Fallout from Emory scandal: Former deans resign current jobs. Still unclear why this mess happened.

At least two impressive careers have been hurt by last week’s news that Emory misreported student data to national ranking groups.

The AJC is reporting that two former university top admissions officials resigned their current jobs in the wake of last week’s announcement by the Emory president that an internal review uncovered the misreporting of student SAT and ACT scores. (Emory deserves credit for conducting the probe and coming forward with the findings.)

It is still unclear why the wrong data was submitted as there is no evidence yet that the difference in the test scores reported — students admitted to Emory versus students choosing to enroll — was enough to boost ranking to a significant degree.

The grand poo-pah of college rankings — U.S. News & World Report — contends that the inflated data did not impact Emory’s current top 20 ranking. A magazine spokesman told the AJC that the university would have retained its ranking with the revised scores.

The score gap is not that dramatic. In 2010, the school reported a score range of 1310 to 1500; the corrected range was   1270 t0 1460. (Emory has a lot of details here.) The private university attracts bright students and sends many graduates to top med schools and law schools.

Former Emory admissions deans Dan Walls and Jean Jordan resigned their current positions with Atlanta private schools this weekend in apparent fallout from this scandal. I don’t know either personally, but have heard them speak on panels and always found them knowledgeable. They were often quoted in the national press as experts on admissions issues.

In an exclusive interview, the AJC spoke with Walls.

According to the AJC story:

“I have to take responsibility even though some of the data was delegated to others,” Dan Walls said. “It happened under my deanship.”

Walls was Emory’s dean of admissions from 1983 to 2007 and was associate vice president of enrollment management from 2007 to 2010.

Jean Jordan followed Walls as admissions dean, filling that role from 2007 to 2011. Jordan did not return phone calls and a man who answered the door at her home Monday declined to comment.

Since at least 2000, Emory overstated SAT and ACT scores by reporting marks for admitted students instead of those enrolled, President Jim Wagner said last week. This inflated Emory’s scores because admitted students have higher averages. Wagner and other officials described the deception as intentional and systemic.

Emory officials said those involved in the data deception no longer work at the college. They declined to name them, citing personnel matters. Wagner said two former admissions deans and leadership of its institutional research office were aware of the faulty data.

Walls said the department historically compiled SAT and ACT data for admitted students. However some ranking publications compile their lists using figures for enrolled students. “The correct information was not submitted and it should have been,” Walls said.

The incorrect data was reported to third parties and was used by those who rank colleges. U.S. News & World Report said Friday that the faulty data would not have affected the school’s current No. 20 ranking and would likely have had a “small to negligible effect” in the years prior. Emory has been a top 20 school for 19 years. New rankings are expected as soon as next month.

Walls cited the U.S. News comments to dispute the idea that the faulty data was an attempt to boost the college’s standing.

Walls said he spoke with Emory investigators about the situation.The internal investigation was triggered in May after John Latting, the new dean of admissions, noticed the data discrepancy and reported it to the provost. Emory’s general counsel conducted a three-month investigation and brought in the law firm Jones Day to assist.

The investigation found the college overstated students’ class rankings. And Emory “may have” excluded the scores of the bottom 10 percent of students when reporting SAT/ACT scores, GPAs and other information, officials said. This practice was not done after 2004, officials said.

The review was unable to determine how long the college had been reporting the incorrect numbers or why it started. The report found no involvement by other deans, the provost or Wagner, who has been president since 2003.

