doing good surveys”.

“Let’s make that survey a little easy to take multiple times and open it up to EVERYONE – including students. So, now the opinion pendulum swings the other way…(and I’m pretty sure that’s where CMT got the 82% from…statistics).” Totally lost me on the new math and english on that one.
“Needless to say, ……..is another that doesn’t due to the way the kids get riled up.” Agreed.

“For the record, do you have kids? I do, and I know I need a break from them every once in a while – thank goodness for grandparents.” – So, just how does a balanced calendar give you a break from your children? If you are talking about teachers somehow, they are employees – nothing more, nothing less.

96% of the students in the country are on a traditional calendar – and Summer activities/opportunties/schedules are built around that fact.

Teachers are not whiners; however there are too many teachers who are whiners.

Dr. Craig Spinks/ Georgians for Educational Excellence

October 9th, 2012
2:31 am

As an older teacher, I needed the more frequent breaks afforded by the balanced-calendar approach under which the Columbia County School System has operated for about ten years.

Another comment

October 9th, 2012
2:34 am

I don’t even live in dekalb county and I voted on survey monkey against the balanced colander as every type of stockholder at least 20 times. Survey monkey is an in accurate measurement tool, this was predetermined Atkinson just did what she wanted.

The balanced colander doesn’t work for most children that are average and above students. It doesn’t work for parent or their employers. Since when due a companies employees get input in setting the work schedule over what the customers (parents and students want and need). We want Sept to June.

If kids need extra help or remediation then their should be summer school paid for by those students parents or they should be held back. I spent $ 500 one summer sending my daughter to reading class for 4/5 th graders for 6 weeks during the summer after she only scored at a 50percent n the IOWA test. They asked me why I had her their, I said my expectations where the 90 percentile. At the end they agreed, she was. Capable had just gotten lazy. Last summer her best friend spent the summer doing a package of 10 lessons for $400 @ Mathtasism. She went from barely passing the 5th grade CTCT and a D to havin an A in Middle School Math. Her dad works at Ga state, but she just wouldn’t listen to him.

I just let the roots of my hair grow out a little longer, wear my hear in that buck head mom pony tail. Reused my bathing suits this year, only bought two pairs of shoes.

Just like the Private SAT tutoring with the teacher from Westminster is worth it. $70 @6 @ classes, two tries of the SAT AND THE ACT definitely worth it. Better by then those rip off company packages.

You need to steep up to the plate for your own child. You can afford to help your child if you have a smart phone, if you have a weave, wig, fancy shoes or clothes, or drive a fancy car.

Every child’s summer vacation should not be taken away for a few. My children have already lost so a much. With this no child left behind,, aka slow down to dummy speed for all.

Ron

October 9th, 2012
5:26 am

Very sad outcome! All these years American children have enjoyed the summer off, but no longer. Let’s face it . . . we’re a work-a-holic society hell bent on achievement at all costs. Never mind leisure, a fabled dream from a bygone era. I don’t agree that children forget that much in two months!!

d

October 9th, 2012
5:59 am

What profession, other than education, has the summer off? How is that realistic preparation for the real world? As far as 8 months with no math, I know for a fact that at least 2 DeKalb 4×4 schools, Dunwoody HS included, students in the basic Math I, II, III, track are taking math both semesters, either support in the fall, regular course in the spring or support paired with the regular course all year.

mountain man

October 9th, 2012
6:19 am

That says it all – 59% of parents opposed it, but a significant majority of teachers wanted it. The county even siad they did it to give something to the teachers, since they can’t pay them.

Forget the BS about student learning, this is all about giving teachers breaks during the year. Screw the parents.

mountain man

October 9th, 2012
6:22 am

Time for Dekalb county to pull a Cobb county and vote in BOE candidates who support going back to a traditional calendar.

concernedmom30329

October 9th, 2012
6:58 am

d,
But with the exception of general level kids, no one else has math year round and that is just wrong. Some schools wanted to offer math year round to all, but the system administration said no, because it cost too much.
By the way, English/language arts should be taught year round as well. The block does a disservice to all students.

concernedmom30329

October 9th, 2012
7:00 am

Also, for teacher who work a second job in summer, they just lost a week of employment. Given the economic situation in DeKalb, I know many teachers who work in the summer. It is a shame for them.

d

October 9th, 2012
7:00 am

@Mountain man, just remember teachers’ working conditions are students’ learning conditions. Although I understand the parents’ desire, too many good teachers are getting burned out and leaving DeKalb for systems that take care of the teachers so that they can do their jobs effectively, or, worse yet, good teachers are leaving the profession all together.

concernedmom30329

October 9th, 2012
7:08 am

Almost every teacher I know left DeKalb for Fulton or Gwinnett. Neither has a balanced calendar. Teachers will leave if they can (and sadly, if they are smart.) The calendar isn’t enough or a reason to stay. They will go where they are better compensated and to a system with a better administration (that leaves most of them).

