UGA professor: Giving voice and hope to undocumented students. (Panel on issue at UGA today.)

Many immigrants in Atlanta joined the push to allow children to attend college legally. (AJC photo)

Many immigrants in Atlanta pushed to allow children to attend college legally. (AJC photo)

JoBeth Allen is a professor in the University of Georgia Department of Language and Literacy Education. She sent me an essay about the plight of undocumented students and the role that educators ought to play.

Here is Dr. Allen’s essay:

By JoBeth Allen

Gabrielle is a National Honors Society student whose goal is to be a translator at the United Nations. She speaks three languages, passed seven Advanced Placement courses, and leads her section in the youth symphony. Her parents work long hours and depend on her to take care of her younger siblings after school.

While her family came to the U.S. legally on work visas when Gabrielle was a baby, they have not been able to become citizens.

Gabrielle is undocumented.

Like thousands of students throughout Georgia, Gabrielle will be affected by the Barack Obama administration’s announcement that ends  deporting undocumented immigrants ages 16-30  brought to the U.S. as children. Georgia’s teachers, counselors and administrators play a critical role in the lives of undocumented students.

In turn, colleges of education are responsible for the pre-service and in-service development for these professionals. Georgia’s colleges of education must provide leadership in addressing educational issues surrounding students who are undocumented. There is a legitimate academic and civic interest in researching how best to aid undocumented students and in helping university students prepare for teaching and counseling them.

I teach in the College of Education at the University of Georgia. Our responsibility is to provide the best possible education for all children in Georgia. We work with teachers, parents, and school systems to provide that opportunity. We educate and support teachers, counselors, administrators and other dedicated professionals as they address needs and develop talents of all students in this nation of immigrants, whether they are first generation or many generations past.

Research shows learning occurs when students feel included in a positive, safe and supportive environment. Students may be teased or bullied if others know their immigration status. Counselors work closely with students as they deal with these and other aspects of limited opportunities: inability to register for courses like Work Based Learning or do service learning projects without a Social Security number, inability to park on school campus without a driver’s license, and limitations regarding college admissions.

Undocumented students may not be able to attend the college of their choice, especially if that choice is one of the universities in Georgia where they are banned. Their teachers and counselors spend hours writing letters of recommendation for admission and scholarships to out-of-state colleges, guiding students in writing admission essays and helping them prepare for the rigorous subject-area tests required at some prestigious colleges. One high school teacher and his students created a 40-page booklet to assist undocumented students in applying for scholarships to colleges.

Do colleges of education also have a role in facilitating public dialogue about education and immigration issues? I believe we do. Some faculty members in my college of education, and in other Georgia colleges and universities, invite such experienced k-12 educators to speak to our classes to share students’ stories, as well as their roles in supporting students who are undocumented. We sponsored a public forum where six high school students like Gabrielle spoke about their dreams of college, how they’ve studied hard to realize those dreams, and how their teachers and counselors are helping them navigate a society that does not welcome them. While these forums generated controversy, public dialogue is essential to understanding immigration and education issues.

Clearly, colleges of education play a critical role in researching immigration issues, in examining policy on immigration and education, and in preparing educators to teach students who are undocumented, students like Gabrielle who will attend a prestigious university in the northeast on a full scholarship this fall.

In a related note: There is a panel discussion Thursday on the legal, political, and ethical implications of President Obama’s new policy regarding undocumented youth. The panel will include DREAMers from Freedom University (including one recent Clarke Central graduate who will be attending Syracuse this fall), UGA’s Director of Immigration Services Robin Catmur, Clarke Central High School English Department Chair Ian Altman, Freedom University faculty member Lorgia Garcia-Pena, and immigration attorney Charles Kuck. The panel will be at the Coverdell Center on UGA’s South Campus near the Coliseum and Vet School in Room 175 at 6 p.m.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

43 comments Add your comment

skipper

June 20th, 2012
3:56 pm

1st! Maureen, this is a tough one. I don’t want to sound mean, but for every one like this youn person with aspirations, there are many more that just (w/o sounding discriminatory) are not like this at all. No easy solution at all!

