Annual paid teacher leave: Average is 13.6 days for veterans. Fulton gives teachers 20 days.

Of Georgia's largest systems, Fulton offers the most teacher leave, according to a new study.  (AP Images)

Of Georgia's largest systems, Fulton offers the most teacher leave, according to a new study. (AP Images)

The print AJC offered several provocative education stories over the past few days, including one on the paid leave afforded teachers in large school districts.

The story was based on a new report from the National Council on Teacher Quality, which noted wide differences nationwide in leave policies and amounts. (Before commenting, please try to read the report as it explains in detail how leave is defined.)

Who provides the least teacher leave? According to the report:

Of the 26 districts which offer 10 or fewer days of general leave, nine are located in Florida. California, Louisiana, and Texas each have four districts with relatively little leave.

The TR3 district with the least amount of general leave is Desoto County, Mississippi, which only gives teachers 9 days.Teachers working for the DeSoto County (Miss.) school system get the fewest days  — nine.

Who gives the most leave? The report says:

“While Newark offers a small number of its teachers the most leave of any school district (25+ years of experience), Hartford, Connecticut offers all of its teachers 25 days of general leave each year (equivalent to five weeks, or 13 percent, of the school year). Twenty of those days are classified as sick leave but 5 can be used for personal reasons; teachers then get an additional 5 personal days after they’ve used all of their sick leave, effectively blurring any distinction between the two types of leave.

Two other districts offer general leave that adds up to 13 percent of the days teachers work each year: Toledo and Burlington, Vermont. In both of these districts, teachers get 24 days of general leave each year.

The AJC story looked at leave in the largest Georgia districts:

Fulton County is far and away the best place to work if you’re a metro Atlanta teacher looking for the most days off a year. Fulton teachers with 10 or more years’ experience receive 20 general leave days a year, which is among the most in the nation, according to a survey by the Washington-based National Council on Teacher Quality, which ranked 113 school systems nationwide.

By contrast, Atlanta Public Schools, DeKalb County and Gwinnett County teachers get only 12.5 general leave days a year. Of the core metro counties, Cobb County offers the fewest (11.9). In Fulton, even teachers with less than 10 years’ experience get 15 general leave days a year.

General leave includes sick days and personal days off, according to the study.

Teachers already work fewer days per year — about 185 — than employees in other professions, who average about 230 work days a year. National Council on Teacher Quality president Kate Walsh said that although public schools have cut budgets in recent years, few if any have cut days off. That’s not a political battle a superintendent wants to fight, ” she said.

I called Fulton County to verify its leave policy and to make sure the numbers in the report were correct. I received this response:

The numbers are accurate. State law requires 12.5 days and we go beyond that by 2.5 days (15 days maximum) for employees with less than 10 years of service. And 20 days maximum for employees with more than 10 years of service. This leave is district policy, approved by the Fulton County School Board. As with all policies, this policy will be reviewed routinely to consider any need for adjustment.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

85 comments Add your comment

LD

September 4th, 2012
3:11 pm

If state law is 12.5 days, how is Cobb only offering 11.9?

Maureen Downey

September 4th, 2012
3:12 pm

@Ld, Trying to get that clarified myself.
Maureen

teacher&mom

September 4th, 2012
3:29 pm

GA does not offer paid maternity leave for teachers. I wonder if any other states offer paid maternity leave for teachers.

Ex- Teacher

September 4th, 2012
3:30 pm

Right? Try using them, the principal denies them and you get your pay docked. Save them and Henry county offers you 15 dollars a day to buy them back. 78 days worth less then 800 bucks after taxes. Glad I left the field

mrchtaylor

September 4th, 2012
3:37 pm

Important to note that teachers only get paid for their contracted days. They receive no pay for weekends, holidays or summer. I would imagine that many have never taken anywhere near the number of days allowed. I have 105 days of unused leave, accumulated over 17 years of teaching

Van Jones

September 4th, 2012
3:42 pm

Fulton: 185 days per year and 3 weeks vacation, to start??? Holy property taxes, Batman.

ABC

September 4th, 2012
3:44 pm

I don’t understand why they need so much. I sorta get “sick days”, since well..we all get sick. But why do you need “leave”? You get many many many more days off than everyone else that works in the private sector.

