Annual paid teacher leave: Average is 13.6 days for veterans. Fulton gives teachers 20 days.

Of Georgia's largest systems, Fulton offers the most teacher leave, according to a new study.  (AP Images)

Of Georgia's largest systems, Fulton offers the most teacher leave, according to a new study. (AP Images)

The print AJC offered several provocative education stories over the past few days, including one on the paid leave afforded teachers in large school districts.

The story was based on a new report from the National Council on Teacher Quality, which noted wide differences nationwide in leave policies and amounts. (Before commenting, please try to read the report as it explains in detail how leave is defined.)

Who provides the least teacher leave? According to the report:

Of the 26 districts which offer 10 or fewer days of general leave, nine are located in Florida. California, Louisiana, and Texas each have four districts with relatively little leave.

The TR3 district with the least amount of general leave is Desoto County, Mississippi, which only gives teachers 9 days.Teachers working for the DeSoto County (Miss.) school system get the fewest days  — nine.

Who gives the most leave? The report says:

“While Newark offers a small number of its teachers the most leave of any school district (25+ years of experience), Hartford, Connecticut offers all of its teachers 25 days of general leave each year (equivalent to five weeks, or 13 percent, of the school year). Twenty of those days are classified as sick leave but 5 can be used for personal reasons; teachers then get an additional 5 personal days after they’ve used all of their sick leave, effectively blurring any distinction between the two types of leave.

Two other districts offer general leave that adds up to 13 percent of the days teachers work each year: Toledo and Burlington, Vermont. In both of these districts, teachers get 24 days of general leave each year.

The AJC story looked at leave in the largest Georgia districts:

Fulton County is far and away the best place to work if you’re a metro Atlanta teacher looking for the most days off a year. Fulton teachers with 10 or more years’ experience receive 20 general leave days a year, which is among the most in the nation, according to a survey by the Washington-based National Council on Teacher Quality, which ranked 113 school systems nationwide.

By contrast, Atlanta Public Schools, DeKalb County and Gwinnett County teachers get only 12.5 general leave days a year. Of the core metro counties, Cobb County offers the fewest (11.9). In Fulton, even teachers with less than 10 years’ experience get 15 general leave days a year.

General leave includes sick days and personal days off, according to the study.

Teachers already work fewer days per year — about 185 — than employees in other professions, who average about 230 work days a year. National Council on Teacher Quality president Kate Walsh said that although public schools have cut budgets in recent years, few if any have cut days off. That’s not a political battle a superintendent wants to fight, ” she said.

I called Fulton County to verify its leave policy and to make sure the numbers in the report were correct. I received this response:

The numbers are accurate. State law requires 12.5 days and we go beyond that by 2.5 days (15 days maximum) for employees with less than 10 years of service. And 20 days maximum for employees with more than 10 years of service. This leave is district policy, approved by the Fulton County School Board. As with all policies, this policy will be reviewed routinely to consider any need for adjustment.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

85 comments Add your comment

TeacherMom4

September 4th, 2012
8:02 pm

In my county, it doesn’t matter how much sick time you have saved up, you can only be paid for 6 weeks for maternity leave. This means that financially people have to come back to work unless they can afford 6 additional weeks unpaid, for the total of 12 FMLA weeks. The days also include personal days (3 total). Last year was the first time in 6 years that I took a day off for being sick. I generally only miss if one of my kids are sick (I have 4). I have even sent my kids to school sick to avoid being out. I figure my kid got sick because somebody else didn’t want to be out of their job either. I am exposed to far more in the way of biohazards than my engineer husband. He also expects me to be the one who stays home with a sick kid every time.

Ron F.

September 4th, 2012
8:06 pm

And another thing: if we’re going to compare teacher salaries to the private sector, think about this: you need a pen in your office. Where do you go? the supply closet, cabinet, etc. Your printer needs paper, where do you go? Same place. You need certain materials for a business meeting presentation, what do you do? You fill out a purchase order and get the materials. Where do teachers go for these things? In most place I know of, they go to their own wallets and pay. In the last five years or so, we’ve gotten nothing to help cover the cost of daily supplies. Most of us buy hand sanitizer, tissues, and other supplies for our kids to use from our own money. What hospital makes the surgeon bring his own supplies? What business makes the employee pay for the paperwork he/she is expected to print and submit?

