Using Race to the Top to pay for doctorates in DeKalb. Good idea or are there better uses for federal money?

Several of you have already commented on DeKalb’s plan to use about $345,00 of its taxpayer-funded federal Race to the Top grant to put eight administrators, including four high school principals and two assistant principals, through a three-year doctorate program at the DeKalb campus of Mercer University. So, I figured we ought to put the story out there for general discussion.

The state Department of Education has to sign off on the school system’s proposal to use the RTT funds to underwrite the doctorates and is expected to do so, possibly today.

According to the AJC:

Twenty-five other Georgia school districts also receive Race to the Top grants. But DeKalb is the only one using some grant money earmarked for teacher and school leader training to add to the 130 Ph.D. holders the system already has in leadership roles.

The idea doesn’t sit well with some in DeKalb.  “Why as taxpayers should we pay for their Ph.D.s?” asked Robert Richardson, a retired real estate agent. “With a Ph.D., they’ll probably get paid more money. They should pay for their own.”

In Georgia, pay raises are automatic for teachers who get a master’s degree or doctorate in their specialty.  Local school districts have discretion to give similar rewards to administrators who attain advanced degrees. A DeKalb school spokesman said there’s been no discussion of that for these eight doctoral candidates, four of whom, as high school principals, make between $85,000 and $111,000 annually.

Cheryl Atkinson, schools superintendent, defends using tax money to pay for the eight administrators to obtain doctorate degrees that teachers and others usually pay for themselves. “We need to begin to build a bench so there are people ready to take on and sustain the reforms that are put in place, ” she said.

The money can’t go to pay bus drivers or fill other budget gaps, Atkinson said. As a condition of the grant, the money has to be spent on training for teachers and school leaders, she said.

David Schutten, president of the Organization of DeKalb Educators, said he had not heard about the district’s plans and would like to know more about how the eight were selected and how the opportunity was advertised.  “I think it’s going to cause some resentment when people aren’t getting raises and there’s going to be this select group of people that got picked, ” Schutten said. Schutten said the money might be better spent bringing in good substitute teachers who could free up regular classroom teachers struggling with class management. This would allow the struggling teacher time to observe other teachers “who have it down, ” he said.  “With classes of 40 and 50 kids in high school, classroom management is paramount.”

Atkinson said the doctoral program is tailored specifically to address issues unique to DeKalb County, such as its high concentration of refugees and financial problems. About two dozen aspiring leaders completed applications and interviews for the eight openings, Atkinson said.

“We certainly wished we could have had more in the program, ” she said. “But we have to start small and do it well.”

Between 1994 and 1998, the school system put some staff through a doctoral program at Clark Atlanta University, though Atkinson acknowledges she has not investigated to see if that proved to be a worthwhile investment of taxpayer money. “To be honest, I have not drilled backwards, ” she said. “I have so much in front of me.”

The superintendent said there’s also a precedent in the system’s policy of paying for the training for teachers who want to be certified to teach gifted classes. “We offer our teachers the opportunity to receive gifted certification at the district expense because that’s going to make them better at what they do with children, ” she said. “The same goal is to offer something that is going to make these leaders better at what they do and ready to take on a greater challenge when that opportunity presents itself.”

Sonny Jester, former vice chairman of the DeKalb County Public School Foundation, a fundraising organization, said DeKalb has a history of lavishing resources on the administration instead of the classroom. “If that money can be used for something other than Ph.D.s for central office administrators, I think it would be a better use of the money, ” he said.

Those chosen for DeKalb’s program had to commit to stay with the district two or three years after completing their doctorates, said Jeff Dickerson, school system spokesman. Each has been with the district at least 10 years, he said.  The eight are enrolled only in evening courses and are expected to complete all their coursework and additional requirements on their own time, Dickerson said.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

94 comments Add your comment

Mortimer Collins

September 21st, 2012
9:21 am

“Cheryl Atkinson, schools superintendent, defends using tax money to pay for the eight administrators to obtain doctorate degrees that teachers and others usually pay for themselves. “We need to begin to build a bench so there are people ready to take on and sustain the reforms that are put in place, ” she said.”

But of course. This woman is no better than her predecessors. DeKalb is permanently sunk.

Dunwoody Mom

September 21st, 2012
9:27 am

My first though is to see the individuals receiving these grants. If they are Central Office “types”, then no this is not, in my view, an appropriate use of the money. However, one of the many issues that DCSD faces is the lack of really good Principals – especially at the high school level. If the district has identified school-based employees that they feel would make good principals, then, I’ll go against popular opinion, and say this could be a good use of the money. From what I understand, there are specific uses tied to RTTT monies and it can’t be used for any “wish-list” items that stakeholders have – am I correct?

