Even magnet school transport and pre-k on chopping block as DeKalb addresses $70 million shortfall

DeKalb is even considering eliminating pre-k to address its $70 million deficit.  (AJC file)

DeKalb is even considering eliminating pre-k to address its $70 million deficit. (AJC file)

More depressing school news today in the AJC about DeKalb’s efforts to address its $70 million deficit:

The DeKalb County School District is facing its worst budget in recent memory, so officials are weighing wholesale elimination of programs, including pre-kindergarten, magnet school transportation and Montessori schools.

“We’re putting everything on the table,” said Jesse “Jay” Cunningham, a school board member who serves on the board’s budget committee. The committee got a long list of possible cuts at a meeting Monday, along with a picture of the potential for new revenue — $29 million — if the board raises the property tax rate by two mills.

Last week, Superintendent Cheryl Atkinson revealed that the school district faces a $73 million deficit. Chief Financial Officer Michael Perrone said about $24 million of it was due to collapsing real estate values, which reduce the amount that property owners pay in taxes. The rest is due to increasing costs, such as healthcare and retirement benefits.

Perrone also revealed this: while most school systems strive to keep at least a month’s worth of operating expenses in the bank, DeKalb has nothing in reserves. Indeed, the district is on a path to finish this fiscal year with a $6 million deficit. Those bills would have to be pushed into the next fiscal year, pushing the budget gap to as much as $79 million, Perrone told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution Monday.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

102 comments Add your comment

The Deal

May 22nd, 2012
12:44 pm

DeKalb Schools do NOT have a shortage of money. They have a shortage of intelligence and foresight on the board and in the central office, and it is the culmination of years of abuse and waste that have gotten us to this point. Taxpayers have paid for two multimillion dollar audits that have rightly revealed the bloat and waste, and neither audit was fully implemented (in fact, the first one was “lost”). The grand jury has revealed that taxpayers have spent and continue to spend tens of millions of dollars in legal fees to TWO law firms when the board chose to reject the bid of a third less expensive and more experienced firm. If the issues of bloat and legal fees had been resolved years ago, we would not be in this situation. The fact that our current administration refuses to correct those problems to the degree that they require and, instead, wants to balance the budget on the backs of teachers and children directly, speaks volumes.

Donaldo

May 22nd, 2012
12:47 pm

Obviously what we have is not working, so it is time for an overall analysis of the systems structure, its funding base and some significant revision of our processes, up to and including privatization & e-learning….

Midway

May 22nd, 2012
1:01 pm

“The committee got a long list of possible cuts at a meeting Monday, along with a picture of the potential for new revenue — $29 million — if the board raises the property tax rate by two mills.”

If the property tax increase goes through this year what do they plan on doing next year when the same budget problems come back? The proposed mileage rate increase will bring the DeKalb County school system near the limit, they won’t be able raise the mileage rate again, there is no way the Republican legislature is going to increase the limit.

The school board and Atkinson need to get busy cutting now. The whole system is one big train wreck. It’s time for Atkinson to show some much needed leadership. Drastic measures need to be taken to fix this mess. A lot of people have been predicting this situation for years. Better late than never it seems the AJC is finally starting to give this disaster the attention it deserves.

Principal Skinner

May 22nd, 2012
1:02 pm

DeKalb is waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay too big. Split it up into 3 districts

Dekalb taxpayer

May 22nd, 2012
1:24 pm

So my house is worth $80,000 to $100,000 less than it was a couple of years ago but my property taxes are going up?

Howard Finkelstein

May 22nd, 2012
1:25 pm

Pre K should be eliminated as it is nothing more than govt subsidized babysitting. Let the parents, who DECIDED to have these children, pay the childcare expense. Oh but wait….that might not be FAIR!!!

A Conservative Voice

May 22nd, 2012
1:28 pm

Hey, get rid of all the “Friends and Relatives” and then we’ll talk. Once again, “Eliminate the School Transportation System or require those who use it to pay their FAIR SHARE”. Along with the first suggestion above, Budget Balanced. It’s not that hard, folks. Pre-K is nothing more than a baby sitting service anyway…..no big deal. Fire Away :)

catlady

May 22nd, 2012
1:28 pm

I notice that the central office is not on the chopping block. Do they think the relatively few cuts they made earlier will seem to be enough? I believe I remember that thousands of jobs are through the central office. What was the number?