While the average teacher salary may seem like a lot, think about this: what you expect in a business where the vast majority of employees has at least one, and usually more than one, college degree? What would you think fair for someone with twenty years of experience and a master’s degree to make?

Ron F.

September 4th, 2012
8:10 pm

@Dr. Henson: thanks for sharing your daily rate. I thought you would, and it’s not bad considering the responsibilities of your job. I don’t have the interest in that level of service. Like my current superintendent, you seem to do your share to earn the salary. I’m sure my tone earlier showed how tired I am of getting all the negative comments about what we’re paid without the critics understanding just what we do day in and day out to “earn” that money, and what we give back monetarily and out of our heart and soul to be successful. They find one example of a bad apple and want to throw out the whole orchard. I wonder what they think good teachers will be willing to work for if they make the benefits what they see as “fair.” How many days of sick leave are you able to currently give your teachers?

Teacher

September 4th, 2012
8:41 pm

I respect this blog for the most part, but this is an awful example of baiting teacher haters. The writer should have pointed out that the county average for sick days used is way below the number of days given. Most teachers save up these sick days for maternity or paternity leave? Can one person on this blog make a case that a new mother or father should be deprived of having a few weeks to spend with their new born without worrying about financial ruin? If you try to, then you truly have no soul.

Dr. Monica Henson

September 4th, 2012
8:55 pm

Real World Education posted, “the average experience level in a classroom is only a few years.” Not true.

The National Center for Education Statistics’ most recent figures are from 2007-2008 and show that nationally, teachers average about 14 years of experience. “About 17 percent of teachers had 3 or fewer years of experience, 28 percent had 4–9 years of experience, 27 percent had 10–19 years of experience, and 27 percent had 20 or more years of experience. For the most part, this distribution did not change between 2003–04 and 2007–08; however, the percentage of teachers with 20 or more years of experience was lower in 2007–08 than it was in 2003–04 (30 percent).”

MsCrabtree

September 4th, 2012
8:57 pm

The soon to be gone supe of Clayton County and his Human Resources sidekick will terminate you if you take 6 sick days. God forbid you get sick. He did this by admin rule, so he didn’t need the BOE to approve it.

Dr. Monica Henson

September 4th, 2012
9:15 pm

Ron, I am happy to share information that is public record. :) I usually end up working in the neighborhood of 70 to 75 hours a week (I am not counting my commute time into Downtown Atlanta, alhtough I use that time to make work-related phone calls on my hands-free device). When I was a classroom teacher (middle and high school English & history) I worked around 50 to 55 hours most weeks during the school year, including paper grading after school hours, more for the years I coached sports.

All of my employees, including me, start out with 8 sick days at the beginning of the first fiscal year when hired–this is prorated down by 2 days per quarter for employees hired after the first fiscal quarter. Unused sick time can be banked for future use, up to 70 days. Employees are not paid for sick time upon separation from employment.

We provide short-term disability coverage at no cost to our employees. They can accrue up to 70 days STD and bank it.

Maternity leave is treated like any other temporary disability. Employees can use sick leave, vacation time, & short-term disability, as well as Family & Medical Leave. Paternity leave is treated the same as maternity leave, except that employees can’t use short-term disability leave for it.

bootney farnsworth

September 4th, 2012
9:21 pm

someone needs to explain to slob the concept of salaried and contract workers.

bootney farnsworth

September 4th, 2012
9:24 pm

@ slob

“crybabies are always crybabies”

so you do have a mirror. excellent

bootney farnsworth

September 4th, 2012
9:27 pm

@ P&J

“I get zero paid days off. No holiday. No sick pay. No vacation days. No paid training time. If I show up to work and get something done, I get paid. That’s it. That’s life in the real world.”

life in your world, perhaps, but not for most Americans,.
stinks to be you

bootney farnsworth

September 4th, 2012
9:30 pm

@ William

lazy man you.
when GPC put me out the door, I had almost 700 hours sick & vacation leave. not that I’m getting compensated for it. guess we were being lazy together.