After leaving Emory, Walls became the senior associate director of college counseling at Pace Academy, a prominent Atlanta private school. He resigned from that position over the weekend. “It was a mutual decision that it would be best if I not continue there,” Walls said. After leaving Emory, Jordan served as the director of Holy Innocents’ Episcopal School’s college counseling, another well-known Atlanta private school. Jordan resigned over the weekend and wrote in her resignation letter that she was leaving “to pursue another endeavor,” Headmaster Eugene Bratek told the AJC.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

53 comments Add your comment

billyBobjacket

August 21st, 2012
2:20 pm

Emory has been getting by for the past 10 years on reputation more than on actual quality of students or instruction. HOPE has killed their chances of getting the best in-state kids, so they depend on these inflated rankings to fool the out of state kids that don’t know any better. 75% come from out of state, and less than 1/3 of those admitted actually attend. Many of those use Emory as their “back-up” plan in case they cant get into schools the likes of the Ivies, Stanford, Cal Tech, Northwestern, or even the top ranked state schools like Virginia or UNC Chapel Hill. So yeah, their ADMITTED students likely have much higher scores and rankings than those actually attending. How stupid would they have to be to risk getting caught lying and cheating if there was no advantage? USN&WP just doesn’t want to look like they didn’t do their homework, so of course they are going to say their rankings are legit.

billyBobjacket

August 21st, 2012
2:35 pm

“Two former university admissions officials resigned their current jobs in the wake of last week’s announcement by the Emory president that an internal review had uncovered the misreporting of student SAT and ACT scores. Emory deserves credit for conducting the probe and coming forward on its own with the findings. THEY WERE ABOUT TO BE BUSTED BY A THIRD PARTY SO THEY TRIED TO MITIGATE BY ANNOUNCING ON THEIR OWN.

It is still unclear why the wrong data was submitted in the first place. There is no evidence that the difference in the test scores reported — students admitted to Emory versus students choosing to attend — was that great.” COME ON, READ YOUR OWN ARTICLE…THE PRESIDENT OF EMORY SAID “Since at least 2000, Emory overstated SAT and ACT scores by reporting marks for admitted students instead of those enrolled, President Jim Wagner said last week. This inflated Emory’s scores because admitted students have higher averages. Wagner and other officials described the deception as intentional and systemic.”

Maureen Downey

August 21st, 2012
2:38 pm

@billy, I can’t speak to instruction at Emory, but I can assure you that you’re wrong on quality of applicants going down — we are in the midst of a boomlet that has made the last eight years among the toughest ever to get admitted into good colleges.
If you compare Emory admits in the last few years with those of years past, you will see a marked rise in credentials. It is a national trend.
We have seen the largest number of high-school graduates in the history of the country— 3.3 million— and that’s made it far more difficult to win admission into top colleges. HOPE may be another factor here, but it’s really a numbers game for the most part.
For example, the University of Texas at Austin saw the number of students applying jump from 14,982 to nearly 30,000.
From the Daily Beast:
Stanford accepted only 6.6 percent of its applicants, down from 7.1 percent a year ago. Duke and Amherst each accepted only 11.9 percent of kids who applied. Northwestern accepted just 15.3 percent, and has seen the number of applicants double to 32,000 since 2005. And on the West Coast, the University of California, Berkeley, saw a record number of applicants—61,661, up almost 10,000 from last year—and an admit rate of 19.5 percent, down from 25.7 percent.
http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2012/04/04/who-got-in-to-the-country-s-top-colleges.html

billyBobjacket

August 21st, 2012
3:04 pm

It’s a numbers game, true, but quantity does not equal quality, and there are kids getting into Emory that have NO chance at those other schools, which both belies the inflated rankings and explains why Emory saw fit to lie and cheat to keep the rankings high. The average SAT score was increased by 40 points, which is a HUGE change when you are comparing schools separated by only a few percentage points. Not sure why you are such an Emory apologist. Funny, when the big football schools cheat to gain athletic advantage, we all cry for blood and the NCAA cracks down hard, but it appears that Emory gets to cheat academically for over ten years and will walk away unscathed. I would have thought an education advocate such as yourself would be as outraged over this as about the CRCT cheating.

bootney farnsworth

August 21st, 2012
3:29 pm

ah….Billy

no, nope, and no way on too many points to deal with individually.
not sure where you drew your information from, but its sadly incorrect.

