A long chat with Erroll Davis about APS and the cheating mess: “Only so many ways to perfume a pig.”

 Erroll B. Davis Jr. says APS must focus on outcomes.

Erroll B. Davis Jr. says APS must focus on outcomes.

Erroll B. Davis left industry to run Georgia’s colleges. Now, he may have the toughest challenge of his long distinguished career, revitalizing a badly damaged APS.

Davis met with AJC reporters and editors this week to discuss how he will do that. Here are highlights of the nearly two-hour freewheeling discussion: (I will be adding to this as there is a lot of information to sort.)

I will begin by saying that at the close, I asked Davis why we should believe that his vision for Atlanta schools will succeed.

Much of what he and his deputy Karen Waldon told us echoed the comments of Beverly Hall in her many meetings with the AJC over the years.

Hall, too, talked about valuing critical thinking skills over test scores, of empowering principals, of improving teaching, of honoring great teachers and of embracing site-based management. She, too, talked about meeting with APS grads now attending Ivy League schools and listening to them heap praise on the quality of their education.

Davis admitted that the rhetoric all sounds the same. The difference, he says, will be that his regime will focus intensely on outcomes and will not farm out the work. He said that he and his team have found 211 ongoing initiatives under way in APS with no one taking any account of whether the initiatives were doing any good.

APS partnered with all sorts of folks who announced that they had a $2 million grant ready to go if only the district kicked in $500,000 to make it happen, he said.

“We never met an initiative we didn’t like,” he said.  APS opened its doors to everyone who claimed, “I am here and I want to help. We had 1,000 points of light, and no outcomes.”

He cited a well-respected community group that told him it had spent $5 million in APS over the last two years. “We have no idea on what outcome we got from them.”

“Excellence has to not be an aspiration or a goal. It has to be the standard.”

About having lunch earlier that day with the APS valedictorians, many of whom are bound for Yale, Georgetown, UGA, Tech and Emory:

“I was just stunned by them. Each had to get up and speak. They are very impressive young people.”

What they recommended to improve APS: More AP classes, more language classes, greater consistency in application of discipline. “They do not want disruptive students in the classrooms.”

“More than one referred to rigor. All felt they got a good eduction. All felt their teachers cared about them. It made me think we may be doing better than we think but still not in a systematic manner.”

“One thing we don’t do well is manage and develop aspirations in younger people. Any time my granddaughter says she has an interest, I have the wherewithal to mobilize resources around that…if she says she wants to be a pediatric surgeon, I have the ability to get her into NICU to observe.”

When one student shared his college choice, Davis said, “I thought they could do better than that.” But it may be the student’s family was “conditioned about people and resources from another era. They don’t understand fully how far they can go.”

The Pathways program that will offer options to four-year college: “It will put to bed that education at k-12 is either a college track or a dummy track. We can put that to bed forever. For some reason, someone in Atlanta thought everyone was going to college. APS is not offering other paths.”

Redistricting:

“Students will now go with one elementary school to middle school, the entire cohort will move to a middle school and parents will move along with them. They will go to one high school.”

He said that stable cluster model was a factor in the success of north Atlanta schools. “Now we are going to have those stable, single feeder clusters everywhere in this city.”

The decision to keep some schools open, including D. H. Stanton Elementary:

Karen Waldon, APS Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum & Instruction, jumped into the discussion here. She talked about the decision to keep schools open based on the promise of communities to maintain their activism and advocacy beyond the redistricting hearings.

“We asked these groups, ‘When it opens, do you just fade in the background again?’”

With Stanton, it was both the community dedication and the focus of the principal. “We see tremendous opportunity there.”

Waldon addressed the need for APS to do better outreach, citing a Saturday morning program at Kennedy Middle on the new Common Core curriculum. Led by four APS staffers, the program drew only two community members. Afterward, she told the team that it needed to go where the community was, to the nearby churches and apartment complexes.

Leadership:

APS has 17 principal vacancies.  Davis was asked if educators were leery of coming to Atlanta because of the cheating scandal.

“There are only so many ways to perfume a pig,” he replied.

But while people have questions, APS has 600 applicants for the 17 openings.

“And they are asking questions. They are aware of how the school board has functioned in the past. They are asking question about the CRCT and they are asking questions about resources. We can only postulate what we want to get done, what we stand for and do you want to join us on this journey.”