Dunwoody Mom

October 9th, 2012
7:18 am

@d, the number of students being offered year-round Math is very small compared to the entire student population. All students should be afford the opportunity for year round Math and Science – at the minimum. I know that since I have been a parent of Dunwoody High students, there has been an attempt each year to move away from the 4×4 to a Modified Block. This has been stopped dead in its track each time. Dr. Atkinson is talking out both sides of her mouth here – we need to shorten the summer so that students don’t “forget”, but it is okay to continue to allow students to go 8 months without Math and Science? This makes no sense to me.

Concerned DeKalb Mom

October 9th, 2012
7:52 am

And to follow Dunwoody Mom…some students go the full 12 months without contact in a subject…consider the freshman who takes Math 1 first semester and then Math 2 second semester as a sophomore. And yes, that happens…and not just with math, but with any subject.

The 4×4 block benefits the extremely gifted and the extremely weak, but those in the middle often suffer.

julie

October 9th, 2012
8:05 am

Did they decide anything about the proposed early dismissal on Wednesdays?

The Deal

October 9th, 2012
8:12 am

In addition to being somewhat surprised that Dr. Atkinson admitted that this was against what the parents wanted (if so, why did she do the survey in the first place), I suspect the teacher survey was given either under duress or required the teachers to enter their names or some sort of tracking mechanism so that they were intimidated into answering the way their dictator wanted.

What irks me more is that this isn’t even a balanced calendar. It is a few days here and there during the year and causing a lot of unnecessary upheaval for no gain and losing tons of parent support.

mg

October 9th, 2012
8:17 am

Here we go again. Everyone is up in arms over the calendar issue. Meanwhile, the board also voted to pay more of Crawford Lewis’ legal fees and to settle a discrimination lawsuit with a former employee. Those are the issues we should be so vigorously discussing. Once again DCSS or DCSD or whatever new name they’re going to try has successfully kept your attention from the real issues with a red herring.

Dunwoody Mom

October 9th, 2012
8:31 am

@julie, the early-release days are a separate issue from the calendar, though the district did poll the “certified staff” of whether they wanted early released days (they did) and what day they preferred (can’t remember which one that was).

Bill & Ed's Excellent Adventure

October 9th, 2012
8:36 am

Atkinson doesn’t really care what Dekalb parents say…as long as she gets what she wants. This is BS.

Dunwoody Mom

October 9th, 2012
8:36 am

It’s interesting that only about 4,000 “certified staff” responded to the first survey that was available on-line for over a week, but yet district personnel were able to obtain about 5,000 responses from “certified staff” in less than week’s time and oh, those responses just happened to support the moves Dr. Atkinson wanted to make. The first survey indicated that parents did not favor the “balanced” calendar, so the parents were not polled again. It would take just a few hours to reintiate the survey and send out an email blast to parents to have them take the survey if they had not done so already. So, “certified staff” gets 2 opportunities to respond, but parents only 1 opportunity.

RB

October 9th, 2012
8:41 am

What was neglected from either calendar is the 25 year agreement with metro systems to have spring break the first full week in April. Dekalb moved theirs to the second week. This really messes up planning any vacation during this time if your kids go to one system and you are in Dekalb. By the way, this “gift” to teachers is just a show for SACS. Dekalb could care less about teachers or what we think.;

Bill & Ed's Excellent Adventure

October 9th, 2012
8:46 am

@D-mom I too found it surprising that “68% of teachers” would choose to shorten their summer break by two weeks.

Maureen Downey

October 9th, 2012
8:53 am

Bill, When polled, a majority of Decatur teachers also voted for a shorter summer and more frequent breaks. (Decatur now goes back Aug. 1, has a week off in September and one in February, along with a week at Thanksgiving, two at Christmas and the regular April spring break.)
Teachers tell me they look forward to those breaks.
It is a tough schedule, however, for parents as there are few options for your kids in September and February, compared to the summer when there are many camps.
Maureen

Concernedmom30329

October 9th, 2012
8:55 am

RB
You are wrong about one thing, Atkinson has talked about changing the calendar since she got here. The teachers’ agreeing with her was a gift to her, but I suspect she would have done it anyway since it was a clear priority.
Last year, some metro systems had break the first week of spring break and some had it the second. Fulton has been on a totally different calendar the last couple of years than the rest of the area.

