Truancy and tardiness: Does going after parents work?

Most people who work with truants say the parents are part of the problem. But is criminal action against the parents the right solution?

Yes, according to districts that are getting more aggressive in criminally prosecuting parents whose children rack up unexcused absences or show up late repeatedly.

Nationwide, more systems are resorting to punitive measures to command the attention of parents and make a point.

Earlier this year, parents in Loudoun County, Va., were stunned to find sheriff’s deputies at their front doors with court summons. The parents faced Class 3 misdemeanors because their children had been late too many times.

In a story on the summons, the Washington Post focused on one peeved couple whose three children had glowing report cards, but the parents were still summoned to court because of how often the kids were tardy. An attorney, the father argued that the summons represented an out-of-control nanny state. The Post story drew 868 comments.

Many posters contended it was wrong to criminalize lateness. So taking kids to school late repeatedly is a bad idea and impacts everyone — conceded. However, is it criminal behavior? Do you all really understand the significance of criminalizing everything in this country? We’ve all gotten so used to the massive overreach of government we don’t even stop to consider that there are better ways to manage our society. How about we handle it in the local school instead of in the courts?

But others argued that the parents ought to own up to their mistakes: The school didn’t take this action because a child was tardy once or twice. It obviously was becoming a routine and disruptive to other students and the school staff. Part of the education of the kids is learning that it’s important to follow rules. If the rules aren’t reasonable then you work to change them through the normal processes. I don’t think the acceptable process is teaching children to blatantly break rules if you don’t like them. I bet that doesn’t work at home! This is pretty simple. Go to court and explain that you are now following the rules, apologize, accept the suspended fine, and get the kids to school on time.

According to the AJC:

Cheryl McCoy and Danelle Swanson were led away in cuffs, each charged with educational neglect, after DeKalb Sheriff’s deputies pounded on their doors.

“When we get eight unexcused absences, that’s when we are getting involved,” said Sherry Boston, the DeKalb solicitor-general. The DeKalb County School District referred 900 cases to her office last year for truancy violations, she said.

The sweep underscores a nagging problem: truancy increases the likelihood that a student will eventually drop out. And students who drop out are likely to occupy a low rung on the economic ladder or a prison cell. Nine of 10 prison inmates in Georgia are high school dropouts

In Cobb County, the number of court referrals last year was around 350, said Paul Pursell, the school system’s truancy coordinator. Police complain to him that truants commit daytime burglaries and other mischief. Both Atlanta and Cobb schools refer cases to the courts after 10 unexcused absences, but school counselors and social workers get involved far earlier, typically after three unexplained absences.

Denise Revels, the coordinator of social work services for Atlanta Public Schools, said students who fail to attend until age 16, as the law requires, affect everyone. “They don’t become productive citizens,” she said. “So it’s a societal problem.”

School officials link parents with social services that try to help. This summer, Atlanta experimented with a month-long summer camp that placed 40 truant middle school students with Atlanta police officers. The kids took field trips, did community service, attended police training and bonded with cops, who plan to follow up with them during this school year.

“Court is really the last resort for us,” Revels said.

Sometimes, though, it’s the only option. About 70 of those 900 DeKalb court referrals last year failed to appear for their meeting with the judge, leading to bench warrants for their arrest, said Sgt. Adrion Bell, spokesman for Sheriff Tom Brown.

Swanson, 26, failed didn’t show for court after her child missed 16 days of kindergarten. McCoy, 43, skipped court after her teenager missed 37 days of middle school. Boston asks judges to impose one day in jail for each day of school missed, but only two or three cases actually got that far last year, she said. “The vast majority of our parents just need help and guidance.”

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

143 comments Add your comment

SGA Teacher

August 3rd, 2012
4:54 am

If you really wanna get kids in school, tie any form of welfare to schooling the kids. If a kid drops out, give then an immediate invitation to join the armed services, but put them in a construction group. No weapons allowed.

Of course, that is wrong and not PC of me to think that.

arnold

August 3rd, 2012
5:19 am

SGA Teacher…Incompetent parents are from all economic classes, not just those on welfare. Parents are responsible for their childrens actions. Parents should be held accountable. Of course those who are not responsible are willing to blame anyone other than themselves.

jezel

August 3rd, 2012
6:05 am

This state has tried to hold the teachers accountable for some of this for way too long. …and how many people jumped on that band wagon ? How many articles do we read in the AJC about how bad teachers are?

