Georgia’s private school scholarships: “Neovouchers”

Many people contend that the private school scholarships approved by the Georgia General Assembly were a back-door voucher and subsidy, that the money would not go to poor students in public schools to move to private schools as promised, but to students already in the private schools.

Reports that parents were making donations to schools that were then repackaged as “scholarships” for their own kids have been made to the Georgia General Assembly, which has ignored multiple reports of abuse and, in fact, enabled even greater abuse of the program.

In the last few years, the General Assembly has adopted a strong anti-public school posture, which remains puzzling given that nine out of 10 Georgia children attend public schools. But these legislators keep getting re-elected, so voters either don’t care or, more likely, don’t know what their lawmakers are doing.

A lengthy new New York Times investigation into these private school scholarships found that it’s no secret that the scholarships are not serving poor children but, instead, as one expert said, are serving as “neovouchers.”

Read full the piece, which is terrific and well documented. Here is an excerpt:

The program would be supported by donations to nonprofit scholarship groups, and Georgians who contributed would receive dollar-for-dollar tax credits, up to $2,500 a couple. The intent was that money otherwise due to the Georgia treasury — about $50 million a year — would be used instead to help needy students escape struggling public schools.

That was the idea, at least. But parents meeting at Gwinnett Christian Academy got a completely different story last year.

“A very small percentage of that money will be set aside for a needs-based scholarship fund,” Wyatt Bozeman, an administrator at the school near Atlanta, said during an informational session. “The rest of the money will be channeled to the family that raised it.”

A handout circulated at the meeting instructed families to donate, qualify for a tax credit and then apply for a scholarship for their own children, many of whom were already attending the school.

“If a student has friends, relatives or even corporations that pay Georgia income tax, all of those people can make a donation to that child’s school,” added an official with a scholarship group working with the school.

The exchange at Gwinnett Christian Academy, a recording of which was obtained by The New York Times, is just one example of how scholarship programs have been twisted to benefit private schools at the expense of the neediest children.

Spreading at a time of deep cutbacks in public schools, the programs are operating in eight states and represent one of the fastest-growing components of the school choice movement. This school year alone, the programs redirected nearly $350 million that would have gone into public budgets to pay for private school scholarships for 129,000 students, according to the Alliance for School Choice, an advocacy organization. Legislators in at least nine other states are considering the programs.

Most of the private schools are religious. Nearly a quarter of the participating schools in Georgia require families to make a profession of religious faith, according to their Web sites. Many of those schools adhere to a fundamentalist brand of Christianity. A commonly used sixth-grade science text retells the creation story contained in Genesis, omitting any other explanation. An economics book used in some high schools holds that the Antichrist — a world ruler predicted in the New Testament — will one day control what is bought and sold.

The programs are insulated from provisions requiring church-state separation because the donations are collected and distributed by the nonprofit scholarship groups. A cottage industry of these groups has sprung up, in some cases collecting hundreds of thousands of dollars in administrative fees, according to tax filings. The groups often work in concert with private schools like Gwinnett Christian Academy to solicit donations and determine who will get the scholarships — in effect limiting school choice for the students themselves. In most states, students who withdraw from the schools cannot take the scholarship money with them.

Public school officials view the tax credits as poorly disguised state subsidies, part of an expanding agenda to shift tax dollars away from traditional public schools. “Our position is that this is a shell game,” said Chris Thomas, general counsel for the Arizona School Boards Association.

After Georgia’s scholarship program was adopted, parents of children in private schools began flooding public school offices to officially “enroll” their children. Their plan was to fill out the paperwork even though they had no intention of ever sending their children to public schools. According to the way the law was interpreted, the enrollments would make them eligible for scholarships. Some public schools balked.

“I recently contacted you about having some trouble enrolling/registering my child in a public school while he is going to a private school,” one parent wrote to a scholarship organization last year in an e-mail obtained by The Times. “A principal told us he cannot attend two schools at the same time, which is simply not true because public and private schools have nothing to do with each other. But we need to have my child enrolled in a public school in order to qualify for the student scholarship program.”

The idea, based on a technical interpretation of the word “enroll,” was promoted by State Representative David Casas, a Republican and co-sponsor of the scholarship legislation in Georgia. In meetings with parents, he had explained that the bill’s wording was intentional — using the word “enrolled” rather than “attending” — to enable the scholarships’ use by students already in private schools.

