A nation grows more diverse as many of its schools grow less

downeyart (Medium)I have written a lot about the resurgence of segregated schools in the South, not by court order, but by housing choices.

Despite the hopes of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, court-ordered school desegregation never led to full community integration.

“Our nation, I fear, will be ill served by the court’s refusal to remedy separate and unequal education, for unless our children begin to learn together, there is little hope that our people will ever learn to live together, ” wrote Marshall in his dissent of the 1974 Supreme Court decision Milliken v. Bradley.

That decision effectively blocked drawing from heavily white suburbs to integrate city districts with high minority populations. When the Harvard Civil Rights Project looked at race and education 10 years ago, it concluded that metro Atlanta’s suburban residential segregation was the cause of its school resegregation.

School resegregation is occurring at the same time that the United States is shifting from predominantly white to multiracial. This week, the U.S. Census announced that Latino, Asian, mixed race and African American births represented the majority of births for the first time in history. In the latest year-end count, minorities made up 50.4 percent of the births, up from 49.5 percent in the 2010 census.

According to the National Poverty Center, 38.2 percent of  black and 35 percent of Latino children live in poverty, compared with 12.4 percent of white children. Divisions along socioeconomic lines produce the same results as divisions along racial lines: More than two-thirds of black and Latino students sit mostly beside other students of color in their classes.

The research tells us that low-income children attending middle class schools benefit by the stronger academic environments and the involved parent base. As Marshall noted, “If the majority is educating its children and making sure every benefit is available, then minority children can also get those benefits if they can attend those schools.”

In the 1968 Green vs. County School Board of New Kent County, Va., the U.S. Supreme Court called for education systems “without a ‘white’ school and a ‘Negro’ school, but just schools.”

Are we  moving away from that goal? And does anyone care?

Here is an excerpt from an op-ed in The New York Times by University of California professor David Kirp that addresses this question:

To the current reformers, integration is at best an irrelevance and at worst an excuse to shift attention away from shoddy teaching. But a spate of research says otherwise. The experience of an integrated education made all the difference in the lives of black children — and in the lives of their children as well. These economists’ studies consistently conclude that African-American students who attended integrated schools fared better academically than those left behind in segregated schools. They were more likely to graduate from high school and attend and graduate from college; and, the longer they spent attending integrated schools, the better they did. What’s more, the fear that white children would suffer, voiced by opponents of integration, proved groundless. Between 1970 and 1990, the black-white gap in educational attainment shrank — not because white youngsters did worse but because black youngsters did better.

Not only were they more successful in school, they were more successful in life as well. A 2011 study by the Berkeley public policy professor Rucker C. Johnson concludes that black youths who spent five years in desegregated schools have earned 25 percent more than those who never had that opportunity. Now in their 30s and 40s, they’re also healthier — the equivalent of being seven years younger.

Why? For these youngsters, the advent of integration transformed the experience of going to school. By itself, racial mixing didn’t do the trick, but it did mean that the fate of black and white students became intertwined. School systems that had spent a pittance on all-black schools were now obliged to invest considerably more on  African-American students’ education after the schools became integrated. Their classes were smaller and better equipped. They included children from better-off families, a factor that the landmark 1966 Equality of Educational Opportunity study had shown to make a significant difference in academic success. What’s more, their teachers and parents held them to higher expectations. That’s what shifted the arc of their lives.

Professor Johnson takes this story one big step further by showing that the impact of integration reaches to the next generation. These youngsters — the grandchildren of Brown — are faring better in school than those whose parents attended racially isolated schools.

Despite the Horatio Alger myth that anyone can make it in America, moving up the socioeconomic ladder is hard going: children from low-income families have only a 1 percent chance of reaching the top 5 percent of the income distribution, versus children of the rich, who have about a 22 percent chance.