Dunwoody Mom

September 21st, 2012
9:36 am

Oops, I “mis-read”… “including four high school principals and two assistant principals,”…

I can understand Assistant Principals, but individuals who are already principals? How is that “building a bench”?

claytondawg

September 21st, 2012
9:39 am

As usual, a Board of Education has decided to use funds to help out TOP-HEAVY administrators instead of the classroom, which is where the crux of the educational system lies. It’s so incomprehensible to me how taxpayers’ money is utlilized throughout the local, state, and national levels. Ms. Atkinson states: “…using tax money to pay for eight adminitrators to obtain doctorate degrees that teachers and others usually pay for themselves.” There you have it. The Boards of Education have now stepped into another arena where they should not delve. Paying administrators for a PhD who already make a pretty darn good salary compared to the classroom teacher continues and will continue to create distrust and lower morale for teachers. Oh, wait…teachers and low morale seem to be the norm anyway.

Dekalbite

September 21st, 2012
9:40 am

IMHO – the teachers in the RTT schools hold have been asked what they needin the way of staff development. After all, they are the personnel who teach students math, science, social studies and language arts, the content students are send to school to master. Until Dr. Atkinson involves the personnel who are responsible for delivering this content to students, her efforts will come to naught.

It’s very sad for students that aloof this RTT money is coming to DeKalb and yet not a single teacher to directly work with students has been added. Instead, highly paid non teaching Data Coaches and their clerical support seem to be the main use of the money – even more data collected from students and teachers to keep them off task. And now – we have to add on sending administrators back for additional degrees. I would rather principals and administrators go to successful school systems and get a birds eye view of how other systems accomplish the tasks of successfully working with disadvantaged students than pay for their degrees.

Dekalbite

September 21st, 2012
9:42 am

Sorry – should have read
“IMHO – the teachers in the RTT schools should have been asked what they need in the way of staff development”

Renee Lord

September 21st, 2012
9:43 am

The automatic pay increase seems to be the motivating factor for many educators seeking advanced degrees rather than a burning desire to teach children effectively. Tax payers certainly don’t need to be funding advanced, but rather spending these funds training and supporting teachers who are in the classrooms.

Dunwoody Mom

September 21st, 2012
9:47 am

@Renee Lord…would you not consider a top notch principal in each school as “supporting” teachers? I think you would be surprised at the number of teachers who desire and value a competent, supportive, caring principal as head administrator of their school. I say that as I have seen how an incompetent principal can demoralize teachers and parents – even to the point of teachers running, not walking, out of said school.

RAMZAD

September 21st, 2012
9:47 am

DeKalb has never seen a piece of official corruption it did not like.

The Deal

September 21st, 2012
9:59 am

If a family doesn’t have enough to eat, you don’t send the dad to graduate school and let the kids starve while he’s doing it.

It is not my school system’s place to pay for higher degrees for people who already qualified for the job they are in. Does the school system pay for teachers to get their masters degrees? Do we REALLY think that these 8 people can do their full-time jobs and go to school and not spend one bit of their day jobs doing degree-related work? This is more top-down, trickle-down BS from the superintendent. Start with the classroom and go up. Put that RTTT money directly into the classroom or use it to create a program that emulates a successful school system’s in-house development program. I cannot believe this is even something worth debating.

Surrounding school systems have logical in-house leadership development programs that do not confer a Ph.D. on their attendees, cost a fraction of this, reach a larger group of people, and tailor the program to their needs. What successful systems don’t do is pay for a one-way ticket out of the the school system that was stupid enough to pay for it. Even the RTTT adminstrator knows this is an unorthodox (but technically allowable) use of these funds.

[head banging against the wall]

freddythefreeloader

September 21st, 2012
9:59 am

Are you kiddin’ me? What nonsense. The Dekalb school system should be embarrased by this.
The fact that they are trying to defend it is also embarrasing. Cronyism. Once they get their
degrees, they automatically get a raise if I heard right. More taxpayer dime. And a 2 year
commitment. Wow. The citizens of Dekalb are the ones getting “drilled backwards” if
Ms. Atkinson gets away with this. Poor leadership. But then, “when in Rome” Aye?

