APS news: Some teachers told they must reapply for their jobs. And does the CRCT scheduling make sense for kids?

I have been getting a lot of notes lately from teachers in APS about assorted concerns.

Here are two such notes, one about some teachers having to reapply for their jobs and the other about the CRCT scheduling this year. I contacted APS and have included the official response to why some teachers must reapply.

Here is the first teacher note:

Teachers at some APS schools were told today that they have to reapply for their jobs. They have to attend a job fair this Saturday, resubmit applications and resumes and respond to a writing prompt. Only teachers from schools that are being closed or from schools that are are being reclassified as primary or secondary have to do this. Grove Park and Woodson are included in this restructuring.

Teachers at these schools already face daunting challenges. They are the professionals who work with the neediest children. Please investigate why only teachers from schools affected by restructuring have to go through this ordeal. Also, teachers were told this the day before CRCT testing.

How can an administration justify these actions?

And here is a response from APS spokesman Keith Bromery:

APS made the difficult decision to close seven schools under a district-wide redistricting initiative and is also reorganizing the high school “small school” concept. The reality of these decisions is that we will have an excess of both administrative and instructional staff for the next school year. This means that personnel assigned to schools slated for closure or restructuring may be subject to a reduction-in-force under School Board Policy GBKA. A reduction-in-force means that certain educator contracts may be terminated due to the closing of schools and the loss of programs and students.

APS personnel impacted by these developments will have the opportunity to apply for positions elsewhere in the district. Several jobs fairs are being scheduled exclusively for APS educators, the first of which is Saturday, April 21 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Douglass High School. Principals at schools with available positions will have the opportunity to interview and hire these educators for their vacancies.

These developments are taking place at this time, because it was only a week ago that the Atlanta Board of Education approved the redistricting plan which was approximately two years in development. This is the time of year when staffing decisions at public schools are normally made in preparation for the next school year.

And, finally, here is a note from an APS educator about the CRCT administration this year:

You may already be aware of this – but I wanted to write and make sure as I consider this to be a poorly thought out plan:

APS is giving the CRCTs from April 17-April 30 (includes make-ups). The results will be received by the schools on or about May 11. For students that do not pass a critical section (3rd Grade = Reading and 5th Grade = Reading and Math), they will be given a re-test from May 17-May 22 (the last four days of school).

Previously, students have gone to summer school and then given the re-test after the remediation (summer school). This year, that will not be the case. This schedule adjustment doesn’t seem to have our students’ best interests at heart. I would also note that this probably affects the kids and their families that are, many times, least able to advocate for themselves.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

95 comments Add your comment

mift

April 18th, 2012
10:45 am

The CRCT schedule is done this way in multiple metro districts.

high school teacher

April 18th, 2012
11:11 am

There is no money to pay teachers for summer administration of the CRCT. Our district is doing the same. Parents also raised a stink when they found out that their children had to take a test the same week that they had already booked a vacation.

Inman Park Boy

April 18th, 2012
11:31 am

The APS is just a pressure cooker, isn’t it? I am grateful everyday I don’t have to work in that environment. To all APS teachers/administrators who have lost jobs: try to find a good side. At least you’re out of the mess.

Reapplying for a Job

April 18th, 2012
11:39 am

Teachers are darn lucky to get to apply for other jobs in the area after their schools close.
We in the public sector are not afforded the same luxury. When our employer loses a contract (which has nothing to do with us) we lose our jobs.
There is no reapplying for jobs within a “district” or other area. It’s OUT THE DOOR.
So cry me a river, teacher when you complain that only poor picked on YOU has to reapply for your job.
Do you really expect every APS teacher to have to reapply for their jobs and for the districts to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars or more evaluating every single teacher in the district and picking the ones who will stay?
Don’t you understand the purpose of closing the school is to SAVE money because APS doesn’t have enough money?
Again, government employees live in a little oyster with all the protection in the world. they feel entiitled to be protected from what we in the private sector have already experiened — job LOSS. Not just the hassle of reapplying but LOSING OUR JOBS through no fault of our own.
So get over it.
Reapply for your jobs with a good atttitude and stop complaining.

