Concerns over funding lead state ed board in New Hampshire to impose a moratorium on charter schools

Interesting Education Week story on the decision by  New Hampshire’s state board of education to impose a moratorium on state-approved charter schools because of concerns over a lack of adequate funding for the schools from the state Legislature.

Last week’s state school board vote jolted the state’s charter school community. It may even have jolted the N.H. Legislature into action.

State Rep. Kenneth Weyler told Ed Week this week that legislators would somehow find $5 million to cover the costs of recently approved schools.

According to the original Ed Week piece:

Board members voted this week deny all applications it receives to open new charters in the state until more funding is provided for those schools.

In a letter explaining the decision, board Chairman Tom Raffio said the panel “continues to be supportive of charter schools.” But he noted that the board has approved eight new charter schools over the past two years, increasing the state’s costs by $5 million. Without additional funding, he said, “it would be inappropriate to approve any new charters schools at this time.”

The moratorium would apply only to charters that come to the state for approval. Charter schools that seek approval by individual school districts—an option allowed in New Hampshire—could still go forward, if authorized by local officials, Raffio explained.

New Hampshire has only a fraction of the number of charters in other states. But the sector is poised for rapid growth, with the state having received 15 applications for new charters, said Paul Leather, the state’s deputy commissioner of education, said in an interview.

The state is obligated to pay a per-pupil cost for the charters it authorizes, Leather said. Presumably, as those costs rise, other costs would fall as students leave regular public schools for charters. But that budgetary trade-off is not occurring to the extent needed to keep costs in check, for a variety of reasons, Leather said. The reduction in regular public school expenses, based on student enrollment, does not occur quickly enough to offset state costs, he said. And even when regular public schools lose students, some of their costs, such as those covering operations and personnel, are fixed.

“One [cost] going up doesn’t cause the other to go down,” Leather said. Over time, the state’s expenses are “ramping up very rapidly.”

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

111 comments Add your comment

catlady

September 28th, 2012
6:14 am

How refreshing that our NH brothers are so tuned into reality! Now, if they just had kin in the Georgia legislature!

Of course, their situation may be different from ours, in that they might be fully funding their traditional schools. In Georgia, it’s a double whammy–no money for regular schools and yet magically money for charters!

mark

September 28th, 2012
7:08 am

NH, like other New England states spend twice the amount per a pupil as Georgia. Their property tax is twice as much as well. They also rank much higher than Georgia. You get what you pay for!! Some how Deal will find the money. $10 million last year to fund those state authorized charter schools, $4.3 million this year for a well at his friends business. Remember, no money is to come from education if the charter admendment passes. I am not sure how to police that, but I am sure Deal will have a bag full of money somewhere.

South Georgia Retired Educator

September 28th, 2012
7:12 am

Finally, there’s some sanity somewhere. In Georgia, if Amendment 1 passes on Nov. 6 and a separate Charter Commission is created, what a mess it will be for public schools! Now, with charter applications in Georgia approved by either local boards or the state board, at least there’s some check and balance, but a third approval body would confuse and easily cause more financial disruption. If Amendment 1 passes, out-of-state, for-profit, school management companies would be the real winners and Georgia students the real losers. What were the Governor and Republican legislators thinking when they came up with this ballot question? Amendment 1 is insanity at the highest (or lowest) level.

Dunwoody Mom

September 28th, 2012
7:13 am

catlady wronte In Georgia, it’s a double whammy–no money for regular schools and yet magically money for charters

Yep…isn’t that amazing?? Our pitiful legislators have cut and cut education spending to balance the budget, but oh, wait, here’s money for Charter Schools? Pathetic.

Dunwoody Mom

September 28th, 2012
7:18 am

Maureen, I’m surprised you haven’t done a post on the Education Finance Comittee’s “suggestions” for Education Funding. Of course, they punted on redoing all of that QBE “crap”. You know where DeKalb County is sending millions upon millions of dollars each year to other school districts. That was pitiful as well. They removed the state funding for central office staff and moved that money into technology and actually had the cojones to pat themselves on the back.