Davis wants to use one of the closed schools to house a teacher excellence institute. “…in education, there is too polite a tolerance of ineptitude. If you can’t do it, you can’t work here. It is really that simple. I want to pull problem teachers out the classroom early. We are wasting the lives of children while adults play games.”

On recognizing ineffective teachers: “Kids know it in two weeks, parents know it in about a month. It should take some steps to fire a teacher. It should take a lot steps. But it doesn’t take a lot to pull them out of the classroom.”

He wants to give those teachers help, including “avatars” that allow them to deal with virtual classrooms and have their classroom management skills appraised by dispassionate panels of experts. But if teachers cannot improve, they will not work for APS.

“They will come to you and say this is an evil man. They may be right. My goal is put effective teachers in the classroom and get ineffective teachers out.”

Why he is replacing principals in schools where cheating occurred, but the principal was not implicated:

“When principals say to me that ‘The investigators’ report said I wasn’t involved, why am I being removed from the job?’ I say, ‘Absolutely, you did not cheat but you failed. I put the malleable lives of young children in your hands and you failed. You can predict for risk and you should manage that risk. That is what a leader has to do.You have to manage the risk. You are accountable. You are responsible for everything that happens on your watch.’”

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

63 comments Add your comment

Atlanta Mom

May 2nd, 2012
9:17 pm

“I asked Davis why we should believe that his vision for Atlanta schools will succeed.”
Because he is here for two years and gone.

NBCT

May 2nd, 2012
9:23 pm

@Davis “But while people have questions, APS has 600 applicants for the 17 openings.”

Hire quality people. Don’t repeat the mistakes of the past: Hiring due to race, nepotism, cronieism, or employee longevity.

Provide support for those you hire by empowering them.

Foster a instructional leaders for each of those positions by providing training in school improvement.

Fund the endeavors the new hires/fires request.

Monitor their progress and provide constructive feedback, not threats.

Sounds simple but APS has, historically, not done so well on the aformentioned.

The Truth Hurts

May 2nd, 2012
9:35 pm

I hope you get this Mr. Davis;
1. Hold schools accountable but get them the resources they need. I came from the business world and military to education and all I can say is really!! I have taken a group of boys that have never met standards and got them up to standards and beyond; it hasn’t been easy.. It wasn’t because of bad teachers previously but because they were too busy unpacking the standards…lol. We have a nation of teachers trying to essentially teach the same thing but not one single place to go for lesson plans correlated to the standards. All I have heard about is research based this and that…..but no resources!!!!! I have created every single worksheet in my special ed. math class and that should not have been necessary. Do you want teachers to teach or create lesson plans….that is why they cheated…..to much to do and not enough time.
2. Hold parents and the community accountable. I don’t care how good of a teacher you are. You can’t do much with a kid that stays up till midnight playing Xbox or who has missed more than 20 days. Make a lack of participation a discipline problem and scare these kids straight. Not everyone can wear a suit and tie!!!

Who is the pig??

May 2nd, 2012
9:41 pm

Speaking of perfume on a pig…you should have asked Waldon how many of her Henry County friends she has called and offered jobs. See what type of answer you’d have received. This administration is doing nothing less than Beverly Hall’s did and they are just as much the media darlings that Hall and her crew were. Waldon is operating her Friends and Family program in the same manner as Augustine, et. al. with the new layer of administration under her (to the tune of $500,000). There are some shady goings-on and Davis might just do himself a huge favor by keeping a close eye on her. Putting Board Docs up. Removing them. Changing them. Placing them back on the site. They should certainly hope that an Open Records Request doesn’t come about specifically asking for budget information (i.e. supplanting) and for recreating jobs. She, herself, just hired a consulting firm to tell her how to “get it done.” At the time the ajc is reporting on a $47 million deficit and cutting 350 jobs. Sorta reminds me of good ole Dan and Jeff from Hall’s regime. Unfortunately, Waldon and company obviously think that Atlanta is Henry County with some big, tall buildings. News flash…different culture, different SES, and parents who do have the wherewithal to show you better. It’s time that the taxpayers woke up and made demands on this money-wasting, spending-hungry group who appear to think that we are too dumb to know the difference.

Who is the pig??