Am so glad someone has the courage to write articles that put the problem into the hands of the only ones who can solve it…THE PARENTS.

ScienceTeacher671

August 3rd, 2012
6:25 am

I’ve had several students who came to school simply so that their parents wouldn’t go to jail. It didn’t mean that the students did anything or tried to learn once they got to school.

Of course, my kids are high school aged, and they were truant because they didn’t like school and didn’t want to be there. Whether earlier intervention would help, or whether the students were reflecting values they learned at home, I’m not sure.

mountain man

August 3rd, 2012
6:32 am

Amen, Jezel!

Thank you, Maureen, for finally doing a blog on what I have been repeatedly saying is one of the worst problems in failing schools. You know what , YOU CANNOT TEACH KIDS THAT ARE NOT THERE!

We see constant bashing of teachers on this blog – bashing of 8th grade teachers who inherit children who have been socially promoted, and we expect that one teacher to “catch them up”. We see teachers bashed for children spitting on them and threatening them. We see teachers bashed for having discipline problems in their classroom. We see teachers bashed for administrators changing their grades from a “F” to a “C”. We see teachers bashed for administrators promoting students to the next grade level over the protest of the teacher. And we see teachers bashed for children being absent.

Let’s put the blame where it mostly belongs – on PARENTS and STUDENTS.

If a student is tardy, make them stay after school an equal amount to the time they were late. Missed the bus? Oh, too bad – call mom (unfortunately, SGA is correct and I think if you did some research you would find most truants are from single parent homes and a lot on welfare). She can’t come and pick you up because she doesn’t have a car? Tough luck – call DFACS. Maybe mom should not party so hard the night before that she can’t get up and get you to school on time.

A lot of these problems are interlinked – drug use=single parenthood=low SES status= welfare=truancy – they all flow from the same sources – lack of responsibility. And they perpetuate themselves! These kids are learning this behavior from their mom and will repeat the cycle.

mountain man

August 3rd, 2012
6:37 am

By the way, from a business community viewpoint, one of the valuable lessons that is learned in school (and college) is the ability to follow rules and be present and be on time. If a kid is not taught to get to school every day and be on time, how long do you think that he/she will last in the workforce? At our company, you get about 4 chances, then you are gone.

So these kids drop out of school, can’t get or hold a job, either get welfare or begin criminal activity, and then end up in prison. All because we want to be Politically Correct and not jail these parents who allow their kids to miss school.

redweather

August 3rd, 2012
7:00 am

“It’s not my goal that the kids are late, but my goal is that they arrive to school well-fed, ready to learn and comfortable in their skin.”

Comfortable in their skin? Say what?

I_teach!!

August 3rd, 2012
7:02 am

Is anyone aware that back in the days before we were waived from AYP, a school with a 100% pass rate on the CRCTs or EOCTs, could FAIL to make AYP because of student attendance being too high?????

I had students who continually strolled in late…it is incredibly disruptive; the child does miss work, instruction, etc.

If you showed up at your job late numerous times, wouldn’t you face consequences???????

If teachers and school personnel suffer because parents can’t get their kids to school on time on a daily basis, yes….parents need to be held accountable!

jezel

August 3rd, 2012
7:36 am

If SCHOOLS AND TEACHERS have any chance at all of breaking the cycle that mountain man mentioned…we must reduce class size. A ratio of 1 teacher per 5 students…up to 1 to 10…must be our goal in education. Maybe some of the at risk students can be reached and enjoy success.

If you are in education and are not teaching, cooking lunches, doing repairs, cleaning or cutting the grass..maybe you should find another job. Our country does not have the money to pay for all the other foolishness.

Mountain Man

August 3rd, 2012
7:39 am

“If SCHOOLS AND TEACHERS have any chance at all of breaking the cycle that mountain man mentioned…we must reduce class size.”

Good luck with that one. Although I agree it would be a good idea, it would require a sustantial tax increase, and that is not about to happen in Georgia.

Also, how will a teacher:student ration of 1:5 help when those 5 kids are ABSENT?

Entitlement Society

August 3rd, 2012
7:43 am

@ I Teach – you wrote – Is anyone aware that back in the days before we were waived from AYP, a school with a 100% pass rate on the CRCTs or EOCTs, could FAIL to make AYP because of student attendance being too high?????