But many of the poor black children who attended desegregated schools in the 1970s escaped from poverty, and their offspring have maintained that advantage. Of course desegregation was not a cure-all. While the achievement gap and the income gap narrowed during the peak era of desegregation, white children continued to do noticeably better. That’s to be expected, for schools can’t hope to overcome the burdens of poverty or the lack of early education, which puts poor children far behind their middle-class peers before they enter kindergarten. And desegregation was too often implemented in ham-handed fashion, undermining its effectiveness. Adherence to principle trumped good education, as students were sent on school buses simply to achieve the numerical goal of racial balance.

And in the 1990s, when the courts stopped overseeing desegregation plans, black students in those communities seem to have done worse. The failure of the No Child Left Behind regimen to narrow the achievement gap offers the sobering lesson that closing underperforming public schools, setting high expectations for students, getting tough with teachers and opening a raft of charter schools isn’t the answer. If we’re serious about improving educational opportunities, we need to revisit the abandoned policy of school integration.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

91 comments Add your comment

puzzling choice

May 21st, 2012
5:59 am

Having attended Grady High Visions this past weekend, not only is integration crucially important, it can be a beautiful thing. Seeing young people, our futures, stand arm and arm, chant the school cheer and perform with all their heart and soul to honor their classmates, their teachers and their principle was beyond heart warming. Individually their different but together they are Grady. What a great school motto.

puzzling choice

May 21st, 2012
6:00 am

they are not their, too early. Apologies to Grady alums for spell error.

Jack

May 21st, 2012
6:05 am

Poverty and lack of early education. Dealing with poverty and the lack of early education can’t be solved with numercal goals so says the above. Children can be read to and taught manners in a hovel if the parents had been read to and taught manners.

drew (former teacher)

May 21st, 2012
6:18 am

“What’s more, their teachers and parents held them to higher expectations. That’s what shifted the arc of their lives.”

So what exactly is preventing “teachers and parents” from holding minority students to higher expectations in segregated schools? This is not the 60’s…students in Dekalb and Clayton counties receive the same amount “educational” funding as those in Cobb and Gwinnett counties.

Although the AJC would have you believe this is a race issue (race sells!), it is NOT…it’s a cultural and socio-economic issue. The more educated the parent, the more likely they’ll value their children’s education, and the more likely they are to reside in more affluent communities, thereby affording their children the opportunity to attend schools with others who value education.

NEWS FLASH: It’s not who you sit next to, it’s how much your family and culture value education. As a matter of fact, if I were a minority, I would be offended by the assertion that sitting next to upper/middle class white kids make minority students more successful. Could it be that the benefits gained by minority students can be attributed to the value their middle-class parents place on education?

Nah…I’m sure it was just sitting next to whitey that changed the “arc of their lives”.

And enough on the “racial gap”. I think this term should be dropped altogether…let’s at least call it what it is…a “socio-economic” gap. As long as some cultures value education more than others, these gaps will persists. And there’s not a damn thing “government” can do to change this.

Linda

May 21st, 2012
6:44 am

We have to face the fact that there are not enough people who value education to spread out amongst those who don’t in order to save them. (At least not in the Atlanta area.) We have to face reality and figure out how to educate these children, or even what else we might do with them. I suspect that until school administrators and teachers have the authority and the will to set and enforce higher behavior standards that there will simply be schools in which it is difficult to learn. This is tragic, as even in the worst schools there are children who are willing and able to learn. We might start by letting them.
Might I ask WHY behavior is not a part of any of these studies? Certainly it is more important than race. Race, really??? We all know successful people of all races and I would like to see race removed from consideration of quality of education. It gets in our way of looking at real problems at actually solving them (and they are solvable). Some children come to school behind in education enrichment; some children (of all colors) come to school behind in manners. It is tragic that we are ignoring this issue, as it has driven many good teachers from the profession. If a private industry were bleeding talent like the schools are, steps would be taken to stop it. Public school administrators are eerily unconcerned…

mountain man

May 21st, 2012
6:45 am

Well said, Drew! It is not about race, it is about socio-economic conditions. The black students who attend Walton High School in Cobb County are great students (and not because they are exposed to “white” values by sitting next to a white student). It is because their parents were ones to value education and have made it in the world, that is why they bought a house in the Walton district. But a lot of APS students’ parents would never even CARE about what school their child attends; indeed, they don’t even care IF they attend school (you can’t teach a student who isn’t there). And you will never solve the race problem by forced integration.

mountain man

May 21st, 2012
6:47 am

What about Chinese students? They are part of the “minorities”, yet they seem to do very well. Maybe, just maybe, it is because their parents value education?