Concernedmom30329

October 9th, 2012
9:00 am

One other point about spring break, the week in the approved calendar is actually the week that is the first full week of April.

Another Math Teacher

October 9th, 2012
9:10 am

Dunwoody Mom:

The district I worked in did this with regard to getting the calendar they wanted.

1) Survey the teachers with 5 schedules. The one that got the most votes was put on a future ballot.
2) Survey the parents with 5 very similar schedules. (Not the same ones as teachers saw.) The four with the most votes were put on a future ballot.
3) A final vote with the 1 schedule the teachers wanted and top 4 for parents. The parental vote was split 4 ways. The schedule the teachers wanted won.

When the central office wanted a certain schedule, they put that on the teacher survey along with 4 schedules that teachers would hate.

Bill & Ed's Excellent Adventure

October 9th, 2012
9:12 am

@Maureen…I’ll bet there are many teachers out there who really like that chunk of time off, as opposed to some days here & there. Regardless, I’m more frustrated with the fact that Atkinson has ignored parents. This is more of a mandate than a process. It’s what she wanted from day one, and I’m pretty disappointed with her and my lame duck school board member for going along…

Concerned DeKalb Mom

October 9th, 2012
9:26 am

Harvard has a summer program for high school students. Unfortunately, it’s end-date is August 10. Looks like the majority of students in the Atlanta area are shut out of that program. I wonder how many other high caliber programs end the first or second week of August?

I’m not a parent of a high school student, but I’d be curious to know from them…is starting the school year so early in August–to avoid exams in January–worth losing opportunities like this in the summer?

Dunwoody Mom

October 9th, 2012
9:26 am

@Another Math Teacher, I would love to see the “second” survey the district gave to the cerified staff to see if it was different than the on-line version.

Smoke Rise Mom

October 9th, 2012
9:44 am

Everybody with students in DeKalb County knows the only way to close the achievement gap is to dummy down the high and average achievers. A couple of weeks here or there won’t have any impact on it. The only ones who benefit from this are the teachers who get more breaks during the school year. I’m not opposed to giving the teachers a break, but let’s call this what it is.

living in an outdated ed system

October 9th, 2012
9:55 am

Herein lies the basic problem with today’s public education system. Ms. Atkinson has shown yet again that public education is a teacher-centric, not student-centric, system. This decision became a “bargaining concession” for the teachers because of budget cuts.

It all comes back to the simple fact that our public education system does not efficiently nor effectively spend the taxpayer dollars it gets. With countless research showing no correlation between funding and student achievement, this petty calendar issue becomes symptomatic of the ongoing dysfunction in public education.

dad99

October 9th, 2012
9:56 am

Nearly 100,000 students, 4,300 parents participate and give feedback compared to 5,800 teachers.
Sounds like a PTA meeting!!

living in an outdated ed system

October 9th, 2012
10:30 am

dad 99 – love it! Your metrics are very compelling : )

Hillbilly D

October 9th, 2012
10:58 am

I’m against the balanced schedule. Kids still need time to be kids. I still believe the kids should be the focus of the education system (that’s probably naive of me).

Balanced Calendar | Michael Edwards, Ed.D.

October 9th, 2012
11:08 am

[...] customer service?  68% of DeKalb County teachers and staff voted Yes to the new calendar, while 59% of parents voted No.  Oh well, sorry, [...]

Ghoti

October 9th, 2012
12:06 pm

Where can I go to voice my anger over this? Why did anyone even ask for our opinions if this was a done deal? I’m the parent of 2 Dekalb school students, and I am livid over this! The so-called “balanced calendar” is nothing but a nightmare for working parents, and will accomplish nothing but making the overpaid school board look like they’re doing something to justify their salaries.

I want my vacation time in August, not September or February!

When I was a kid in the ’70s and ’80s, we started school the day after Labor Day, got out in June, and no one forgot what they learned over the summer. Maybe all these furlough days should be eliminated instead.

Poverty and unconcerned parents are the problems, and that won’t be solved by changing the school calendar.

Baffled taxpayer

October 9th, 2012
12:54 pm

Back when the Dekalb school calendar was changed to start @ August 10, the rationale was that the current governor wanted kids graduating from High School midyear to be able to enter the college/university system in January. Virtually everyone I talked to then agreed that that number had to be the merest fraction of all HS students. And concerning the bad air quality in the area, and the pressure from the federal government to improve it, we could not fathom how the local school system could put all those cars and buses of students on the road in sultry, sweltering, suffocating August. I am baffled that issue has not been raised in this discussion!