_______________________________________________________________________

could FAIL to make AYP because of student attendance being too high?????
Is that a typo? Seems like it would be the other way around. Maybe “too low?”

Mountain Man

August 3rd, 2012
7:45 am

Headline: ” Truancy and tardiness: Does going after parents work?”

What other means would you use? Ignore the problem and let the kids drop out and become criminals and welfare users? Punish the kids because their mother did not wake them up in time for school? (I can see punishing a child if he/she left the school after the bus dropped them off.)

Some parents might be open to and improve with help and guidance. Maybe all the mother needs is two alarm clocks, one located 10 feet from the bed (loud ones, I have had to do that myself so I would get to work on time). But I think in most cases, the mother just doesn’t care, and punishment is the only way. While we are talking about it, what about the baby daddy? How about tracking him down and make him also responsible for getting his children to school. That might take a lot of DNA testing, but is it not also the father’s (sperm donor’s) responsibility also?

jezel

August 3rd, 2012
8:01 am

Good point about teaching empty desks.

Money is already there. Department of Corrections gets more than a billion dollars each year. Much more than the schools. 1 of 12 Georgians have felonies…national average is 1 out of 32. Cut the incarceration rate 60 percent and you have 600 million that could go to education.

Average class size is 1 teacher per 30 students currently. With an additional 600 million dollars class size can be reduced 60 percent. That would be a 1 to 12 ratio.

It is all about priorities.

Mountain Man

August 3rd, 2012
8:04 am

Redweather – Took me a while to find that quote. From the article link. Interesting article – about a well-to-do white family with two parents where the mother just can’t seem to get her three kids to school on time – despite living a two-minute drive from school. WHAT IS WRONG WITH THIS PICTURE!!!!

I feel sorry for these nice, smart, kids that may grow up and get out in the real world and get fired from their jobs because of repeated tardiness. Or else they had better go to work for Apple or some other job that doesn’t care when you get to work.

I have no sympathy whatsoever for this mom. Suck it up and get your lazy butt out of bed two HOURS early if you have to, but get your freaking kids to school on time!

Entitlement Society

August 3rd, 2012
8:11 am

Yes, this crack down needs to start in Kindergarten. Children need to begin developing the behavior pattern of getting up on time and getting to school on time. Parents need to be accountable for this from DAY 1 of their children’s schooling. No slack. If it’s not enforced from day one, there’s no hope. Administrators must back up teachers and go after these dead beat parents who don’t see education as the top priority in their child’s day. End of story.

Diana

August 3rd, 2012
8:12 am

I believe the lessons learned at a young age carry over to adult hood. My mother was always on time. I joke that if we were 5 minutes early we were late. That has carried over to me now. I am always early. I taught high school a few years ago. I never accepted late papers. One parent questioned me on it and I explained to him that I am trying to teach them to be responsible now so that when the students enter the workforce and they understand deadlines. Parents should totally be held responsible for their children being late. Parents are the ultimate teachers of their children.

old school doc

August 3rd, 2012
8:13 am

Why do we continue to hijack the futures of children WHO WANT TO LEARN by having these children in regular schools? THe ones who are there “just so the parent won’t go to jail” often times bring a whole host of other issues to the classroom– an ever increasing sized classroom at that!
If we as a society force kids to attend school, make sure they at least do not disrupt those that actually want to lea n. Kids who, for whatever reason, of whatever class, who have too many behavioral issues, should be sent to alternative academies, in each area of town . And have all sorts of social/psychological/educational extras at these alternative academies.

Parents and children who are well behaved, educateion- oriented certainly do not want to be around disruptive children who do not want to learn. Just look at the numbers of children going to out of area schools, charter and private schools, or homeschooling.

Why not acknowledge this is occuring and set up charter or magnet schools from elementary on, with strict discipline and consequences in place?

Mountain Man

August 3rd, 2012
8:13 am

Interesting point about priorities – Jezel.

The only problem is that using the department of corrections money to improve teacher:student ratios does not guarantee a 60% reduction in crimes committed. As I said before, lower student :teacher ratios do not automatically make kids come to school. And absenteeism is only the FIRST of many problems that must be overcome in order to improive the education system. Then you have to deal with discipline and apathy (I don’t want to learn because my friends say it makes me act TOO WHITE). Social promotion is also a killer. Absenteeism is only a START.