Parents questioned the idea. “Aren’t people going to say that’s a scam?” asked one father during a presentation by Mr. Casas that was posted on YouTube. “ ‘You’ve been going here for nine years. Now you’re enrolling in public school? You’re enrolled in two schools?’ ”

Mr. Casas, the president of a seminary, assured him it was not a scam. “Feel fine about it,” Mr. Casas said.

The fact that children already attending private schools can receive scholarships from some organizations means that Georgia’s private schools have a ready source of donations — parents and families of existing students. While the law was advertised as a way to help needy students, it contained no income limits for eligible recipients. And although it prohibits donations designated for a specific student, some students are benefiting from the donations of relatives and friends.

Hanaiya Hassan, whose daughter attends Hamzah Academy in Alpharetta, Ga., said she had saved $5,000 by asking four friends to donate to a scholarship organization with money earmarked for her daughter’s school. “If you collect four people for $2,500, then one of your children is free,” she said. The friends were awarded a tax credit. Depending on their tax bracket, some donors could actually come out ahead by filing for a federal charitable deduction as well as the state credit.

The Christian Heritage School in Dalton, Ga., circulated a flier for the 2011-12 school year titled “TUITION BREAKS FOR CURRENT FAMILIES!” It stated, “The scholarship tax credit is so vital to CHS that the school is encouraging all parents to participate in the program and enlist at least two others to do the same.” Participating families would get a 10 percent tuition rebate and a $250 bonus. The rebates would be doubled or tripled depending on overall participation.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

68 comments Add your comment

intown parent

May 22nd, 2012
11:51 am

Goes along well with the article in the NY Times over the weekend that the one program that actually proved to raise the education levels of disadvantaged students and lift them and their families out of poverty is the one that has been completely obliterated – desegregation…
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/20/opinion/sunday/integration-worked-why-have-we-rejected-it.html?_r=1
Fear of a black planet…

teacher&mom

May 22nd, 2012
11:54 am

Wow! To have so many suspicions about the tax credit confirmed by the NY Times…. I’m speechless.

Let’s hope the GA media will find the words to broadcast this far and wide.

Follow the money…..we MUST follow the money.

Abused taxpayer?

May 22nd, 2012
11:55 am

Maureen, thanks for the blog post. I have my draft email ready to go to my State Senator, who I know is behind this mess. I suggest everybody pile on to their General Assembly members asking about this abuse.

Maureen Downey

May 22nd, 2012
11:57 am

@Abused, Please share the legislator’s response. Some of the lawmakers behind this are serial offenders, yet get re-elected time after time. I don’t understand it.
Maureen

teacher&mom

May 22nd, 2012
11:57 am

Any chance the AJC could follow up on this story with a breakdown of who proposed these bills and who voted for them?

Once Again

May 22nd, 2012
11:58 am

Please, just get the government completely out of the business of “educating” kids. A free and fully competitive system of schools, partnership arrangements, home schools, charity schools or whatever the market or individuals wish to put together, combined with private scholarships given by caring individuals to assist others would completely solve all of the problems government, its monopoly on education, its tyrannican tax structure, and its bureaucracy have caused in education.

The founding fathers may have envisioned an educated populace being the key to a healthy democracy, but what the government has done to the citizens of this country (all in a calculated manner to keep them igorant of their rights as citizens or their power to withdraw their consent) should be treated as the criminal act that it is.

Howard Finkelstein

May 22nd, 2012
11:59 am

Sounds fair to me. The quasi poor take advantage of every govt program to which they can avail themselves, lying and cheating all the way. So if private school parents want to “pad the numbers” as it were, then I say go for it.

Mox-nix.

teacher&mom

May 22nd, 2012
11:59 am

Any chance this legislation was written by ALEC?

Anonymous

May 22nd, 2012
12:00 pm

It is interesting to see a president of a university gets a raise about 20% in 2011 (from 2010), and gets salary supplement from the UWG Foundation without informing the donors. Yet, he seems to be going after few faculty to reduce their salaries with bogus claims, and to deflect blame from himself…. http://www.westga.edu/alumni/index_16366.php

http://www.facebook.com/events/128093483992328/

Aquagirl

May 22nd, 2012
12:00 pm

Some of the lawmakers behind this are serial offenders, yet get re-elected time after time. I don’t understand it.

You live in Georgia.