Edugator

October 9th, 2012
1:05 pm

Not surprisingly, Florida, South Carolina, and several other states mandate that schools not open until late August. Their main reason is economic- tourist dollars that flow out of the state during the money making months of July and August if kids are busy sweating in classrooms instead of frolicking at the beach.. We’re teaching a lousy economic lesson here. Our kids can still get their 180 days (I’d actually favor more) starting near Labor Day and ending in June, and preserve our tourist industry as well.

Dunwoody Mom is right about many things this time, particularly the fact that teachers got a “make good” survey (pretty much like the one online) and parents were denied a second shot at input.

Shorten summer by two weeks to reduce the loss of knowledge? Please. The kids will lose just about as much during that random week in February or October.

The Deal

October 9th, 2012
1:19 pm

Not to mention how disruptive the entire schedule is. Long weekend in September, 3 days in October, week off in November, 2 1/2 weeks in December/January, week off in February, week off in April. Teachers will need to cram in lessons between those breaks because they certainly can’t continue them across those breaks without considerable catch-up. There is also considerable concern that teachers will fill those breaks with homework and projects.

Maureen Downey

October 9th, 2012
1:25 pm

@The Deal, I agree with many of the comments here on the disruptive nature of the calendar. In Decatur, we had a four-day week due to Labor Day, followed by a full week off from school under our version of a balanced calendar
But I will repeat that teachers seem to like it. I had my own internal debate when Decatur adopted this.
Should it matter more that parents opposed it or teachers preferred it?
Was it unreasonable for the school system to adopt it over the resistance of parents because teachers liked it better?
And here is what I finally concluded: It is essential to keep good teachers. If this schedule helps Decatur with recruitment and retention, I can live with it. (However, I am ever hopeful it may be reconsidered.)
I still don’t like this calendar and still think it favors affluent parents who can take off in September and February, but I accept it.
Maureen

Archie

October 9th, 2012
1:26 pm

If memory serves me correct, the original reason for three month summer break from school was so that the kids could help out on the family farm during the “busy season.” Things have changed since then, as it seems the family farm is going the way of the full-service gas station that sold regular at 25 cents a gallon!

DunMoody

October 9th, 2012
1:27 pm

We’ve made the most of our kids’ public school education by filling in the gaps during the summer … hiring a private tutor to teach Algebra from beginning to end since the spiral math doesn’t lead to mastery in time for Chemistry, working on writing skills, registering for camps in computers, sciences, etc. Oh, yes, and making sure they have lots of down time to explore boredom-catalyzing explorations, creativity, and fun. This “balanced” calendar now takes curriculum-rich summer programs off the list because they spread into August. Bet we have to cross off some wonderful enrichment just in time to come back to school for the inevitable two to three weeks of no instruction while DeKalb figures out how many teachers they need, balances classes, gets materials shuffled around to meet the demand, reconnects computers, resets passwords, updates teachers (oops) on IT’s idiosyncratic changes to eSIS, etc. Yes, that’s certainly a good reason to cut into the summer break.

As for those breaks in Fall and Spring, I bet teachers load up students with homework, oh joy, particularly since AP classes on the block schedule are just barely completing the required coursework by semester’s end (many are year-long, but most are not on the block).

And yes, these are “problems” for parents who are able to give their children additional enrichment during the summer. I appreciate the fact that socio-economic challenges prevent many parents in DeKalb from doing anything but bide time until school starts. But the solution to that lies in the very schools DeKalb shutters during the summer – summer school, summer tutoring, summer enrichment specifically in schools with large free-lunch populations. The wanton wasting of our hard-paid tax dollars makes those options impossible.

One size doesn’t fit all.

Dunwoody Mom

October 9th, 2012
1:36 pm

But the solution to that lies in the very schools DeKalb shutters during the summer – summer school, summer tutoring, summer enrichment specifically in schools with large free-lunch populations. The wanton wasting of our hard-paid tax dollars makes those options impossible.

I think this was one of the thoughts Nancy Jester was making last night (if I remember correctly) – wouldn’t it be a wiser use of Title I funds to use them during the summer months for those students that need extra help academically. It seems that all the monies are used on pre-packed curriculum such as Success For All or Academic Coaches (or whatever they are called now) that just don’t seem to help many in DeKalb. A 2-week shorter summer is not going to be the answer for anyone.