Condition of public high schools: More math, science. More kids going to college. And, in the South, more kids.

There is a wealth of detail about public high schools in the Condition of Education 2012 report issued a few weeks ago by the National Center for Education Statistics.

This year’s report looked at high school trends over the last 20 years. Among the interesting statistics: There has been a doubling of students taking math and science courses.

Of local interest, the statistical snapshot found that public high school enrollment increased by 35 percent in the South between 1989 and 2010, from 4 million students to 5.4 million.

Other striking stats: The number of high school students 16 and older holding jobs dropped from 32 percent to 16 percent between 1990 and 2010. Distance/online education is growing, from 222,000 students in 2002-03 to more than 1.3 million in 2009-10.

High school grads are more likely to go directly to college. In 1975,  51 percent of teens went off to a two- or four-year college in the fall after their high school graduation. In 2009-2010,  70 percent did so. (For a deeper look at this increase and why the news is not all cheery, take a look at this Ed Week blog.)

The Alliance for Excellent Education released a good summary of the Condition of Education 2012 report, which can be read in full here. Here is the summary from the Alliance:

In its analysis of high school completion, the report uses several different measures, including the number of high schools that are considered “low-retention.” In these high schools, the senior class is 70 percent or less than the size of the freshman class that entered four years earlier. In School Year 1990–91, 3,112 regular public high schools (24 percent) were considered low-retention. That number increased to 4,581 high schools (32.4 percent) in SY 2000–01 before dropping slightly to 4,096 high schools (26.4 percent) in SY 2009–10.

The report also examines trends in the status dropout rate, which represents the percentage of 16- to 24-year-olds who are not enrolled in school and have not earned a high school credential (i.e., diploma or General Education Development certificate). It finds that the overall status dropout rate declined from 12 percent in 1990 to 7 percent in 2010. Most notably, the status dropout rate for Hispanic students fell from 32 percent to 15 percent. Even with the decrease, however, Hispanic students continue to have a higher status dropout rate than white students (5 percent) and African Americans (8 percent).

The final completion statistic the report examines is Averaged Freshman Graduation Rate, which is based on a ratio of diplomas conferred compared to an incoming freshman class from four years earlier. The report notes that the national rate increased from 73.7 percent in SY 1990–91 to 75.5 percent in SY 2008–09. During that time, 30 states saw an increase in their AFGR, including Vermont, which saw a 10-percentage-point increase. Twenty states saw their AFGR decline by more than 5 percentage points, including New Mexico (5.3 percentage points), Wyoming (6.0 percentage points), and Nevada (20.7 percentage points).

In addition to high school completion data, the report includes significant data on high school enrollment, finding large increases in enrollment from the School Year 1990–91 until 2010–11, followed by a period of slower growth that is driven largely by increases in the number of Hispanic students. According to the report, enrollment in grades nine through 12 increased from 11.3 million in 1990–91 to 15 million in SY 2010–11. By 2021–22, high school enrollment is projected to grow only slightly to 15.5 million.

By SY 2021–22, the report projects that white students will account for only 53 percent of the enrollment in grades nine through 12, down from 67 percent in SY 1995–96. Enrollment for African American students will remain steady at around 16 percent, while enrollment of Hispanic students will grow dramatically from 12 percent to 23 percent. The percentage of Asian students is expected to increase from 4 percent to 7 percent.

In its analysis of course-taking habits of high school seniors, the report finds that the percentage of high school graduates from the Class of 2009 who took science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) classes was higher than their peers from the Class of 1990 in nearly every subject studied, including geometry, Algebra II, biology, chemistry, and physics. The only subject in which a decrease was identified was Algebra I, which fell from 77 percent in 1990 to 69 percent in 2009. The report attributes the decrease to more students from the Class of 2009 taking Algebra I prior to high school.

The report also examines the explosion in the number of students enrolling in distance education courses. According to the report, distance education courses are “credit-granting, technology-delivered, have either the instructor in a different location than the students, and/or have the course content delivered in, or delivered from, a different location than of the students.”

In School Year 2002–03, there were 222,000 high school students enrolled in digital courses; by SY 2009–10, that number had grown to 1.3 million. Among school districts, 53 percent had some high school students who were enrolled in distance education courses in SY 2009–10.