Ex- Teacher

September 4th, 2012
3:46 pm

Here it comes: I can’t understand why they need so much time off…..it’s so easy……I wish I had every holiday off……
Step 1 pass college
2 pass test
3 have at it

mrchtaylor

September 4th, 2012
3:46 pm

Once again, teachers don’t get paid for all those “days off”. I would love to sell my accursed leave back to the system, as is allowed in many for profit industries.

Don

September 4th, 2012
3:47 pm

Kids tend to carry colds and flu and all kids of stuff. So duh, teachers need sick days. Also, try going to the doc only on weekends. Good luck with that.

Ex- Teacher

September 4th, 2012
3:51 pm

Taylor props to you. I only survived 10 yrs.
I am waiting for the union is killing are system in 3 2 1 …

hildymac

September 4th, 2012
3:54 pm

I took my first personal day in three years last October, and I’m otherwise only absent when I am legit sick. Unfortunately, that tends to happen a bit.

When parents stop sending children to school sick because they’re scared the kids’ll miss something is when sick days for teachers should drop off. Being around 90 teenagers every day in one room, ten of whom are there ill, is going to cause someone else in that classroom to come down with something. Chances are good it’s the teacher.

Trust me, most of us don’t want to miss work. It’s more trouble than it’s worth.

ajones

September 4th, 2012
4:14 pm

with very little research, I found average pay per working day for teacher in Ga. $189.00
average pay per working day for other degreed professions in Ga. $314.00

sloboffthestreet

September 4th, 2012
4:42 pm

mrchtaylor

Why not tell all the nice people what you get to do with those 105 days you have accumulated? You make it sound like it’s a bad thing?

As for you and the rest of the whiners, guess what folks, no one else gets paid for weekends they don’t work. Your contract argument makes you sound like an ignorant idiot but that is another post that needs to be addressed as to your mental fitness to be allowed to teach our children.

Please, all teachers, take your annual salary and divide by the number of days worked and post the amount you earn for each day you work here on the “GET SCHOOLED” blog so we can “GET SCHOOLED.” Please no “I work 15 hours a day crap.” Just the facts. $$Dollars Per Day Worked$$ And when calculating your per day pay please subtract your sick and personal days from days worked per year. You know why, don’t you? Here is a clue. You don’t work those days and they get banked for when you leave! No cheating please. What am I saying. Teachers would never ever cheat. Would they?

Then explain your sick and personal days and benefits. Yes we want to hear about your medical and retirement too!!

Apple Teacher

September 4th, 2012
4:48 pm

Leave is not vacation. There are many restrictors about when you can take a personal day. Most of the days are designated as sick days. I would be interested in average days actually used. I have been teaching for over twenty years and rarely use more than three days total of leave–sick and personal combined. There is a cap on what you can accumulate, and compensation at retirement for unused leave that is allowed to accumulate is very minimal. It seems people are always looking to portray teachers as negatively as possible. As in any profession, there are always those who will abuse sick leave.

sloboffthestreet

September 4th, 2012
4:55 pm

ajones

With the average salary for a teacher in Georgia being @ $50,000 and using the 185 days reported as the work year, please subtract the 14 days given for sick and personal days and this leaves you 171 days worked. Now I am not a teacher so perhaps my math isn’t as good as yours but I calculate the average daily pay before benefits to be $292.40 per day. Perhaps you are using some of the “NEW MATH” we have heard about over the years? If we use the entire 185 days for the calculation it still gives you over $270 per day. Don’t forget to add in the amount the taxpayers pay into your retirement. Health care also! Fair is fair and crybabies are always crybabies. So grow up and get to work and please do it right.

JEM

September 4th, 2012
5:03 pm

In Dekalb and Clayton where I have worked, we received sick days of which two are personal leave days. If we were out more than three days, we had to give a doctors excuse. I only was out a few days and had 150 sick days left when I retired. Some teachers do misuse this, but generally people are responsible. When people in business are sick, do they get their pay docked. Teachers are on salary just as are other professions. Sloboggythestreet you more than likely had teachers you didn’t like and you probably had difficulty learning. Therefore you have such negative view on teachers. So sorry that the best teachers weren’t there to help you.