Ole Guy

June 20th, 2012
3:57 pm

Gee-frequin whiz, EVERYONE’S got one “plight” or another; guess what? WE DEAL WITH IT, ONE WAY OR ANOTHER! Now (scratching of head, accompanied by furrowed eyebrow), let me think…oh yea, one way the “benevolent” leader might deal with this issue is to introduce the concept of LEAGALIZATION! How-frequin bout’ that, rather than issuing this TEMPORARY relief (I believe it’s all of two years), after which…WHAT? Back to square one; we’ll still have an undocumented worker, only more of an educated undocumented worker. In the end, just exactly what has been achieved? NOTHING!

Let’s howbout this benevolent wise leader see what might could be done in order to facilitate the leagalization process. Color me silly, but that effort seems to make a helluva lot more sense for all concerned.

William Casey

June 20th, 2012
3:59 pm

Difficult issue. I believe that society benefits from an educated citizenry. However, as always, the issue is who pays for it?

Lee

June 20th, 2012
4:04 pm

Beat me to the punch @Skipper. I agree. Besides if “Gabrielle” is so dang smart, surely she can figure out how to go down to the courthouse and fill out the paperwork to become a US citizen the LEGAL way.

Shar

June 20th, 2012
4:04 pm

Those who commit crimes often attempt to excuse them on the basis of an underprivileged childhood or the frustration of being ‘caught in the system’. Dr. Allen follows this formula in relating the touching history of Gabrielle, whose parents are ” not able to become citizens” because they, and she, have broken the law by overstaying their visas.

Gabrielle has taken advantage of all the benefits that American taxpayers provide to their fellow citizens, and wants more. Sympathetic mentors such as Dr. Allen help them find their way around restrictions and gain access to more benefits that are intended for citizens. Once again, Gabrielle is taking advantage of this with a full scholarship to a “prestigious university in the northeast”.

Apparently Dr. Allen thinks this is a success story. I do not share her view.

She is sponsoring a panel discussion that is heavily stacked with pro-illegal immigrant speakers. She espouses “dialogue”, when in fact, between this panel and the “experienced k-12 educators” she invited to speak alongside illegal students who have taken taxpayer-funded benefits, she obviously only tolerates monologues that support her point of view.

Gabrielle has had a far better life here than she would have in her country of origin, and she has made the most of the opportunities she stole. But the fact remains that she did this as a criminal, just as much as a purse-snatcher who excuses himself because he had a bad childhood.

Gabrielle is one of millions who are draining the foundations of this country. Students who do not speak English, who are behind in class, inevitably require more services and retard classroom progress. How many of Gabrielle’s past classmates’ progress was held back so the teacher could attend to her specific needs?

Dr. Allen is trying for the human interest angle, to humanize the illegal person and make the audience sympathetic to her plight. This is sophomoric, simplistic and offensive. The “controversy” is not about a particular individual, it is about the millions and millions of students who have overtaxed schools, taken benefits intended for citizens and in so doing interfered with classroom progress while siphoning off countless resources, degrading the public services as they do so.

Dr. Allen wants her audience to “understand immigration and education issues”. I think she needs to learn about those issues herself before insulting us with this condescending, adolescent propaganda.

Maureen Downey

June 20th, 2012
4:06 pm

@Shar, Don’t think Dr. Allen is sponsoring. Just happens to be at UGA. I have clarified that in post.
Maureen

RCB

June 20th, 2012
4:53 pm

These professors teach our children in college AND you get to pay for it!! Rubbish.

mountain man

June 20th, 2012
5:38 pm

Excuse me, am I missing something? Her parents brought her to this country when they legally had work visas? So are people with legal work visas not allowed to have children with them? Or did they overstay their visas and are now illegal in this country? The article doesn’t say. If her parents are legal, why would she be “undocumented”? Someone want to explain?

mountain man

June 20th, 2012
5:38 pm

Excuse me, am I missing something? Her parents brought her to this country when they legally had work visas? So are people with legal work visas not allowed to have children with them? Or did they overstay their visas and are now illegal in this country? The article doesn’t say. If her parents are legal, why would she be “undocumented”? Someone want to explain?