Whirled Peas

September 28th, 2012
7:27 am

Another biased article. These educators found another tool that they might use to wrench some more money from the pockets of the taxpayers. Fire them.

Pardon My Blog

September 28th, 2012
7:44 am

New Hampshire has it right! Charter schools are actually private schools funded by taxpayers for a select few and have no place in the public school system.

Mary Elizabeth

September 28th, 2012
8:19 am

The sad thing is – in Georgia’s legislature, which is highly ideological, funds may continue to be awarded to increasing numbers of state charter schools (if the constitutional amendment passes) while funding to traditional public schools may continue to be decreased because the ideological agenda of most of Georgia’s Republican politicians, imo, is to gradually transform public “government,” not-for-profit schools into schools that are based on the free market’s profit incentive of the private sector.

Georgia has had a history of using people for profit, i.e. the societal system of slavery, the societal system of Jim Crow, a penal system from 1875 until WWII in which 90% of prisoners were black males incarcerated for minor “found” infractions so that they could be “leased” to private businesses for profit to the state, and the peonage system in which people were held captive for working off debt, similar to being in slavery, until federal law under FDR stopped this immoral practice. (See PBS-TV’s broadcast “Beyond Slavery” (or title similar in name which aired late last evening).

School children must not be used for profit purposes. We must sustain and improve traditional public schools in Georgia, and we must be aware of attempts to dismantle Georgia’s traditional public schools for the profit purposes of profiteers.

living in an outdated ed system

September 28th, 2012
9:03 am

This is bad policy, period!

Karl Marx

September 28th, 2012
9:06 am

If you have ever lived in New Hampshire you will understand why they did this. Just another reason why I’m glad I don’t live there.

An Observer

September 28th, 2012
9:15 am

I still do not understand why the state needs to issue school charters. As others have mentioned, charter schools are private schools funded by government money. What is the sense of that? Why do these charter schools not operate simply as private schools? Aren’t vouchers, so students can attend private schools, a better option. I would vote no on charter schools and yes on vouchers. Charter schools just do not seem to be a solution to the problem of school choice.

DeborahinAthens

September 28th, 2012
9:30 am

I love how Republicans are all for the”free market” until they want tax money for their pet projects. I am not an educator, butvI have not seen data showing that students in charter schools perform better than kids in regular public schools. We know, and the Repubs know we know why they are doing this. But they don ‘ t care. Ignorant voters that suck up their swill believe that their kids have a better chance at a good education. Imagine their surprise when we e eventually have a voucher system, which is what their ultimate goal is, and these pathetic people get a voucher that is unusable because it won’t pay the full freight on private school and they are stuck in an even worse public school with even less resources. Fund public schools!

Mary Elizabeth

September 28th, 2012
9:35 am

An Observer, 9:15 am

Charters are public schools although some are managed by private sector corporations. Some political analysts believe that the emphasis on authorizing state charter schools is a first step toward moving toward vouchers. Vouchers allow for the possibility that public tax money (meant for public, not private schools) could be used to support private schools, in which many operate for profit.

I do not support vouchers because their use would probably make even more prevalent, than in public charter schools, the use of school children for the profit purposes of profiteers seeking a perceived “educational industry” to tap into. Using the education of children for the profit purposes of profiteers would fundamentally change education as we have known it, which has been to serve the common good of all students and families, equally, through public taxes.

10:10 am

September 28th, 2012
9:44 am

Maureen’s and the unions’ anti-reform message has hit another “bump in the road” with the Hollywood film WON’T BACK DOWN.

