Former U.S. ed secretary on legacy of No Child Left Behind

Margaret Spellings

Margaret Spellings

Daniel Malloy, the AJC’s reporter in Washington, D.C., sat down with former U.S. Education Secretary Margaret Spellings for an interview at an event in Washington today.  Here are her answers to a series of questions on major education issues:

DM: Cheating scandal call testing into question?

Spellings: I think obviously the vast majority of educators and education leaders take assessment seriously and the integrity seriously and don’t cheat. When it does happen it ought to be addressed and attended to vigorously. Obviously, we saw that exact same thing play out in Atlanta and what encourages me when I think about the Atlanta case study, the business community, as you know, was very engaged, got a little sideswiped by the scandal, a little aggrieved by their engagement that was rewarded with this sort of behavior. I think to their credit they’ve stayed engaged and active and continue to be and are moving forward to the benefit of kids. Often we take our eye off the ball with students and achievement and get ensnared – in that case – in criminal activity, when we really need to stay focused on the mission. So I think it’s a good news story that bad things can happen and the business community can stay engaged and do good things.

DM: Is there a way to keep standards without incentivizing cheating?

Spellings: Accountability and assessment is a way of life. We need to isolate and attend to and be very vigorous in the way we treat cheating and scandal as we do kind of generally. But to say that we’re not going to have assessment anymore, we’re going to go back to the days of not caring enough to find out would be a very, very wrong direction in my view.

DM: So you still see national standards as a part of the future?

Spellings: Standards, accountability, transparency, absolutely.  And when there are bad actors we ought to call them out, but we shouldn’t get rid of assessment.

DM: Does that fit in with your vision of more power at the local level?

Spellings: Absolutely. In the business community we want people who are capable of making it to the workplace. We are more concerned with the product and the outcome. The only way we’re going to know if we’re successful is if we have strong accountability. All the how-to that gets done at the local level, how teachers get paid, how they’re allocated, what the pension plan looks like, what the bus routes are, what the role of technology is and on and on. Those are all appropriate decisions for local policymakers. We in the business community — how are the kids doing, period.

DM: What are the prospects for NCLB reauthorization?

Spellings: Not anytime this year I wouldn’t think. We’re, as you know, in a heavy duty political year and I wouldn’t try to predict the behavior of the Congress but I wouldn’t go along on a bet for reauthorization.

DM: Why is this so hard to get done?

Spellings: Well, a variety of reasons. Obviously budget constraints, the toxic political climate that’s up there, the fact that it’s a major major piece of legislation. It’s 1,000-plus pages. It affects every community and every citizen and every kid in this country. What, frankly, is more compelling and interesting in my view is the fact that we passed the thing in the first place with these amazing bipartisan margins. I mean 87-10 in the Senate. You can’t pass a motion to adjourn 87-10 in the Senate. So, honestly, that’s one of the things I’m most proud of is that it was so bipartisan in the first place. We all know how easy it is to be partisan, what’s hard is being bipartisan.

DM: What’s the legacy of the law at this point?

Spellings: The fact that we’ve greatly enhanced a focus on poor and minority kids and we’re telling the truth about the state of affairs in our schools, which is sadly and woefully inadequate.

DM: Are you bothered by the amount of criticism and number of state waivers being sought right now? You mentioned you employed waivers when you were secretary?

Spellings: I think obviously it’s a tool and I think it has to be used judiciously and discreetly so I’m worried that we’re going too far when clearly the intent of the law is to have annual accountability and so when states are approved to go to every other year things like that concern me, absolutely.

DM: Was it unrealistic to call for 100 percent proficiency?

Spellings: On any given day there are plenty of kids who are out of the accountability system in keeping with the requirements of the law – they’re transitioning to English, they haven’t been in that particular school on campus enough, they are severely and profoundly disabled. So, every day a good number of kids are righteously and rightfully out of the accountability system. The question remains of the remaining 90 percent or so that remain in an accountability system: Should they ever get to grade level in reading and math — at a very low standard in most states? So, the idea that we’re now saying we can’t get to grade level in very, very crude basic measures over a 12-year period but we are going to get to international standards by 2020, I want to believe but these same folks that are making these same promises on the Race to the Top and the waiver applications are the same folks that have brought us down so far.

DM: Is it going to be possible to enforce national standards with politics moving to more local control?