The previous illegals question

June 20th, 2012
5:43 pm

And by the way—why is the suffering of 23 million unemployed and underemployed Americans and LEGAL immigrants … being so HEARTLESSLY ignored?

Have we no shame?

catlady

June 20th, 2012
5:55 pm

I’d like us to put those young people who have REALLY excelled put into this program, not those who have just been mediocre. I think we should be selective, and choose the top of this group. Young people like two sisters I know who came as children, excelled, graduated in the top 10 in high school, have gone on to a private college here in Georgia, graduated after winning every award that college offered, and are ready to teach, but cannot, because they lack paper. People like this–we need them! Now, the girls’ brother made it through high school but lacks their drive. He hasn’t been in trouble, but he really does not benefit us much.

I noticed that about 2 dozen immigrant children made it though high school here this year. Of them, about half were probably born here or have papers, the others I doubt. How about let’s pick and choose who meets our needs? That is what Canada and other countries do.

Those of you who claim these folks do not pay taxes–where do you live? They pay tax when they buy things (Walmart having no special line for illegal immigrants so they don’t have to pay the tax), they pay property tax directly or (more frequently) indirectly. And, around here, the majority work for the only large employer in town, who supposedly uses e-verify. (Look into how e-verify works, and you will have an eye opener) That employer takes taxes out of their paychecks. (Some do work under the table, but then again, around here quite a few of the “native” people do for “cash money” also.)

mountain man

June 20th, 2012
6:11 pm

“I teach in the College of Education at the University of Georgia. Our responsibility is to provide the best possible education for all children in Georgia. ”

That sounds in conflict with the law of the state of Georgia that prohibits undocumented students from attending UGA.

Reality Check

June 20th, 2012
6:43 pm

This makes me so mad. If the education department takes up this “cause”, they will have public school teachers indocrinating children about the injustice done to illegal students, as they have preached indocrination on other issues. I do not mind them looking at the issue as one that has two sides and having students read both opinions and maybe write an essay about it, but I very much object to preaching only one side of an issue that is still being debated in the public forum. This is why some people pull their children out of public schools and go private or homeschool. NO TEACHER HAS THE RIGHT TO PREACH HER/HIS POLITICAL OPINIONS IN THE CLASSROOM. These opinions about illegal immigration are political and controversial and should be treated as such and if discussed, both sides should be presented, with no indication by the teacher on which side she stands. Why is this so hard to understand?

James

June 20th, 2012
8:36 pm

Shar your comments are right on!
If they want to get into UGA or GT or any other
school in Georgia then get legal. I personally think
we shouldn’t let them in our K-12 schools either…
I and many other are sick of paying for these people
who don’t want to obey our laws…

a reader

June 20th, 2012
9:12 pm

I think what many people forget is folks can’t just go to the courthouse or file papers and just “be legal”. It doesn’t work. There are limits by country and folks who would love to be legal just can’t. Let’s also remember that when we cut off avenues of higher education and employment for youth we end up leaving them nothing to hope for. So you see teen pregnancy and drugs and gangs. The young kids who learned English so easily and did so well in the early grades lose all incentive to continue onward when they’re just told “you can’t”.

yesica

June 20th, 2012
9:18 pm

honestly , i think they should do it give them permission to live in the U.S beacause they came here from other places to be successful and to get a better education and ,2 my oponion is that they should only give it to students who are behaving and not breaking the laws or have good grades and all the things that kids have to do , if They want to be citizens they should prove it that they deserve it thats my oponin and i would have to have rules to live in the U.S so , i hope that they give them permission to be citizens and they also need rules too thats my opinion i hope that they make a good choice for all those students .