Here’s a film review: http://tinyurl.com/9mzp5d9

Try as the liberal elites might, they won’t be able to stop parents from viewing the movie and transferring its message to the most troubled schools in their own districts—and to the assertion that failing traditional public schools are something we must simply endure.

living in an outdated ed system

September 28th, 2012
10:03 am

Let me remind everyone that more funding does NOT equal quality education. I would rather see our state fund schools that are truly educating our children than wasting existing funding on school systems that can barely graduate half its students, like APS!

John Konop

September 28th, 2012
10:31 am

The following are the protections I am asking for to support the amendment and or local school boards for the apporval of charter schools:

No board members should be able to be a consultant, owner and or work for vendors, charter management contracts…..Full disclosure if they had any prior affiliation. No board member should be able to be on the board if they revived any form compensation in the last 2 years from any material vendor.

Full disclosure of any office holder and or relatives with any affiliation with vendors providing services for the school.

No board member and or officeholder should have any interest in the property the school uses
Full disclosure of any officeholder relatives employed by the charter school

Board meeting should be listed 30 days in advance on a set day after 7 pm, not at 10 am on random days with short notice….

Any school, with more than 750 students with a private management company should be required to put up bonding to make sure that the school fulfills the school year

Full disclosure on ownership of property the school uses ie detailed list with names of the people with any affiliation to the school and or officeholders

If the property has any ownership affiliation with the private management company it should be put up as security to pay back the government for any free tax payer dollars ie grants and management fees or expenses against the district eats via placing the kids back into public school via failure of the charter school.

Full disclosure of the contract between the private management company and the charter school. Once again a list of any cross affiliations….

Is this really asking too much, for protecting tax payers ?

DeKalb Teacher

September 28th, 2012
10:39 am

OK. If we are going to defeat the Charter Amendment, we need to get on the same page.

1. Charter schools are public schools. We don’t need or want them.
2. Georgia Supreme Court ruling last year effectively said the state has no constitutional right to approve school charters. We are therefore back down to county boards of education approving charter schools and that’s where 100% of the authority to do so should reside.
3. Traditional public schools need more money.

OK … What else do we have?

DeKalb Teacher

September 28th, 2012
10:43 am

Here Here John!
Let’s make this happen for traditional schools too!
Is there any way we can get it in both?

Angus

September 28th, 2012
10:51 am

living in an outdated ed system, check your logic. APS has more charter schools than any system in the state.

John Konop

September 28th, 2012
10:59 am

Dek,

Just so you know I have been very critical of public/private projects outside of just schools via all the loses we have taken as tax payers. We cannot have a system that a private company gets the upside and tax payers take the majority of risk.

I do believe most of what I posted is covered via public schools in my district, especially the conflict of interest issues. In my county it so strict a board member stop student teaching via it looking like a conflict of interest in the process, when they becaome a school board member.

APS Parent

September 28th, 2012
11:02 am

@Mary Elizabeth: Your comments are usually spot-on, but you missed it with this one. You say that, if the Amendment passes “funding to traditional public schools may continue to be decreased.” What do you mean “may”? Is there really any doubt? The operative word is “will.”

John Konop

September 28th, 2012
11:07 am

……….. OK. If we are going to defeat the Charter Amendment, we need to get on the same page.
1. Charter schools are public schools. We don’t need or want them.
2. Georgia Supreme Court ruling last year effectively said the state has no constitutional right to approve school charters. We are therefore back down to county boards of education approving charter schools and that’s where 100% of the authority to do so should reside.
3. Traditional public schools need more money.
OK … What else do we have?……..

For instance in Cherokee County, Charter USA has a private management contract that pays them close to a million dollars a year. Do you understand the conflict of interest issues if board members have had or do have current financial affiliation with them? Do you understand the conflict of interest issues Charter USA owned the property they are renting to the public charter school ? I hope you get my point.

DeKalb Teacher

September 28th, 2012
11:35 am

John Konop @ 10:31am is Right On!
What can we do to push that list of protections for public traditional schools and charter schools?

Question
John, you’re the man with influence. What are you going to do to push those protections for public traditional schools and charter schools?