KIM

August 21st, 2012
3:43 pm

For sure this is not a “minor” disruption to Emory as was touted over the weekend. This is a huge issue. For the sake of Emorya and the institution’s future, I do hope there will be a deep and wide investigation and that they don’t stop at two former deans who have resigned from jobs.

Kevin

August 21st, 2012
4:03 pm

“…they depend on these inflated rankings to fool the out of state kids that don’t know any better.”

Not sure why I’m feeding the bitter troll, but U.S. News has already stated that the revised data wouldn’t have changed Emory’s ranking.

billyBobjacket

August 21st, 2012
4:04 pm

bootney: You might be surprised at my sources, and I will be happy to debate point by point and compare my sources with yours…

Pride and Joy

August 21st, 2012
4:36 pm

I am proud of Emory and I would absolutley send my childrne to school there. Why?
This school has integrity.
They audited themselves and reported their own mistakes.
They admitted guilt without excuses and resigned.
There were no denials. No lying to investigators and absolutely no excuses and no burden to the public.
Yeah, Emory.
If only our Atlanta Public School system had just half that much integrity.

catlady

August 21st, 2012
5:12 pm

I am horrified that the IR office participated in this.

Teacher's Son

August 21st, 2012
6:01 pm

So, Pride and Joy, help me out here. They lied but…they have integrity? And please do not use the word ‘mistakes’ to describe these actions. These actions were, and will always be, deliberate acts, not mistakes. Nice move, though, trying to make Emory look better by comparing it to the APS.

Not so Fast

August 21st, 2012
6:02 pm

Integrity? I think the only reason they self-reported was because the current administration found “ex” administrators guilty as charged. Lying in any fashion is never the right thing to do. And let’s not kid anyone – a 1300 to 1500 range is much more “attractive” than a 1200 to 1400 range. 40 points is a lot, same goes for the Top 10% of Class farce. My daughter is going to be a National Merit Semi-Finalist soon (list comes out in Sept.) and hopefully a National Merit Finalist, and is going to apply to three Ivies and potentially Emory. The reality is, if you want to get the top kids that don’t end up getting into the Ivies (and that is a large group), you have to be just as selective as the Ivies. That is why Emory did this, not to get ahead but just to “keep up” with the Jones of the Ivies, the Stanford’s, etc. Even though it did not officially alter its official ranking, being in that 13-1500 range was a marketing ploy. When helicopter parents like me and child academic prodigies look at the school, details like selectivity of the student body DOES MATTER. Although this incident will have NO effect on my child’s personal decision to attend Emory or not, I do think in many ways this could help Emory…as I think this puts more pressure on them to keep it clean and reassure parents there is no other collateral cheating going on in other departments. Too bad for the kids and parents at Pace and Holy Innocents though. Not a good time for resignations with the key college application season now upon us, but Pace and Holy Innocents made the right decision. Can’t have Letters of Recommendations coming from Guidance Counselors recently involved in a cheating scandal. Good decision by Pace and Holy Innocents.

Woody

August 21st, 2012
6:47 pm

If you are trying to maintain a reputation, It is not enough to avoid impropriety. You have to strive to avoid the mere APPEARANCE of impropriety. Something to pass on to our friends at Emory.

Kevin

August 21st, 2012
6:59 pm

“And let’s not kid anyone – a 1300 to 1500 range is much more ‘attractive’ than a 1200 to 1400 range.”