Anonmom

June 20th, 2012
10:03 pm

I think I understood that the decree as passed by Pres. Obama actually wouldn’t help this girl — she actually entered legally — I think I understand that the new provisions are strictly for those here illegally and don’t apply to those who entered legally and who, for some reason or another have “overstayed” their welcome and are now undocumented. I haven’t read the decree. I have a real problem with the way it was just enacted through executive powers and without Congress — I believe, with all my heart, in our system of checks and balances. I may want everyone who has great story to stay — there are many who have been trying for years — legally — to get here and to stay — the law needs to be fixed — through Congress — to allow for the provisions and mechanisms for this to work. Executive Orders and Decree are not the way to accomplish this. (I might add here that I also have a problem with executive office shields protecting attorney generals when Congress gets too hot and the Executive Branch doesn’t want Congress to see what it’s doing — our founding father’s created a system of checks and balances to protect us from too powerful executives — as in Watergate).

mgdawg

June 20th, 2012
10:36 pm

My favorite part of the essay “inability to park on school campus without a driver’s license.” Should someone be allowed to park without a driver’s license? Lets think a little bit here, if they don’t have a license why are they driving? So not only are these students illegal for being in this country, they are doing other illegal things. Doesn’t look to me like they are being model citizens.

To start with, my initial response to this is that they are illegal, they are breaking the law being in the US so they have no rights in the US. While I understand it costs money to deport, it also costs money to send them to public school, pay their hospital bills, etc. All school systems are in a horrible situation as far as money, imagine if you take a way children that shouldn’t be there, maybe the school systems wouldn’t have as many layoffs and furlough days. This would increase the education of the students who are legal.

My next thought is, if this is going to happen, there should be some stipulations. First, whoever is working in the family, whether it is the kid or parents, they should have to prove they are paying taxes. Second, they should be working on becoming legal citizens, they shouldn’t just be ok with staying illegal all their life.

Entitlement Society

June 21st, 2012
7:47 am

Shar, you are spot on! I agree that she stole opportunities from our very own American citizens. Not until we can get our own mess of a public education system in order, should we even consider for a second the thought of extending some sort of olive branch to members of these families who have broken our immigration laws. Look at Atlanta for example, what a mess! Sarah Smith is now about to become even more overcrowded with the addition of Spanish speaking students from Garden Hills. The principal had to hire over 20 new teachers and add 8 new classrooms just for ESOL, while the English speaking students (our national language last time I checked) will continue to sit in overcrowded classrooms, not benfiting in a class size reduction with the addition of all those teachers and classrooms. It’s all for Spanish speaking students. You tell me those parents aren’t steaming mad because the children of illegals aren’t taking time and resources away from English speaking, legal citizens.

Entitlement Society

June 21st, 2012
7:48 am

* are taking time away*

Learn something today, Shar, James and MGDawg

June 21st, 2012
10:04 am

Shar, James, and mgdawg,

There is not a way for Gabrielle to get legal, until Congress breaks out of its political gridlock and updates the immigration law.

NTLB

June 21st, 2012
10:06 am

I suggest most of the readers here visit the federal government’s immigration website and read about how you become “legal” in this country before you pass judgement.

Entitlement Society

June 21st, 2012
10:18 am

@Learn something today, Shar, James and MGDawg – Why can’t Gabrielle’s parents take her back to their country of origin and follow proper immigration procedures? That seems like the legal way to me. That’s the method law abiding people who seek a better life in the USA use. That’s why we as taxpayers have our tax dollars allocated to fund INS.

Keith

June 21st, 2012
10:36 am

She is an illegal alien and I don’t give a sh** about her problem. She can voluntarily move to the country of her birth or be deported. Either one is fine with me.

Red

June 21st, 2012
11:06 am

@Entitlement Society, check again. The United States has no official language.