Maureen Downey

September 28th, 2012
11:46 am

@10:10: Thought this comment from the Times review was relevant to your usual refrain, especially since I don’t think you can get more liberal elite than Hollywood filmmakers:

But “Won’t Back Down” ultimately has no use for nuance, and its third act is a mighty cataract of speechifying and breathless plot turns that strip the narrative down to its Manichaean core. Once teachers give up job security and guaranteed benefits, learning disabilities will be cured, pencils will stop breaking and the gray skies of Pittsburgh will glow with sunshine. Who could be against that?

“When did Norma Rae become a bad guy?” one of the union heavies asks, and it is a question that might well be directed at the filmmakers, who have turned the rousing rhetoric and simple us-against-them storytelling of the classic strike film upside down. As drama, the movie is not entirely ineffective, thanks mainly to the cast. Ms. Davis’s gravity and Ms. Gyllenhaal’s exuberance harmonize nicely, though it may be worth noting that both of them — along with just about everyone else named in the credits — are dues-paying union members.

sneak peak into education

September 28th, 2012
11:52 am

@10.10am – Here is a review of the movie you are lauding (see at the bottom of the blog). It has been funded by the same people who produced “Waiting for Superman” and is nothing more than a propaganda exercise that is so far from the truth it’s laughable. Funnily enough, those backing the movie are the same people who seek to make a profit by taking over schools to educate our children. So transparent. A parent trigger law has never been successful and is filled with many flaws. What the public is not told is that the trigger law can only happen once; that means if the parents are unhappy with the for-profit charter that takes the traditional school’s place, they can’t do anything about it. Why would anyone want to take away their democratic rights in such a way is beyond me. Also, To say that the movie is based on real-life events is, at best, a stretch. It’s another union-bashing, teacher hating movie.

http://dissentmagazine.org/online.php?id=631

Mary Elizabeth

September 28th, 2012
11:56 am

APS, 11:02 am

First, let me say “thank you” for your kind words regarding my writings, overall.

I used the word “may” instead of the word “will” because the funding variances that I mentioned have not actually occurred, as yet, and I did not want to presume to “play God” with future actualities.

But, I see your point. So, perhaps instead of having used the word “may,” I should have used the word phrase “will probably.”

The below is what I actually had written. Please be aware of my linguistic intent. I thought that In using the following clause (after I had used the word “may”) in my statement, i.e., “because the ideological agenda of most of Georgia’s Republican politicians, imo, is to gradually transform public ‘government,’ not-for-profit schools into schools that are based on the free market’s profit incentive of the private sector” that readers would understand that this funding shift would have a strong likelihood of coming into fruition, in the future:
———————————————————

“The sad thing is – in Georgia’s legislature, which is highly ideological, funds may continue to be awarded to increasing numbers of state charter schools (if the constitutional amendment passes) while funding to traditional public schools may continue to be decreased because the ideological agenda of most of Georgia’s Republican politicians, imo, is to gradually transform public ‘government,’ not-for-profit schools into schools that are based on the free market’s profit incentive of the private sector.”

John Konop

September 28th, 2012
12:03 pm

Dek,

….Question

John, you’re the man with influence. What are you going to do to push those protections for public traditional schools and charter schools?………

I am not really sure about my degree of influence . I merely write articles that newspapers pick-up and hopefully it helps inform people. I do not make any money doing this, just a parent. The problem some people have with me, is I am not an ideologue. I am just a businessman that seeks solutions. And as I have gotten older, I realize life is more gray, than black and white. I do truly appreciate people like you on the front line teaching our kids. I am open to any suggestions from you.

ELMom

September 28th, 2012
1:17 pm

@sneak peak into education “if the parents are unhappy with the for-profit charter that takes the traditional school’s place, they can’t do anything about it.”