The report also examines increases in the percentage of high school graduates who enroll in postsecondary education in the fall after graduation and the growing gap between male and female graduates in the pursuit of higher education. According to the report, the percentage of high school graduates who immediately enrolled in a two- or four-year college increased from 60 percent in 1990 to 70 percent in 2010. A significant gap was identified between the percentage of students from low-income families (52 percent) electing higher education compared to those from high-income families (82 percent).

More troubling could be the slowing rate at which males pursue higher education after high school compared to their female counterparts. According to the report, 62 percent of females enrolled in higher education immediately after high school graduation in 1990 compared to 58 percent of males — a gap of 4 percent. In 2010, however, 74 percent of females pursued higher education compared to only 63 percent of males — a much larger gap of 11 percent. The pattern continued for students who planned to graduate from a four-year college, with 53 percent of males planning to do so in 2010 versus 66 percent of females—a gap of 13 percent in 2010 compared to a 5 percent gap that existed in 1990.

The Condition of Education 2012 includes various high school student achievement data, including the 2008 long-term trend National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), the main NAEP tests in civics, geography, and history, and the 2009 Programme for International Student Assessment. It also examines high school attendance and its impact on student achievement, school safety, and extracurricular activities and work. For example, it finds that the percentage of students participating in extracurricular activities changed little between 1990 and 2010, with the exception of sports, in which participation increased from 36 percent to 40 percent. What did change during that time, however, was the percentage of students aged 16 or older who were employed, which fell from nearly one-third (32 percent) in 1990 to just 16 percent in 2010.

In total, The Condition of Education 2012 includes 49 indicators of important developments and trends in U.S. education based on data that was available by March 2012, including participation rates in education, elementary and secondary education and outcomes, and postsecondary education and outcomes.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

46 comments Add your comment

profling

June 17th, 2012
3:47 am

Teaching is a highly overrated activity. Instead of schools, I think we should look into autodidactic learning or self-instruction. Very few geniuses or great artists were ever shaped by their attendance at school. With the arrival of the computer and virtual reality technology, there is more reason than ever to encourage self-instruction.

Really amazed

June 17th, 2012
3:58 am

I do believe the future will hold no more brick and motar buildings. Within 20 years all will be online learning, College tuition has gotten way out of line. Public education has been and will continue to take cuts no matter how much money keeps being thrown it’s way!!! So very sad for our country. Take control of your own education don’t depend on the gov’t or anyone else to do it!!

Dr. Craig Spinks/ Georgians for Educational Excellence

June 17th, 2012
4:11 am

The human rights issue of the 21st century is the lack of first-rate learning opportunities for poor kids enrolled in public schools.

“You can’t have good learning opportunities without good teaching opportunities.” And “you” can’t have good teaching opportunities in classrooms and schools where disrespect, disorder and detachment reign.

Peter Smagorinsky

June 17th, 2012
5:35 am

Profling, if everyone were a genius or great artist, we wouldn’t need schools, as you say. The reality is that most people benefit from being taught how to do things.

At the same time, as the report reveals, online learning is becoming more common, and will likely take an increasing share of the educational market. Whether people continue to learn online through formal classes that require tuition, or on their own using available sources, remains to be seen.

vcatron

June 17th, 2012
6:45 am

STOP teaching to pass the government tests. Bring real problem solving, and real world skills back to schools. We also need to stop coddleing students and hold them accountable for their actions. Parents need to get a backbone and realize their kid is NOT perfect and does no wrong.

GwinnettParentz

June 17th, 2012
7:47 am

Should be good news for those earning their living off the taxpayers.

But should we be concerned that NAEP and other achievement tests aren’t mentioned until the very end? And that no comparative assessment scores are included—or even hinted at?

7:51am

June 17th, 2012
7:51 am

Should be good news for those earning their living off the taxpayers.

But should we be concerned that NAEP and other achievement tests aren’t mentioned until the very end? And that no comparative assessment scores are included—or even hinted at?