Dr. Monica Henson

September 4th, 2012
9:41 pm

I don’t think it’s realistic to compare teachers salaries to private-sector compensation. Teacher salaries are tied to length of service and adding degrees, and for the most part they are not tied to any sort of real performance outcomes. another comment posted about bonuses paid to private-sector employees. Bonuses are generally tied to quantifiable outcomes, such as sales figures and other ways of generating business for the company. Education employee unions and other membership organizations fight tooth and nail against any type of change to the salary structure that public school districts follow, except to raise pay without adding accountability measures that take into account student achievement. As long as this kind of rhetoric dominates the teachers’ side of the conversation, the general public will never be willing to support increasing teachers’ pay, other than paying lip service to the idea that teachers are overworked and underpaid.

Math & Tech teacher

September 4th, 2012
9:47 pm

What a news story, AJC is teacher bashing again!! The average teacher salary is $52K? Where? I’ve been teaching for 10 years and haven’t had a raise in the last 3 due to furloughs and budget cutbacks. So how is salary increasing? BTW, I am 10 years in and actually make LESS THAN $50K a year, however the stated salary schedule would put me at just more than $50K. I work from 7:30am to 5:30pm every day with a 20 min lunch break that is used to supervise children while I eat. That does allow for the bathroom break, but nothing else. Planning time is used for copying, emails, conferences, meetings, etc. I work another 15 – 25 hrs on weekends grading and posting grades. My God folks, that is 50 hrs a week at school and another 20 on weekends, and NO, I do NOT DRAW THE $50K as stated by the “experts”. I DO NOT NOT NOT GET PAID FOR HOLIDAYS, BREAKS, OR SUMMERS!!!!! I DO NOT GET “OVERTIME”.

Sick leave is restricted use and Fulton County has rules against taking personal days on Fridays or Mondays. Sick leave is NOT A COST to the taxpayer UNTIL IT IS TAKEN. Then it is only used when one is sick!!!!! In my current system we don’t even take sick leave because the system does not have the money to pay for substitutes. It is emergency use only and days taken are tracked by personnel.

AJC, enough fantasy. When will you publish the reality?

Dr. Monica Henson

September 4th, 2012
10:12 pm

Private-sector employees on salary are not paid for weekends, either. I’m not sure how that is relevant. Teachers are not paid for days outside the ones they actually work, but take a look at the comparison in this aspect: a private- or public-sector exempt employee earning $52K, working year-round except for two weeks’ vacation and about ten paid holidays, puts in 241 days’ of work (365 days in a year – 104 weekend days – 10 vacation days – 10 holidays). At 8 hours a day, that’s 1,928 hours. At $52K, that employee is earning $26.97 an hour, regardless of any overtime worked.

A public school teacher works 190 days a year at an average $52K annually. At 8 hours a day, that’s 1,520 hours. At $52K that teacher is earning $34.21 an hour. Let’s assume the teacher actually works 50 hours a week, even though s/he is not paid overtime. This is not the case every week of the year, because there is a testing window in the spring, when holidays approach there may some “noninstructional” days being factored in (a practice I despise and did not indulge in, but I’ve seen way more teachers do it than not), and after state testing, many teachers let up and don’t assign the volume of work to be scored that they did prior to testing. I estimate (conservatively) that there is an average of 20 days out of the 180 student contact days that teachers do not work any overtime at all. So for 140 days, or 28 weeks, the teacher is logging extra hours at 20 hours per week. 28 * 20 = 560 additional hours added onto the 1520 paid hours, for a total of 2080 hours. Prorated, the teacher earning $52K a year is actually earning $25 an hour, a difference of $1.97 an hour less than the private-sector employee.