Dr. Monica Henson

September 4th, 2012
5:06 pm

The average teacher salary in Georgia is closer to $52K. Leave days are paid and are included in the 190 days that most district teacher contracts are for. This amounts to $273.68 per day.

JEM

September 4th, 2012
5:10 pm

Dr. Henson, the 190 are the actual days the staff is at the school.

Ron F.

September 4th, 2012
5:23 pm

Geez- here we go having at the teachers…again. We get paid for contracted days ONLY. Yes we have paid sick leave days, but in most systems if you use more than 5, they require a doctor’s note or the dock your pay. You have them but you can’t use them unless you have a dire medical emergency (and most places don’t consider a sick child or immediate family member dire). We get no paid maternity leave- you use your sick days up and come back to work. We are harrassed if we use the days, which is why most teachers bank them.

How about the AJC follow this up with stats on how many days teachers typically miss a year? I guarantee you the average will be a LOT less than the days given. Those numbers and this entire article fail to tell that side of the story. I’ve never counted my sick leave days because they’re worthless unless I end up with a medical condition that requires their use. We had a teacher last year who did, and he finally had to get a lawyer involved to be able to use his sick leave time. The school kept calling trying to get him to resign. He finally returned to work when the doctor released him- what else was he supposed to do?

As to the “average” teacher salary, that includes administrators who make significantly more than a classroom teacher. Do the REAL math, and you’ll find it isn’t as cushy as you think. I guess when the whole system is charter or private schools and you can’t get good teachers because the benefits suck, you’ll have a real problem to solve. I’m getting out as soon as I can reasonably because I’m sick and tired of being trashed, yet again, for being a devoted teacher who has been, for many years, willing to work ungodly hours for pay that typically is less than I could make in a job I don’t like, and yet we’re attacked for one benefit we rarely can use. Have fun folks. You’re slowly but surely running us off and God help you replace us…

Dr. Henson: how many day do you get per year and at what rate if I may ask? Since you’re so determined to get the figures right, share your own please.

Ben B

September 4th, 2012
5:32 pm

Leave should not be accumulated. It is either “use it or lose it.”

Ron F.

September 4th, 2012
5:34 pm

According to a quick search, the average days taken off for teachers is about 8 sick days per year, and for the population as a whole, it’s about 8.5. So, it obviously doesn’t make a hill of beans difference how many days we’re “given”, we evidently don’t use any more of them than a typical worker. Quite frankly, I’ve worked sick because it’s less trouble than trying to plan engaging, meaningful lessons for kids if I’m not there. The only time I’ve take more than 1 or 2 in a year is when my mom died. Even when my dad had open heart surgery, I went to work because it was too much trouble and I felt guilty about NOT being at school.

Middle Georgia Teacher

September 4th, 2012
5:41 pm

My school district gives us the 12.5 days per year, with 9 of those for sick days and 3 for personal days. MOST teachers that I know do NOT take very many days off, however. We aren’t paid for maternity leave, so a lot of younger female teachers usually try to avoid taking time off so that they could bank days for maternity leave. I certainly had to! Everyone gets sick once in a while, but most of us who do use sick days take them because we have to be out with our own sick kids. Also, like one poster already noted, we, too, have to go to the doctor once in a while, and these visits cannot always be planned for after school time. I don’t call in sick unless I am sick, or one of my children is sick. We need personal leave (only 3 per year for me) when we have to be out for reasons other than being sick or going to the doctor. In fact, we have been told that if we lie about our reason for being sick, then we could get fired for failing the ethical clause in our code of conduct. So, since my daughter is a senior this year, when she uses her college visitation day, a day that won’t count against her attendance, I will be using a personal day to go with her.

Dr. Monica Henson

September 4th, 2012
5:57 pm

Ron, I am under contract for 250 days per year at $115,000 annual salary, which is commensurate for an experienced superintendent who holds a doctorate in a small public school district . My contract includes ten days’ paid vacation and two personal days. No chauffeurs or housing allowances for this old schoolmarm, or extra retirement annuities. That comes out to $460 a day. My last year in the classroom, I earned $60,000 a year as a 190-day employee, which came out to $315.79 per day, in Massachusetts. That was with a master’s degree and National Board Certification plus 11 years’ classroom experience.