Maureen Downey

May 22nd, 2012
12:01 pm

@Teacher, From the NYT piece:

One big proponent of the tax-credit programs is the American Legislative Exchange Council, a coalition of conservative lawmakers and corporations that strongly influences many state legislatures. The council became a flash point in the Trayvon Martin case because it had championed the controversial Stand Your Ground gun laws.

“ALEC is a huge player in pushing forward a conservative agenda based on the premise that the free market and private sectors address social problems better than the government,” said Julie Underwood, dean of the school of education at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, who has been critical of ALEC’s education agenda.

Scholarship legislation was approved in Virginia this year and is gaining traction in other states, including New Hampshire and New Jersey, according to Malcom Glenn, a spokesman for the American Federation for Children. Schools participating in the programs range from elite private academies to small, inexpensive programs operating in church education wings. The New Jersey proposal would establish a five-year pilot program in several school districts, including Lakewood, a community with a number of Yeshivas.

LeLani Smith

May 22nd, 2012
12:02 pm

Not surprised! I have my own question: How come there is not a agency that provides
transportaion?? Most Agencies say: you can look for a job, but you have to find your own way there! In Cobb! where is the help? I don’t have a dime! how do I start a job if I can’t get therre? Help me UNderstand?

AngryRedMarsWoman

May 22nd, 2012
12:09 pm

They are covering this on Jay’s page as well, and here is what I wrote there. I read about this tax/scholarship program when I recently enrolled my son in private (non-sectarian) high school. It seemed “strange” to me, so I bypassed it and wrote the tuition check (twice what I paid to attend a year of law school less than 20 years ago..choke) – a worthwhile investment IMHO because even though our public high school in Cobb County is a “Top 10″ there are 2,000+ students and recent budget cuts mean the class sizes are increasing. If you want your child to attend private school you need to suck it up, make sacrifices, apply for private financial aid….but not fund it by avoiding your own tax obligations . I see this as an abuse by both the schools and the parents. Shame on them….maybe they consider me a fool for not taking advantage of a $2k per year “tax savings”, but sometimes you have to do what feels moral/ethical in your gut rather than what the law will allow you to get away with and my morals are not for sale, especially not for a mere $2k.

Why not choice?

May 22nd, 2012
12:10 pm

So the top 50% of income earners who actually do pay income taxes might be allowed greater choice in selecting schools for their kids.

And this upsets you, Maureen, to the point of alleging a “strong anti-public school posture” by the General Assembly?

Would this include those Democrats who joined with Republicans in giving the public a say in proposed state powers to approve charter schools? Is too much parental choice as frightening a prospect to you as it is to teachers’ union bosses nationwide?

What does your union talking points memo say?

Why not choice?

May 22nd, 2012
12:14 pm

So the top 50% of income earners who actually do pay income taxes might be allowed greater choice in selecting schools for their kids.

And this upsets you, Maureen, to the point of alleging a “strong anti-public school posture” by the General Assembly?

Would this include those Democrats who joined with Republicans in giving the public a say in proposed state powers to approve charter schools? Including frustrated inner-city parents? Is too much parental choice as frightening a prospect to you as it is to teachers’ union bosses?

What does your union talking points memo say?

Maureen Downey

May 22nd, 2012
12:17 pm

@Why Not, Why not ask those legislators why they didn’t just propose a straight choice bill rather than disguise this bill as a way to help poor kids attend private schools? If you attended any of the hearings on this bill, the theme was helping the children of single mothers go to the local religious school. No one ever admitted the real agenda — which was to benefit middle-class parents whose children were already in those private schools.
The Legislature can try to enact voucher laws to help middle-class parents if it chooses, but this was a clear act of deception as this bill was never described as such.
Maureen

Jerri at Center for an Educated Georgia

May 22nd, 2012
12:18 pm

Georgia’s tax credit program certainly needs improvements to stop cases of abuse, but it’s equally important to note that this program is improving the lives of thousands of low-income Georgia students.

The NYT article mischaracterizes the program by not providing the complete picture. Yes, there are some Georgia SSOs that engage in unethical practices that go against the spirit AND letter of the law, and the legislature needs to act to disallow this behavior. However, it is inaccurate to say the scholarships are “not serving poor children.”