Spellings: That’s why the business community and local accountability are essential ingredients for us not to lose track. We can raise the bar and some kids will get over it but what No Child Left Behind is about is opportunities for every kid, and right now we have half of our minority kids and poor kids getting out of high school on time – it’s shameful. And when I talk to parents and say, you know, I’ll just ask: When did you think your parents wanted you on grade level? When you were in the third grade, they wanted you doing third grade work. If I came into your parents sand said “I think we can get Daniel on grade level in 12 years” they would have had you out of the school by noon. And this idea that what we want for ourselves is different from what minority parents want is just wrong.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

79 comments Add your comment

JR

May 15th, 2012
1:17 pm

Poppycock, pure poppycock. She is just spewing the usual beauracratic screed and saying what she thinks all of the other beauracrats want to hear.

Former APS Teacher

May 15th, 2012
1:51 pm

Vomit. “The business community, the business community…” No one cares about the business community! They know nothing about education, teaching, learning, or children. And their main contribution here in Atlanta was to shield and protect Bev.

Inman Park Boy

May 15th, 2012
2:03 pm

Emotional subject, isn’t it? Not sure why it needs to be so emotional, however. I know the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce (among other business groups) wanted the success so badly that it was willing to turn a blind eye to statistical impossibilities, but I think that to suggest that they “know nothing” about education, teaching, or children is naive and misguided. The Atlanta cheating scandal was a perfect storm of a corrupt administration putting pressure on principals and classroom teachers to raise scores “at all costs,” a business community that wanted to believe, and a local media that was happy to shout praises. I am glad the AJC woke up to the truth, as well as the whistle blowers that made it happen. I suspect that our local medai will never again accept such rises in scores without doing their due diligence. Freedom of the press only works for all of us when you do that!

Michael Moore

May 15th, 2012
2:21 pm

Every pill on the market goes through tons of testing. Every car that’s made has been through rigorous testing. We seem to vet everything except school reform. We seem to want accountability of our teachers, administrators and schools but there has been no accountability for the common core standards. The groups were formed and the standards written in 2009 and adopted by 43 states by 2011. No where has the standards been tried or tested…by anyone.

Now back to accountability, Margaret, the issue is the high stakes nature of an accountability system that involves the results of a single test. And in order to get ready for this single test in May, we make children practice and practice on sample tests and we teach what we think will be on the real test. NCLB, another unproven and untested reform, did little more than to blame teachers and schools for societal problems. The Reading First experiment lasted nine years before it was discredited and dismantled for not working.
Yet…here we go again…

Attentive Parent

May 15th, 2012
2:28 pm

When the question asks about tests and her response refers to assessments, she is showing she is unfamiliar with the actual definitions of the terms. Ralph Tyler created the term assessment in the 1930s to obscure the reality of what was being measured in the 8 Year Study. It is not a synonym for testing unless you are careless with words.

Very dangerous in Ed World. Please see Attentive Parent’s Glossary of Terms.

Plus the emphasis on the business community ignores the common conflicts of interest that frequently are behind various recommendations.

For example, the technology and broadband companies think we need a greater emphasis on digital literacy. Just altruism I am sure. The resulting lucrative contracts from the school districts have no bearing in what various groups recommend.

Ron F.

May 15th, 2012
2:36 pm

“So I think it’s a good news story that bad things can happen and the business community can stay engaged and do good things.”

Soooo, it was good that it was bad but still good? I love political answers to direct questions. A politician can turn telling the time into a dissertation.

As for NCLB, does its good outweigh its bad? Ask me after we finish testing…in the meantime I’m not liking it! The pressure of standardized testing is a lot for kids. I wish we could do benchmarks through the year that would be shorter and require less of the day to administer.

Former APS Teacher

May 15th, 2012
2:49 pm

Inman Park Boy,

Can you give an example of a business leader who has shown that they have a realistic grasp of what a teacher does on a daily basis, or what the dynamic of a roomful of children is like, or how children learn (developmentally speaking), or what a teacher can and cannot control?

I’m not being snotty; I’m asking. I’ve yet to see such an example.

C Jae of EAV

May 15th, 2012
2:53 pm

There was quite abit of poltical double speak in that interview. It isn’t worth the ink or in this case the disk space wasted on it.

usethebrainsgodgiveyou1

May 15th, 2012
2:54 pm

God bless the children, they are the one’s who truly suffer for it. I would have never believed there would be a day you would see their role models cheat.

usethebrainsgodgiveyou1

May 15th, 2012
2:57 pm

She did have her stuff together on this one: “And this idea that what we want for ourselves is different from what minority parents want is just wrong.”