Red

June 21st, 2012
11:20 am

It’s like talking to brick wall. Always the same arguments. “What about American workers?”
I’m sorry, that argument would be valid if illegal immigrants were being legalized and citizens were being stripped from their citizenship. Giving someone an opportunity to COMPETE in the job market doesn’t somehow break deserving citizens’ legs and prevent them from getting a job, IF THEY SO DESERVE.

Stupid argument number 2- “What part of illegal don’t you understand?”

This is a particularly funny one. I think it’s funny that people who don’t understand the immigration process themselves, expect that these kids understand and abide by the nations laws before they even know how to read. How bright of you. In addition, citizens commit crimes (by the way, overstaying a visa is a civil violation similar to a parking ticket) far worse than this, and tell me how many of them lose their citizenship, or become “Illegal” in their nature? People aren’t illegal. Many of these people have cleaner criminal records than any of you from the point to where anything was up to them.

Ignorant remark number 3: “why can’t they just go back and apply the right way?”

Well, without getting to deep into it, there is NO PATH to citizenship for these kids once the initial entry occurred.

Laws are not written by gods, they are written by man, and are thus often flawed. It is our responsibility (and claim to fame) that we are a nation that adjust to changes. (the constitution is a “living” document.) If a situation arises in which our laws don’t apply, then we must CHANGE them to ensure our survival as a country.
Obama didn’t pass a decree or even an executive order. It is a MEMORANDUM.

Entitlement Society

June 21st, 2012
11:25 am

@Red – I never claimed it was the “official language,” as obviously I know there is no such thing. According to the 2000 US Census, 96% of the US population claims to speak English “well” or “very well.” That is precisely why I have a problem with US public schools catering to the 4% (comprised of many illegals) who can’t speak the English language and require additional resources which require additional taxpayer money.

Red

June 21st, 2012
11:35 am

@Entitlement Society OK, just wanted to make sure that was clear.

Just out of curiosity, what is your biggest argument against these people (the ones brought over as children) being allowed to work and/or obtain citizenship?

Entitlement Society

June 21st, 2012
11:47 am

@Red – My mother works for the federal government in INS. She reviews applications for citizenship only for those people who already have family members living in the US. These people plead their cases through a long and arduous process to be able to legally join their loved ones in the US. Not only is it a slap in the face to these people who wait in their homeland (separated from loved ones) to do it the right way), it’s a colossal waste of taxpayer money to fund INS to do what it does if it then turns and opens the floodgates for hundreds of thousands.

Red

June 21st, 2012
11:55 am

@Entitlement Society, that’s an understandable position to have, and I see where you’re coming from. I am also upset that these children’s parents did things the wrong way. But mostly I’m upset because this leaves these kids in a bind. The children did nothing wrong. The tourist visas they might’ve come with were taken out IN THEIR NAME, they had no involvement in that or in coming and being forced to grow up here. This is the only place they know as home. Take a moment to imagine that, and then picture them breaking their backs in school to earn the right to stay (but as of yet there is no path, but there would be with the DREAM Act.) Now, can you see where they’re coming from too?

Reality Check

June 21st, 2012
12:42 pm

@Red,
These children should be mad at their parents, not the citizens of the US. They have no legal rights here and should not have been misled to believe they do. Actually, they did have the gift of a public education since they were here away from their own home schools. They have NO GRIPE; they got a free public education in the US which I imagine is better than the school to which they would have gone in the home country. They are in a much better position to make a better life for themselves even if it is not in the US. We do not owe them citizenship; this is their parents’ fault and not ours to remedy. We could come up with all sorts of examples of bad parenting adversely affecting children. US citizens do not owe a remedy. Except for misplaced expectations from someone, they have not been mistreated and take away a free education.
And the second argument, that they are bright and finished college and cannot work: THERE ARE MILLIONS OF LEGAL COLLEGE GRADUATES WHO CANNOT FIND A JOB. This is not the area of employment where we have openings we cannot fill. This is the most specious argument of all.