The figure I cited for average teacher salaries was from teacherportal.com and doesn’t account for administrator salaries, which are considerably higher than teacher salaries, especially in metropolitan districts. teachersalaryinfo.com cites the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics in reporting that “the 2009 average teacher salary in Georgia was $51,050. This figure represents a 5.43 percent increase over the previous year’s average salary of $48,420. This makes Georgia teacher salaries slightly higher than the national average for teacher salaries, which was $49,720 in 2009 and $48,353 in 2008. The average teacher salary in Georgia has been steadily rising for the last several years. In 2007, teacher salaries in Georgia were $46,900 before increasing by 3.24 percent the following year.”

Dr. Monica Henson

September 4th, 2012
6:01 pm

I do have to say this–I love my work. Larry King once said that he’d do his job whether he earned $20,000 a year or $20 million. I feel just like that. I have to force myself to take time off because I love what I do. I felt the same way as a beginning teacher earning $18K a year back when the earth was cooling. :) And I remember feeling rich beyond measure when I hit $35K by my 35th birthday, when I became a high school department chair.

I love teaching. I hate what it is becoming...

September 4th, 2012
6:02 pm

@Dr. Henson “The average teacher salary in Georgia is closer to $52K.”

This is always a shock for me, because I make less than that with 22 years in and a Master’s. I guess my district does not pay very well….or your figures factor in pay for adminstrators, which may skew the results.

Personally, I hate taking days off because it really isn’t worth it when you consider the time it takes to plan for it. I get TWO personal days, which may be used for anything I choose (which usually means waiting for the repair man or taking my car in) and 10 sick days (of which I earn one every few weeks.) If I take a sick day and am not really sick, and get caught out shopping or something, I could lose my job – so they really are SICK days. I took my first sick day in 10 years last year. I started throwing up at work… usually I just soldier through rather than trying to make sub plans. I personally do not know of ANY teachers who abuse alloted days, though there likely are some out there.

Atlanta Mom

September 4th, 2012
6:03 pm

I must admit, I’m surprised that teachers don’t get paid maternity leave. Seems like if there was ever a profession that deserved it!
I’d give teachers at least 10 sick days a year. I hated it when my children went back to school, because we all got sick. On that note, I kept mine home when they were sick.

William Casey

September 4th, 2012
6:05 pm

HEY SLOBBO: I haven’t seen you in awhile! Yup, you got me! I drew pay for 31 years and guess what? I didn’t actually work a single day. That’s right! Not one SINGLE day. Just goofed off even when I bothered to show up. That’s right, Slobborino, I STOLE all that money from hard-working taxpayers like you. BTW– I didn’t pay any taxes either! Now, don’t you feel better!

William Casey

September 4th, 2012
6:08 pm

I retired with 125+ days of unused leave. I don’t think I got a “thank you” for that. Oh, well.

Ex- Teacher

September 4th, 2012
6:08 pm

I repeat: step 1 pass college
2 pass test
3 have at it…. And start at the bottom…38500 Henry co

Dr. Monica Henson

September 4th, 2012
6:12 pm

JEM, you are correct that 190 days includes the days teachers are at school. There are 180 instructional days in a typical district school year, and teachers are usually paid for 10 additional days to cover pre- and post-planning.

Dr. Monica Henson

September 4th, 2012
6:19 pm

The National Center for Education Statistics cites the average Georgia principals’ salary, with ten+ years experience, as $87,400. Administrators are generally on a 230-day contract, so that would be $380 per day.

“The average salary for superintendents nationwide for the 2010-2011 school year was $161,992, according to Educational Research Survey’s 38th national survey, ‘Salaries and Wages Paid Professional and Support Personnel in Public Schools 2010-2011.’ Salaries of more than $225,000 were seen in districts with enrollment levels of more than 25,000 students, the salary survey states.”

Bernie

September 4th, 2012
6:31 pm

We should be paying ALL of Our Teachers More and with more Benefits, if we were SMART!