How about teaching the way children learn, so the onus is on teachers, not businessmen.

Adalyn Watts

May 15th, 2012
2:57 pm

Before you make comments, read the full text of No Child Left Behind on the web http://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/esea02/index.html . You will see that it makes schools responsible for things that are not possible. Read the literature. No Child Left Behind has been a totally miserable failure. Schools have gotten worse. Children are not learning what I was learning in school 50 years ago. Great teachers have left the profession because they spend their time teaching to tests when they are teaching and not administrating. When the whole purpose of education becomes accountability instead of the education of children; we will not progress.

TimeOut

May 15th, 2012
3:19 pm

Students who perceive learning as a necessity will choose to learn. Those who view their educational experience as indoctrination into a larger, dominant and oppressive culture, will resist assimilating into that culture. Minorities have not always viewed educational institutions as ‘the enemy.’ Many respond to the opportunity as an effort by prejudiced members of a racist institution to strip them of their identity, their ability to resist, etc. Along with this dynamic, we have the problems resulting from the attitudes and actions of irresponsible, amoral parents and their offspring. When students are accountable for their effort and conduct, it greatly enhances their opportunities to learn. When parents and community members value education for the general well-being of our community and not for their own profit-making opportunities, students benefit academically. In sum, without ‘buy in’ of all groups, without broad-based support for an agreed-upon educational goal that serves the advancedment of the whole community, we will continue to have sporadic success. NCLB was idiocy. RTT is idiocy. Everyone standing in front of the classroom knows it.

TimeOut

May 15th, 2012
3:20 pm

advancement……….

Kirkwood Parent

May 15th, 2012
3:26 pm

No child left behind any of the others. That’s what we called this law when I was teaching in APS.

Parent Teacher

May 15th, 2012
3:27 pm

As we say in the south, Bless her heart, but she is as dumb as a sack of rocks.

Beverly Fraud

May 15th, 2012
3:28 pm

“what encourages me when I think about the Atlanta case study, the business community, as you know, was very engaged, got a little sideswiped by the scandal, a little aggrieved by their engagement that was rewarded with this sort of behavior”

Which part was encouraging Madge? The blatant attempt to cover up the scandal with a bogus Blue Ribbon Commission report that “bidness” attempted to finesse past the governor?

And in other news MARGARET SPELLINGS was quoted today as saying she is “encouraged by the goings on in Somalia, in particular the entrepreneurial spirit and seafaring ability of Somali pirates”

Gavin S

May 15th, 2012
3:44 pm

To B. The Smith Parent:

Good show Monday night. Thanks for all y’all did to make our little ones feel wanted, welcomed and cared for. Your office staff, though from what I’ve heard, could use a little training in how to be a public servant!

Beverly Fraud

May 15th, 2012
4:42 pm

Has Daniel Malloy ever heard of a FOLLOW UP question?

Or more to the point, words to the effect of “I call BS on that”?

How does he let her spout that nonsense first answer without bringing up what the “bidness” community did to COVER UP the cheating scandal?

If she doesn’t want to be honest, cut the interview and report as such!

teacher&mom

May 15th, 2012
5:24 pm

I find it interesting that Spellings is more concerned about accountability to the business community and never mentions accountability to parents or local communities.

As I read her responses, I was left with the impression that her biggest concern has nothing to do with an education system that produces strong democratic citizens. Instead, she is focused on producing a compliant worker for the business community with an attached quality assurance stamp (test score) to “prove” the individual is an effective worker.

She is tenaciously holding on to NCLB and is unwilling to admit the damage it has created.

At least Diane Ravitch has the courage to survey the damage and admit it was a bad idea.

mountain man

May 15th, 2012
5:43 pm

What the “business community” want are high school graduates who speak, read and write proper English, and can do basic math. Teach and require mastery of those subjects and you don’t have to worry about the testing. “Teaching to the test” is fine if what is on the test is what you want students to know anyway.

Double Zero Eight

May 15th, 2012
5:50 pm

Just a bunch of rhetoric, or as James Bown said in one
of his songs, she is “Talking Loud and Saying Nothing”.

Cheating is, and has been rampant throughout the country
as the AJC has proven. Absolutely nothing will happen to those
educators or school districts. Mark my words.

mountain man

May 15th, 2012
5:50 pm

“compliant worker for the business community with an attached quality assurance stamp (test score) to “prove” the individual is an effective worker”

Who said anything about “compliant”? Yes, we do want workers who exhibit good “soft” skills – such as being on time, coming to work (school) every day (no absences), etc. We also want workers to come with a “certification” – a diploma from high school that guarantees the the student meets minimum requirements. What we DON”T want is a high school graduate who has a diploma, but can’t make change, can’t read simple instructions, can’t write a coherent sentence, and uses incorrect English and grammar because they don’t want to sound “white”.