Dunwoody Mom

September 21st, 2012
10:02 am

To be honest, I just don’t get it….I was at one of the Parent Roundtables Dr. Atkinson held when she was first hired. More than 1 speaker decried the lack of good Principals in our schools and my guess is that she probably heard that as well at the Teacher Roundtables. So, she hears this and think, ok, here is money that does not come out of the DCSD general budget and can’t be used for everyday use within the schools, that we can use to try and address this issue. And now, people have a problem with this?

You know, I think people just want to be negative about everything that happens with DCSD. I don’t understand, truly, I don’t.

Inman Park Boy

September 21st, 2012
10:07 am

I’ll tell you right now that a PhD is NO guarantee of a “good principal.” Put good leaders in the principal positions, not wall paper doctors.

Progressive Humanist

September 21st, 2012
10:07 am

In addition to this questionable practice from the standpoint of taxpayers, the “PhDs” are likely in leadership, a field in which the degrees aren’t worth the paper they’re printed on.

Victor Kulkosky

September 21st, 2012
10:11 am

A number of issues arise here:

1. Is there solid proof that simply getting an advanced degree makes you a better teacher, rather than experience, support and ongoing training?

2. I suspect the proliferation of online advanced education degree programs is related to people’s willingness to pay for the degrees, given the promise of pay raises simply for getting the degrees.

3. All teacher ed programs are not created equal. There are huge differences in academic rigor, qualifications of faculty, resources and so on. If Dekalb insists on sending people to school on the public’s dime, will such factors be considered?

4. How will it be determined that the public’s investment in these Doctors actually paid off? Will the lucky few be required to demonstrate some tangible improvements in their and their school’s performances?

Marney

September 21st, 2012
10:19 am

Actually the part that most floors me is: “to add to the 130 Ph.D. holders that the system already has in leadership roles.” Right there it tells me that a Ph.D. in educational leadership is an oxymoron. If 130 of them can’t supply it, what makes them think 138 will change anything.

seen it all

September 21st, 2012
10:20 am

I agree with Deal. Why should the school system pay people to get doctorate degrees when, 1) their job really doesn’t require it, 2) this newly acquired doctorate degree isn’t going to improve the performance of the people involved OR lead to higher student achievment, and 3) nobody is going to pay me to get a doctorate degree. I paid for all of my schooling, including graduate level work, out of my own pocket.

Most importantly, in the realm of public education, most educators seek graduate degrees for one purpose and one purpose only– AN ADVANCEMENT IN SALARY. The career improvement prospects of higher degrees are minimal, particularly for teachers. With the exception of principals, vice principals, and some central office staff, most people don’t need higher degrees. You can teach with a bachelor’s degree. You learn more studying on your own, taking local professional development, and real life experience in the classroom than you do taking graduate level courses.

All a doctorate of education (Ed. D) is good for is getting a star on your resume.

The Deal

September 21st, 2012
10:22 am

Dunwoody Mom, RTTT talks about principal INDUCTION programs. What Dr. Atkinson is doing is paying for degrees for people who are already in the job. If they are not getting the job done, do you not think there are qualified principal candidates out in the field that we can simply hire? How has spending $45,000 on a degree ever guaranteed success?

“Another blog” provided the link to the Georgia RTTT website. Go look there and see how many other things can be done with the RTTT money. If she is intent on spending money on a leadership training program, then there are many more ways you can do it that will reach more people at less cost. Why does DeKalb always have to make things so difficult? DCSD is not a leader, it is not innovative, it cannot reinvent the wheel. It needs to look at what other successful school systems of its size do and COPY THEM.

Disgusted in Dekalb

September 21st, 2012
10:26 am

As soon as the principals and assistant principals get these taxpayer-funded degrees, they will grab the first central office position that becomes available to them. This is not only NOT a good use of taxpayer dollars (and federal RTTT funds ARE taxpayer dollars), it will actually lead to a more top-heavy DCSS. Horrendous idea.

Dunwoody Mom

September 21st, 2012
10:29 am

@The Deal…I made the statement earlier that current principals should not be involved in this. If they need to “further their education” in order to be a good principal, then they shouldn’t be a principal now…but as we all know, DCSD does not have enough good principals to “go around”.

do you not think there are qualified principal candidates out in the field that we can simply hire?

No, I don’t. I doubt seriously there are enough “good” principals “out there” to be hired. Despite what some want to believe, there is a vacuum of good principals in every local school district, not just in DeKalb. Do I think this is the “best” way of creating a bench? I don’t know, maybe not, but at least the effort is being made and maybe, just maybe, the school district can get away from putting supremely unqualified individuals into Principal jobs.