May 2nd, 2012
10:01 pm

Wow..lit seems that the “consultants” that have been hired have a direct connection/link to Erroll Davis. It seems that Mr. Davis and Miles Cook, Director of Bain & Co., sat on the Board of Directors for the Metro Atlanta Chamber together last year. Hmmmm…small world, huh? Maybe he already has both eyes on Waldon. Sounding more and more like the Hall/Augustine relationship.

Ed Johnson

May 2nd, 2012
10:02 pm

@Maureen, this past Monday, April 30, Karen Walton presented to the ABE Special Legislative Meeting a fairly interesting “Authorization to Abolish Positions within the Curriculum and Instruction Division, Create Positions and Execute a Transition Plan.”

APS has yet to publish the plan to their web site, as Mr. Davis said it would. Will you follow up with APS about this and put on this blog a link to the plan once it’s on the APS web site?

Thanks a million!

Maureen Downey

May 2nd, 2012
10:05 pm

@Ed, Just sent off your question. Will post reply, if I get one.
Maureen

Who is the pig??

May 2nd, 2012
10:28 pm

Well, whaddaya know? Seems that the Metro Atlanta Chamber (MAC), who reached out to Davis to run the district, had a COO by the name of Peter Aman. Well, Mr. Aman left the MAC back in November’of 2011 and went back to his former job. Guess where this former job is?!?! None other than this new firm that APS has hired to help them “get it done”…Bain and Co. I suppose this is all a big coincidence, though.

Passing by

May 2nd, 2012
11:22 pm

Beverly Fraud

May 3rd, 2012
1:37 am

Re: I will begin by saying that at the close, I asked Davis why we should believe that his vision for Atlanta schools will succeed.

The supposed “tough question.” A softball. Did you ask given the abusive corporate culture, a REAL tough question. Why has Davis not address the blatant violation of state law that Dr. John Trotter brought to his attention at his first board meeting?

Is that not a fair, legitimate and necessary question, giving the rampant violations of the law APS engaged in?

Or is the The AJC provides political cover for the APS Supt. Version 2.0?

Loving Life!

May 3rd, 2012
2:06 am

In all seriousness I have an extreme distaste for President Adams, yes his leadership of UGA has transitioned it into a very selective institution (which some may consider a good thing) however, his alienation of donors and supporter has created a minuscule endowment for such an old and large institution as UGA. Former Florida International University President Modesto Maidique transitioned his institution into one of the fastest growing public research universities in the US by doubling enrollment, increasing academic programs and sponsored research. Of course Maidique had been president of FIU for over two decades however, he transformed the commuter college into a well-respected university.

I would have loved to see former Wake Forest Provost Jill Tiefenthaler become Adams successor however, she has recently taken the reins as president of Colorado College in 2011.
The most excellent choice I would think of is University of South Florida VP of Research and Innovation, Karen Holbrook, who is a former UGA Provost and former President of The Ohio State University. Holbrook may have a stellar track record however, her age of 69 may appear unattractive to the selection committee.

My hope is that UGA will select a leader that embraces change – and yes I know is cliche but one must have hope! Sharon Gaber (Arkansas Provost), Garnett Stokes (Florida State Provost, former UGA Dean), Maureen Grasso (longtime UGA Grad School Dean since 2002), my wish for any of these admirable leaders to be given a chance at transforming UGA into a world leader with aspirations of creating a place like no other.

Loving Life!

May 3rd, 2012
2:07 am

@Maureen – Opps! Wrong post above!

Loving Life!

May 3rd, 2012
2:43 am

@Maureen & Ed – the document is posted on the APS Board Doc website (http://www.boarddocs.com/ga/aps/Board.nsf/files/8TS46B09FFC5/$file/CI%20Reorganization%20Plan%20Revised.pdf) and another move informative document is here (http://www.atlantapublicschools.us/cms/lib/GA01000924/Centricity/Domain/1/APS%20Reorganization%20Powerpoint%20Presentation%2004-30-2012%20with%20current%20org%20charts-2.pdf).

It is very interested to see 198 positions removed from the payroll and replaced by 112 “new” positions. What I find most interesting is that of the abolished positions eight were top level (holding titles of Executive Director or Associate Superintendent) however, of the “new” positions have decreased these to four – which may symbolize a reduction in the top down management style of APS. Also, the movement of the Assistant Principals to the direct supervision of the Deputy Superintendent, which is a sign Waldon will implement “shifting” moving APs around the district at her leisure.