However, our current value system places much more value on Athletes and Entertainers.

Time will tell which was the better and smarter Value! You can count on that one!

Dr. Monica Henson

September 4th, 2012
6:31 pm

Atlanta Mom, teachers use sick time and short-term disability leave for maternity leave. Many teachers try to time their due dates to fall near long breaks such as the winter holiday or summer vacation to maximize their maternity leave.

Meredith

September 4th, 2012
6:32 pm

Masters and 20 years experience. I make around 30 bucks an hour if and only if you count the time I am on the clock. HOWEVER….over labor day weekend a graded essays and papers for 15 hours. I spend 8 hours the weekend before that and on average 1 to 2 hours a night. Also, I arrive at the school at 30 mins early. I leave 1 hour late. I often eat my lunch while I am working. So…if you factor in the 7.5 hours a week. Add the 7.5 hours I work at home during a week, and conservatively the 8 hours I work each weekend, I work a 63 hour week…conservatively speaking. My 40 bucks an hour turns in to….let’s see let’s start with 40 times 30, so you can see what you that is 1200 bucks a week. Now take that 1200 dollars and divide it by 63. Very different number, huh? Sooooo…..seriously…shut it. By the way. Show me the average days teacher use of their sick leave. So….sick of explaining this to you jerks out there.think I make.

Old timer

September 4th, 2012
6:32 pm

I retired with over 200 sick days…I thank the Lord I was healthy and had my children in April and May and had time at home without using much sick leave.

Beenthere

September 4th, 2012
6:33 pm

My cousin teaches in Virginia. She says they have 30 subs in the building on Fridays for teachers taking long weekends. Seems that they don’t get to keep their sick leave when they retire. These teachers have accumulated large amounts of sick leave by guess what? showing up for work. So, Virginia, in their vast intelligence, is paying subs instead of rewarding teachers for being diligent employees.
Those of you who think teachers have it so cushy should stop by sometime and volunteer. We don’t quit at 3:00. We have papers to grade and lessons to write for the new common core standards. We don’t have text books, so we spend hours and our own dollars looking for materials to teach with.

RealWorldEducation

September 4th, 2012
6:40 pm

As a teacher with a masters and counting my experience, with furlough days, cut benefits and extended work hours (the county extended our workday by a few mins each day, adding up to an extra few days unpaid work a year) I am now making less than I did when I entered the private workforce after obtaining my undergraduate degree 10 years ago.
That average teacher salary is based on teachers with much more experience than most. Remember, the average experience level in a classroom is only a few years…because most leave after less than 4 years of low pay, lower respect and even lower future prospects for growth in the field.

Pride and Joy

September 4th, 2012
6:44 pm

I get zero paid days off. No holiday. No sick pay. No vacation days. No paid training time. If I show up to work and get something done, I get paid. That’s it. That’s life in the real world.

Another Math Teacher

September 4th, 2012
6:51 pm

sloboffthestreet : “Please, all teachers, take your annual salary and divide by the number of days worked and post the amount you earn for each day you work here on the “GET SCHOOLED” blog so we can “GET SCHOOLED.” Please no “I work 15 hours a day crap.” Just the facts.”

You should never, ever, rely on your math skills. Your skill is incredibly poor. (Remember when you couldn’t understand that being a magnet school, hosting the all of the smartest kids in the county, would skew the S.A.T. results?)

Here are some facts, for the factually challenged (that’s you:)

2350 hours worked. Pay of $50000. Here is the tough part, see if you can keep up because this is NEW Math!

$50000/2350 hours = $21.28/hour.

You do not get to tell people that they hours they work do not count. Facts do not work that way.

“Now I am not a teacher so perhaps my math isn’t as good as yours”

Understatement of the…well…all time.