Entitlement Society

June 21st, 2012
12:46 pm

@Red – while I feel for these children, I’m not sure what the solution is. They’ve already received a free education. It’s not their fault that their parents broke the law and put them in this unfortunate position. I do feel like someone has to be penalized in some way, so that it doesn’t set a precedent for others to think – hey, if we just enter on tourist visas and overstay our welcome, our kids can get a free education and an eventual work visa an bypass the regular “wait in line” system. Obviously there hasn’t been enough thought put into the logistics of this change, as it’s been rammed down the throats of the US citizens against the way the people have voted. I really wish that our elected officials would work together to find a solution. Cold day in hell when that’ll happen…

Red

June 21st, 2012
12:57 pm

@Entitlement Society, I agree with you there.

Red

June 21st, 2012
1:05 pm

@Reality Check, like I said before, opening up the competitive job market doesn’t do citizens any injustice. In fact, it helps to ensure we get the best possible workers out there in every field. The more variety the better. And maybe you personally don’t owe these kids anything, but this government does. It owes them answers. Our congressmen should have passed the DREAM act, because these kids committed NO crimes. And whether you like it or not, it is our problem to remedy because the way our immigration system is now, these kids can’t get jobs or driver’s licenses or health insurance so they are draining wayyy more than they would. If they could get jobs they’d be PULLING THEIR OWN WEIGHT. Paying for their own educations, not clogging up emergency rooms, or jails. Currently, some people spend about 6 months in jail BEFORE they get processed and deported. That may not tug at your heart, but I guarantee you it tugs at your wallet, cause YOU’RE the one paying for it. Wake up, and stop letting your congressmen and other political leaders lie to you so that they don’t have to fess up for the legislation THEY’RE not passing and the jobs THEY aren’t doing but getting paid millions for.

Reality Check

June 21st, 2012
1:20 pm

I agree that our government failed to secure the borders and prevent their parents from sneaking in illegally, but that is not a reason to make it worse and encourage others to do the same thing because they get to go to the front of the line for citizenship.
The only part of the Dream Act I will support is if one of these “raised in America illegals” wants to serve a designated tour in the military; they should earn citizenship. However, they should be subject to the same risk of being called up over and over as our other citizens do.
My main objection is fairness; it is not fair to all the other folks waiting in line, playing by the rules, to let these folks force their way to the front of the line. I also resent people in heavy traffic that take off up the shoulder and try to push their way back into the line in front of all those who patiently waited. I DO NOT let them in.
One other concession I will make; we do need to reform the NIS and make it more effiecient and move more quickly. Deciding how many immigrants we can absorb each year should be a determination made by our government based on economic indicators and logic, not emotion. If we hand out visas, we should have some better way of keeping track of where they are and seeing that they leave on time. This is a matter of homeland security. But just giving in to the hordes flooding our borders from the south and saying we cannot do anything about it, means we are no longer a sovereign country.

Shar

June 21st, 2012
1:33 pm

@Red et al: Politicians don’t want to touch this issue as the voters strongly want current immigration law enforced and business strongly wants to maintain the flow of cheap labor while passing all the social costs on to taxpayers. Standoff, with the people slipping money into the pols’ pockets winning by default. Plus, there are so many illegal immigrants here, with second or third generation legal family members who can vote, that politicians now prefer to break the law rather than endanger immigrant political support.

I’m sure Gabrielle is very nice and has worked very hard. I know that she has gotten benefits of US citizenship without being a citizen by breaking the law and residing here illegally. She has a much better life here than she would have in her country of origin, which is why her parents brought her here, and now she wants more. She wants to have everyone forget what she and her parents have done and give her the rights she has decided she deserves.

Red, have you ever spent a week – just one – in a classroom where the teacher is trying to teach 30 kids and 4 of them speak no English, so she has to stop and try to communicate by sign language or show-and-tell to attempt to transmit the lesson? When was the last time you went to a pediatric emergency room and waited and waited to be seen because a roomful of immigrants who are not eligible for insurance instead use it for primary care? When were you last in a PTA meeting when the donated budget was not compromised by the need to pay for a Spanish-language aide to try and enable teachers to teach?