The admitted range was 1310-1500; the enrolled range was 1270-1460. Feel free to continue making stuff up, though.

bootney farnsworth

August 21st, 2012
7:06 pm

@ Billy

please bring your sources to the table. by all means. points I’d like sourced are:

-out of state students “don’t know any better”
-US News didn’t do its homework. in regard to a-how you know this to be true and b-why this has any bearing on their findings.
-any relevance to students shooting for high dollar / high value education having more than one choice. there is zero shame in not being admitted to UNC or UVA.
-how Emory kids had NO chance getting into other schools.

kids tend to go to Emory for some very simple reasons which have little to do with what you stated:
family tradition
medical school
theological school
law school

being high among them.

bootney farnsworth

August 21st, 2012
7:15 pm

@ not & teacher son,

I do see some integrity in the way Emory handled themselves. not in what they did, but how they dealt with it.

regular readers know I was one of the GPC 282, a group of people laid off due to “unprecedented ” fiscal irregularities. when the crap hit the fan at GPC, many people lied, many people intentionally mislead and misrepresented the situation, the ex president has threatened lawsuit to protect his image, and instead of dealing with the reality of what occurred and taking steps to fix it – GPC laid off the most vulnerable of staff hoping to sweep it all away.

from what I’ve read, Emory dealt with the issue in a straightforward manner, admitting the problem and taking real steps to fix it. there are at least 282 people who used to work for GPC who would have loved the Emory approach.

Kevin

August 21st, 2012
8:08 pm

“And let’s not kid anyone – a 1300 to 1500 range is much more ‘attractive’ than a 1200 to 1400 range.”

The ranges were 1310-1500 for admitted students and 1270-1460 for enrolled students. Get your facts straight.

SKB

August 21st, 2012
10:06 pm

I think the bigger problem here is that they supplied the wrong information to students and not so much the rankings.

Teacher's Son

August 21st, 2012
10:07 pm

@bootney

So we’re supposed to applaud Emory because of the way they handled this matter? They did the right thing, nothing more. It’s sad to me that society today is wowed by people, and institutions, simply doing the right thing (yourself excluded, I understand the point you’re making). I can’t, and won’t, applaud.

bootney farnsworth

August 21st, 2012
10:42 pm

@ teachers

I never said Emory should be applauded for anything. they screwed up, big time.

but in today’s society is it worthy to note and recognise when people actually do the right thing.
its so rare and not considered a smart thing to do. my own family member have chastised me for taking a moral/principled stand .sadly most people wouldn’t know the right thing if it bit them on the leg.

we need to actively promote people and entities who do the right thing – even if they do it for less than noble reasons.

MannyT

August 21st, 2012
11:00 pm

I think 40 points on the Math & Critical Reading parts of SAT means you got 4 more question correct that were blank or turned 3 wrongs into rights out of 121 questions. Students that were interested in Emory are still likely to be interested.

Dekalb Parent & GT Prof

August 21st, 2012
11:21 pm

Claremont McKenna College earlier this year reported that an admissions officer inflated their median SAT scores by a similar amount (10-40 points) since 2005. That raised quite a furor. Emory has been misreporting since 2000. It stinks, it’s stupid, and both universities will put these scandals behind them. Prospective students (and helicopter parents) should ignore silly rankings and SAT scores, and look deeper into the success of the graduates of colleges and universities and the educational environment and experiences the colleges and universities provide.

Not So Fast

August 22nd, 2012
12:34 am

@Keving and DeKalb Parent – first of all, I was generalizing the different between how a 12-1400 range looks vs. a 1300-1500 range looks. It is the same concept as how $2.99 looks vs. $3.00. The bottom line is this – Emory is competing for the same kids that are considering the Ivies and the other top schools and when students and parents are looking at “selectivity” of the student body, not having that 1500 range puts Emory into the second tier of the “Most Selective” range. It is not so much as the gap between 1460 vs. 1500 but how much better 1500 truly looks and is vs. 1460. In the world of Selectivity Marketing via SAT Scores, it is huge. Every school fights to improve the selectivity of their student body. Emory wants to be considered in the same breath as the Ivies and get the highest % of kids that don’t make it into the Ivies. They won’t be taken as seriously with a 1460 as they would with 1500. It is what it is. That is why they did what they did, they felt the pressure and did the wrong thing. Like I said, personally, it won’t affect my daughter’s decision re: Emory but I know it will affect other’s impression of Emory given the cheating and also the lower scores coming to light. My daughter’s going to one of the Ivies or getting a full ride at a great non-Ivy school so I could care less about all of this, but just chiming in here as the parent of a high achieving, selectivity conscious daughter. It is not the key driver of final decisions but it is a factor nonetheless.