Ms. Downey, can we have a story that addresses the past failures of the public educational system that specifically covers how the general public adult population can’t handle finding rate per time. Some of them even think it’s ‘NEW MATH.’

another comment

September 4th, 2012
6:56 pm

Alot of Private Sector folks think that government employees have it so good, but we really don’t. I worked in the Private Sector as an Engineer and for the Federal Government. Someone just brought up Maternity leave. Guess what the Federal Government provides their employees no paid maternity leave. Sure you earn sick leave at the rate or 4 hours per 2 week pay period, or 13 days per year, but that it takes a full 3 years to earn enough just to go on 1 average 6 week maternity leave. You better plan on working 4 years before you have a child, to allow for Maternity doctors visit that you will have to take to during your pregnancy. Even trying to schedule them around your 1/2 hour lunch, we all no you can never get in and out of an OB/GYN in less than 1.5 hours. You go at least every month in the first two weeks, then every other week, then every week, then it can be every other day near the end. Then the big dread of what will happen if you need a C-section, that is 8 weeks off or 4-5 years of working to earn it. Every working woman’s fincial nightmare in a State like Georgia, that does not require employers to provide short term disability, is that the doctor will put them on months of bedrest. ( New York and other state require short term disability and every woman in that state is covered for pregnancy, gets 60% pay). Most fortune 1000 companies offer paid maternity leave. It is taken for granted by a lot of Private Sector Employees.

Other things taken for granted by Privated Sector Employess, Large Bonuses. I am talking 10K, 25K, 100K, 250K, 100K and up. I would often hear my private sector friends with the same or lessor level equvialent positions that I ever had in the Federal Government nonchalently mention what they were doing with their upcoming bonus. Going to the boat show to pick out a nice little cabin cruiser that he had parked at lake lanier, had to make sure it had a head, so it would count for second home deduction. The boat had to be $60-80K. Another friend was going to use her bonus to pay her 3 children’s tuition at Woodward ( 3 x $22K = $66K) I was shocked that this was the funding source of the tuition. In the Federal Government most people got between 1-2% of their salary maximum, depending upon their bonus pool. I had one bonus pool that got $800-900 for Excellent performance with outsanding getting 1100 to 1,200. then the management pool got a little higher amount, because the salaries in the pool were higher, but they also tended not to have anyone in their pool getting satisfactory or unsatisfactory ( you did not stay in a management pool position which did not get a bonus payout if you got a 3 or less rating) Exellents got about $1,600 to 1800 and outstandings got $2,000 to 2,200. Certainly no where near my friends getting bonus of $60,000 and buying new boats and paying for 3 kids in a private school. Only the few SES, the Political Appointees got higher bonuses around $5k-10K generally though their have been some published cases of $25K or so. These are very very rare.

Company Cars are very common in the private sector. I had one or a several hundred dollar allowance in jobs I held while in the private sector. While working for the government you can not get a Company Car that you can use as your own. If you do it is illeagal. In the Private Sector people get $600 or so dollars all the time to put towards the lease of a vehicle of their choice per month.

Expense Accounts, your expense account can be used to enterain clients. As a federal employee I could entertain no one. I also could not accept any sports tickets or any meals, over $25. Best just skip it. In the private sector, I was taken to lunch 4/5 days by vendors. I also had to get all of my vendors, customers to donate money to the United Way. For Example, Sponser me in the Atlanta Walk a thon. I would go to every Hawks game and sit in the 3rd row from the court, I would get braves ticket, right behind the plate, Falcon’s tickets, all while working in the Private Sector. I could not accept any of these in the Federal Government.

My employer and myself pay over $1,000 per month for my Blue Cross and Blue Shield insurance policy that hardly pays anything on dental. Yet I see Walmart encouraging their employees to have their kids sign up for tax payer funded peachcare which is tax payer fundeded medicaid for thier children, for no more than $35 each. Their dental coverage on Peachcare covers everything. I sit their at the dentist just astonish at the lack of coverage that I get my great policy.

The list goes on.

fultonschoolsparent

September 4th, 2012
7:13 pm

I’d be interested in seeing what the university systems give the professors for leave? As for the public school teachers, they deserve every day they get. Too bad they can’t take them!

crankee-yankee

September 4th, 2012
7:19 pm

$68,887.16 for 190 days = $362.56/day

minus 2 furlough days so I will lose $725.12 in salary, I am the highest paid in my district in my department. So that is NOT indicative of an average salary. I am an outlier.

I have 560 hours (70 days) of leave accumulated over 16 years in this county.