The policies of most of the large SSOs and donation data indicate that a majority of scholarships go to SSOs with income-based requirements. For a well-informed perspective, research SSOs mentioned in the article such as Arete Scholars and the Goal Scholarship, and other SSOs with income requirements, and you will find that the scholarship program is changing thousands low-income student lives.

The Deal

May 22nd, 2012
12:21 pm

Having lived in DeKalb now for a long time and having seen the drastic decline of the school system, I have a new devil on my shoulder that wants to recoup any and all of the completely wasted tax dollars I pay into our dismal educational system. This donation program appears to be some sort of voucher substitute. Having never supported vouchers or anything of the like, I do have to be honest and say I am getting so worn down by the ineptitude, greed, deception, and stupidity in DeKalb that any “program” that offers a ray of light, either financially or educationally, is going to be tempting. I still haven’t crossed over to the other side, but if any school system can make me, it’s DeKalb.

mountain man

May 22nd, 2012
12:24 pm

I am a little confused here, so someone straighten me out. Donations to this “scholarship fund” will qualify for a Georgia tax credit, so that means it will come out of income tax revenue. Property tax revenue will not be affected. As long as the State of Georgia doesn’t cut its financial commitment to public schools, I don’t see what the problem is. Other than siphoning the best students off to private schools.

Aquagirl

May 22nd, 2012
12:29 pm

Georgia’s tax credit program certainly needs improvements to stop cases of abuse, but it’s equally important to note that this program is improving the lives of thousands of low-income Georgia students.

Jerri, I have “noted” it took the press to expose this little tax scheme, not an organization like yours, which is happy to enable the shenanigans while keeping quiet.

But thanks for the damage control, I’m sure you’ll be busy today trying to cover the $#!^ that has hit the fan. Sweep hard, honey.

SDR

May 22nd, 2012
12:32 pm

I have never posted on this site. However I read it ever day. This story is very alarming. I don’t know what should be done but clearly this is a HUGE threat to public education. Never mind the whole idea of people cheating the same system that was put in to place to help students who could NOT otherwise afford private school. Elected officials clearly have an agenda. At one point I thought that the talk of public schools being deliberately under cut was some crazy conspiracy theory…. now I know that this issue and the people behind it are working for a different type of American education. We have a system of cheats and liars and morality appears to be gone in this country

Really amazed

May 22nd, 2012
12:34 pm

I have two children in private and we never used the tax credit program. Please remember people, it does NOT go towards your tuition like I think many believe. It gets deferred into a fund for some other finanical aid in need family to attend.

Ron F.

May 22nd, 2012
12:44 pm

The Deal: I understand your frustration, and this is exactly what the legislature is using to fuel the fight for vouchers. I don’t have a problem with choice, and I could see having vouchers if the majority of voters approve them. I think that would be a disaster in the long run, but the will of the majority should rule.

I just don’t understand why the legislature, or ALEC for that matter, thinks they have to pull all the cloak and dagger routines. Why not just be honest about the legislative priorities and put the vote to the people? In the long run, their reputations would seem far better if we didn’t catch them lying to us all the time.

Ron F.

May 22nd, 2012
12:46 pm

Really amazed: unless your school advertises its willingness to funnel it to your child. It depends on the moral fiber of the school trying to raise funds this way. Not all participating in the program are abusing it, but evidently many are.

PapaSmurf

May 22nd, 2012
12:46 pm

Really amazed, your children obviously go to one of the reputable private schools in Atlanta (as mine do) where you are explicitly told that participation in the Georgia Private School Tax Credit program will NOT reduce your tuition bill one penny, but will enable a disadvantaged child to receive tuition assistance. So it burns me up to know that unscrupulous private school operators are abusing a program that, if run properly, do real good in our State.

Dr. Proud Black Man

May 22nd, 2012
12:49 pm

More rethuglican nonsense. C’mon legislatures’! This isn’t Mississippi!

Howard Finkelstein

May 22nd, 2012
12:57 pm

Dr. Proud Black Man

May 22nd, 2012
12:49 pm

Your comments certainly make it feel like MS.

catlady

May 22nd, 2012
1:23 pm

Our local private Christian school participates in this. And the legislature voted no control or oversight of this. Wonder why?