What I would have loved to see is the replacement of the SRT Directors (or Area Superintendents) completely. It appears they have transitioned the five SRTs into four Executive Regional Directors. From my experience in administration, I would have loved to see school principal report directly to the Deputy Superintendent instead of a dense bureaucracy of Deputies, Assistants, Executives, Seniors, etc..

Dr. Craig Spinks/ Georgians for Educational Excellence

May 3rd, 2012
3:00 am

Chancellor Davis is a good and able man. The APS is fortunate to have a person with his skill-set and character leading it.

Beverly Fraud

May 3rd, 2012
5:41 am

Dr. Craig, I would be more impressed if he addressed the very legitimate questions Dr. Trotter raised at his first board meeting. Ignoring violations of the law is not a way to build trust even IF the AJC won’t hold you accountable for doing so.

apsupdate

May 3rd, 2012
6:17 am

@Ed @Maureen Regarding Dept. Supt. Waldon’s presentation, it was posted on May 1 as promised, and we’ve updated the website with a quick link this morning so that it will be easier to find, per Mr. Johnson’s post. It was also added to our live blog on Talk Up APS on May 1and publicized via all of our social media channels. Hope this helps.
Direct Link: http://www.atlantapublicschools.us/cms/lib/GA01000924/Centricity/Domain/1/APS%20Reorganization%20Powerpoint%20Presentation%2004-30-2012%20with%20current%20org%20charts-2.pdf

mountain man

May 3rd, 2012
6:25 am

Erroll Davis talks a good game, Just like Beverly Hall, but where are the REAL answers to REAL issues. He mentioned not having discipline problems in the classroom; what exactly is he doing about it? What about absenteeism? What about social promotion? He mentions principals removed from cheating schools, but he doesn’t ay they were fired (where did they go?). Maybe they just got transferred. While the teachers got fired. Why have teachers been targeted while administrators who drove the cheating still have not been prosecuted?

Davis sounds just like another con man (or woman) that knows that there are deep problems but knows he can’t address them with band-aids, but tries anyway.

Dr. John Trotter

May 3rd, 2012
8:08 am

“They do not want disruptive students in the classrooms.” Yes, the students had to bring this up, not the adults. We have been saying over and over that the kids deep down want discipline but the adults have allowed the thugs to take over.

Dr. John Trotter

May 3rd, 2012
8:14 am

Blah. Blah. Blah. We have heard it all before. When Erroll Davis begins respecting O. C. G. A. 20-2-940(g) and starts responding to duly served subpoenas, then at this point I may start respecting him. But, I don’t give a rat’s behind what background he has if he egregiously and flagrantly continues to violate the Georgia Statutes on public education as well as a teacher’s right to a due process hearing.

By the way, of the nearly 300 pickets that MACE has staged in 17 years, we have picketed only one time in Henry County…where Karen Waldon was principal. Enough said.

carlosgvv

May 3rd, 2012
8:15 am

Does he also realize that, when it comes to the overall quality of APS students, you can’t make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear?

Dr. John Trotter

May 3rd, 2012
8:40 am

In a word, Erroll: The problem in the Atlanta Public Schools is not one of ineffective teachers; it is a problem of a complete breakdown of discipline, and from the report that Maureen gives here, it appears that you and Ms. Waldon did not bring up the huge 800 pound gorilla in the resplendent dining room, viz., a lack of student discipline.

V. Granny

May 3rd, 2012
8:50 am

Maybe I’m not on the right blog, but please tell me why a child is repeatedly raped on a school bus in Fulton County and nobody handled that til now?

Jack

May 3rd, 2012
8:56 am

I agree that the lack of student discipline is the main cause for the APS problems.

C Jae of EAV

May 3rd, 2012
9:48 am

The more things change the more they stay the same. Dr. Davis talks of accountability when speaking of firing principals at cheating schools not directly implicated, but what of the accountability that Dr. Augustine held yet he saw fit to authorize re-hiring her as a highly paid consultant? The words and actions don’t match. Creditability for APS remains an issue and it appears that will be the case for the forseeable future.

Atlanta Mom

May 3rd, 2012
9:57 am

‘The problem in the Atlanta Public Schools is not one of ineffective teachers”
Dr Trotter, how much time have you spent in APS schools? There are many ineffective teachers in APS.