Dr. John Trotter

May 15th, 2012
5:58 pm

No Child Left Behind? A complete disaster. Admit the truth. As well noted, at least Diane Ravitch admits the obvious. Hooray for Diane!

Eric

May 15th, 2012
5:59 pm

What I read into this is too much influence by the business community. The message is we are educating for workers not citizens living in a democratic society. We already have a high standard of living for most people in this country as result of the current education system. Why then is there still an obsession with increased accountability and standards? Same old tired goals.

Ron F.

May 15th, 2012
6:02 pm

“Instead, she is focused on producing a compliant worker for the business community with an attached quality assurance stamp (test score) to “prove” the individual is an effective worker.”

Oh how I enjoy reading your posts!!

“We also want workers to come with a “certification” – a diploma from high school that guarantees the the student meets minimum requirements.”

And you would think a high school diploma would guarantee that. Unfortunately, kids can pass the tests and meet the standards without much independent ability to think. The focus on “high-stakes testing” has ironically pushed us to that point of programming kids to think only what will be assessed on The Test. I can’t tell you how many times I have to write lesson plans that fit the mold and then go on to add the critical thinking, discussion, and debate that kids need. It’s not the teachers’ fault as much as it is the system that all the pressure to produce passing test scores has created. This is how we end up with the graduates you see who can’t think beyond a very simple, literal level.

mountain man

May 15th, 2012
6:03 pm

“too much influence by the business community”

Fine, keep giving diplomas to people who can’t read and write amd make them good “democratic citizens”. Just don’t be surprized when these graduates wind up unemployed, turn to crime, and end up in jail.

mountain man

May 15th, 2012
6:05 pm

Just for the record, I thought NCLB was stupid – no matter what you do, some students are bound to fail – most because they do not WANT to succeed. Just LET them fail, and DON’T give them a diploma.

mountain man

May 15th, 2012
6:11 pm

“I can’t tell you how many times I have to write lesson plans that fit the mold and then go on to add the critical thinking, discussion, and debate that kids need”

So you say the students only need critical thinking, discussion, and debate skills (almost impossible to test and I doubt they possess these qualities when they graduate) but they don’t need to know how to read, write , and do simple arithmetic?

You just don’t want them tested on basic skills because you know they don’t HAVE them. And if they don’t have the basic skills, you KNOW they don’t have the higher level “critical thinking” skills. The LEAST you could do is give them some vocational training so that they have SOME skills with which to WORK after they DON’T graduate.

Ed Johnson

May 15th, 2012
6:20 pm

“Instead, she is focused on producing a compliant worker for the business community with an attached quality assurance stamp (test score) to “prove” the individual is an effective worker.”

@teacher&mon, I could give you the biggest and longest hug of your life for what you said!

See APS’ Quality Assurance Process, page 32 of 34 in this huge 10.5MB PDF…

http://preview.tinyurl.com/6uoq2l9

The APS Quality Assurance Process comes straight from the business world apparently without APS understanding what it means and the negative consequences it will bring to teaching and learning. Or, APS does understand what it means and simply don’t care about the consequences.

Certainly, quality assurance is useful, even necessary. But quality assurance deals only with “after the fact.” Quality assurance means inspection, as in testing, at the “end of the line.” Quality assurance means the “defectives” get kicked back into rework or resigned to the scrap pile.

It would be great to see the AJC proactively report on this kind of APS stuff, too.

Mary Elizabeth

May 15th, 2012
6:25 pm

I find it telling that former U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spelling mentions the business community in four different sentences within her short interview, given above. See below for the quotes from Secy. Spelling, which I have lifted from the above interview. The frequency with which Secretary Spelling has mentioned the business community shoud give readers some idea of the direction the Republican Party wishes to take education in this nation, as well as in Georgia.
—————————————————————–

“. . .what encourages me when I think about the Atlanta case study, the business community, as you know, was very engaged, got a little sideswiped by the scandal, a little aggrieved by their engagement that was rewarded with this sort of behavior.”

“So I think it’s a good news story that bad things can happen and the business community can stay engaged and do good things.”