Dunwoody Mom

May 22nd, 2012
1:33 pm

Well, having 2 children go through GA Pre-K, I can assure it is much more than a baby-sitting service. If the school system wants to provide the Pre-K service then it needs fund it based on what the state provides through the lottery proceeds.

Howard Finkelstein

May 22nd, 2012
1:38 pm

“Do they think the relatively few cuts they made earlier will seem to be enough?”

Relative ie nepotism being the operative word.

Taxi Smith

May 22nd, 2012
1:51 pm

Why nor a Pre-K 2, or Pre-K 1? It is always easier to let someone else do your parenting for you.

Concerned DeKalb Mom

May 22nd, 2012
2:07 pm

However the board chooses to balance, or at least fund, the budget, I implore them to leave class sizes alone. They are already large enough.

And don’t start quoting the studies that indicate class size is irrelevant–most studies look at 15 vs 18, or 17 vs 20…nowhere in those reports is there any comparison made between class sizes of 20 vs 35. And with many 5th grade classes already sized at 30–and that’s what I know…can’t even begin to guess how bad it is in middle and high school–any increase in class size can only hurt our children.

skipper

May 22nd, 2012
2:09 pm

The idea that people would elect such incompetants is in fact a mandate to start over……it likewise is a reflection of the STUPIDITY of the voters; the right to vote does not guarantee the intelligence to do the same!

Blance the Budget for All

May 22nd, 2012
2:11 pm

If you really want to balance the budget, start by ending the high-achiever magnet programs in DeKalb–interesting those are not mentioned but Montessori, which addresses far fewer students county-wide, is. There is a waiting list over 300 for Kittredge for next year…who wouldn’t want class sizes of 17 for your child, and guaranteed foreign language and instrumental music instruction…send those kids and those resources back to the home schools. There is no financial justification for schools that provide these services only for those who win a “golden ticket.”

Ernest

May 22nd, 2012
2:11 pm

I don’t envy Dr. Atkinson and the Board because some tough and unpopular decisions will need to be made. Something else that may need to be put on the table is the evaluation of possibly closing and/or consolidating several schools. While the plan last year addressed most of the small schools, it is worthwhile looking to ensure there are no outliers based on the state funding provided to schools. Possible consideration may be needed for moving small stand alone magnet schools into other schools.

At the end of the day, all sacred cows may have to be put out to the pasture……

Teacher Reader

May 22nd, 2012
2:14 pm

1. PreK needs to go. We do not have the money to pay for it and it takes up a classroom that could be used in schools. At the very least, pre-K teachers should be paid what the state gives and nothing more. No benefits, etc as we can’t afford it.
2. All magnet programs, theme schools, special programs/schools of any kind that cost the tax payer more than the cost of educating a child at a home school need to be cut. Until we can educate all children well in their home schools, we do not have funds to spend more on some kids, while other kids are struggling to learn and read.
3. Transportation to your home school only.
4. Stop funding middle school sports. Children participating in high school sports need to pony up money to cover the incredible costs associated with it. If they don’t they don’t play. Period.
5. Fernbank Science Center needs to close.
6. Stop purchases that are not of the utmost importance. No text books, computers, furniture, etc.
7. Stop funding the test fees for PSAT, and Advanced Placement tests. If parents want their child to take the tests, than they need to pony up the money.
8. Stop the unnecessary lawsuits, and find a law company that has reasonable fees.
9. If teachers have to take a pay cut, than every other employee should have that same pay cut, including the superintendent.
10, Parents pay for music lessons if they want their child to learn an instrument.
11. Last but not least, cut the central office to the bare bones. We need to be doing more with less. Not everyone needs a secretary and with less teachers, less central office should also be needed, as it’s been too large for some time.

Until the school system is run as leanly as possible, and this is not happening even now. I cannot see how those running the district can ask the public to raise taxes when bloat still exists. It would be like me asking family for money to pay my bills, as I take my salary and use it to fund a party lifestyle.

The school board and superintendent need to focus on providing a quality education to ALL students and not just those fortunate enough to have their name chosen for a special program. More money is not needed in the field of education. The money that is currently available needs to be used in as prudent of a way as possible, as we can no longer afford to waste a penny.