Another comment

August 22nd, 2012
2:01 am

@not so fast unless your daughter has an athletic scholarship how are you so sure that she is going to one of the ivies or has a full ride to the next tier. I take by your second comment you did not donate a new building. My sister’s son two years ago along with my sister was telling everyone that he was going to one Harvard, if not their Yale. He was after all the valedictorian or his class along with being the Class Oresident of the upstate New York Town that they were from. His father is a prominent well bred doctor in the town they live in. He wanted him to apply to the British Ivies like Rhoades as my Brother-in-law had graduated from prior to coming to the US for Medical School, since he had dual citizenship. The big surprise was he got wait listed at All his preferred schools but he did get offered one of 200 full ride scholarships paid for by the crown prince of the United Arab Emetrites in Abu dabau at NYU. So don,t be so sure of what even a valedictorian will get unless they were one of the girls that one an Olympic gold medal. (my daughter seems to still think 11 years of completion gymnastics that you just quit at. High level maters, I told her she needs to push for the varsity cheerleading captain selection tomorrow after 4 years, she needs more leadership).

Now if you want to talk about a college bait and switch the NYU in UAE program was sold as being a program where Professors from all over the world would be bought in to teach the best and brightest the class of 200 each year choosen by the crown prince every year (there was a big write up in the nytimes last year about this program) My Nephew soon found that they were just NYU professors who had come for a semester or a year for a higher or tax free salary opportunity. Not the program he. Was sold, and he didn’t! Really care for the strict Muslim diet in the dorms. He asked to. Go back to NYU in New York, so far they have honored his full four year scholarship minus the travel because as my brother in law says you know how the academic research community never wants any failures, ESP. With a big donor.

redweather

August 22nd, 2012
7:43 am

@Not So Fast: “The bottom line is this – Emory is competing for the same kids that are considering the Ivies and the other top schools and when students and parents are looking at “selectivity” of the student body, not having that 1500 range puts Emory into the second tier of the “Most Selective” range.”

I wonder what other numbers Emory has been cooking in its attempt to “compete” withe Ivies and other top schools. Graduation and retention rates perhaps?

Anon

August 22nd, 2012
9:24 am

Personally, I was heartbroken — I’m an alum, I have known Dan Walls since the mid-80s, I have ties to Pace with a Senior going into the admissions process who knows him as well — this hit home much too hard and I put pieces of this together on Friday — I don’t know why whomever did what they did internally at Emory — I also have seen other stories along similar lines — Claimont college with SAT scores — a Duke physician with results on a medicine study that actually harmed (really harmed) patients on 60 Minutes — there are the CRCT score issues we have been dealing with locally — this is just off the top of my head. So, I’m quite frustrated that Emory has done this and not played straight by the rules. I’m even more frustrated that there’s such an incentive to do so and that, as a society, we’ve become so ‘driven’ by USNWR and they drive the schools to do this. I don’t have any doubt in my mind that there are many other schools out there doing the same…. (surely not all — but they all self-report — there are no audits of anything public it seems — dollars or scores). Ethics, audits and accountability have gone by the wayside… where, exactly, are we headed as a society? I give Emory and Pace — i don’t know how HIES is handling their situation beyond what’s said in the article — a lot of credit for the way they’ve handled this very unfortunate situation but I wish (really, really wish) it hadn’t been necessary — we’re looking for lessons and silver linings.

Fred ™

August 22nd, 2012
1:02 pm

billyBobjacket

August 21st, 2012
2:35 pm

THEY WERE ABOUT TO BE BUSTED BY A THIRD PARTY SO THEY TRIED TO MITIGATE BY ANNOUNCING ON THEIR OWN.
+++++++++++++++++++

That is a bald faced lie billyBobjacket and you know it. you obviously have a vendetta against Emory. Are “that guy?” The one who was passed over for Dean of the Business school?