This is Mrs. Norman Maine

May 21st, 2012
6:58 am

My parents attended segregated schools by law.
I attended “desegregated” schools by law.
We have now come full circle and my kids attend segregated schools by choice (housing).

First of all, as I recall even in my “desegregated” school down in South Georgia we were segregated. The classes were broken up into 3 levels: general, vocational ed and college prep. As you probably guessed, general education and vocational ed were almost completely Black and college prep level was almost completely White. I was in the college prep level and as such I was often the only Black or one of only 2 or 3 in the class. I don’t remember feeling particularly privileged or inspired by sitting next to my White classmates so I don’t know why my kids should. How insulting.

My kids education has been subpar and not because I didn’t care or I was not engaged. In fact, I am relieved every summer when they get a school because then I get a small break before I start looking for educational activities for the summer for them. No, it is subpar because of some subpar teachers, an overfocus on testing and an administration that doesn’t seem to know its butts from a hole in the ground. Do White students really have to attend our schools for them to fix them? God help us. Do the schools not have the same curriculums, the same teacher standards, the same materials? They don’t? Start there.

Former Teacher2

May 21st, 2012
7:22 am

As Marshall noted, “If the majority is educating its children and making sure every benefit is available, then minority children can also get those benefits if they can attend those schools.

”This week, the U.S. Census announced that Latino, Asian, mixed race and African American births represented the majority of births for the first time in history. In the latest year-end count, minorities made up 50.4 percent of the births, up from 49.5 percent in the 2010 census.

We have to face the fact that there are not enough people who value education to spread out amongst those who don’t in order to save them. (From Linda above)

Looks like more interesting times ahead.

GwinnettParentz

May 21st, 2012
7:27 am

Maureen, what percent of your immediate next-door neighbors are African-American? And do the younger members of your extended family presently attend K-12 schools which precisely reflect the black-white demographics of Atlanta?

Blacks who reach or aspire to middle class status almost invariably flee the inner cities for the suburbs for the same reasons whites—and Thurgood Marshall himself, no doubt—did decades ago.

The constant craving of white liberals for equality of outcome (impossibly Utopian) over equality of choice (something in which America already excels) would be merely puzzling—if it didn’t carry with it the potential for fomenting race and class warfare.

Lee

May 21st, 2012
7:32 am

Great topic! Let the politically correct apologies commence….

Oil and vinegar. You can forcibly mix them, but left alone, they will soon separate into their own groups.

Gee, I don’t know why whites don’t want to be around blacks. Could this be the answer?: http://www.atlantapd.org/uniformcrimereports.aspx

If you take the time to read through those reports, you will find that in Atlanta, blacks are 54 percent of the population, but are responsible for 100 percent of homicide, 95 percent of rape, 94 percent of robbery, 84 percent of aggravated assault, and 93 percent of burglary.

While you’re at it, Google “Black Flash Mobs”, where 10-20 blacks attack innocent victims, or go into a store en masse to shoplift. For a bit of nostalgia, you can also Google “Rodney King Riots” or the “Watts Riots”. Heck, just Google “Race Riots” and get them all.

Once again, I issue the challenge to anybody to find me a city or neighborhood that went from majority white to majority black that didn’t see a corresponding decrease in quality of life standards. The same goes for schools.