Dunwoody Mom

May 22nd, 2012
2:20 pm

In my view, the district just need to shut down the current magnet programs and make sure that all school students have access to art, music, PE and foreign language – not just the few lucky enough to get their number chosen. At the MS and HS level, quite honestly, these schools (all of them) do not seem to perform at any higher level than many of the “traditional” schools. In the future, when there are funds (???) I would love to see a “real” Magnet school such as the Gwinnett Math, Science and Technology Magnet school for DCSD – this type would really address the need DCSD has for those truly gifted students.

The Deal

May 22nd, 2012
2:21 pm

Congratulations, Dr. Atkinson and BOE! As evidenced by the few posts already here, you have succeeded in getting parents and taxpayers to start pointing fingers at each other instead of at them! I don’t know how you do it year after year, but you do. THE PROBLEM IS MISMANAGEMENT OF BILLIONS OF DOLLARS. The first, last, and biggest cuts need to come from the central office and non-school related items like legal fees. Stop the infighting and rally together against the huge ticket items that are managed solely by the BOE and administration.

Dunwoody Mom

May 22nd, 2012
2:23 pm

Ernest, oh, goodness, closing schools and redistricting – that’s a whole ‘nother mess. Wait a couple of years when my youngest is out and I don’t have to hear it all again. :)

Donaldo

May 22nd, 2012
2:24 pm

The ship is sinking, and people are throwing deck furniture overboard to keep the ship afloat. Not going to happen. We need to address the hole in the hull with a comprehensive review and overhaul, including how schools are funded, the body count required to successfully carry out an educational program, reviewing and updating curriculum to meet current market needs and to focus on the critical areas most needed by students in the future. This is not a short term process, but it must begin or yet again we will be facing the same issues in the future. Everyone with skin in the game needs to be involved, we need all leaders to step up and be open to change and stop the bandaid approach, or we all go down with the ship. We owe it to our children, nothing less….

Ernest

May 22nd, 2012
2:26 pm

Good list, Teacher Reader! Though I may personally disagree with some of the items on your list, I agree that everything should be there.

Something else to consider that was somewhat unpopular when it was designated, Arabia Mountain may need to become a neighborhood school (as originally intended). It could still keep the magnet program however parents would be responsible for transporting their children. If magnet transportation is eliminated, this would be consistent throughout the district.

Converting AMHS could allow enrollment balancing between Lithonia, Martin Luther King, Jr, and Miller Grove HSs and perhaps could allow some scope reduction for pending construction projects. The enlargement project scheduled for Lithonia HS as a part of SPLOST III has already been deferred.

Dunwoody Mom

May 22nd, 2012
2:30 pm

Teacher Reader, some of your ideas are fine, but please remember that many,many in this school district cannot afford to join other sports leagues, or buy their own instruments or pay for their own musical lessons or their own computers. Some of us who are able to afford those items for our children need to stop and realize the economic condition of this county and it school children.

Ned

May 22nd, 2012
2:32 pm

Some great comments above.
Raising the millage rate is a short-term strategy–we can basically do it one more time before we max out, and part of that money gets redistributed by the state anyway.
Any “across the board” cuts in pay need to be 100% across the board–Dr. A, Miss Tyson, and BOE members included. Share the sacrifice or stop asking teachers to sacrifice.
Extracurriculars really need to be cut before basic curricula–sports, payment for individual music lessons (we do that? I pay for my kid’s lessons), Fernbank Science Center . . .
Cut our losses and finish the lawsuits NOW.
Cut the DCSS police force back to a size commensurate with the forces in adjacent counties.
Cut non-teaching personnel overall back to a level of 50% minus one of DCSS staff.
Open closed DCSS buildings to charter schools and stop paying rent to New Birth and others.
Other ideas?

Concerned DeKalb Mom

May 22nd, 2012
2:32 pm

@Donaldo and The Deal…a $79 million defecit is not going to be overcome just by making cuts in the Central Office. And I disagree that parents are pointing fingers…there are poor financial decisions being made at the school house level–in terms of programming, for sure–as well as at the central office. This is a serious issue that will take serious discussion and a hard look at all the programs funded with taxpayer dollars to determine if they are all in the best interest of the schoolchildren in the county–ALL of the schoolchildren.