Follow the Course

September 21st, 2012
10:37 am

“Over education” is not a good thing. Educators learn and “repeat” what was taught. It is doing the exact same thing over and over again and expecting a different outcome ieach time … well this idea to “grant” PhD’s … is just plain crazy.

Original thinkers are not allowed in this process because they have to conform to the thinking of their predecessors.

Ernest

September 21st, 2012
10:40 am

Dunwoody Mom, I agree with your comment at 10:02am. I’ve heard many throughout the community speak about the ‘leadership void’ is many schools. We’ve seen the formula of someone working in the classroom for 3-5 years then looking to get into leadership. I don’t begrudge anyone wanting to be a school leader (along with increasing their salary) but I don’t believe this ‘fast track’ we’ve seen in recent years has benefited student achievement. I always understood the principal to be the instructional leader for the school. Perhaps we as citizens have turned it into more of a management role. If RTTT allows money to be spent for investing in leadership development, what’s this big deal with the model DeKalb chooses?

I could sit back and ‘nitpick’ every decision a superintendent makes however at some point I have to acknowledge they are the education professional. I’m no better than some Board members if I will micromanage every decision that is made. Just because other school districts are not doing this does not make this wrong. As I understand, this has been done before in the 90’s. If there are lessons to be learned from that, hopefully they can be applied.

StnMtnMOM

September 21st, 2012
10:51 am

@Inman Park Boy-My sentiments exactly. There is absolutely no guarantee the Principals and/or Asst. Principals (with a PhD) will lead our schools to victory in every classroom or simply pad their pockets and see them leave after the 2 yr. requirement. I wonder how many principals or asst. principals had PhDs back in the 80s (when I attended HS). I would guess not half of them and they truly lead with precision and dedication. As long as Dekalb say they are putting the students first and not showing that on a consistent basis..they will always encounter discord and backlash from the stakeholders.

Gail

September 21st, 2012
10:52 am

I don’t think that a doctorate guarantees a better leader. But if the RTT people say it is ok, is there a condition that once they get the degrees that they have to they stay in that position or at least stay in the DeKalb School System for a specific period of time? Otherwise,what’s to prevent them from having DeKalb(RTT) pay for their doctorate and then get a job somewhere else for higher pay?

Renee Lord

September 21st, 2012
10:54 am

@Gail-Even if there is a requirement that says the educator has to stay, do you really want someone working for the system who is ready to move on? Yet, another reason this is a poor use of tax dollars.

Maureen Downey

September 21st, 2012
10:55 am

@To all, A DeKalb teacher sent me this note about the use of RTT funds for doctorates:

After learning of Dekalb’s intention to pay for eight employees’ doctorates with RTT funds, money intended to “support new approaches to school improvement,” I emailed the Georgia Department of Education to express my concerns. I felt that this was my ethical duty since I see so many students who would benefit more from smaller classes, intensive reading instruction, and meaningful intervention programs.And unlike the superintendent, I have the data-CRCT scores, IOWA test results, AP scores, and the findings and recommendations of last year’s curriculum and instruction audit-to support my recommendations.

But there are too many of us teachers who feel as if no one is genuinely interested in improving this school district so that students are granted the educational opportunities they deserve. How long has it taken SACS to finally recognize the district’s problems with governance and finance? How did the state’s decision to reduce budgets and increase class sizes force districts like Dekalb to focus first on the classroom? And how has the state ensured that Race to the Top Funds would be used responsibly?

There is also the valid concern for one’s job that may prevent some teachers from speaking out. Districts like Dekalb have been cutting educators,and the new Teacher Keys and Reduction in Force policies could make a teacher feel vulnerable. At times it even appears that any questions a teacher may ask about the feasibility of new initiatives or the meangfulness of mandated policies are viewed only as attacks on the leaders.

It seems to me that until enough teachers are involved in the discussions and decision-making little will change.

catlady

September 21st, 2012
10:56 am

Absolutely, totally inappropriate! If money needs to be spent for training, it should be the boots on the ground teachers! And at a private college!? Totally insane! If these “administrators” don’t already know what they are doing, GET THEM OUT OF ADMINISTRATION!

If I had a dog in this race, I would be SOOO mad!

catlady

September 21st, 2012
10:56 am

WTH, I am mad anyway! How tone deaf can they be?

Pride and Joy

September 21st, 2012
11:10 am

THis should be illegal. RTTT should be used to hire real educated teachers to relieve overcrowded classrooms, not enrich the rich.

catlady

September 21st, 2012
11:15 am

Yeah, when I think of an outstanding ed leadership program, I first think, “Mercer!”