Dr. John Trotter

May 3rd, 2012
10:28 am

@ Atlanta Mom: I have spent much time in the Atlanta schools since 1988, some 24 years. I have never said that there are NO ineffective teachers. These, by the way, can be caught with a loose net. The MAIN problem, however, in the Atlanta schools is an abject lack of student discipline. Period.

Dr. John Trotter

May 3rd, 2012
10:31 am

By the way, I am quite sure that the reason that Erroll Davis does not addrress the lack of discipline in the student population of APS is that he doesn’t have a clue what to do, and if he does have a clue what to do, he doesn’t have the stomach to do it.

Maureen Downey

May 3rd, 2012
10:33 am

@Trotter, He wants stronger police presence in the school and more accountability for what school officers do each day. He says there is a gap now on who oversees them. He is talking to APD about the longtime arrangement and whether it is the best situation for the schools.
Maureen

Atlanta Mom

May 3rd, 2012
10:34 am

Dare I inquire Dr. Trotter, what you would do with badly behaved students?

Atlanta Mom

May 3rd, 2012
10:41 am

Dr Trotter, while you didn’t say “NO ineffective teachers” I did say there are many bad teachers. My children went to schools on the northside of town, and were for the most part in honors classes. In the HS, I would say 25% of their teachers should not have been in the classroom. I shudder to think about the lower level students and the teachers they had. There were of course, many incredible teachers at all levels. But MANY should be gone.

Being Censored by @Maureen

May 3rd, 2012
10:45 am

I would have asked Mr. Davis why APS is squandering $15K per pupil. You could almost send a student to private school with that kind of money! I would ask him why $15K per pupil is not enough. I would love to hear his response to that one.

dontyouwanttoknow

May 3rd, 2012
11:05 am

Maureen, Superintendent Davis said principals who had schools where cheating took place are being replaced. Please ask him why Danielle Battle received a promotion to Executive Director. Parkside had confirmed cheating while she was principal and strong evidence from the Blue Ribbon investigation and the GOSA investigation show that cheating probably took place at King; there was even a news clip with a whistle blower who had documentation of her claims.

Beverly Fraud

May 3rd, 2012
11:12 am

How, given what has happened in the TOXICITY that is APS, did the AJC not ask about how he intends to address administrative RETALIATION?

atlmom

May 3rd, 2012
11:18 am

atlanta mom: create military style academies where the kids do not want to be sent. Then start sending students who are recurring problem students there. It’s really that simple. You really only have to have one elem/one middle/one high school. REALLY REALLY enforce discipline in the classroom. When a student is sent out – don’t discipline the TEACHER, discipline the STUDENT.
Ron Clark takes a lot of kids with discipline problems into his schools – and they are winning millions of dollars in scholarships to high schools across the country.
How does he do it? WITH DISCIPLINE in the classroom. With telling the students to say: yes ma’am, no sir, etc.
But you need excellent teachers to be able to do this, too.

Beverly Fraud

May 3rd, 2012
11:18 am

Want to stop administrative retaliation? Allow the teachers to give the principal a vote of “confidence or no confidence” each year. Why not? Are we not allowing KINDERGARTENERS to do the same thing with THEIR “supervisor” (i.e. the teacher)?

And what do administrators like to say? “If you are doing a good job, you have nothing to fear.”

So, isn’t what’s good for the goose, good for the gander?

Undermines the authority of the administrator? Valid point. Glad you asked. So…set the bar RIDICULOUSLY low…say 35%

Now if you can’t get even 35% of your staff to agree you are “effective” doesn’t that mean in essence that administrator has “lost their staff”?

Love to see what Davis has to say about that, or for that matter, any of the teacher organizations.