“Absolutely. In the business community we want people who are capable of making it to the workplace.”

“That’s why the business community and local accountability are essential ingredients for us not to lose track.”

=========================================================

Regarding this pronounced emphasis on business and education, I wish to repost my post from the “Library Cuts” thread on this blog, in which I had highlighted the wise words of a writer of the first essay of the Teaching Georgia Writing Collective. My words follow the writer’s words. See below:
————————————————————————–

“We dream of a school system where students aren’t projected to fail and schools don’t produce failure. That school system would encourage teachers to slow down and learn about a student who is struggling and design instruction to make that student successful. We teachers don’t need more textbooks, scripted curricula or software programs, we need time to teach our students in the way that is best for them. And students don’t need more textbooks, scripted curricula or software programs either. They need a less stressful and anxiety-ridden environment and more time in creative, supportive classrooms where they know they are valued and projected to succeed. They need student-centered inquiries back in their school lives, and teachers who do engaging projects with them where they ask questions and find answers.”
—————————————————————————————

In other words, educational systems throughout Georgia (and our nation) do not need a business model for public schools, they simply need the state of Georgia to support, again, public schools and to fund them adequately, including funding Media Center personnel, so that Georgia’s public schools can, again, be the best that is possible, as described in the paragraph, above.

Mary Elizabeth

May 15th, 2012
6:29 pm

CORRECTION: Secretary Spellings, not Secretary Spelling. I apologize to former Secretary Spellings for incorrectly typing her surname.

mountain man

May 15th, 2012
6:31 pm

“But quality assurance deals only with ‘after the fact.’”

Shows that you don’t know much about “quality assurance” in the workplace. If the business is ISO9000 ceertified, they focus on building quality into the product at all stages, through focusing on the process, so that you don’t have to test at the end and “throw away the rejects”. What that does mean is that you have accurate measurements all down the line. This is what I have regularly recommended: test students at the end of each year (since you cannot trust teachers’ grades) and HOLD BACK students who have not mastered the grade, so they won’t be lost next year when you SOCIALLY PROMOTE them.

Ed Johnson

May 15th, 2012
6:36 pm

“If the business is ISO9000 ceertified, they focus on building quality into the product at all stages, through focusing on the process, so that you don’t have to test at the end and ‘throw away the rejects’”.

Shows you don’t understand much about “process quality improvement” as opposed to quality assurance of product.

teacher&mom

May 15th, 2012
6:38 pm

@mountain man:
“Yes, we do want workers who exhibit good “soft” skills – such as being on time, coming to work (school) every day (no absences), etc.”

There was a time when the “soft” skills you mention were skills that were taught at home. Yes, schools reinforced those skills but the ultimate responsibility rested on the parents.

It still does….IMHO.

Mary Elizabeth

May 15th, 2012
6:46 pm

To understand why it is difficult to have every student functioning on grade level material, at the same point in time, please read the following entry from my blog, entitled, “Assessing Teachers and Students,” especially that part of that entry which describes “Johnny’s” academic development from grade level 2 through grade level 9.

http://maryelizabethsings.wordpress.com/2012/02/25/about-education-essay-5-assessing-teachers-and-students/

Double Zero Eight

May 15th, 2012
6:48 pm

We are doomed to fail without strong parental
involvement and accountability. Spellings made
no specific references of the role that parents
play in their child’s development and success
(or lack thereof).

Her synopsis basically indicates it is up to the
teachers, business community and politicians to
ensure that our children are properly educated.

mountain man

May 15th, 2012
6:53 pm

“There was a time when the “soft” skills you mention were skills that were taught at home.Yes, schools reinforced those skills but the ultimate responsibility rested on the parents.”

You are 100% correct and that is the way it should be now. Schools can “reinforce” those skills by having high expectations concerning tardiness and absenteeism. How many students are failed because they miss too many days? You can’t teach students who aren’t there. Parental and student responsibility should be the watchword.

KIM

May 15th, 2012
7:20 pm

Sorry, guys. But NCLB with all its flaws and criticisms is not wihout merit. Never before have so many done so much for so few. The interventions for low performing students have never been more focused. Now the challenge is to do as much for the high performers. All students deserve the same attention, and if we could EVER get all parents on board with their responsibility we would change the world.

Old Physics Teacher

May 15th, 2012
7:44 pm

Old Mountain Man,
” What the “business community” want are high school graduates who speak, read and write proper English, and can do basic math. Teach and require mastery of those subjects and you don’t have to worry about the testing. “Teaching to the test” is fine if what is on the test is what you want students to know anyway.”