Dunwoody Mom

May 22nd, 2012
2:34 pm

No one is pointing fingers – if everything is “on the table”, we’re just throwing out suggestions and ideas because she raising property taxes and cutting a few central office staff, well, just aren’t going to be acceptable.

Ernest

May 22nd, 2012
2:36 pm

Dunwoody Mom, in fairness I don’t think there is enough time to evaluate possible closings, consolidations and redistricting due to the public hearings that would be required. It should be put on the table for possible consideration for the 2012-2013 school year.

The Deal, in fairness Dr. Atkinson just got here in September and this fiscal problems have been here for a while. She is the one in the chair that has to make the operational recommendations to address these problems. The BOEs over the years do have something to answer for. Not rolling back the millage rate doing the ‘cash good’ days probably contributed to the problems also.

Beverly Fraud

May 22nd, 2012
2:36 pm

Can we not convince a single asteroid to have a moment of Christ like consciousness and sacrifice itself by descending upon DCSS for the betterment of all mankind?

Dunwoody Mom

May 22nd, 2012
2:39 pm

Ernest, I realize that closings, etc., cannot be done for the upcoming school year, but the district needs to put together a budget, a plan, that looks at not just this upcoming year, but what needs to occur in subsequent years. As someone has said, the district will not have the ability to raise the millage rate each year to cover these budget deficits.

Donaldo

May 22nd, 2012
2:49 pm

This issue is well beyond cutting a few programs, reducing schools and class sizes, it will require fundamental and comprehensive changes to how we do business in education. We require a wellness program on how we approach education, not a surgical approach to programs. Why?? Because this problem is huge and universal. The problems we face may well be with us for a generation, so long term vision and planning are required, along with short term strategies. There is much we can learn from other systems going thru this precise process…..one thought is a combination of public & private partnerships, we need innovative thinking……..we owe it to our children, the world has changed a great deal, but our systems remain the same……..

The Deal

May 22nd, 2012
2:51 pm

This is the exact same argument and discussion we have been having for years. Obviously there will be some efficiencies to cutting little things here and there, but we need a major hatchet, and the biggest culprits are the legal fees and the central office. How many administrators now do we have making over $200K? Has a paycut or furlough EVER been discussed for non-teaching staff? Is the same pain that our teachers feel in a classroom of 35 being felt at the administrative level? Are they down to bare bones? I don’t think so. My kids are in elementary school, and they will have graduated by the time this group could nit-pick and cut enough small things to make a difference. Do I doubt that cutting Montessori would save money? No, but is it the key culprit? No. Audit after audit has shown that DeKalb overpays and overstaffs its administration to the tune of tens of millions of dollars. Yes, Dr. A has only been here less than a year, but she has an audit and a round of contracts under her belt, and she blew the chance to do something monumentally positive for the children of DeKalb County. It was now or never. She is only going to get embedded further and further into the nasty politics of this county. Did no one read the grand jury presentment that revealed the tens of millions of wasted legal fees? Did no one see that even if we “win”, we are out over $100 million dollars? So, yes, let’s definitely cut out some tubas and track programs. That will definitely fix what ails us.

catlady

May 22nd, 2012
2:53 pm

Keep praying, Bev.

In one Calvin and Hobbes episode, Calvin has just been threatened by the bully into giving up his money, and he asks, “Why can’t a lightning bolt come down when you need one?” (or something like that.)

yes i am worried

May 22nd, 2012
2:59 pm

My understanding is that more cuts have already occurred at the Central Office– Dr. Atkinson you need to share this information with the public. More cuts are being planned as we speak.

Magnets can exist — they simply have to exist with the same dollars as every other school in the system. No more extra funding.

Ernest

May 22nd, 2012
3:00 pm

Dunwoody Mom, we are on the same page!

I’d like to take a crack at one of Teacher Readers suggestions, #7 in particular. I ‘believe’ hearing that Title 1 funds paid for the PSAT so those scores could be used for diagnostic assistance. The school district could still fund this however only for Title 1 students. All other students would pay the going rate, if they elect to take it. I think this may also be true for AP exams. Seems I recall the expectation was set that parents would need to pay for AP exams during this school year however some dollars were ‘found’.

A similar thought was given to Pre-K as I ‘think’ Title 1 funds could be used to subsidize this program. I though a possible remedy offer back in 2010 was to only provide Pre-K at Title 1 schools., I seem to recall this being on the color coded listing of possible programs cuts that was distributed back then.