I’ll bet that most employees, public or private, earning $52K would be willing to consider taking a $1.97 hourly cut in pay to gain a weeklong break at Thanksgiving, a two-week break at Christmas & New Year’s, another week in the spring, and eight weeks in the summer. Particularly if they have school-age kids.

Dr. Monica Henson

September 4th, 2012
10:19 pm

Whoops, I miscalculated. An extra TEN hours a week for 50 hours weekly, not 20. 10 hours a week extra * 28 weeks = 280 hours. Added onto the 1520 paid hours annually, that’s 1800 hours. At $52K a year, the teacher is earning $28.89 an hour.

Hey Teacher

September 4th, 2012
10:21 pm

Just because teachers accrue sick leave does not mean it is possible to actually USE said leave. In my district, there are so many “rules” about taking leave that most of us only use it when we have no other choice because you or someone in your family is seriously ill. We are given 10 plus days per year is to cover maternity leave and other long term illnesses which occur maybe a few times a career. Many counties do not offer short term disability leave, so sick leave is the only way to cover a family illness, maternity or paternity leave, an accident or other event.

Dr. C

September 4th, 2012
11:44 pm

It seems odd that both “sides” here seem blind to the fact that all salaried workers, teachers and private sector work more than 8 hours a day. While I think most people understand that teachers often work >8 hours a day and take work home with them… I did that for 28 years in the private sector. My wife was a teacher, so we spent many an evening working at home. When I retired, I left 24 weeks of sick tome on the shelf. The righteous indignation some of the teachers here express seems tainted by a lack of understanding that long hours, work at home, and practical limits on time off are not issues they alone experience.

I love teaching. I hate what it is becoming...

September 5th, 2012
6:23 am

@Dr. Henson “I estimate (conservatively) that there is an average of 20 days out of the 180 student contact days that teachers do not work any overtime at all.”

First of all, many of us work more than the 180 days they students are in school. Even on “workshop” days, many of us arrive at school before the workshop, work, go to the workshop, then go back to school to work more. Secondly, many of us also spend several days during the summer in the classroom getting ready or dealing with creating lessons. Furthermore, I always keep track of how many days I actually leave work ON TIME and do not stay late. Last year it was 12, and that was because I had some health issues and many doctors appointments – which I scheduled AFTER hours to keep from having to use sick days. They year before, it was 8. The year before that, I think it was around 10. I do not recall EVER leaving on time 20 days…nor do I recall my colleagues doing so – except for the ones with small children, who often then come BACK to work after they have seen to their kids.

And less that $30 an hour is not really a great salary for a profession that often requires a graduate level degree.

I wish we could have a “reality” show based upon what teachers actually do in a day – I think most of the public would be shocked at how little down time we actually have.

RealWorldEducation

September 5th, 2012
6:48 am

Dr. Monica Henson

September 5th, 2012
7:27 am

RealWorldEducation, the fact that students were “more likely to encounter a teacher” with fewer than 3 years’ experience in 2011 means that the average number of inexperienced teachers had risen somewhat from the 2008 average of 17%, not that most teachers working now average one year’s experience nationally.

Entitlement Society

September 5th, 2012
7:42 am

@Another Comment – obviously you don’t work in the Private Sector. Don’t speak about which you don’t know firsthand.

Another Math Teacher

September 5th, 2012
10:51 am

Monica Henson : “Whoops, I miscalculated. An extra TEN hours a week for 50 hours weekly, not 20. 10 hours a week extra * 28 weeks = 280 hours. Added onto the 1520 paid hours annually, that’s 1800 hours. At $52K a year, the teacher is earning $28.89 an hour.”

Wow, again I have to assume you work in a school where they ride unicorns to work. I worked 2350 hours a year while teaching. The only ones that I saw working less were the P.E. teachers and the teachers who were working out their contract before moving to a new job.

So, let’s use the $52000 figure you cite. 2350 hours per year is below average, but we’ll use that as well.

$52000 / 2350 hours = $22.12/hour.

If you think the teachers you worked with only worked 1800 hours a year you probably should not be in administration. Oh, wait, weren’t you NBCT and teaching low end students and such? How many hours did *you* work?