Aquagirl

May 21st, 2012
7:37 am

Do the schools not have the same curriculums, the same teacher standards, the same materials?
Yes, what they don’t have is enough parents who care if those standards are really being met. Was anyone with an IQ over room temperature surprised at the APS scandal? The parents had their own role–remaining quiet and not questioning why their children were supposedly acing all these tests but obviously not learning a thing.

I feel for you if you have kids stuck in a subpar system, but if other parents don’t care, it’s going to remain subpar. And there’s only so much those outside the system can do.

Maureen Downey

May 21st, 2012
7:47 am

@Gwinnett: My kids attend a middle school that is 37 percent African-American and 55 percent white, according to the state GOSA site.
Maureen

Tabitha

May 21st, 2012
7:55 am

Good comments this AM. School success is so much more than funding and race. When we dumb down our thinking to those two variables we doom our children to failure. Going to higher performing schools may confont chiildren with competitive reality sooner but do a far better job of equipping them for the longer term.

What the hell ...

May 21st, 2012
8:00 am

As an African American teacher, I see truth and tolerance in your many of your comments. The truth is, many parents and students do NOT value education. Because of the permissive enviroment and lax discipline in some schools, some kids think its a joke. In their minds, there ’s too much “real” money to be made in the streets in some illegal enterprise. Until some people start taking responsibility for their own lives, “what can you do”?

catlady

May 21st, 2012
8:00 am

I have to wonder about the studies. The minority families who were involved in desegregation just might have been a good bit more educationally oriented than those who were not.

I recall when my high school began desegregating. The first black classmate that I had was a TEACHER’s child. The mama volutarily “bused” her (had a family member bring her) from wwaaayy outside the district. She was very middle class, and fit in fine with the other (white) students. That was in 9th grade. In 11th grade, another couple of very middle class (educated parents) black kids came. They, also, fit right in. Then, my senior year, they closed the “black” high school and sent half to my high school and half to the other. These students generally did not fit in so well. Their parents were not the type of educated, motivated black folks we had had before.

If I push, make an effort, for my child to attend a certain school, RIGHT THEN AND THERE all things are NOT equal. You cannot compare my child to any child of uninvolved, uneducated parents fairly. And to compare us by skin color is insulting!

I am not against integration. The world is an integrated place. God must have liked us to be in different colors, like the flowers of the fields. But to say that just putting ANY “at risk” child beside my child will work wonders for the “at risk?” That is just plain dumb.

Mountain Man

May 21st, 2012
8:08 am

Maureen, so your school has not reached teh “tipping point” yet? The whites are still the majority there. Usually when the black population reaches 55%, i.e. when they are in the majority, white flight takes over and the school suddenly becomes 95% black. Would you want your children to go to the average 95% black school in Atlanta? Would your good teachers stay in your school system when all the “problem child” (discipline problems) showed up. Flight can be teachers, too. Do you think APS draws the upper 50% of teachers? Be honest, now.

Double Zero Eight

May 21st, 2012
8:12 am

Nothing will change until parents do their jobs.
Discipline begins at home. Teachers do not have
time to waste as a result of disruptive behavior,
which is common in urban public schools.

Many young uneducated parents have no clue as to
what it takes to be an effective parent. Their lack of
skills will unfortunately most likely be passed on to
their offspring.

Socio-economic reasoning is an excuse in many
instances. There are many individuals that grew up
“dirt poor” that went on to matriculate at Harvard, Yale,
UGA, Georgia Tech, Howard, Hampton, etc.

Many students are allowed to spend more time watching
entertainmant channels on TV, versus spending time
studying and completing homework. This is an accountability
for parents and should be within their control.

If you took the best teachers from Gwinnett and Forsyth counties
and put them in APS, the results would remain unchanged. Parents
are more concerned about what little Robert or Karen are wearing,
than what they are learning.