Dunwoody Mom

May 22nd, 2012
3:12 pm

Just received a K-12 alert: Here in part is what it says:

The DeKalb County School District on Tuesday announced results of a reorganization of the District’s Central Office, a process designed to drive personnel and resources to schools, align salaries and positions and streamline staff across divisions……The reorganization will result in the elimination of 73 positions from Central Office, including administrators, secretaries and other staff, for a total cost savings of approximately $5.1 million…..The reorganization addressed 3,197 positions that were formerly coded to and counted among Central Office personnel. These positions have been assigned and coded to the schools where they deliver services, eliminated or had their funding assigned to appropriate schools. These positions included, among other positions, Title funded teachers, Pre-K teachers, Montessori teachers, magnet school teachers, English for Speakers of Other Languages teachers, exceptional education teachers, paraprofessionals, lay coaches, interpreters, school security officers, psychologists, social workers, nurses, school crossing guards, bus monitors and bus drivers. The reorganization consolidated more than 380 job titles into 17 job classifications, each with an aligned salary structure that is uniform across departments and comparable with similar school districts. With the reorganization, DeKalb Schools’ Central Office will convert from 4,098 positions to 814 positions, in line with school districts with comparable student enrollment. Changes to Central Office will be in effect for the 2012-2013 school year.

Dunwoody Mom

May 22nd, 2012
3:15 pm

I like how you think Ernest. Such a creative way to use Title 1 funds. My issue with Title 1 funds is that they don’t follow the student, but the school. There are disadvantaged students in Non-Title 1 schools.

Donaldo

May 22nd, 2012
3:18 pm

WOW!!! An 80% reduction in force, now that is huge and shows the significant amount of overstaffing. Makes me wonder, what else is bloated???
At the very least it is a beginning, however, the public must keep the pressure on for change.

@Dunwoody mom

May 22nd, 2012
3:32 pm

A little nit-picky, but just for clarification, Gwinnett School of Math, Science, and Technology is a system charter school, open to all children (gifted or not), and not a magnet school. However, I agree that it is a good model of what can be done (but only by a system that is well-run and truly knows how to support such a school).

Dunwoody Mom

May 22nd, 2012
3:34 pm

Thanks for the clarification – whatever type of school it is – it’s a great idea. Not something DCSD could pull off right now.

Soccermom

May 22nd, 2012
3:34 pm

I don’t have a dog in this fight but, as I have said before, PreK looks to be the most easily eliminated education program. My original comment (regarding Georgia’s funding of HOPE and PreK) pointed out that most parents can teach their preschoolers ABCs and 123s but most parents can’t teach college level courses. This logic can, I believe, be extended to the PreK vs Public school issue too.

And to the question about individual music lessons, I don’t think the initial comment was meant to imply that the schools are providing individual lessons. I think the poster was saying eliminate the music programs and let those that desire these skills take private lessons. I personally think that course of action would be a big mistake!

Ned

May 22nd, 2012
3:36 pm

It’s not an 80% reduction in force–it’s not even 80 people. It’s 3,000+ people now “coded to the schools .”

The question isn’t where they sit, or which budget line they are on, but how many classroom vs. non-classroom personnel we have. Even laying aside the security officers, lay coaches (what is that?) and others shifted to the budgets of individual schools the phrase “included, among other positions” leaves a lot of room for unspecified non-academic personnel to remain on the payroll through sleight of hand.

Beverly Fraud

May 22nd, 2012
3:38 pm

Quote:

The reorganization will result in the elimination of 73 positions from Central Office, including administrators, secretaries and other staff, for a total cost savings of approximately $5.1 million…..

@Dunwoody Mom would you concur that removing the tip of the iceberg will NOT save the Titanic?

Dunwoody Mom

May 22nd, 2012
3:42 pm

I’ll wait and withhold judgement until I see a Organization Chart and the August HR report, which should cover all personnel who have been “let go” or have left the school system.

Ernest

May 22nd, 2012
3:43 pm

Dunwoody Mom, if my assumptions are correcting regarding using Title 1 funds for the PSAT, SAT and AP exams, those dollars would follow the child, regardless of the school they attend. Regarding subsidizing Pre-K at Title 1 schools, there should not be a restriction as to where the students come from as long as they are a Title 1 student. If demand is such that multiple Title 1 Pre-Ks are established at a Title 1 school, hopefully there are not restrictions from doing this.