Mountain Man

August 3rd, 2012
8:15 am

Entitlement Society @ 8:11am

Right on, brother!!

long time educator

August 3rd, 2012
8:15 am

@Jezel, We could come close to your lower class size ratio if we put all certified personnel collecting a paycheck back in the classroom. The non-teaching professionals make salaries that could probably fund two normal teaching positions. We have the money; we are just spending it foolishly. If we reduced all the ridiculous paperwork and administrative tasks, we could get by with many fewer certified administrators. Most of the district level director tasks could be done by civilians (accountants and secretaries) and not by doctoral level educators. Our most prestigious private school in town has part time administrators, who teach half day and do administrative tasks the other half. There is not a large pay incentive to “be the administrator” and they rotate the duty among the teachers. They do pay one principal, but he teaches one or two class a day. We need to clean house and put our money and personnel where the children are.

bootney farnsworth

August 3rd, 2012
8:17 am

it won’t work.
parents (for the most part) already don’t give a damn.

and ignoring the fact school should be voluntary, tossing mom and dad into jail for a non violent activity done by their child?

stupid, ignorant, and nanny state run amok. again

bootney farnsworth

August 3rd, 2012
8:19 am

you really want to get mom & dad’s attention?

let us fail their children. if a kid has excessive absences and can’t keep up…give them the grade they deserve.

Annette Rogers

August 3rd, 2012
8:21 am

Before the automated “your child was absent today” calls, I volunteered in a Gwinnett Middle School making attendance calls. With school not starting until after 9 AM, parents were often already at work before the bus came. The first 2 years we were at the old school near the high school and students could and did walk or bike to school if they missed the bus. When the new middle school was built on a major highway “fortressed” by fenced retention ponds and geographical barriers, students were no longer allowed to walk or bike to campus period. Students “caught” walking to campus receive punishments including in school suspension. Before and after school options for students seem to have the biggest possitive impact on decreasing tardies and absences. Typically there are no day care options for students over 12 even for parents that can afford it.

Dunwoody Mom

August 3rd, 2012
8:25 am

In my day we actually had Truant Officers – I don’t remember if they were employees of the school district or the DeKalb police, but families certainly did not want a visit from one of these individuals.

Yes, it is the parents responsibility to get their children to school. If they have trouble doing so for legitimate reasons, that is the role of the Social Worker to help them out. Schools should not be held accountable for the failures of parents/guardians.

Inman Park Boy

August 3rd, 2012
8:25 am

Parents teach their children a poor lesson indeed when they teach that timliness is unimportant. Heck yes, go after the parents. That’s where it starts.

Guest

August 3rd, 2012
8:27 am

Why don’t people just use birth control? If you don’t want kids, don’t have them! Not that difficult.

bootney farnsworth

August 3rd, 2012
8:28 am

there is another side to this as well: the stupid rules set and enforced by morons in the system.

true story: when one of mine was in elementary school, she had to have surgery to correct an airway problem. caused her to miss 4 weeks. told her teaches, her counselor, everyone. made sure to keep up with what was going on, and to have her do as much homework as she could while out.

about two weeks after she returned to school, we got a letter informing us we were on a very short leash for her absences and we would have to explain ourselves — or else. and if she missed one more time….when I contacted her school, I reminded them they knew all this, both via meetings and in writing.

their response: not our problem.

so as long as morons like those mentioned above are involved in the process, there is no way in hell I’ll ever support anything more than expulsion for excessive absences.

jezel

August 3rd, 2012
8:32 am

mountain man…1 of 12 Georgians have felonies…1 of 32 people nationally have felonies…ARE WE THAT MUCH WORSE THAN THE REST OF AMERICA?

bootney farnsworth

August 3rd, 2012
8:33 am

so if we start arresting parents for children’s truancy, what next?

fine for bad haircuts? jail time for obnoxious binders? flogging for excessive makeup?

its scary how many of you wish to use the force of government to enforce your view of how other people should behave. if a kid misses to much school and can’t do the work – flunk them. if its really bad, put them out.

woodrow

August 3rd, 2012
8:33 am

I wonder why people have children and then not take care of them so they become menaces to society? How about just use some birth control and save everyone a huge hassle.

Dunwoody Mom

August 3rd, 2012
8:34 am

@bootney…It’s not against the law to hve a bad haircut….it is against the law for children not to attend school.