— GwinnettParentz

carlosgvv

June 17th, 2012
8:09 am

7:51

Some people earn their living off taxpayers? Say,how does that work?

bootney farnsworth

June 17th, 2012
8:11 am

several things stuck out for me in this

-did the number of hispanic non finishers reflect the migrant nature of many lower income families?
-I’m not surprised the male – female ratio is what it is. for decades now socially the role and value of men has been under fire.
-of course the gap between lower/higher income is great when it come to going directly to college. lower income kids have less options and often have to work. and then factor in the skyrocketing costs of higher ed…
-distance ed/online courses are growing for a very simple reason. kids can do summer school from the comfort of their own home.

overall, seems to me the results are pretty straightforward for a society which places no real value on education and a highly overdeveloped sense of immediate gratification

bootney farnsworth

June 17th, 2012
8:13 am

@ carlos

please don’t feed the troll

Rick in Grayson

June 17th, 2012
8:17 am

I think what 7:51 meant was those citizens/(non-citizens with citizen children) who receive welfare checks simply live off the earnings of taxpayers. They certainly don’t “earn” anything.

Jack

June 17th, 2012
8:26 am

On-line teaching and learning is coming and will replace traditional school rooms. These changes are mind boggling now but will be the norm in about 15 to 20 years.

Rick in Grayson

June 17th, 2012
8:31 am

Peter Smagorinsky, I agree with profling that self-instruction could be more of a factor in education. It does not rely on genius, but it does depend on self-motivation/ambition.

Promoting/teaching the skill of self-instruction is like teaching someone how to fish instead of providing them with fish (I think the Bible, the historical parable, states that somewhere).

Computers can be used to visualize mathematical and scientific concepts that help and inspire understanding. Another way computers help learning is actually development of ideas. Would a student learn more by reading a dull book/listening to a dull lecture or actually building a working robotic device?

History/Political Science…aren’t they just “facts” in general. They say “if we don’t understand the past we are doomed to repeat it”. I’m not sure it works that way anymore, they’re are too many variables in any historical context that the chance of history repeating itself is pretty low.

We need more innovative online teaching techniques and more educational material developed that drives home the point being presented clearly. I don’t think one texbook for all always works. I look for alternative presentations when the current presentation is not working for me. The differences between authors can be dramatic in their impact on different students.

Peter Smagorinsky

June 17th, 2012
10:06 am

Rick in Grayson and others, online learning takes place every day. It’s available to high school students, both for school credit and for homeschooling (e.g., http://www.musthighschool.com/) or GED prep. Universities are now in the game as well; we’re always being encouraged to develop online courses (credit-bearing, of course).

If gasoline continues to get expensive, as I’m certain it will, online courses may well take a bigger role in university learning. Because young people are so acclimated to computer-based learning, it’s often a good option for them; and for working people getting degrees in the evening, it’s also a good option.

As for becoming self-educated online–I do it all the time, and I suspect that you do too. I’m self-taught in much of what I do; but I also value the great teachers I’ve had along the way who helped me become an independent learner. Since when do we have to choose between formal learning and informal learning? It takes the two to tango intellectually.

So please don’t paint me into an anti-online-education corner. I just don’t belong there. Education is taking on hybrid forms, and that’s the way it is.

There are plenty of alternatives for those who don’t believe in public schools: private schools, online/GED self-instruction, learning on the job, homeschooling, etc. If you don’t like what’s there, try something else. But don’t use your own choice to say that the rest of us shouldn’t have ours.

wovoka

June 17th, 2012
10:25 am

Students taking more math and science classes is a direct result of the raising of the graduation requirements from 3 units to 4 units. Were there any statistics on the number of students taking personal finance, Driver’s education, family living courses? We may have one or two scientists, one or two mathematicians, coming from each graduating class. But also in that class, 100% of them will need to manage money for the rest of their lives. A high percentage of them will drive, and a high percentage of them will be sexually active and become parents..whether they marry or not. So, WHY then do we think math and science are so important to a person’s success, when there is little chance most will use these advanced skills beyond high school or college? Why do we pay so little attention to helping people learn to manage money? Current evidence should tell us students are not learning these skills from their parents, because their parents do not know. Students graduate knowing mathematics, somewhat, but without the real application of how 18% interest rates on a credit card can
send one into horrible debt. Also, they don’t know what buying a house means..the current foreclosure rate speaks to that. Why not teach a LIFE course that would cover the basics of all of these? I have many smart young friends who have no understanding of the simplest aspects of bill-paying, borrowing, any of these skills that are necessary for making wise financial decisions. Are they taught about saving? Not in school, they aren’t. And if their parents are not savers, they are not seeing the example at home. I say we swap one of those math or science requirements for a course in making wise decisions in life.

Attentive Parent

June 17th, 2012
10:26 am

You know geniuses and great artists are usually born with unusual potential. It goes nowhere without instruction and nurturing. Usually over many years.