The list goes on and on. The fact is, as Reality and Entitlement have posted, that immigrant children have no right to be here. They have already gotten an unimaginable bonanza from US taxpayers, unlike anything they could imagine back home, and they have run into the consequences of being illegal and don’t like them. Neither the government nor the citizenry owes these people anything at all – the boot is definitely on the other leg.

Ellis Island has an exhibit with a huge 3 dimensional graph showing immigrant waves since the 1830’s or so. The current graph shows a level of Mexican and Central American immigration that is far, far larger than all other waves combined. We cannot sustain this, and letting ‘just one more’ sympathetic group in with legal rights merely opens the door to more. We learned this after Reagan promised that his amnesty would be the end of accepting illegal immigrants here.

What needs to happen is that every employer of illegal immigrant workers should be fined for all costs related to that employee – detention and deportation, health care, education, etc. Plus a flat fine of $10K per employee and a minimum of 3 months jail time per employee. In addition, immigration violations should be treated like tax evasion crimes, where anonymous informants can receive half the proceeds of prosecution. There would be no more sad stories like Gabrielle’s because no one would hire her parents in the first place.

Red

June 21st, 2012
1:40 pm

@Shar, I understand where you’re coming from, and it’s clear that we’ll never agree. I guess we’ll just have to see what happens depending on who gets elected and what strategies they implement.

Vox Populi

June 21st, 2012
2:50 pm

Sorry…the CRIMINALS who whine and complain that breaking the law “wasn’t their choice” MUST be deported, along with their scofflaw relatives.

No amnesty now or ever!

Entitlement Society

June 21st, 2012
3:12 pm

Atlanta to Cancun, Mexico on Delta $173 one-way. If I knew for sure that those who left would never come back (except legally), I would GLADLY buy 5 tickets out of my own pocket. 5 problems solved. Forget red tape, etc. They got here somehow, mysteriously. I’ll send a few back on my dime if the government can’t seem to do it on theirs.

Red

June 21st, 2012
3:23 pm

@Vox Populi Oh how I love it when people hide behind their wagging righteous fingers. Keep shouting in bewildered frustration while the rest of us actually get something accomplished.
You sound just like a politician.

I wonder where your blind chagrin stems from…

Shar

June 21st, 2012
6:48 pm

@Red, you accuse Vox of bewildered frustration and wagging a righteous finger while you, apparently superior, “get something accomplished.”

All you have offered in this discussion is squeamish pity and an empathy that you seem to feel trumps both the law and common sense. For most of your fellow citizens, it doesn’t. Yes, it’s too bad that Gabrielle’s parents compromised her at an early age, but she has gotten far more than she could have hoped for while she’s hidden the truth. She, and her parents, can go back secure in the knowledge that they have taken far more than they have given. You brush by that fact, as you do the unsustainability of opening up our borders, wallets, schools, hospitals, work force, roads and every other element of life to anyone who can creep over and grab hold. Taking something you want does not give you the right to own it – just ask anyone who knocks over a convenience store or launders money,

You feel free to make unsupported personal aspersions (blind chagrin?) at those who disagree with you. It would be more to the point if you stopped calling names and actually presented a rational argument based in fact, the well being of our country and the rule of law.

Good Mother

June 22nd, 2012
6:49 pm

Gabrielle is NOT UNDOCUMENTed.
Her so-called parents are Criminals and so is she. She and her family and every criminal like her are stealing from genuine REAL honest American citizens.
Cry me a river, Gabrielle. Your tears are meaningless. They prove that you have that entitlement attitude. If you want the rights of a citizen — earn them — HONESTLY.
And in the meantime — get out.

Vox Populi

June 25th, 2012
4:05 pm

Sorry. ALL CRIMINAL SQUATTERS & SCOFFLAWS must be deported NOW.
They must learn that residents of the USA cannot pick & choose which laws they choose to obey. If she tried this dodge in Mexico she & her parents would be put UNDER the jail.