@Loving Life

May 3rd, 2012
11:25 am

What do you mean a reduction in the Top-Down level?? In addition to the former EDs (which went from 5 to 4), she added Assistant Superintendents (4–who all have Henry County ties). So…take away 5…add 4 and then add another level. Not downsizing to me…8>4. She’s not finished yet, either. Stay tuned. Looks can be deceiving. Many of those 198 were hourly positions that do not even call for abolishment (at least 39 of them and I didn’t finish counting). It’s fluff to look good for the community. “Oh, yes. We abolished 198 positions to recreate 112.” How many other positions were hourly, as well? Either they don’t know that hourly positions do not have to be abolished, or they are engaging in deception. The jury is still out. They should be careful…violating statutes regarding abolishment of legitimate positions could be costly in the long run. I think Who’s the Pig raises some valid points. Is there some conflict of interest going on? How much did this consulting firm cost?? I smell Open Records on RFPs…

@Loving Life

May 3rd, 2012
11:26 am

Edited to add Some of the 198 positions were hourly…not “many.”

mountain man

May 3rd, 2012
12:01 pm

“Dare I inquire Dr. Trotter, what you would do with badly behaved students?”

Dare I inquire, MR. DAVIS, what WILL you do with badly behaved students?

@dontyouwannaknow

May 3rd, 2012
12:10 pm

Not just Battle being promoted but also SHaron Pitts…there seems to be something about Karen Waldon bringing in all her cronies

Atlanta Mom

May 3rd, 2012
12:16 pm

atlmom,
If public schools could select their students, spend $18,000 a year (all of it going to nondisabled children because Ron Clark doesn’t accept disabled children), kick the students out if they don’t perform as required, I image the public schools would have much better result too.

publicsch

May 3rd, 2012
12:38 pm

nothing will change—they will hire a bunch of connected friends in these principal slots who will do what the corrupt board orders, while wasting a bunch of money as always on “initiatives”, deals and contracts with friends

Double Zero Eight

May 3rd, 2012
12:42 pm

“Talk is cheap.”
.
Reminds me of an old college course
I took called “The Strategies of Rhetoric”.

FollowingPublicEducationPolicy2DT

May 3rd, 2012
12:59 pm

Why he is replacing principals in schools where cheating occurred, but the principal was not implicated:

“When principals say to me that ‘The investigators’ report said I wasn’t involved, why am I being removed from the job?’ I say, ‘Absolutely, you did not cheat but you failed. I put the malleable lives of young children in your hands and you failed. You can predict for risk and you should manage that risk. That is what a leader has to do.You have to manage the risk. You are accountable. You are responsible for everything that happens on your watch.’”

From a Retired Principal:
There is absolutely no way that a principal can know every single thing that occurs at every single minute in the school! They are not magicians or GOD!! No matter how hard s/he may try, it just can’t be done! I’m sure Supt. Davis was not always able to account for all the staff members he supervised. If there are principals that weren’t implicated in the cheating, they should be permitted to retain their jobs. If a principal is exonerated, s/he should retain her/his position. What is Davis’ plan for the educators that are exonerated? From his comments, it appears that he has mentally associated guilt to all, regardless of outcome.
Whatever happened to effectively implementing our judicial system that we all stand behind here in our great nation? INNOCENT UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY! Does it not apply in this case? It seems as though any individual mentioned in this ordeal was automatically guilty once the GBI published its findings! Have GBI officials ever been wrong? Absolutely! We must remember, just as it is the responsibility of educators to ensure students produce good test results, it was the responsibility of GBI officials to produce guilty individuals! Given the enormous amount of tax dollars spend on this investigation, it was critical that the GBI produce results that substantiated why tax dollars were spent! I have several importants points to make here:
1, We know many educators DID participate in unethical actions and should be dealt with accordingly. HOWEVER, IT IS POSSIBLE THAT SOME INDIVIDUALS NAMED IN THE REPORT ARE INNOCENT AND DID NOT CHEAT? THE GBI REPORT SUMMARIZES MANY PRINCIPALS AS “SHOULD HAVE KNOWN”. Is that a solid confirmation of “Guilty” without any doubt? ABSOLUTELY NOT! “Should have known” clearly suggests doubt.
2. I have to agree with John Trotter and his comments involving Davis following proper procedure and policy in his handling educators involved in the scandal. All of the educators out on paid administrative leave have been away from their jobs for months and many are yet to receive charge letters and/or hearings from from APS. CLEAR VIOLATION!! Some have even received hearing dates but no charge letter. VIOLATION OF RIGHTS1.
Let’s continue to stick to what our forefathers worked so hard to create for us as Americans. People should be considered innocent until proven guilty. When a person is found innocent, s/he should not be punished. Davis’ comments indicates the punishment of leaders not implicated in the scandal. Further, it appears he has already developed a “guilty” plan (even before hearings) for all educators named in the scandal. Surely all named employees (innocent and guilty) should not be handled the same.
I charge all APS educators involved, and not involved (you could be next) to contact your respective unions and sound your voices! Take action! Fight for your rights! If there is a RIF (Reduction In Force) that occurs in APS, SENIORITY DOES MATTER! FIGHT FOR YOUR RIGHTS. SOUND YOUR VOICES. JOHN TROTTER IS ON POINT!