The levelling emphasis that all must be exposed to the same content. And nothing is to go on in the classroom unless it is accessible to all will result in a real loss.

Those with tremendous capabilities we could all benefit from will have to do without unless it comes from home or the parents can provide tutoring and special instruction.

Some equity. What a lousy way to close the achievement gap.

Donaldo

June 17th, 2012
10:39 am

Look up USMES, a math/science supplementary curriculum developed out of MIT in the mid 70’s. I helped bring it to Fulton Schools, it is innovative, contemporary in teaching math/science in practical ways. Might be worth another look at, given the traditional curriculum is not making it. We need to reenergize math & science with students at an early age……USMES might be one cog in the math/science wheel..

crankee-yankee

June 17th, 2012
10:58 am

So let me see here… more students going to college, more students taking STEM classes in HS, more students completing HS, low retention HS’s decreasing after a spike, distance learning becoming more accepted, less kids splitting time between school & work, yet we have a dire “crisis in education.”

Maybe it isn’t all doom & gloom as some would have us believe.

Are there local crises? Of course, APS, DCSS, Clayton Co., granted, but they are balanced by Gwinnett, Rockdale, Forsyth, Buford, Decatur. The problem areas always seem to get more press than the non-problem areas (better ratings I would guess) but there is a lot of good going on in public education that gets ignored. It is disingenuous to paint a picture of crisis blanketing everyone by cherry-picking problems.

Statewide there is a funding crisis but most other crises are locally created. Unfortunately, in the current social climate of instant gratification, fixes often are not given the time necessary to succeed, decision-makers are replaced by new decision-makers telling the electorate what they want to hear, fix-it plans are changed and when they don’t show instant results, the cycle repeats. Perhaps the cycle will soon be broken.

William Casey

June 17th, 2012
11:21 am

@wovoka: Kids don’t learn to manage money because their parents don’t teach them. Suze Orman does a wonderful job of teaching the fundamentals on cable TV but how many parents make use of this resource? I sat down with my son every few months beginning when he was 13 and went over our family finance spreadsheet. He learned how much our income was and how it was spent. He learned the real cost of our comfortable but not lavish lifestyle. He learned the power of using money to make more money (”Wow, you mean we get that much $ without working?”) He learned the real cost of financing a car when I involved him in 2004 while I purchased my last car. I’d say that his knowledge at 21 matched mine at 35. This worked because it was REAL. All it cost was a little bit of my time.

Teacher Songs 2012

June 17th, 2012
11:35 am

@wovoka…Thank you for saying the obvious. How is learning more science and math going to assist us in cutting down the number of copper thefts, weave thefts, car jackings, home invasions, muggings, and shootings at parties? What percentage of our young people get married before they have children any more? How much of the drop out rate can be attributed to young girls having babies in Middle school and 9th – 10th grades? How many young men join gangs, get killed and/or jailed and of course don’t graduate? Foreclosures? You saw that Dekalb county neighborhood with the citations for not painting. The need for values education, socialization skills, personal finance (separate from part 5 of the Economics course) and mandatory driver’s ed (so you use your blinkers, don’t cut others off and stop and look before you make that right turn into traffic) is so obvious.
Distance Learning has its place. My high school piloted a program at least 10 or 15 years ago and the students enjoyed learning about “Etiquette” from a local college. Most of them were lower income and had no idea that you have to set a table for dinner. They did not know the difference between a saald fork and a dinner fork and what side of the setting your water glass went on. It was fun to see them try to eat soup with their new found knowledge. Just how do you get that hard boiled egg opened?
Today’s kids can get almost everything off YouTube but any Sociologist or Anthropologist will remind you that we are social animals. The trending toward solo all electronic learning will have its own consequences. A virtual trip through the woods identifying plants for medicinal purposes doesn’t quite have the same flavor as actually walking with the students through the woods. Its time for the 8th grade prom…ok lets tune in. Oh, so everyone watches each other on a screen? Oh, or do we have our own little avatars at a simulated dance that we move around like we are really there?
There are billions and trillions of dollars to be made reforming education for the likes of who ever controls the purse strings of the now and the future. Meanwhile, none of these “great minds” as yet has found a solution for stopping murders, armed robberies, hate crimes, wars, poverty, sexually transmitted diseases, girls’ poor self image and racism.
Just, more technology, and more technology in the classroom please. “These kids only understand technology…this is the 21st century and we must meet them on their own terms.” That is our mantra now. Yes, we’ve created a monster…one we can’t control because we’ve lost sight of the true meaning of life? You decide.