If this is the case the how did the parents of Wesley break ties with Imagine?
http://www.ajc.com/news/news/local/split-illustrates-management-disputes-charter-scho/nR2cK/

There isn’t a trigger law in GA so how do you know how it will work????

DeKalb Teacher

September 28th, 2012
2:07 pm

John
Thank you for the kind words. Keep writing articles and get these protections into traditional public and charter schools. I’ll see if I can put together a coherent list of reasons put forth by the bloggers here to vote ‘no’ on charter schools.

This is what I have so far

1. Charter schools are public schools. We don’t need or want them.
2. Georgia Supreme Court ruling last year effectively said the state has no constitutional right to approve school charters. We are therefore back down to county boards of education approving charter schools and that’s where 100% of the authority to do so should reside.
3. Traditional public schools need more money.

Fed Up

September 28th, 2012
4:08 pm

I think there should be a LAW that lawmakers cannot legislate anything unless they also provide the funds to pay for it and that when they DO pass and fund laws that those laws are only good as long as the money is there. Once the money runs out, the law should immediately expire. No more unfunded or underfunded laws!

LarryMajor

September 28th, 2012
8:32 pm

Here’s some:

1. Taking authority away from elected official and giving it to a politically appointed board is simply throwing away your voice in our government.

2. The first commission took millions of dollars in state funding away from kids enrolled in Gwinnett schools and showered it on their own pet schools. When you look at the most vocal amendment supporters, you’ll find they are the exact same people who thought it was perfectly moral to rip off little kids’ education funding. That fact alone should bother you.

3. The first commission refused to stop its parasitic funding and fought the practice all the way to the State Supreme Court. If you cede enough authority to these people, there will be no stopping them next time.

4. Lots of the money spent on supporting this amendment is coming from outside Georgia. You can’t seriously think groups outside the state are sending money here to influence changing our constitution because they care about kids.

5. This isn’t about education; it’s about power – your power to control our government. That’s what they want to take away.

Alex

September 28th, 2012
11:28 pm

Yeah, Jan Jones, Edward Lindsey, Chip Rogers and the others in the General Assembly favoring segregation vouchers and private school tax credits for the rich have no common sense and will break the state bank building their utopian education system. And….our kids will still be stupid when compared to other states let alone other countries.

One Teacher's Voice

September 29th, 2012
12:24 am

Alex

I am absolutely shocked that you can make such statements.

Next, you will be stating that politicians are trying to take advantage of the public in an effort to bring in private companies to procure tax dollars for profit.

And then, you will be trying to show that test scores in many parts of Georgia don’t show a need for charter schools.

And then, you will show data that is easy to understand but cannot be trusted because it has factual data that shows charter schools are not working in areas which have had long-term experiences with the corporate educational method.

CharterStarter, Too

September 29th, 2012
12:26 am

Maureen, somehow I am not surprised at all that you would go as far as New Hampshire to find a charter related topic that has nothing to do with Georgia – yes, nothing, as their budget issues, educational system, laws, and state politics are vastly different than ours. Would it really be too much to ask to expect you to show some semblance of balance in your blog topics?

One Teacher's Voice

September 29th, 2012
1:00 am

CharterStarter…..

“their budget issues, educational system, laws, and state politics are vastly different than ours.”

What factual evidence are you referring to in reference to charter schools?

I would like to better understand your point of view on this.

You and I are on polar opposites when it comes to charter schools, but I would like you to change my mind based on facts that support your opinion.

Give us something to read and evaluate.

How do Vermont issues not apply here in Georgia?

Give us evidence that we can read to help us understand your point.