“Private-sector employees on salary are not paid for weekends, either.”

You don’t know the difference between salaried and contract? Hint: teachers are contract employees, not salaried. Private sector contract employees are paid what their contract says they are paid. You’re insane if you think contract employees don’t make sure they get paid extra money for putting in extra hours.

Entitlement Society

September 5th, 2012
11:00 am

@Another Math Teacher – your wrote “Private sector contract employees are paid what their contract says they are paid. You’re insane if you think contract employees don’t make sure they get paid extra money for putting in extra hours.”

Wrong. Again, teachers, please stop espousing on the private sector when you don’t work there. A contract is a contract. Typically it is for a stated project or number or hours. A contractor just can’t work any number of hours as he or she pleases and expect to get paid. Really. Talk about the land of unicorns…

Prof

September 5th, 2012
11:26 am

I think what needs to be explained to some posters such as sloboffthestreet, Pride & Joy, Another Math Teacher, and Entitlement Society is the difference between wages and salaries. Labor compensation paid by the hour is termed wages. Of course it doesn’t include leave days, sick days, or vacation days, for it only pays for the hours actually worked. Labor compensation that is a fixed amount for the work to be done is termed a salary. It doesn’t matter how long it takes the salaried worker to complete the work, so long as it is done.

Entitlement Society

September 5th, 2012
11:39 am

@ Prof – I work in the private sector. Of course I know the difference between a salaried worker and an hourly worker. No where in either of my posts did I indicate lack of that knowledge. My point is that apparently teachers posting on this board love to call out non-teachers thinking they know it all about the education world. Well, tides have turned, and now I’m trying to educate them on the how compensation in the private sector works. If they think they can just get a contract job and work as many hours as they’d like and get paid for it all or perhaps get the bonuses that @Another Comment speaks of, why aren’t they in the private sector? Oh, that’s right… They’re the martyrs self-condemned to teaching the dregs of society that we, as parents, are so bad at raising and disciplining. (Don’t worry, my little darlings won’t cross the threshold of your classroom.)

Another Math Teacher

September 5th, 2012
11:51 am

Entitlement Society: “Wrong. Again, teachers, please stop espousing on the private sector when you don’t work there. A contract is a contract. Typically it is for a stated project or number or hours. A contractor just can’t work any number of hours as he or she pleases and expect to get paid. Really. Talk about the land of unicorns…”

Yes, you are wrong. I was private sector before I taught and I am private sector now. I said that if they are expected to work extra hours that it would be in the contract and they would get paid. Did you read that? Did you sign a contract that said “all hours on weekends are not to be paid?”

Might want to read and understand something before you spout off.

“Well, tides have turned, and now I’m trying to educate them on the how compensation in the private sector works.”

The only thing you have done is clearly demonstrated your ignorance.

Entitlement Society

September 5th, 2012
12:28 pm

@Another Math Teacher – my, my, such hostility… and on an education blog! Please point me to the time of your post where you wrote “I said that if they are expected to work extra hours that it would be in the contract and they would get paid. Did you read that?” because I don’t see that anywhere. I honestly didn’t read where you wrote that. Your post stated “Private sector contract employees are paid what their contract says they are paid. You’re insane if you think contract employees don’t make sure they get paid extra money for putting in extra hours.” Your first post never said “if they are expected to work extra hours that it would be in the contract and they would get paid.” Now you’re changing the whole discussion. Being EXPECTED to work extra hours is one thing, but voluntarily working extra hours is another. Let me throw this one out there… what contract positions in the private sector are you referring to that have negotiated such generous terms with regard to overtime (extra hours)? Since you have such extensive experience in both the public and private sector, maybe you could tell us what these positions are that are so wonderful compared to a teacher’s contract? The ones I’m aware of don’t allow compensation for extra hours. For example, a consultant is engaged by a company for an engagement of “x” time length for “x” dolllars. He is expected to solve the problem in that length of time. If he doesn’t, any additional time he spends is on his own dime. Another example, a painter signs a contract to do a job for $5,000. Whoops. He didn’t realize it’s going to take him 12 days instead of 10 days. A contract is a contract; he doesn’t have recourse to get extra compensation. BTW, yes, any hours I work on the weekend are unpaid thank you.