So, mountain man, if your share of Georgia income tax is, let’s say, $2500, you can “donate” it to one of these school programs and not pay into the state of Georgia coffers. That means you are NOT paying a share of roads, prisons, and all the other state infrastructure. You can let the rest of us pay it for you. Sweet, right? I mean, that will show those “50% of the people who never pay taxes” won’t it? And, since there are no controls over it, if your grandchild “just happens” to go to the school to which you are donating, your (former) tax money can go towards your grandchild’s tuition–they can get the scholarship momey, while you short the rest of the taxpayers of your fair share.

Isn’t Georgia great?

YALLOweMe

May 22nd, 2012
1:57 pm

Our kids have always been going to a private school in metro Atlanta. We live in Alpharetta and pay right under $10,000 in property taxes to Fulton Co. and City of Alpharetta each year. Over $6,000 of the tax money goes to local public schools, which our kids don’t even attend. We personally don’t support Georgia GOAL because the money has enabled our school to bring in some students whose families don’t share our value (academics and traditional value). For all we care, you can do away with GA GOAL and we will still be very happy.

Former Middle School Teacher

May 22nd, 2012
1:57 pm

Just another step toward the true Republican goal, the elimination of public school.

Mom of 3

May 22nd, 2012
2:12 pm

There are many private schools in Atlanta that are truly using this money as scholarships for students who would not other wise have the opportunity to attend. A few bad apples are not representative of all private schools. The state of our public school system is bad and getting worse each year. Parents deserve the right to look else where and put their children in schools that they deem will do a better job educating them. I think that there should be some repercussions for the schools who are abusing this program. But it is crazy to want to punish all schools for the sins of a few.

RexDogma

May 22nd, 2012
2:23 pm

This whole scholarship program is corrupt. Does not suprise me. If you want your kids in private school, do what I do. I pay my tuition 100% and I am at the bottom 5% of my kids schools income level. It’s called sacrifice. We live cheap. Not like some nuevo riche.

mamacita

May 22nd, 2012
2:50 pm

Representative David Casas…ALEC Task Force Chairman
http://www.house-press.com/?p=2141

skipper

May 22nd, 2012
2:52 pm

If the school system was not so screwed up now, folks would not be hunting ANY loophole available………………….

mamacita

May 22nd, 2012
2:53 pm

Batgirl

May 22nd, 2012
3:10 pm

I love the values that these Christian schools are teaching.

Maureen Downey

May 22nd, 2012
3:47 pm

@mama, What is amazing about this video is that Rep. Casas never once mentions poor kids, for whom this bill was allegedly designed. He is talking to a middle class parent group about how this bill allows them school choice and enables them to spend their tax money on the school of their choice and, he says, even the student of their choice.
And he repeats that it is their money several times.
If so, I would like to take my state taxes this year and go to Europe rather than support the state government, including the Legislature.
Why can’t I make that choice if, as he says, the taxes are my money? I don’t want to pay for roads or police or fire. I want to go to Italy.

Maureen

Kim Dyson

May 22nd, 2012
3:55 pm

I am the CEO of a Georgia SSO and we had the same criticisms about the program that the article highlights when we first got involved in Georgia but we decided to do something about it.

We fixed the problems by designing our SSO to address those issues head-on.

AAA Scholarship Foundation is different from every other SSO in Georgia in that we:
• Award scholarships directly to families – not schools
• Award scholarships solely to qualifying low-income families
• Empower parents to choose the best school for their child(ren) – scholarships follow the children to each school as long as the family remains eligible
• Award scholarships for a 3-year term because we believe that continuity of the educational setting is important for children to succeed
• Have over 15 years hands-on experience successfully administering tax-credit scholarship programs (Florida and Georgia)
• Have contracted with a nationally-respected 3rd party provider to objectively determine each family’s scholarship qualification
• Have a CPA on-staff to ensure that tax questions are answered correctly and to ensure timely and accurate reporting

We are truly helping those families for whom this program was designed – the low-income and working-class families who otherwise would not be able to afford to send their children to the schools that best meet their learning needs.

Jan

May 22nd, 2012
4:08 pm

@RexDogma… Preaching to the choir here… Amen!

I only get one chance to educate my children, so the sacrifice was worth it.

100% private education, 100% paid from my pocket, 100% satisfied with the results.

Not a dime of tax payer money went to educate my children.

Maureen Downey

May 22nd, 2012
4:13 pm

Ms. Dyson, I just talked to Steve Suitts of the Southern Education Fund, which has studied the tax credit program and concluded that there is widespread abuse and that protection of that abuse is built into the program deliberately. Their research helped inform the NYT story today.
He raised a point in our discussion that I want to run by you as someone who says her group is doing it right: Why aren’t the law-abiding schools and programs speaking out about abuses?