At least the folks (Chosen Few) should sign on with an agreement to 1) work as a principal or AP for 5 years for Dekalb after getting the degree, 2) forego any “additional income” during those 5 years and 3) if they “have” to leave early they will repay the funds spent on their behalf.

Miss Management

September 21st, 2012
11:17 am

” build a bench” – hmmm. Who says these people will end up being ‘great’ just due to this program? Leadership can’t always be ‘taught’ – great leaders are natural leaders. Wouldn’t it be easier – and MUCH faster – to just do a national search and HIRE some PROVEN leaders to lead our struggling schools? These degrees will take 3 years. Then more time will go by as these new ‘leaders’ ramp up. This could be a 5 year plan! Students and teachers need great principals today!

Ernest

September 21st, 2012
11:29 am

@Maureen, I don’t think anyone will disagree with the comments shared by the DeKalb Teacher. We know the keys to instructional success start with early learning opportunities, emphasizing reading and phonics. This can be best done in small learning groups.

The reality is that property tax revenues have shrunk substantially, partially due to the housing crisis. Given 90% of school budgets are salaries and compensation, personnel will be impacted . As we discussed in the Fayette blog yesterday, they are having similar challenges with school closings to remedy budget shortfalls in addition to across the board salary cuts. I was surprised to read that some of their citizens believe their Board is dysfunctional but that is for the media to report.

Tough decisions have to be made with regards to how to use fewer dollars. I still contend that DeKalb has way to many schools and needs to go on an aggressive program to close and consolidate. What do you believe the community reaction will be if this is proposed? You sat in those meetings in DeKalb a few years ago so you recall the emotion in the room. Again, we saw what just happened in Fayette.

I don’t like the class sizes today but what options do we have given the revenue reductions? I agree with Dr. Trotter that firmly addressing discipline could make current class sizes an easier pill to swallow but that is not a long term solution. I’m waiting to read/hear about a workable solution that can be done within the current budget and does not compromise any federal or state laws.

Mom of 3

September 21st, 2012
11:36 am

Dekalb County schools are in crisis. I don’t understand why the people who are running it do not see this. If your family was close to bankruptcy, would you go out and buy food for your children? Or would you buy a new washing machine/dryer. It’s not that educating these 8 people is a terrible thing. It’s that there are so many more basic needs that the county leaders are ignoring. The new washing machine would be great. But the old one still works. When you are able to get your financial house in order, then you buy the washing machine. Dekalb County leaders need to stop pretending that everything is fine and face what is really going on.

College Professor

September 21st, 2012
12:15 pm

What an appalling waste of money made even more egregious by wasting it on worthless degrees. And let us not forget that the school board raised taxes this year because it did not have enough money to run the system.

The whole situation stinks.

Another Math Teacher

September 21st, 2012
12:21 pm

Theft.

Leadership certificates and Education degrees, especially at the L-5, L-6, and L-7 levels are worthless. They are just there to get a raise. The 3 Rs in Education. Read. Regurgitate. Raise.

If you call a PhD or EdD in Education a Doctor, make sure to use air quotes.

Terry Krugman

September 21st, 2012
12:26 pm

I am a 20 + year veteran of the DCSS. I have two adanced degrees and am certified in three fields. Over the last few years I have attended numerous workshops and conferences to enhance my skills and content knowledge. All of this was done at my own expense and there were numerous times when I was the sole self-funded participant. The only time I requested reimbursement, the county ‘lost’ the paperwork. I have very little faith in how the central office handles money and selects candidates

Teacher Reader

September 21st, 2012
12:27 pm

Dunwoody Mom, A PhD, EdD or any other higher level degree does not make a good, quality principal. Degrees do not make a principal great. Principals are great because they put children and teachers above the BS in the school district.

These people were hand picked and are most likely friends and family, who will get an automatic pay raise at the completion of this degree. They will use school time to do their work and the children will lose out.

I thought that you were smarter than to equate a quality principal with an advanced degree.

Dunwoody Mom

September 21st, 2012
12:31 pm

@Teacher Reader….I did not equate a quality principal with an advanced degree…My point was, that hopefully, this is an avenue where the school district can identify and educate AP’s and Teachers (I don’t believe that current Principals should be part of this offering) who would make good Principals in a school district that is so, so void of good Principals.

So, is there a reason you took my words and twisted them to suit your point? That kind of nonsense belongs on another blog.

2nd Year Teacher

September 21st, 2012
12:36 pm

Total BS.