Mountain Man

May 21st, 2012
8:14 am

I have an idea, since we are talking forced bussing. Let’s take all those successful blacks who moved out to Cobb County so their children could go to goood schools, and bus their children back to the urban blight centers. That will show all the “homies” how well a black child can succeed and, presto!, they will all become good citizens and want to be like them! No parental involvement needed, no discipline needed, attendance problems will disappear, and best of all, they can’t put them down for sounding “too white” (well, I guess they can).

Maureen Downey

May 21st, 2012
8:14 am

@Mountain, When my older children went to middle school, it was probably a 50/50 school. The surge of intown neighborhoods, coupled with the appeal of a smaller school system, has dramatically changed the demographics of our local schools.
Maureen

dc

May 21st, 2012
8:16 am

While parents or other family/community figures are important, I also think that “who you sit next to” in school is extremely important, especially for those who come from a culture that does not value education. Sadly, that’s the real value of charter and other “magnet” schools…where poorer kids (typically AA) don’t have to take the daily abuse and ridicule of their peers for “acting white”.

Mountain Man

May 21st, 2012
8:17 am

Why don’t we quit focusing on race and focus on the REAL problems: parental involvement, attendance, social promotion, lack of student caring about education. Solve them first.

AlreadySheared

May 21st, 2012
8:18 am

Black & White is yesterday’s news; there are whole legions of hispanics and asians out there who couldn’t care less. Combine that with slowly increasing rates of intermarriage and a growing number of citizens who classify themselves as multiracial, and you’re singing an increasingly irrelevant song.

Last week’s breaking news from the Census Bureau is that ‘minority’ births for the 12 months ending in July 2011 were in fact the majority, constituting 50.4% of all births over that period.

Pluto

May 21st, 2012
8:20 am

It should not come as any surprise that people choose to live in areas with other folks that share their common interests. Having lived in Chamblee, you could drive up and down Buford Highway and see apartment complexes (communities) with single ethnic populations, ie. El Salvadorans, Russian, Vietnamese, etc. So if white folks choose to live with white folks this is a race issue? If they then choose to suppport the schools in their area, I think that’s great. Maybe other folks should take notice and emulate what successful schools are doing.

Mary Elizabeth

May 21st, 2012
8:29 am

“The failure of the No Child Left Behind regimen to narrow the achievement gap offers the sobering lesson that closing underperforming public schools, setting high expectations for students, getting tough with teachers and opening a raft of charter schools isn’t the answer. If we’re serious about improving educational opportunities, we need to revisit the abandoned policy of school integration.”
==========================================================

With an overemphasis upon creating more and more charter schools and the use of vouchers (or public money) to enhance private school profits, we may be in the process of recreating another segregated system of schools (by class/wealth as much as by race) and we may regress as a society, as a result.

Oprah Winfrey, who spoke at Spelman College yesterday, told the graduates to know themselves, to have a vision for their lives, and to serve others. In my opinion, since the 1980s the focus of many people has been on personal material gain more than on the above attributes and, as a result, our schools, which are reflective of society, have been losing ground. We must not simply think of ourselves and what will benefits us and our families, personally. We must, also, consider others in society and what will uplift them.

Attacking poverty more fervently, as was done in the 1960s, will lift many so that they are able to move into the middle class, buy homes in middle class neighborhoods, and send their children to excellent public schools. Simultaneously, we must work to improve public schools in poorer neighborhoods – not by running away from them through charter schools or private schools – but by improving them, from within. As Eleanor Roosevelt’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights proclaimed, “Education (throughout the world) should be free (to all).” In the U.S., that right translates to a good public education being provided for every child through public taxes.

Decatur Joe

May 21st, 2012
8:29 am

I do NOT care if a school looks just like the community where it resides. If a community is 100% of one race, I am far more concerned that the school is meeting the needs of its students academically than I am that the school is diverse in its student population.

I think we are focusing on the wrong things. Focus on quality, not diversity. Would it be great to have both, sure!