I would dearly love to have you run for congress and win. Unfortunately, this is not what NCLB asks for. We must produce students who have an passing understanding of algebra AND geometry. Not basic math. We must produce students who understand “basic” chemistry and “basic” physics. “Basic physics” requires an “expert” understanding of algebra and when to apply specialized formulas with changing variables. It requires us to teach and the student to understand biology, evolution, and DNA. The average “business manager” cannot even spell the correct words for the acronym DNA.

We would be thrilled to produce ONLY those so needed skills, but that’s not what the congress critters (and state critters) require of us.

Tabitha

May 15th, 2012
8:10 pm

When we shoot NCLB and its requirements for all groups and subgroups to show progress on annual testing will the education sytems also be giving back the billions that went with it? Or will the taxpayers keep funding that which we no longer authorize?

RCB

May 15th, 2012
8:18 pm

We brought report cards home every 6 weeks back in the old days. The process never had a name either–process improvement or quality improvement. Seemed to work very well. No end of year tests. You, your parents and the teacher knew LONG before the end of the year that you were in danger of not passing.

Attentive Parent

May 15th, 2012
9:33 pm

Ed Johnson- I cannot get that Quality Assurance document to pull up. Any other links?

Quality Assurance is also in the AP Glossary of Terms and it has nothing to do with corporate America.

Oh. My. Goodness.

They learned nothing at all. No wonder AdvancED ignored it all.

Once Again

May 15th, 2012
9:51 pm

Spoken like a true government bureaucrat. When are you parents going to take your children’s future seriously and get them out of this failed prison system?

Parent Teacher

May 15th, 2012
9:55 pm

@Tabitha
NCLB was never even close to fully funded. Just like all the mandates from Fed. or State. They are at best partially funded.

Typical

May 15th, 2012
10:02 pm

No child left a dime. Best military murder machine in the universe, yet we cannot teach kids simple math and english skills. We should all be ashamed. But I know, let’s worry about gay marriage and continue to stick our heads in the sand. I promise, I will not think in your church if you promise that you will not pray in my schools. Grow up. The rest of the world is.

Ed Johnson

May 15th, 2012
10:43 pm

@Attentive Parent, where did you find the AP[S] Glossary of Terms? Got the link?

For the APS Quality Assurance Process, go the APS web site, http://www.atlanta.k12.ga.us, then on right side of the screen click “Curriculum and Instruction: Organizing for Results.”

Or, below is the link directly to the PDF. Again, the PDF is a whopping 10.5 megabytes big.
http://www.atlantapublicschools.us/cms/lib/GA01000924/Centricity/Domain/1/Final%20APS%20Reorganization%20Powerpoint%20Presentation%2004-30-2012%20with%20current%20org%20charts.pdf

An important distinction requires understanding “quality assurance” deals with the product produced by a process, whereas “process quality improvement” deals with the process that produces the product.

Again, quality assurance comes directly from the business world, specifically manufacturing.

While the U.S. auto industry practiced quality insurance, trying to inspect quality into cars, Japan practiced continual process quality improvement to build quality into its cars. And that’s much the reason the U.S. fell behind Japan. And that’s much the reason APS will fall further behind others.

Ironically, an American taught Japan how to practice continual process quality improvement.

Ed Johnson

May 15th, 2012
10:48 pm

Oops… Quality assurance, not quality insurance.

Truth in Moderation

May 16th, 2012
12:11 am

ARNE DUNCAN (the CURRENT unconstitutional Education Secretary) has come out in support of “same sex marriage”. WHY ISN’T MAUREEN BLOGGING ABOUT THIS!
Why post about a FORMER Ed. Secretary spewing politically correct gobbledygook?

Attentive Parent

May 16th, 2012
4:09 am

Ed-It may be used in the manufacturing world. In ed world though it has a defined meaning.

I am sure because I downloaded those documents fairly recently.

My Glossary is an inside joke because I keep a list of where and who and what various ed terms actually mean. It’s like learning a foreign language except in this case it’s Orwellian Newspeak.

Actually Deming did not much appreciate what education did to his TQM.

mountain man

May 16th, 2012
6:22 am

“We brought report cards home every 6 weeks back in the old days”

That was back in the day when the grade on the report card was truly indicative of your progress in mastery of the subject that semester. Not like today when teacher’s inflate grades and administrators MAKE teachers change grades ( or parents pitch such a fit that teachers change grades).