I have to pay for color paper, printer cartridges, hand santitizer, dry-erase markers, etc. out of my own pocket, but APs and principals get education for free.

concernedmom30329

September 21st, 2012
12:42 pm

This money could be used to impact 100s of administrators and teachers. Instead, it will benefit 8. DeKalb has some of the lowest test scores in the metro area (even among like populations) and this is how it chooses to use funds that must be used for professional development?
Across the country, there are professionals making strides with poor and disadvantaged students They run schools where students are achieving, despite their disadvantages. Why not bring in some of these folks to work with our teachers and our principals?

bu2

September 21st, 2012
12:47 pm

They could do a lot more with this money even if used for training. They are simply spending it on 8 people. Not sure how much 345,00 is (I’m assuming Maureen put the comma in the wrong place and its 34,500), but you could put 170 people in a $200 course for $34,000.

Teacher Reader

September 21st, 2012
12:47 pm

@ Dunwoody Mom, These people were hand picked, you think that they picked good principals to get these degrees, or do you think friends and family were chosen for more salary increases. Sorry but I doubt that people were chosen because they were already good principals. That doesn’t happen in DeKalb. It’ always who you know.

Can we afford to give Atkinson the benefit of the doubt? NO!!!! Our children’s futures are at stake here. We cannot afford to have any more children be useful idiots who can barely read, write, and do basic math. We need thinkers, questioners, problem solvers. We don’t need more people with advanced degrees. We need our focus to be on providing a quality education and teaching our children how to think and problem solve, not take a stupid test.

Sorry, but every good principal that I ever worked for never had a PhD. The degree does not make the person great or even good. Mercer is not the place where I’d think one would get a good or even decent advanced education degree, although these degrees really aren’t worth the paper they are printed on, and are only valuable in giving the paper holder more money.

Teacher Reader

September 21st, 2012
12:52 pm

Race to the Top dollars are tax dollars, your money and my money. We all need to email those involved in the GA Department of Education and Race to the Top and tell them how we feel about DeKalb wanting to use tax dollars to fund higher salaries for a certain few, instead of spending it directly on things that could benefit the children in failing schools more directly.

Even if you’re not in DeKalb you should be outraged that Atkinson wants to use YOUR money this way. This is an outrageous and our voices need to be heard loud and clear!

Teresa MacCartney
Deputy Superintendent
Race to the Top Implementation
Email: tmaccartney@doe.k12.ga.us

Jon Rogers
Race to the Top Communications/Information
Email: jonrogers@gadoe.org

Dunwoody Mom

September 21st, 2012
12:53 pm

@Teacher Reader, I don’t know the names of the individuals who were chosen, do you?

Again, I never indicated that having a PhD makes a person great or good. What’s wrong with Mercer?

Dunwoody Mom

September 21st, 2012
12:57 pm

We all need to email those involved in the GA Department of Education and Race to the Top and tell them how we feel about DeKalb wanting to use tax dollars to fund higher salaries for a certain few

Well, considering that the grant money being used here can only be used for training teachers or school leaders, I’m not sure those entities will be too interested in your email. You may not agree with how Dr. Atkinson is using this money, but, from what I understand, her use of it does not violate any terms of the RTTT grant.

Dunwoody Mom

September 21st, 2012
12:59 pm

But, if her use does violate the grant terms, the GADOE will disallow its use.

Maureen Downey

September 21st, 2012
1:14 pm

@Dunwoody, I did a panel at the Mercer ed grad school last year and was very impressed with the faculty I met there.
Maureen

Teacher Reader

September 21st, 2012
1:21 pm

Dunwoody Mom, it’s our money and taxpayers have a right to voice their desire to have it impact the most students and to help these children receive a quality education.

According to the DOE Race to the Top funds are to be used to:
1. Recruiting, preparing, rewarding, and retaining effective teachers and principals, especially where they are needed most; and
2. Adopting standards and assessments that prepare students to succeed in college and the workplace and to compete in the global economy;
3. Building data systems that measure student growth and success, and inform teachers and principals about how they can improve instruction;
4. Turning around our lowest–achieving schools.

These individuals already hold their administration certification, so adding a PhD to their credentials does not fit number one, and goes against the purpose and intent of these funds.

The Deal

September 21st, 2012
1:27 pm

@bu2, it’s $345,000. As in, $45,000 per person.

Dunwoody Mom

September 21st, 2012
1:27 pm

@Teacher Reader,,,I am not disputing that you have a right to voice your thoughts…go for it….