Pride and Joy

August 3rd, 2012
8:35 am

Being late is disruptive. It negatively impacts the learning of the other children in the class. So although these parents are obviously doing their job in other areas, they have to follow this important rule. If they can’t get their kids to school on time, they deserve a wake up call, .like a nice, fat fine; however, I have to ask about the school. Are they going after everyone equally, including their own staff?
I had two parent teacher conferences this year with one teacher at 7:30 a.m. — the teachers’s choice. When I have a 7:30 meeting at school, I am there at 7:15.
Both times the teacher saunters in the front door of the school at 7:30. By the time the teacher dispensed with her own child, got all her items and so on, it was 7:40. Now, kids are allowed in the classroom at 7:45. So of course, she wasn’t finished until 8:00, when school started or was supposed to start. She kept 21 other kids out in the hall waiting to get in the classroom, which meant other teachers were having to manage the students in the hall.
My husband and I both managed to get out of bed, get dressed for work, get our kids to school on time and were patiently waiting for the teacher on both occassions.
The school staff has to realize they need to play by the same rules too.
Promptness is important.
Timeliness affects everyone.
It’s very important at school and it is critical in life.
When a candidate shows up late to an interview, I show them the door. I don’t even waste my time. Some are shocked, one has even cried.
Show up on time or suffer the consequences.

long time educator

August 3rd, 2012
8:39 am

As much as possible, the punishment should fit the “crime”. The reason we do not want students to be late is because they miss instruction and disrupt the ongoing class. For this reason, the consequence should be: the student is held in the office until the beginning of the next class subject, is unable to make up the work missed, and receives zeroes for assignments missed. If tardiness becomes a habit, then the student would fail the class and if it is a major one, like reading in elementary school, the student might fail the grade. Under no circumstances should lack of responsibility on the parents’ part become a burden for the teacher to find time in the already crowded school day to catch the child up.

mark

August 3rd, 2012
8:42 am

I am starting a Charter Jail. it is for profit. I will take anyone for $55/day that is $20,000 per a year (ICE prisoners are $188/day). You fools trying to educate people for $7000/year. CharterJailUSA will incarcerate anyone for a small fee and what is wrong with making money?

Woody

August 3rd, 2012
8:44 am

I dunno – I think self-tardiness and self-truancy act as a kind of natural selection, a pressure-relief valve if you will. You could argue that there are no ‘bad’ children but certainly there are disruptive and impulse-ridden children and if they are not present in class, then the class benefits. Probably a relief to the teacher whenever those sorts are gone! And then there are children chronically bored with the whole thing, disengaged and frankly not seeing the point of it all. Probably OK not to have those in class, either! And y’know, I always thought it was the Principal’s job to deal with these sorts of things (usually through the offices of the Vice- or Assistant Principal) with a family conference to find out just what was going on – Maybe the missing kid has been saddled with child-care responsibilities? Handing this over to, my God, the police, just because trying to motivate individuals or their parents is ‘icky’ is a little bizarre. Harkens to the pre-revolutionary days when the town constable hauled you in for not attending the town church. And, unsaid behind this, is the difficulty of maintaining a place of education that is actually so fun and rewarding, that kids are beating down the doors to get in. Make it truly worthwhile, and they will come.

long time educator

August 3rd, 2012
8:48 am

@Woody, The joke among teachers is that the behavior problem kids have perfect attendance.

Steve

August 3rd, 2012
8:54 am

Parents are responciple for their children if the child is a minor. As the adult, they need to be held accountable.

Tom

August 3rd, 2012
8:57 am

While excessive tardiness and absences are a problem for learning, few people would commit to anything that didn’t allow 8 days per year away. School has gone overboard with their definition of the problem, and I believe funding reveals the true picture. I believe schools have funding and ratings tied to their average daily attendance. Money and ratings push them to an unreasonable position on what is acceptable.

We have truancy laws for a reason, I believe we would be better served to use them to address the real truancy problems, not funding problems. Making examples by harassing parents who have high performing children with 8 absences is abuse of the system. I wonder how many government employees we would have if we got rid of everyone who missed eight days in a year for reasons we felt were unimportant?

NONPC

August 3rd, 2012
8:58 am

Where laws are absolute, there can be no justice. Every kid is different. Even if the overwhelming majority of the fault lies with the parent, there will be kids who simply disobey. Those kids will give their parents a criminal record, and that is wrong on the part of our criminal justice system.