atlmom

May 3rd, 2012
1:16 pm

huh atlanta mom? I don’t understand. I didn’t say kick them out. I didn’t compare the system to private school. I gave an answer to your (?) question.

The Responsible Conversant

May 3rd, 2012
1:21 pm

@C Jae of EAV @ 9:48 a.m.,

We need to be 100% factual on these posts. Dr. Augustine has NOT been hired to serve as a consultant for APS.

Inman Park Boy

May 3rd, 2012
1:22 pm

“What they recommended to improve APS: More AP classes, more language classes, greater consistency in application of discipline. “They do not want disruptive students in the classrooms.” Teachers have been singing this tune for years and get little or no help from parents or administrators. Especially parents. I also might add the every time a kid is disciplined “harshly” his parents run to the AJC and YOU routinely fall on the side of the kid. So, what do you expect?

Who is the pig??

May 3rd, 2012
5:20 pm

Well…does anyone have any ideas about how Bain & Company just happened to be the consultants of choice? @ @Loving Life…you are right. The numbers are fluff to deceive the public. Abolishing hourly positions?? LOL. That is wild. @John Trotter…do you see some conflict of interest with Davis and his colleagues? Seems that the same company did a study on the city of Atlanta in the mid-2000s and recommended privatization of services. Hmmmm….I smell the pig, too, Eroll.

JAR

May 3rd, 2012
8:04 pm

Davis is a mistake and more incompetent as the APS superintendent than he was as the head of the Ga. Board of Regents. He has absolutely no education credentials and is making a mockery of the profession. His forced appointment to APS superintendent is as embarrasing as the infamous election of Lester Maddox as Govenor of GA. Mickey Mouse would have been a better superintendent. There were many other considerably more qualified candidates that Govenor “Let’s Make A Deal” could have chosen. Why does AJC keep trying to convince Atlantans that Davis is somehow competent? He will be kicked out of office by the next APS board or Atlanta voters will kick the board out of office.

What “distinguished” career in industry? If he were a such a great leader, the APS “cheating” issues and this continuous drain of tax payer money would be over. But no, he sticks his foot in his mouth and turns the situation into a fiasco; then, he’s too stupid and vain to pull the foot out of his mouth. The school closures and selective reductions in force are directly related to the losses APS incurred by dragging out this so called “punishment for cheating” process.

So, Error Davis you need to fire yourself. You have failed!! Then, go outside and ride your bicycle backwards down the center of Peachtree Street.

Maureen Downey

May 3rd, 2012
8:32 pm

@Jar, You may disagree with Davis, but he had many significant roles in industry:
Davis served as chairman of the board of Alliant Energy Corporation – an energy holding company with $8.3 billion in total assets and annual operating revenues of $3.0 billion – since 2000, after joining the company in 1998 as president and chief executive officer. He retired from his dual roles as president and CEO in July 2005, and retained the chairman’s post. Prior to the creation of Alliant Energy, Davis served as president and CEO of WPL Holdings, from 1990 to 1998. From 1978-1990, Davis rose through the senior management ranks at Wisconsin Power and Light Company, starting as vice president of finance and ending as CEO and president. His career also includes corporate finance positions at Xerox Corporation and Ford Motor Company.

Who is the pig??

May 3rd, 2012
9:49 pm

Maureen, with all due respect, what do those industrial entities have to do with education and educational regulations? Laws for corporations are significantly different from those for government jobs. A teacher would be considered too incompetenent to run GE; why not the same scrutiny? The job descriptions that APS writes for those who evaluate educators have a common requirement: Educational Leadership. How does the district allow the captain of the ship, who has the right to evaluate all of the employees, not to have the minimum credentials? The next question should be if his employee evaluations and recommendations will hold up in the event of a lawsuit since he doesn’t have the basic Leadership credentials.