The slob will rejoice over the fact I lost 68 days from a county I worked in previously because I was denied a leave transfer, within the state. I also lost 84 days when I moved to GA from up north and GA did not accept transfers on earned sick days from other states. So in 30+ years of teaching, I have “earned” over 300 leave days and not used 222 of them. That’s 2.6 days per year (actually less but I am being conservative to the employer’s side). I would have used significantly less were it not for my wife’s poor health.

As has been pointed out by many already, it is rarely worth the extra effort necessary to create meaningful, step-by-step sub plans for bogus sick (or what are euphemistically called “mental health”) days. It does not often occur in my building. When we take leave, it is because we need to and have no other choice (Dr/Dentist appt, sick family member needing our care, etc). Personal days (2/yr) are deducted from our sick days.

Sick days can be used (up to a certain #) to count towards retirement but I have been told that differs county to county, I do not know hard facts about the details (someone else know?) having not explored retirement yet. I have second-hand info that indicates it is better to use the days to offset retirement dates rather than have the county buy back unused days. They do not buy them at the regular sub rate (which is what is done in some northeastern states). The buy-back is supposed to be only dimes on the dollar but, again, I do not have hard facts.

NTLB

September 4th, 2012
7:23 pm

@Maureen—please don’t forget that in our teacher annual reviews, the amount of leave days we take, whether it be sick or personal, is also held accountable against us if we surpass the leave average of the district.

And the beat goes on...

September 4th, 2012
7:25 pm

There have been no state pay raises for teachers in several years. Here is what everyone needs to understand. A first-year teacher in a Georgia public school earns the same state pay regardless of where he or she is teaching. There is a state pay scale. All teachers will 20-plus year of experience and Masters or Specialist degrees earn the exact same state pay regardless of where they work. My county offers a county supplement of $1600 a year for a teacher with 20-plus years of experience with a Specialist degree. This teacher makes significantly less than teachers in most urban areas; however, my rural county has the 5th highest paid teachers in the state. Huh? Exactly. Our state average is the 5th highest (which isn’t the same thing as the 5th highest paid) because more than half of our teachers have been teaching for 20-plus years and have advanced degrees. Counties which give teachers supplements of 3-5 thousand dollars may still rank low in state average pay because these counties have more teachers with 15 years of experience or less and may not have advanced degrees. To suggest that the teachers in my rural county make more than teachers in Fulton County or any other urban county is ludicrous. This isn’t new math. This is basic statistics. All teachers with the same degrees and same number of years teaching earn from the state the exact same pay. Local supplements for extra duties or given as a thank you are what makes one teacher earn more than another.

mommamonster

September 4th, 2012
7:29 pm

Dr. Henson,

Cobb is only working 185 days this year with furlough days

Sissy

September 4th, 2012
7:29 pm

Today I nearly stepped into a puddle of pink vomit someone sprayed all over the floor. Think that happens in the business world? The mop/broom used to pick it up is used in other areas of the school. I went behind with Lysol I bought out of my own money (along with cleaning wipes, hand sanitizer) and sprayed the floor.

Sissy

September 4th, 2012
7:31 pm

I don’t want to be out anymore than the next person and I certainly don’t want a stomach bug.

Prof

September 4th, 2012
7:46 pm

@ fultonschoolsparent, September 4th, 7:13 pm.

Basically in college, it’s the honor system. Professors have to get their own substitutes if they’re absent, but usually can’t because they’re specialists in their fields and others can’t teach their classes. It’s not like K-12 where faculty are interchangeable. College faculty come and go, and no-one punches a time-clock. If you have the flu and call off class for a week, no-one knows but the students and you just change your syllabus accordingly. But malingerers do get in trouble, for students nearly always complain if you miss more than a few days…. especially the ones who aren’t getting A’s.

Unused sick leave is accrue-able at a maximum rate of 1 and 1/4 days per month and be used as creditable service, counting toward retirement or a time when you need unpaid leave like a family death.

I know, I know—let the scornful and/or envious comments begin. But that’s just the way it is at a large college/University.

MiltonMan

September 4th, 2012
7:48 pm

Once again Fulton County is sucking the lifeline known as North Fulton dry.