LongTime Teacher

May 21st, 2012
8:30 am

I have often thought that the idea of homeschooling or private schools has the underlying motive of keeping children away form children of different race, religion, or social status. They say it is for a better education but I have never had a private schooled or homeschooled student come to my class that was farther ahead of the class academically. The churches, schools and neighborhoods are self segregated in the Atlanta area. As one African American teacher taught me years ago, “It’s always about race.”

AlreadySheared

May 21st, 2012
8:31 am

If you want to have a meaningful discussion about “diversity”, the below link is an excerpt from Charles Murray’s “Coming Apart”.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204301404577170733817181646.html

Mary Elizabeth

May 21st, 2012
8:32 am

CORRECTION: “what will benefit us” not “what will benefits us”

skipper

May 21st, 2012
8:36 am

Nobody wants to talk about the elephant in the room due to the race card: the “hood” mentality that has so much of the APS by the tail! Parents with all kinds of kids wanting the school to baby-sit their kids. Go ahead, crusaders: cuss me for calling folks out. However, see whare APS is in ten years, and get back to me!!

Solutions

May 21st, 2012
8:38 am

I believe white academic accomplishments have declined over the last 50 odd years. Children are graduating from high school unable to read, to perform simple math, or to write an intelligent sentence. If it were not for the high achieving suburban schools producing high quality graduates, we would be in much greater trouble in global economic competition. We need to raise academic standards for any high school degree, general, vocational, or college prep. Otherwise the high school diploma becomes a meaningless piece of paper, and the graduates just more useless dependents on the actual producers of wealth. Reverse discrimination is the problem with the Atlanta Public School System, the leadership must be of the correct race to hold office, regardless of ability. The solution to the problems in APS is to end reverse discrimination and impose real academic standards.

Another view

May 21st, 2012
8:38 am

Let us be quite honest here about funding and rhetoric. Rhetorically, federal, state, and local governments argue and create laws making all children equal when it comes to educational outcomes. However, local and state law creates inequality by funding education largely through property taxes. Thus the best schools are located in the richest property tax areas. If you want to “desegregate” schools and match rhetoric and practice, stop funding education through local property taxes. Instead, fund each district by student population from the state as a whole. You are not going to have equal access or opportunity when County X has a property tax of 8000 dollars per student and County Y has a property tax of 5000 dollars per student. Ample research shows that white flight housing bubbles occur in large part to keep poor people out of their zones, and thus restricts their equal access to education, though the state rhetorically and legally obligates poor students to achieve the same standards. Ironically, when the states should be equalizing funding with standardization, that actually reduce it and make it poorer with charter schools.

What the hell ...

May 21st, 2012
8:46 am

Amen!! Double Zero Eight

GwinnettParentz

May 21st, 2012
8:48 am

@MaryLiz: Please do stop your silly rants about “evil profits” and the coming doom to be inflicted by charter schools or greater parental choice.

Enough already! Change is coming PRECISELY BECAUSE too many public schools are already a mess and have remained so through decades of over-spending and liberal bromides.

Solutions

May 21st, 2012
8:49 am

AlreadySheared – I recently read Charles Murray’s book “Coming Apart,” and I can highly recommend it to all people interested in the direction our country is heading. My own children are both graduates of Georgia Tech, and both live in one of Mr. Murray’s “Super Zip Codes.” For those of you who have not read the book, the best and brightest American students increasingly graduate from a relative few universities, tend to marry others like themselves, and live in roughly 100 exclusive zip codes surrounded by other highly intelligent and highly educated people just like themselves. Their voices of intelligence and reason that helped keep the rest of society in check for hundreds of years are now concentrated in a few zips, leaving most local communities without their guidance. The people in super zips have little understanding of the rest of the country, just as the rest of the country has little understanding of the people in the super zips.

catlady

May 21st, 2012
9:01 am

So. Solutions, the federal government will expand the super zip you live in so that all kids in North Georgia are in it, and then the problem will be solved.