Amanda Green

September 29th, 2012
1:59 am

School finance data gives you an indication of how much advanced money is spent per student in your district, and how this amount compares to the state average. In most school and district budgets throughout the country, the lion’s share of the funding goes to instruction and instructional-related services, i.e., teacher and staff salaries.

sneak peak into education

September 29th, 2012
8:19 am

@EL Mom- Sorry to have taken so long to reply but with a new baby, time is of a premium. Firstly, the Parent Trigger Law does not exist in Georgia YET, but the legislation, written by guess who (if you guessed ALEC, you are correct) is drafted in such a way that the it can only happen once. The parents are courted by the very companies (for-profit charters) who seek to swoop in and take over the public schools. In one of the 2 schools in California where this happened, the parents tried to remove their names from the petitions once they realized the ramifications of their local school being put into the hands of a for-profit charter but the judge refused to allow to do this. Please bear in mind that the parents were not told when they signed the petitions that this would be a total take over, nor were they told that those asking them to sign the petitions were the ones seeking to take over the school to make a butt load of money.

The link you provided is very interesting but it has nothing to do with a parent trigger law. The school is a board approved charter school. The parents did not petition to sever ties with the management company. It is still a charter school and did not completely rid itself of all the admin and teachers, as happens in the parent trigger law.

Maureen Downey

September 29th, 2012
8:33 am

@charterstarter, And I think you are going out of your way to see bias in a story that has nothing to do with being for or against charters — this story is about funding, which is critical to every state and even more so to Georgia, which is slower to see recovery than other states. The state board of ed in New Hampshire is not opposed to charters; it was making a stand on funding. Why this is even more relevant is that NH has in place the same system we do — locals can approve and fund charters and the state can approve and fund.
Those of you deep in the charter world — and I recognize that posters who work in the industry have a far greater stake in this debate — are clearly more involved and more sensitive to any news on charters. But I think your comment is without merit given what this news story addresses.
Maureen

John Konop

September 29th, 2012
9:21 am

Charter,

Maureen is right, you sound irrational and paranoid on this topic in my opinion, in all due respect.

CharterStarter, Too

September 29th, 2012
4:55 pm

@ One Teacher’s Voice – I think you ask a fair question. I could get deeply into details about various differences, but let me hit 1 very “on its face” difference related to this particular article and our own state. New Hampshire’s legislature actually has an appropriation for all charter schools’ funding in their state budget. In Georgia, our charters earn funds following the QBE statute, so the funds follow, to a large extent, the child. If the Commission passes, Like New Hampshire, funding (per HB 797) will be subject to appropriation.

@ Maureen – I do not believe I’m being overly sensitive given the very contentious political environment over the charter amendment and the districts’ erroneous projections of charters having funding impacts as one of their reasons that folks should not support the amendment. It is odd that when I put in by browser “state eduction funding cuts September,” there were 470,000,000 links you could have chosen from for a blog post…it is just amazing that the 1 you selected includes a hotly debated issue in our own state. Coincidence? I think not.

You want to say you are fair in the blog topics you post related to charters. You are not, and in not providing balanced viewpoints, you do a disservice to the voters in this state who should have both sides of the issue to make an informed decision.

CharterStarter, Too

September 29th, 2012
4:56 pm

@ John Konop – You are certainly entitled to your opinion. Regards. CS, T.

CharterStarter, Too

September 29th, 2012
5:02 pm

@ Sneak Peak – I agree to some extent that the link provided was not related to any sort of Parent Trigger law as we do not have one in Georgia; however, EL Mom is right that the school voted to part ways with its management organization. This is a board responding to its constituency and exercising its responsibility to the students and the tax payers.

@ Alex – Can you please explain to me how, if charters earn funds based on their students, the legislature will “break the bank?” And honestly sir, can we fall much further than #48 in our country. Don’t we have a moral imperative to do SOMETHING rather than stay status quo? We are one of the most impoverished states, which speaks to our education system. This impacts not only quality of life for Georgia citizens, but the state economy and the social programs that cannot be sustained based on our current output of qualified workers.