RJ

September 5th, 2012
12:35 pm

@Dr. Monica Henson, you really want everyone to believe that this job is gravy huh? First, I had a baby last year and didn’t have any long or short term disability. Guess what, when my 20 sick days were up, I wasn’t paid! I didn’t plan any of my pregnancies around vacations. Is it really that easy to conceive? Also, I work late just about every day. I sit through long meetings after work, leaving around 5. My day begins at 7:30 although I arrive around 7:15 to get set up for the kids. Our new lesson plans are about 3 pages, so I have to do 7 separate detailed lesson plans every week. I only get 45 minutes of planning, so I am never able to get it all done. It takes a lot of preparation to create a lesson plan. Then I have to make copies, input grades, etc. I am also required to offer tutoring once a week. I have to stay until the last parent arrives. No matter how much we complain, parents will come late, very late, to pick up their child. In the meantime, my little one has been sitting in daycare since 6:45am. During the summer months I take classes to meet the 10 hour plu requirement. I’ve taken at least one class every summer. This is always paid for by me. We have multiple furlough days this year, which I don’t see in any of your calculations. In the school system I just left, you received 3 days for Thanksgiving. My current school system just started a week for the break last year. My pay has stayed the same for the past 6 years. My husband works in the corporate world and has similar if not better benefits than me. I don’t even use our health insurance because it’s so expensive. His is much better. He gets 4 weeks paid vacation and an additional 5 days of sick leave. Just like me, he doesn’t use them. We’ve been told if we use more than 5 days without a doctor’s excuse we’ll be written up.

It’s great you love your job and your pay. I’d love to earn $115,000 a year too. I love teaching, but I hate what it’s becoming. I plan on leaving this profession very soon.

Another Math Teacher

September 5th, 2012
1:00 pm

Entitlement Society:

Right here is where I stated it: You’re insane if you think contract employees don’t make sure they get paid extra money for putting in extra hours.

Whether those hours be on the weekend, at night, at day, or on Friday between 3:30 and 3:45 is not relevant. The relevant part is hours outside the contract.

You clearly do not work on a contractual basis. Right now one of my contracts requires me to be available M-F for differing hours each day. They wanted me to do extra work on a months worth of Saturdays. They wrote a new additional contract for Saturdays only. Of course they did not expect me to work for free on Saturdays, since my original contract called for M-F only.

“Since you have such extensive experience in both the public and private sector, maybe you could tell us what these positions are that are so wonderful compared to a teacher’s contract?”

The contract for teachers in the district I worked in was incredibly one sided. No lock in of pay rate, vague terms such as “other duties.” You know in other positions you get to negotiate the contract. You don’t sign it if you don’t like it. Well, of course you don’t know that. You don’t work on contract, do you?

“The ones I’m aware of don’t allow compensation for extra hours. ”

Contracts are not required to be based on certain tasks, you know that right? They can be based on anything. Hours, availability, task completion. Well, of course you don’t know that. You don’t work on contract, do you?

If you really worked on a contractual basis, you would know these things. If you really worked on a contractual basis, you would know that the ‘positions’ are generally within your area of expertise.

“The ones I’m aware of don’t allow compensation for extra hours.”

So, you admit your ignorance and lack of experience while trying to ‘educate’ people on how the private sector works? How’s that working out for you?

Entitlement Society

September 5th, 2012
2:03 pm

I work on a contract basis. Most contracts I have seen are based on projects or set hours. The contracts don’t allow you to work whatever hours you think appropriate to get the job done. I would never write an employment contract like that as an employer. What employer would leave hours open ended like that? Not a smart one.

No ignornace here. No lack of experience here. Moving on.