Solutions

May 21st, 2012
9:08 am

catlady, super zips are not defined by the government, rather they are populated on a self selecting basis by individuals that give the super zip its parameters. Your suggestion that the government can solve the problems identified in Mr Murray’s book by just redefining the borders of the so called super zips is an extension of the current policy of awarding academic degree’s on the basis of watered down requirements. It does not solve the problem, rather it hides the problem and makes future analysis more difficult.

Blue dog

May 21st, 2012
9:09 am

Maureen

What about the rural areas were there is only one high school. Unlike Atlanta, Augusta, Columbus etc,
The students in these schools seem to do much better than the “city” school students. These rural kids also play “rec” ball together growing up. There are a smattering of private schools but not enough to influence the racial “mix” in the public schools.
My son attended Statesboro High. They demanded good behavior and academic excellence from everyone…and it worked.
What do you think Maureen…is there a difference.

Maureen Downey

May 21st, 2012
9:13 am

@Blue dog, That may be true for your local school, but many rural high schools are not performing well. According to US DOE, more than one fifth of the nation’s 2,000 lowest-performing high schools are located in rural areas. It’s a serious issue because more than 3.4 million students attend rural high schools.
One of four dropouts are from rural high schools; 20 percent of dropout factories are in rural communities (mostly in the South, mid-South Delta, and Southeast); and rural students are less likely to enroll in and graduate from college.
Maureen

AlreadySheared

May 21st, 2012
9:14 am

@Solutions:
I suspect catlady make ironical joke.

skipper

May 21st, 2012
9:18 am

@Blue dog
You are about right…..APS has become a cluster of incompetant nuts! The right to vote, etc. does not mean the intelligence to do so. The smaller rural counties that have no choice for the most part do better; APS has demonstrated that the “hood” mentality from top to bottom is here to stay! The sad part is that folks will blog, yell, scream, cuss, and swear that those who think APS is a downhill cluster are all wrong, racists, etc. However, my ten-year offer still stands. If some (I do not know which) entity does not take this train-wreck over, we will be in the dog-fight to have the worst school-system in america right here in Georgia! See where ths mess is in ten years…….

skipper

May 21st, 2012
9:19 am

Thats “America” with a big A!! (My bad!)

Thomas

May 21st, 2012
9:27 am

2 weeks ago I submitted an analysis of violence in schools for the Eastside metro county I have worked in the last 4/12/4 years. The county went from 90% white in 2001 to 90% black and hispanic enrollment for public schools in 2012 . During the last 18 months violence escalated to the point that at one middle school assualts / beating/ robberies and weapons took a dramatic jump in 2011- 2012 The results 95% of 31 incidents involved blacks hispanic and one white incident of defense against black assualt. This article has been submitted to the County newpaper for publication . Ironically I didnt even mention race to the newspaper . It is given!!

We can now prepare ourselves for the next racial jolt when China continues its worldwide acquisition of resources(just purchased the largest USA movie chain today AMC.) and they will exploit land resources in Africa(nothing but territory to drain of resources to them) They have alliances to purchase oil from Canda, Iraq and mid eastern an area where they have not spent a penny but have lent it to our weak so called leaders these last 15 years. Our country is now so enslaved to China that we need to look back 70 years to their ruthless treatment of Japanese and American prisoners from WW2 and Korea to know what our end of USA dominance will be like. You can bet they have focused on education and they only laugh at the squandered billions in the US to help promote and protect diversity. In their eyes our country will be good only for one thing slaves to be owned and produce the goods for THEIR intelligent middle class.

Anonmom

May 21st, 2012
9:32 am

I’ll remind you all of my earlier posts — most of “south” Dekalb thinks that “north” Dekalb is “white” while the “north” knows the “south” is “black” the problem with this all is that the “others” get left out of the equation — the feeder schools into Lakeside are only, at best 35% white — they are also — I believe — about 20% black — the difference is in all other minorities and folks who speak languages from parts of the world many have never heard about along with a critical mass of Latinos and a small number of Asians. This makes for a challenging environment for administrators because many don’t speak English on grade level (both native and non-native born) and other issues arise because it appears that black “lump” all non-blacks into the “white” category and “whites” lump all “non-blacks” into the “non-white/minority” category — as a result many see Lakeside as an incredible diverse school because it is not very white at all and really does have a “rainbow” — whereas if you look at any high school on the south side of the county there is zero “diversity” as it is 100% black. Think about it — it is all in our perspectives.