Marney

September 29th, 2012
7:09 pm

Doesn’t this article make the case quite nicely that reasonable people overseeing charters have decided to stop before breaking the bank? The commission didn’t approve any virtual charters until they had asked the general accounting office to give them an assessment of how much such a set up should legitimately have lower costs than a bricks and mortar school. Then they lowered the funding accordingly. Not sure why you are assuming that in Georgia a commission (even and especially one appointed by republicans) will behave in a fiscally irresponsible manner.

Yes, I have heard of the Cherokee one….have you heard of all the money wasted on lawyers in Dekalb by duly elected officials?

I love teaching. I hate what it is becoming...

September 29th, 2012
7:11 pm

Charter,

I have noticed you never seem to comment on anything that does not involve Charter Schools or the Charter school amendment. Does nothing else that is happening in education in our state hold any interest for you? I would think that if the desire to improve education in Georgia was so important to you, I might see you express an opinion on other topics occasionally. I can’t help but suspect you have a vested interest in Charters and not much else educational.

CharterStarter, Too

September 29th, 2012
9:07 pm

@ I love teaching – I am an avid reader on a variety of educational topics, but I usually only do the blog thing with charters. I post on other sites occasionally as it catches my eye (i.e., the homecoming girl), but charters are my thing, and I am deeply invested as my children are in charters.

sneak peak into education

September 29th, 2012
9:20 pm

CharterStarterToo-Since you are so interested in charters, I have posted this one especially for you. Of course, anyone else who wants to have a laugh and their eyes opened on what happens when the Parent Trigger Law is enforced, click on the link. It is a screenplay written to show what happens in the movie “Won’t Back Down” when the parents/teachers successfully “takeover” the school and the cameras have stopped rolling. It is a must read for anyone interested in the current and backhanded move by our legislature to privatize our public schools.

http://jerseyjazzman.blogspot.com/2012/09/wont-back-down-ii-sequel.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+JerseyJazzman+%28Jersey+Jazzman%29

CharterStarter, Too

September 29th, 2012
10:07 pm

@ Sneak a Peek – Have I ever said I have an opinion on the Parent Trigger? Currently, I don’t. It’s not in our state and I frankly haven’t done the requisite research to state an opinion on it. You will be the absolute first person I reach out to when I’m ready to start that research though, as you are such a valuable and knowledgeable source of information.

Lance

September 29th, 2012
10:18 pm

Charter Starter….if I thought you had the best interest of ALL children at heart – I would support you 100%. But all eveidence suggests we will pull out the best and essentially segregate our children – whether by race, ethnicity, learning. Those selected – whether lottery or those with enough welath to get to the Charter School – will find a school with much better funding per FTE. In the meantime, those left behind in failing schools will fall even further behind due to be starved for resources you propose to take away. Hey, I am not defending public education as the perfect plan…it sucks. Too much turning brats over to schools, to much concern with athletics, etc. But your solution is worse than the poison. Charter Schools WILL favor the affluent at the expense of other kids. All because certain north Fulton legislators do not like being boxed into a county with people they would never share the time of day. Charter Starter….want to help? Demand reform for ALL kids not just the select lottery chosen few. Do that and I will be impressed.

Lance

September 29th, 2012
10:22 pm

Charter Starter…..it occurs to me, you want all the perceived benefits of private school but you want taxpayers to fund your choice. Go straight to advocating for vouchers and see if you state paid voucher and the amount you ae willing to come out of pocket buys what you think your brats deserve.

CharterStarter, Too

September 29th, 2012
10:36 pm

@ Lance –

I’ve spent an awful lot of time on here educating those mistaken by providing factual information about the amendment. So how about this time you educate ME. Why don’t you show me where in the statute you can show:

1. Charters will take funds from local districts
2. Charters will segregate
3. Charters wlll earn more money per FTE

Show me.

As for vouchers – I am personally on the more conservative end of the choice spectrum. I support public dollars going where there is accountability for outcomes. Charters are required to meet all academic and fiscal accountability measures that traditional schools meet in exchange or public funds. I also support access by every child for educational options.