Reapplying for a Job

April 18th, 2012
11:42 am

High school teacher is right. There is NO MONEY for teachers to teach kids in the Summer what they should have taught them the 180 days they children were already in school. One retest is fair. After a retest and another failure…the kids needs to be retained so they can LEARN. If the teacher can’t teach them, the teacher needs to be fired.
There are plenty of teachers waiting in the unemployment line who would like to have that job.

senseandsensibility

April 18th, 2012
11:44 am

Many times you hear that you should be a dedicated employee and always do your best. Well where is the employer doing there best to find these people jobs. I think this stinks. As an employee they should be able to tell you where the vacancies are and you should be given first crack at the jobs. Why would you have to reapply or submit a resume or take a test. This is very demeaning and demoralizing. A lot of teachers are leaving the profession because they are fed up, by the way they are being treated. Im sad to say this but I don’t encourage anyone to become a teacher anymore. Not until they get this mess sorted out. It’s not worth the time and money you put into your college education. You can make more money at startbucks or walmart then a first year teacher. So sad! Why would anyone go 30-40 thousand into debt, it doesn’t make sense.

Michael Moore

April 18th, 2012
11:53 am

@Reapplying…Schools are not businesses like your private sector comparison. Education provides a service to the public. The intro provided for this holds the key: “Teachers at these schools already face daunting challenges. They are the professionals who work with the neediest children.” Making teachers apply for their jobs does not solve the problem of why these are the neediest kids. It does not solve the research informed causes for why these schools are not performing well…poverty. Private sector analogies cannot work.

skipper

April 18th, 2012
12:22 pm

APS is a cluster….my congrats to those trying to make it better but Lord knows I’m glad my kids didn’t have to go there……

Frankie

April 18th, 2012
12:29 pm

my only issue with this is it does not seem as though the Reduction in force part of this redistircting was brought up during the negotiation for which schools stay open, etc.
This seems to have caught a lot of teachers by suprise.

MannyT

April 18th, 2012
12:31 pm

One unfortunate factor with the teachers reapplying for jobs is the timing. I don’t know the full picture, but don’t teachers have to sign annual contracts at some point (that has already passed) for the 2012-13 school year? I’d suspect that some good teachers at closed schools would have easily gotten new job offers if they had been let go when principals had more time to choose staff.

On the CRCT side, I took a peek at last year’s CRCT results in this blog
http://blogs.ajc.com/get-schooled-blog/2011/06/22/crct-scores-are-in-what-do-they-tell-us-this-time/?cp=1

I am curious what passing or failing the CRCT means quantitatively? What score means you pass? I wonder because the retest concept seems like it wouldn’t help much unless the student was close to a passing number or had some situation (illness, etc.) that impacts score. If 2 or 3 weeks of intense attention gets you from a very low score to passing, why don’t schools pull the low performing students into these types of sessions multiple times during the school year to accelerate their learning? If it doesn’t work, why is it done at all?

Beverly Fraud

April 18th, 2012
12:31 pm

Re: APS is a cluster…

As North Korea’s “dearly” departed Kim Jong-il was overhead to remark when he visited APS, “And the world has the nerve to condemn US for the way we treat our people? Child, please.” (Loosely translated of course)

Blah, Blah, Blah, Blah

April 18th, 2012
12:55 pm

@Reapplying for a Job: Want is the point of coming on here and parrotting what you hear on Faux News. We know that govt. schools are bad, that everyone who doesn’t hold your view is wrong and that it is all the teachers fault. Blah, Blah, Blah, Blah

atlmom

April 18th, 2012
12:55 pm

I am not surprised by the reapplying thing. Actually, Davis has indicated that principals will have a lot of autonomy in his administration – but they are ALSO going to be responsible for the output. I.e., they will be able to get rid of teachers they don’t want there, but if the school doesn’t do well, they are responsible. The only way to have a principal responsible, though, is to have them also be able to make the personnel decisions.
So this is no surprise at all. This is the first step.
AND more importantly – there aren’t enough jobs for all these teachers. The reasons these schools are closing is that there aren’t so many students in the system.
So what do you think APS should do? Allow teachers to teach empty classrooms? There are fewer jobs. what else would you do?

carlosgvv

April 18th, 2012
1:18 pm

And yet, many people still believe the recession is over because the Govt. says it is. I’ll bet these laid off teachers don’t buy that any more than I and many others.