His conclusion: They are benefiting too much from the program so they are silent on the wrongdoing. As he notes, all private schools are now able to use the tax credit funds for their scholarships, thus freeing up the money that they would have normally set aside for scholarships.

In essence, schools are getting a subsidy from taxpayers that allows them to use what would have been their scholarship funds to add a tennis court or a new lab or whatever.

Suitts says: “Right now, we have people in private schools, people of good will, and they are saying that ‘I am raising X amount of money and I am doing this the right way. I can’t worry about what the law is allowing other people to do.’ That, too, is profoundly disturbing. What they are saying is that, ‘So long as a corrupt system doesn’t require me to be corrupt, even though it is allowing other people to cheat and defraud, then it is all right.’ I am not a moralist by profession,but that is serious business for society.”

A Conservative Voice

May 22nd, 2012
4:21 pm

@LeLani Smith

May 22nd, 2012
12:02 pm

Not surprised! I have my own question: How come there is not a agency that provides
transportaion?? Most Agencies say: you can look for a job, but you have to find your own way there! In Cobb! where is the help? I don’t have a dime! how do I start a job if I can’t get therre? Help me UNderstand?

I don’t think you would “understand” the explanation…….

Old Physics Teacher

May 22nd, 2012
4:29 pm

I’m shocked, shocked I say, that our legislators are corrupt. Our legislators…, the best that money can buy!…

AlreadySheared

May 22nd, 2012
4:55 pm

“‘I am raising X amount of money and I am doing this the right way. I can’t worry about what the law is allowing other people to do.’ That, too, is profoundly disturbing.”

What an absolute, senseless steaming pile of hooey. I am saving money by deducting my mortgage interest lawfully – I can’t worry that other people are using their savings to buy illegal drugs.
That makes me worryingly immoral; far better for me to relinquish that money to benevolent, omniscient bureaucrats so that they can work for the common good.

The money spent to educate a child should follow that child – public or private. I know there are 817,000 reasons why this can’t possibly happen,
#1 being that the earth would stop spinning and fall into the sun, and it’s all downhill from there.

It is indeed unfortunate that our legislators have to engage in subterfuge to begin to do the right thing.

GNGS

May 22nd, 2012
5:00 pm

We donate money to our local public school. I wish the same tax credit could be applied to our donation as well.

AlreadySheared

May 22nd, 2012
5:09 pm

@GNGS:
Write a check to the PTA and you should be able to itemize the deduction on your federal and state return.

GNGS

May 22nd, 2012
5:46 pm

@AlreadySheard

Do you know the difference between tax break (i.e., tax deduction) and tax credit?

Tony

May 22nd, 2012
6:07 pm

Our state leaders have no interest in supporting public education. They are hostile to all the voices of educators who try to speak out about the issues. They are diverting funds from public schools to ventures like the so-called scholarships. This year, the big push is to create a new funding stream for charter schools. They are turning their backs on the public schools that educate so many of Georgia’s children.

mountain man

May 22nd, 2012
6:18 pm

Catlady @ 1:23 – I am not really defending this program because I don’t really believe in it, but I am just playing devil’s advocate. I don’t know how the State plans to make up the money that it gives out in credits. Highways and roads should be paid for with gasoline taxes, so they should not be affected. And just before anyone else says it – right now the “50% of people who pay no taxes” are being subsidized by the rest of us who DO pay taxes. But as Maureen will undoubtedly point out – if the State wanted just to give a tax credit for private school tuition, why not just go ahead and do that, rather than try to disguise it as something else.

mountain man

May 22nd, 2012
6:22 pm

“We donate money to our local public school. I wish the same tax credit could be applied to our donation as well”

If they did that, then the people in the APS would complain that THEIR parents don’t have the financial wherewithal to donate – so you create two different classes of schools – not that that doesn’t happen already.

YALLOweMe

May 22nd, 2012
7:46 pm

“I just talked to Steve Suitts of the Southern Education Fund, which has studied the tax credit program and concluded that there is widespread abuse and that protection of that abuse is built into the program deliberately. ”

Southern Education Fund is race baiting organization and should not be taken seriously. You know that, MD.