Dr. Monica Henson

September 5th, 2012
4:22 pm

RJ, I don’t believe that teaching is “gravy” at all. However, teachers are not being paid slave wages, which becomes apparent when you calculate it out, even accounting for working more than 8 hours daily over several weeks out of the school year.

sloboffthestreet

September 6th, 2012
11:15 am

Another Math Teacher

PLEASE, You expect us to believe you work over 12 hours a day, every day for 190 days each year? I think your nose is growing once again.

As for your comment about my correct observation pertaining to a certain magnet school and their outstanding performance, please go back and visit the article and you will see the post was in relation to minority students lack of performance and that particular magnet school enrolls a majority of black students. So I see once again you fail to deal with the truth and twist and turn facts until you become comfortable with the lie you have created. There is a name for that process you posses. Also please proof read your comments. After all you are the teacher, aren’t you?

Billie Casey,

I see you also fail to state the facts. Perhaps the statement you made about not working for your money may be true but I am quite certain your unused sick days counted toward your retirement. I am also quite certain we have discussed this fact here on the schooled blog. I don’t see where anyone is obliged to THANK YOU for being credited for your accumulated sick pay. The days you saved in your early years of teaching were cashed in at your higher pay rate of your last year of service. Perhaps you should THANK THE TAXPAYERS! Sounds like a SWEET DEAL to me!

I love all the stories about how some teachers never take a day off. It hasn’t been my experience with our children’s teachers. Our county gives the teachers 17 days total. 12 sick and 5 personal. Our sons 3rd grade teacher used personal days to go to Disney. Surgeries for chronic conditions are planned for during the school year. Not the summer break and they are allowed to return to school to teach while taking prescription pain medication but have another teacher provide transportation for them to and from school because they feel they are not able to drive under the influence. They are OK to teach under the influence? Interesting.

I loved the post about so many people are provided company cars and given large bonuses in the private sector. Really? I think some cold hard facts are needed to make that case. I’m calling BS on it just like ajones stating public school teachers earn an average of $180 a day and Another Math Teacher works over 12 hours every day.

Thank you to the honest educators who correctly stated the facts concerning salary for educators. And as it was correctly stated all public school teachers are state employees paid by the state according to the pay scale. Supplements added to the salary are paid by the local taxpayers as are administrators salaries. That is why they are not added into the Average Teacher Salary figures. Look Ma, NEW MATH!!

crankee-yankee

Please note I never rejoice. I do delight on occasion but it would never be over another persons misfortune. In your case it sounds like you are angry about your poor career moves. Don’t feel alone, from time to time some of us suffer from the same curse. Ourselves. How human? What is it that Ron White says?

You go on about this fact and that fact and after 30 years teaching you admit you don’t know what the facts are. Perhaps that is the trouble with education today. Just an observation. I just expect more from people who claim to be educated.

artvicki

September 6th, 2012
12:37 pm

Sadly, religious holidays are taken as personal or sick days. Jewish, Muslim, and any other religions must use sick days or personal days to practice their chosen religion. I don’t see school in session on Christmas or Easter. How nice for those people who do not have to choose to get paid or practice a religion. The year I had my son, I had to use all my sick and personal days for maternity leave. I then had to take off for Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur without pay. And, don’t forget jury duty. If I do not have a sick day left, I will get docked for my civic duty as well.

Ole Guy

September 6th, 2012
1:26 pm

Once again, we see much fodder to support the activity known as teacher bashing…I prefer to label such activity as KICKING EM IN THE SIX AND…MAYBE, JUST MAYBE…PRODING THIS PARTICULAR LABOR GROUP TO START EARNING THEIR CREDENTIALS. While gaining the legal right to call one’s self “teacher” is certainly not one requiring much more than the superficial passing of a “simon sez” course of study, the process of remaing an effective teacher is quite anotherv story; one which requires all teachers to realize that they must EARN the title every damn day. Do they deserve all this pto/paid time off? Absidamnlutely! SOME DAY, maybe they will all, collectively, come to understand this and stop assuming the position of hand maidens of educational policy set by bafoons. Once they, collectively, start assuming a little control of their professions, these petty arguements will become completely moot.

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