Teacher Songs 2012

June 17th, 2012
11:40 am

@ William Casey…excellent!

[...] look at this increase and why the news is not all cheery, take a look at this Ed Week blog.)” (more)    Comments (0) Return to main news [...]

wovoka

June 17th, 2012
12:21 pm

@ William Casey..I agree, the parents don’t know how to manage money. But how are these kids gonna find out about Suze Orman? Most of them don’t get beyond Snooki. Maybe schools could bring her program into the classroom. It would certainly be better than a curriculum some poor, over-worked teacher who had little experience with money management was forced to work up at the last minute. It is the responsibility of the schools to produce a more educated (all-around) prepared-for-the-world citizen. It would be great if the parents would teach their children to drive, how to manage money and make it work for you, and basically how to live in a family, do one’s part, and raise children to lead responsible lives, get it through their heads that if they have babies they are responsible for them (financially and otherwise) until those babies turn 18. I have tried to do these things with my children. But some parents are so woefully inept in these areas that you HOPE they do not pass these traits to their children. The children need outside help. I hope some progressive middle schools see your post. Many they will incorporate Suze Orman’s instructions. She is good.

@Teacher Songs 2012.. I Laughed at your descriptive, accurate post. But it is not the school’s fault that kids are stealing weaves and growing up to be so antisocial. Society has dictated that more time be spent preparing for tests and such. Helping children with rotten home lives learn to like themselves and do better in society, and rise above to become productive citizens is not a priority. So many teachers are not really prepared to deal with some of the students they are given. I don’t know that there would be a way to prepare them for some of the products of these awful home lives that are entering our schools. Still, some schools have totally cut out recess..which is one of the craziest things I have ever seen. Children de-stress through play time, running, exercising and getting their aggressions out. No wonder we are seeing so much more violence in the classroom and in society among young people. If they are not allowed to get their aggressions out one way (a safe way) they will get them out in a bad way.

William Casey

June 17th, 2012
12:22 pm

Online/distance learning certainly has its place for CERTAIN TYPES of learning. This technology has vast implications for the next twenty years, certainly for students who must juggle post-secondary education with paid employment. However, there are limitations. One of the most valuable aspects of my living on campus education was exposure to people quite different from myself. Another was it’s “halfway house” approach to independent living. I’d hate to see the day arrive when there was no RESIDENCY requirement for a college degree.

redhousecat

June 17th, 2012
12:23 pm

@wovoka: life skills are parental responsibilities, not public schools.

catlady

June 17th, 2012
1:26 pm

William: Very important point, largely missed by many.

redhousecat: true about life skills, but the public schools already do 70% of parental tasks as it is.

Bernie

June 17th, 2012
2:21 pm

This and all of the reported statistics should end with a disclaimer saying ” The Republican Party and its many supporters have a strong desire and intent to Abolish the Department of EDUCATION for Amercia’s children, in a time when many of the Industrial Nations of the WORLD are increasing support and financing of their children’s Primary , Secondary and Post Secondary Educational goals.”

Bernie

June 17th, 2012
2:24 pm

profling @ 3:47 am – Your comment is a PERFECT example, as to why we should not take that particular course of action! TRULY!

Lee

June 17th, 2012
2:30 pm

Regarding personal finances, all you have to do is to listen to a few car ads to recognize the problem:

“Bad credit? No credit? No problem. We’ll get you into the LUXURY car you DESERVE.”

“A customer came in the dealership with a recent bankruptcy and a credit score of [??] and we were able to get him into a new Tahoe.”

and my personal favorite:

“ZERO percent financing”

Bernie

June 17th, 2012
2:43 pm

Lee @ 2:30 pm – Lee, I bet neither you and/or your co-worker refused that commission either! :)

William Casey

June 17th, 2012
2:45 pm

@LEE: And, the really SAD thing about it is that there are many dumb-a$$es out there that fall for those lines.