Fred ™

August 22nd, 2012
1:05 pm

KIM

August 21st, 2012
3:43 pm

For sure this is not a “minor” disruption to Emory as was touted over the weekend. This is a huge issue. For the sake of Emorya and the institution’s future, I do hope there will be a deep and wide investigation and that they don’t stop at two former deans who have resigned from jobs.
++++++++++++++++

There WAS a deep investigation. And who would you like to see nailed to a cross Kim? The three responsible are gone. ypou want to just pull out random people and shoot them for forms sake? how many folks that DIDN’T do anything will it take for you to “think” that “justice” has been served?

Fred ™

August 22nd, 2012
1:09 pm

Teacher’s Son

August 21st, 2012
6:01 pm

So, Pride and Joy, help me out here. They lied but…they have integrity?
+++++++++++++++++++++

Three people lied Teachers Son, NOT Emory. those people are gone. As soon as their lie was discovered it was addressed. How could it have been handled any better?

Pride and Joy

August 22nd, 2012
2:37 pm

To Teachers’ Son and Everyone — here’s my point.
Public school teachers on this blog often gave a pass to public school teachers and principals for erasing children’s test scores …..and offered excuse after excuse to condone the behavior.

But when private school does it, the public school teachers here on this blog are in uproar about it.

Where was all this righteous injustice when Atlanta Public Schools did much, much worse and refused to admit their lies? Well, it was no where to be found.

Lying and cheating is wrong, unless of course, if the cheaters and liars are public school teachers, then it’s OK.

It seems All pigs are equal but some are more equal than others.

redweather

August 22nd, 2012
9:02 pm

Pride and Joy, you spout more nonsense than I can keep up with.

Rick

August 22nd, 2012
10:06 pm

Are we to believe that two admissions officers acted alone and no one else in leadership was aware of this ? Yes, there was an investigation – an investigation conducted and paid for by Emory. Are we hearing all there is to hear ? Two admissions officials and that was all ? No one else ? They just cooked this up on their own and so it went for a decade ? Okay – So I guess we should just take Emory’s word for it and stop there. Case closed.

RCB

August 23rd, 2012
10:46 am

When these 2 private schools were looking to hire admissions counselors, did they not think it odd that a senior admissions employee at Emory was all of a sudden looking for another job? Why would you WANT to move from a “prestigious” university to a local school? Two of them!!

Anon

August 23rd, 2012
12:08 pm

Actually — Mr. Walls was really at retirement age so it wasn’t really that odd

Sage

August 23rd, 2012
12:59 pm

It seems to me the ranking of a school should be based on the GRE, LSAT, or MCAT scores of the students who have attended that school, not on the SAT scores of its enrolled students.
I attended Emory many years ago. My SAT score was not high. But my GRE score was exceptionally high. An Emory education did that..

Pride and Joy

August 23rd, 2012
3:59 pm

Sage, you are as wise as your name.
You wrote “It seems to me the ranking of a school should be based on the GRE, LSAT, or MCAT scores of the students who have attended that school, not on the SAT scores of its enrolled students.”
Your point is valid and right on target. SAT scores measure the progress that was made before the child attended Emory. A high SAT score says nothing about the real quality of an Emory education.

Pride and Joy

August 23rd, 2012
4:01 pm

redweather, please don’t try to keep up with it. When you see my monniker, just blow on by.

Kris

August 23rd, 2012
8:35 pm

Maureen, can you clarify? As I understand it, the admissions inflation occurred only for Emory College, i.e., one of the undergraduate schools. The graduate programs admissions offices are run separately and in no way fell under Walls. Am I correct?