Anonmom

May 21st, 2012
9:34 am

fyi — there are only a couple of Dekalb schools (elementary) that are more than 75-80% white — the rest of the school don’t come close,

Mary Elizabeth

May 21st, 2012
9:35 am

@GwinnettParentz, 8:48 am

“@MaryLiz: Please do stop your silly rants about ‘evil profits’ and the coming doom to be inflicted by charter schools or greater parental choice.

Enough already! Change is coming PRECISELY BECAUSE too many public schools are already a mess and have remained so through decades of over-spending and liberal bromides.”
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If you are going to quote me, please quote me correctly. I did not write, “evil profits” nor did I refer to a “coming doom,” which are, both, your dramatic phrases. I wrote these words: “With an overemphasis upon creating more and more charter schools and the use of vouchers (or public money) to enhance private school profits, we may be in the process of recreating another segregated system of schools (by class/wealth as much as by race) and we may regress as a society, as a result.”

My words are consistent with the thoughts in the article, above. I suggest that you reread the article, including the op-ed by Professor David Kirp in the New York Times, from which I lifted the beginning words within my 8:29 am post.

I believe you should look within, as to why a variant point of view causes you to become so perturbed.

Aquagirl

May 21st, 2012
9:37 am

The sad part is that folks will blog, yell, scream, cuss, and swear that those who think APS is a downhill cluster are all wrong, racists, etc.

No, what leads to the screaming and cussing is when people write off APS and other minority districts because they’re full of “those people,” and those people should just reach down and pull themselves up by their bootstraps.

Let’s be honest—social issues in minority communities result in underachieving students. The question is how we fix those issues. Right now, an increasing number of people think the solution is isolation in their superzip enclaves. That solution only goes so far.

catlady

May 21st, 2012
9:46 am

Solutions: My tongue was firmly in my cheek. My “suggestion” was just a take-off on the idiotic cures du jour of our legislators. “I know. Let’s define ’success’ as a lower standard; then all the children will ‘meet’ or ‘exceed’!”

skipper

May 21st, 2012
9:51 am

@Aquagirl,
No matter the reasoning, folks do not want to send their kids to these places unless they absolutely have no choice! Even those on the lower end of the socio-economic ladder can behave! Who the *&%$ wants their kid in a violent place with folks who (many, not all, but many) could care less about an education. Of course “diversity” is coming….but largely minority groups are in concentrated enclaves at this point. Until the whole mentality changes, nothing will improve. I realize it must be from all sides, but these clowns on the APS school board should certainly be removed. Be VERY honest; at this point who the heck would move in an area where their kid would be sent to one of these places???????? Many on the outside who live in all white areas scream and cry about how wicked racists are. They, however, certainly are not clamoring to move in these areas nor send a kid to school there, nor come up with a solution. APS school board? Waht a mess!! Past injustices, admittedly are partially to blame. However, when do folks quit doing that and start to behave???????

Solutions

May 21st, 2012
9:58 am

catlady, I understand, I just wanted to reply seriously to your tongue in cheek suggestion. The premise of Mr Murray’s book is that the yardstick by which accomplishments are measured in America is changing, and not in a good way. All groups are compared to the average white middle class accomplishments, in income, education, marriage, divorce, our of wedlock births, and mortality. But the white middle class is both shrinking and becoming less accomplished and more like the so called under classes. In the sciences, one is taught that a constant unit of measure is required, but in the soft sciences our unit of measure is flexible, such that it is more difficult to draw conclusions! There are politicians who seek to define problems out of existence, but in reality they are just hiding the problem.