Thanks also for sharing the alert above as it confirmed several things that I have heard. There will be ‘right sizing’ of salaries with the new salary scale. One example is with Instructional Coordinators (not to be confused with Instructional Coaches). I understand their salaries will be right sized to the Assistant Principal pay scale. I understand there were some that were paid as much as Principals. I’ve also heard that Parent Center coordinators will now be paid around $25K. The new model will allow the principal of each Title 1 school to determine if they want to establish one at their school and this salary will be factored in.

One other thing that should be clear, we will see a sharp decrease in Central office positions and it will be offset with an increase in school based positions. For example, a SRO that was formerly coded as a Central office staffer will now be associated with a particular school. This has a net zero effect on overall staffing.

Dunwoody Mom

May 22nd, 2012
3:45 pm

I am confused as why teachers were ever coded as Central Office staff. Any ideas?

Dekalb taxpayer

May 22nd, 2012
3:48 pm

Love the simplicity of the asteroid idea.

Donaldo

May 22nd, 2012
3:48 pm

Thanks Ned, my percent did not seem right, and am glad you clarified. However, my enthusiasm for change has not been muted…..

Dekalbite

May 22nd, 2012
3:50 pm

I think you misunderstood. From the standpoint of the students, state funded Pre-K in daycare centers is like state funded Pre-K in the local schools. It is funded by the state of Georgia so it cost NOTHING for the parents. It is FREE in the local schools or in the daycare centers. In addition, EVERY Pre-K class has a teacher certified in Early Childhood and follows the same state standards whether it is located in daycare centers or in the local schools.

From a financial standpoint, it is better for DeKalb Schools to have it in the daycare centers because the state absorbs every single bit of the cost. When the Pre-K is in the daycare centers, there is no administration and support cost for the school system, and the school system bears no facilities cost as well.

An advantage to the children is that they can go seamlessly from their Pre-K day with a certified teacher to after school care at the daycare center. There is no van or bus that has to pick them up and take them to an after school program (not all schools have after school care in the schools). That is important for 4 year olds.

It’s easy to see why all of the other school systems moved the Pre-K program from the school system to the daycare centers or started the program in the daycare centers in the first place.

Dekalbite@Dunwoody Mom

May 22nd, 2012
3:55 pm

That would be be the special education lead teachers, coaches (not to be confused with the Instructional Coaches), and coordinators (not to be confused with the Instructional Coordinators). There are 90+ DeKalb Special Ed Lead Teachers, Coaches and Coordinators (termed Special Education Specialists on the Salary and Travel audit) serving 130+ schools costing $8,000,000+ a year in salary and benefits. They are in charge of paperwork for the special education program and never teach a single child.

By contrast, Gwinnett Schools has 20+ Special Education Specialists serving 130+ schools costing them around $1,7000,000.

DeKalb has 7,500+ Special Education students while Gwinnett has 16,000+ Special Education students.

These Special Education Specialists have never reported to principals in the schoolhouse so they have always been considered Central Office personnel. Contrasting this group of personnel (90+) with Gwinnett numbers (20+) and their respective costs, perhaps there is room for some “rightsizing” in this cost center.

A Conservative Voice

May 22nd, 2012
4:06 pm

@Dunwoody Mom

May 22nd, 2012
3:12 pm

Just received a K-12 alert: Here in part is what it says:

Read it closely…….most of the cuts at the CO are just being re-assigned……no cost savings realized and none of the waste eliminated. It’s just Buffalo Chips, folks. What needs to happen, IMHO, is for parents of DCSS Students to assimilate at the “Palace” and let it be known that “We’re not leaving until you straighten this budget mess out”…….and we mean it and “Just do it”. Create an uproar they cannot dismiss……it’s the only language they understand. Let me know when it starts :)

A Conservative Voice

May 22nd, 2012
4:09 pm

@Dekalbite

May 22nd, 2012
3:50 pm

An advantage to the children is that they can go seamlessly from their Pre-K day with a certified teacher to after school care at the daycare center. There is no van or bus that has to pick them up and take them to an after school program (not all schools have after school care in the schools). That is important for 4 year olds.

It’s called…….BABYSITTING, folks.