Maureen Downey

August 23rd, 2012
9:04 pm

@Kris, Yes, that is correct.

what_what

August 24th, 2012
9:07 am

did maureen go to emory? to wit in the article….”sends many graduates to top med school and law school.” that sentence just doesn’t seem grammatically correct. maybe plural instead of singular?

i recall several years ago when the emory president sent out a generic email to everyone asking their thoughts on how emory was doing regarding ethics. ha! i told him exactly what i thought about the lack of ethics at emory. to my surprise i received a personal reply from the president with a quite indignant tone “how dare you say there is an ethics problem at emory!”. whatever.

to anyone interested in emory politics i recommend the excellent book “waking up blind”.

Prof

August 24th, 2012
11:15 am

@ what_what. What’s grammatically incorrect in that sentence, “The private university attracts bright students and sends many graduates to top med schools and law schools”??? The singular subject, “university,” takes the singular verb form, “sends,”

KIM

August 25th, 2012
10:27 am

@Fred: seldom does a “mistake” like this happen with only two people involved. I don’t believe in nailing people to the cross. I do, however, believe in holding people accountable for errors. And this is of great magnitude. Fortunately for the world, whether a person has an SAT of 1200 or 1600 has little to do with whether he/she is a great world contributor. But, having integrity does have a lot to do with it. A culture that accepts less is doomed.

@ what_what

August 25th, 2012
12:53 pm

“to my surprise i received a personal reply from the president with a quite indignant tone ‘how dare you say there is an ethics problem at emory!’.”

Sure, pal. I seriously doubt Wagner cares what some random schmo with an ax to grind thinks about Emory.

Rick

August 25th, 2012
4:31 pm

Who believes that this was the action of only 2 people ? That it was only two people who conceived and executed a decade long campaign of knowingly feeding inaccurate information to US News and World Report. Also the “investigation” was internal and conducted by Emory for Emory. So we are hearing only that which they feel comfortable disclosing. This would have gone over much better had they allowed a third party to drive the investigation with full transparency and publication of all intermediate discovery results and conclusions. Yes they hired a law firm to assist but ,again, on the Emory dime and closed to public inspection except for their press release style notification that attempts to neatly tie up the nasty loose ends into a nice summary package. Where is the timeline of events or detailed presentation of facts. What is Mr. Walls version of the story ? His successor’s ?

dropit

August 25th, 2012
8:26 pm

“integrity”? funny stuff–they deliberately provided false data to students / parents, got caught, then put out a lot of spin that no current employee knew anything about it, which is total BS. that is not integrity.

Can you read?

August 26th, 2012
10:41 am

@dropit: Emory didn’t “get caught.” It self-reported the errors when the new dean of admissions discovered them. Emory could’ve just as easily swept this issue under the rug, and no one would’ve been the wiser.

Teacher's Son

August 26th, 2012
1:34 pm

@Pride and Joy: You’ve obviously jumped to the conclusion that my father was a teacher in the APS or that I have some other connection to the APS. You are wrong. My dad was a lifelong high school teacher in the Midwest, wrapped around four years spent in the Army during WWII, including combat in Europe. My children did not attend an APS school. What the APS did was absolutely wrong and I deplore it in the strongest possible terms—as was what Emory did. Situational ethics do nothing for me.

Teacher's Son

August 26th, 2012
1:47 pm

@Pride and Joy: Let me rephrase, since my prior post smacks of conclusion jumping. I am going to assume that you have concluded that my father…etc., etc.

exteacher

August 27th, 2012
10:09 pm

Emory does this because they are big enough to do it. This entity does whatever it pleases. They have lots of money and it grows like a fungus encompassing all in its path and to heck with its neighbors. If they cannot do it legally they will do it however they can. Got to keep the money farm going. They NEVER get enough. It is a greedy lot.

Teacher's Son

August 28th, 2012
9:31 am

And now Emory has stated there is no need to review their graduate program data, and has refused to release a copy of the report or any details therefrom:

http://www.ajc.com/news/dekalb/emory-no-need-to-1508220.html

Yep, integrity and transparency, all right…