So, the question REALLY is this: are we willing to sacrifice a few innocent parents because of the conduct of a lot of other lazy parents?

Solutions

August 3rd, 2012
9:06 am

Criminalizing tardiness is part of the great American pass time of shifting and dispersing the blame for failure. The teachers do not want to be held responsible for student failure, so they try to shift the blame to parents and the students themselves. Ok, if we allow that, then I demand the same criminal penalties apply to teachers who sleep in class, read the newspaper in class, drink alcohol prior to or at school, or take drugs, either legal or otherwise. With disruptive students, is it not better for everyone if they are absent from school as much as possible?

hssped

August 3rd, 2012
9:15 am

Don’t make attendance mandatory. Once you miss x number of days then you fail. Period. As other bloggers noted…sometimes it is not the parent and I feel bad for those parents that have to go to work before the kid goes to school. Once a kid reaches a certain age there isn’t a whole bunch you can do other than quit your job to oversee that they are going to school. Sometimes you can take everything away and they still won’t go to school. One of the bloggers was correct…this is not a “welfare” family issue; this happens in well-off families, too.

bootney farnsworth

August 3rd, 2012
9:17 am

@ dunwoody mom

so is taking a bath in a graveyard in Indiana.
so is oral sex in Georgia

what’s your point?

Jane W.

August 3rd, 2012
9:17 am

Perhaps withholding selected entitlement benefits would motivate some repeat offenders. Another minor segment of school goers might also find military training an incentive to attend school—and behave better while there.

Was personally amazed some years ago when a retired gentleman instituted a quasi-military after-school club at our middle school, and within weeks had some of the worst classroom disrupters suddenly acting like West Point cadets.

The main draw, as far as I could see, was the right to wear a simple “uniform” shirt and learn a bit of military terminology. Plus take part in a flag honor guard ceremony at infrequent student assemblies.

Self-styled libertarians among the school’s parent community eventually brought an end to the experiment, and those attracted to its voluntary self-discipline quickly reverted to disruptive behavior.

No doubt some readers are indignant just reading about the idea.

bootney farnsworth

August 3rd, 2012
9:20 am

in my younger days, I had the occasion to slip out the back door during HS. my parents would have kicked my butt had they caught me – and usually did when they found out. they took my HS education far more seriously than I did.

but short of chaining me to the chair…

bootney farnsworth

August 3rd, 2012
9:23 am

@ woodrow

are you kidding? bringing up birth control is only slightly less evil than being indifferent towards gay marriage.

society will crumble

Ron F.

August 3rd, 2012
9:25 am

Solutions: so how is it the teacher’s fault if a kid misses 30 days?

catlady

August 3rd, 2012
9:41 am

I can only speak for what I have seen in my system: Parents are given dozens of second chances, year after year, starting anew each year. THEN, IF the school takes it to juvenile court, the judge puts it off to revisit month after month. AND since juvenile court judges change so much, there is more delay when the new judge has to be brought up to speed. What I have seen is a process as slow as molasses on a cold day.

And it isn’t just the welfare kids who are doing this. In fact, they have an incentive to come on time so they don’t miss breakfast. It is, in my area, also a few of the few middle class kids we have–the rules don’t apply to them!

Batgirl

August 3rd, 2012
9:47 am

Truancy may be a problem associated with low socioeconomic status, but chronic tardiness is not. It is a problem of the little angels who cannot possibly ride the bus and must be chauffeured by Mommy or Daddy. So maybe punishment for chronic tardiness should be requiring the students to ride the bus for a few weeks. Require them to sit directly behind the driver so that they cannot claim they are being bullied or that the kid sitting next to them smells bad. The kids might not like it, but I’d bet the parents would find that they like the extra time they gain by not having to take their children to school.

long time educator

August 3rd, 2012
9:51 am

catlady, If the middle class kids starting failing classes and being held back; their parents would pay more attention. It is because the school has taken on the responsibility for everything that the parents and kids do not take responsibility for anything; failure is a fair consequence.

Beverly Fraud

August 3rd, 2012
9:55 am

“The teachers do not want to be held responsible for student failure, so they try to shift the blame to parents and the students themselves.!

Imagine that; teachers don’t want to be held responsible for the lack of academic progress of students who aren’t there!

Oh the horror!