GwPtz

June 17th, 2012
3:05 pm

@ Bernie: Nice day like this, and there isn’t an Obama-Biden-Pelosi rally somewhere you could be attending along with the rest of your fellow sophomores?

catlady

June 17th, 2012
4:02 pm

I’m glad to see the AJC do an article on “equalization grants.” It would be instructive to also include info on how much each system contributes to the fund, the school millage rate, and the % free lunch. Perhaps also the % of citizens receiving “transfer income” which I understand to be welfare, SS, food stamps, etc. Perhaps also the percent of land privately held–important for those of us with much land as national forest. Could the database gurus work this up into a searchable database for us? I think it would expose quite a few “inconsistencies” that should be re-thought. And, yes, Mr. Millar, we base much of our school money on property taxes, but the state, which also contributes to our educational system, runs largely off income taxes.

I know UGA produces the Georgia County Guide with some of this in there..

Perhaps the authors might also examine these issues in followup, and get the attention of the citizens who might be shocked to find out “their” money goes to places like “poor Gwinnett.”

Bernie

June 17th, 2012
4:18 pm

GwPt – 3:05 pm, NaaaaaH, Somebody has to stay here and respond to the many lies, and half-truths that are falsely stated as fact
.
A lot of the republicans comments here, unfortunately have a little bit of problem determining the difference between what is Truth and what is a bold face LIE!
I do not blame them at all, after watching FOXNEWS hour upon hour, I too have found , I was starting to hate on my own self too!

online learning

June 17th, 2012
5:26 pm

Online learning is great if you know how to manage your time (you must turn in assignments on time), organize information, and have great research skills. Who is going to teach students to do these things? Also, for online learning a student must have a computer connected to the Internet, not dial-up. Who is going to pay for that? The majority of my students in my school do not have a computer or Internet access. Plus, guess what, there is a professor, with a degree in the subject matter, creating the online class and scoring the assignments. There is no way to get away from educators or learning. Also, who is going to pay for the online classes? My online class this semester is $1,161.45 at the University of West Georgia. Just because it is online learning does not mean it is cheaper or easier.

Digger

June 17th, 2012
5:41 pm

So educators will have to learn how to use a computer?

AP Calculus online

June 17th, 2012
6:04 pm

This year at my high school we did not offer AP Calculus AB. 6 students took it online and by the end of the school year, only one made it to the AP exam (he struggled). Unless the student can think really abstractly, hold a lot of knowledge and know to recall, and is discipline, AP Calculus should not be taken online.

@William Casey

June 17th, 2012
6:09 pm

Unrelated to topic, I think it’s ironic that Suzie Orman’s credit card has one of the highest interest out there when she advocates saving money. I think kids could learn a great lesson by reading our credit card offers in the mail and analyzing. If I knew in my teens what I know now about credit, I would of made wiser choices.

James

June 17th, 2012
6:18 pm

On-line education is the wave of the future.
No more buildings needed.

Democrat

June 17th, 2012
6:20 pm

The only solution to this problem is to pour more money into the failing government schools.

Paulo977

June 17th, 2012
6:26 pm

Off topic?????

POOR SCHOOLS STILL GET THE SHORT END!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The “equalization” fund’s biggest check this fall will go to ( poverty stricken?)
GWINNETT COUNTY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Informed

June 17th, 2012
6:38 pm

I only watch MSNBC so I know and understand every issue.

Paulo977

June 17th, 2012
6:57 pm

online learning

Just because it is online learning does not mean it is cheaper or easier.
________________________________________________

or better??????????????

crankee-yankee

June 17th, 2012
7:52 pm

Informed
June 17th, 2012
6:38 pm

I prefer PBS Newshour

NTLB

June 18th, 2012
1:20 pm

“And in the South, more students.”–and more cuts to teachers’ salaries.

3schoolkids

June 18th, 2012
3:32 pm

@APCalculus Online: Assuming those kids took it through GA Virtual it would have been difficult to complete on top of regular school work. They changed the structure of assignment timelines last fall, giving kids 2 weeks to work through a series of assignments (assignments due by midnight every other Friday). If you let it all pile up it would be really hard to get it done, especially AP Calc. The other problem comes from the quizzes and exams. It is not like a paper test where you can do the problems you can solve quickly first and then go back and work on the harder ones. You can only work on one “page” at a time, once you send it and go on to the next page it is done. They are also timed tests, so if you are afraid to spend too much time on a problem you have to move on and hope you will do better on the next page. Not saying GA Virtual is all bad, but kids need to think about this before they enroll and they don’t really advertise this on the website.