Snarky One

April 18th, 2012
1:20 pm

All of the fuss over the CRCT for what? It is not like anything will happen to the students if they don’t pass. All will happen is the students will be sent to the next grade level. The whole idea of retaining students is a fantastic idea and is hilarious to assume that it would actually happen.

TimeOut

April 18th, 2012
1:23 pm

Once again, the tired argument about private vs public sector employment serves as a smoke-screen, blinding many to the common concerns of an entire community. I wonder if it would be productive to focus on who benefits from such a rift among citizens. APS teachers face a daunting task, as do all of those who attempt to empower our neediest citizens. As with all workers, some earn their money and some serve no purpose other than their own. The entire community bears responsibility for the development of human potential. The academic world is not the proper venue for the attempted attainment of each and every goal. The churches, the families, the community organizations, the neighborhoos, and the various levels of government with their policies, regulations, and laws all share in this role. School personnel cannot overcome all situations. The mentally-ill have children. The irresponsible have children. The selfish have children. Only a community whose capable, committed, and caring adults are united in their commitment to raising a healthier, more civic-minded and academically-able generation can succeed. One group of stakeholders is insufficient to the task.

Another comment

April 18th, 2012
1:26 pm

Not only should they give them a written test, but they should given them a speaking test. Any teacher that feels the need to use “ax” in lieu of “ask” should automatically not be rehired. If a teacher can not speak correct English, then they should not be hired as well.

I believe that all of the school systems should over a weekend secretely install Nanny Camera’s so they can see what poor English the teachers and administrators use. I am so sick of teachers and Administrators that can not communicate effectively. They should set the standard and speak properly. They would never be hired or kept at Westminster, Marist or any of the Catholic Elementary Schools.

Supt. Davis’s Goal is to keep the better schools open. To model the higher performing clusters, Grady and North Atlanta. The two that did not have the CRCT Cheating issues. Did you ever stop to think that they can not get them all off the roll through the CRCT investigation, so a downsizing is being used just like in the Private sector. Only the best, only the strongest candidates survive. If you are an outstanding teacher, use proper English, was not involved in the CRCT mess, you should not be worried.

Erica Long

April 18th, 2012
1:34 pm

@atlmom-

Thank you for making sense. As a parent, I’m excited about the idea of empowering principals with staffing decisions and making them more accountable in return.

Really amazed

April 18th, 2012
1:52 pm

Snarky one is correct! They are still passed on. DOE has decided, why even bother with summer school to re-test. The student will be passed on if they fail again so why bother with teachers and students spending the time and money when they will be passed on even if they fail again??? I don’t understand why they are still using this stupid test anyway. It doesn’t tell crap! Parents just get to say my child exceeded the crct. The test is to see that the child learned what they were suppose to learn throughout the year. What the heck was the quartely report card for?????? Plz!

Here We Go Again

April 18th, 2012
1:52 pm

@ATLMOM..This is nothing new. Principals always hire their teachers. I wish teachers were paid more for the type of crap they go through. One would think this was a $200,000 a year job. I predict a huge Exodus after the recession.

godoggo

April 18th, 2012
1:53 pm

-

I enjoyed having the Great experience of my Son attending a TOP Atlanta Elem. School last year(WTJackson)…..i was very active with the School and his class, some of the kids i’d known since they were in diapers…..and i also Coached many of them in Youth Sports. I for one know for a fact, there are GREAT Teachers in this City.

But can you imagine…….Working for a Corporation for several years, being implicated in a Grand cover-up or a apart of it….costing let’s say, that Public company or Corporation Millions of dollars in losses and continuing to…………….while we have to sit back and wait 2+ years for there:

1. Investigation
2. Summary investigation
3. Alleged defendant (that was videotaped say during crime, placed on temporary leave with pay)
4. Formally charged
5. Denial of charges
6. Appealing of charge (still on payroll)
7. Appeal to the Union for reinstatement
8. Denied @ 2+ years

The convicted or “disrespected” would then Scrape real low in the Attorney or EEOC barrel to file a discrimination suit because they are as dumb and ignorant as a box of rocks. If that doesn’t work, they coddle together with the other sacks of incompetent rocks and file a class action lawsuit…..saying their Civil Rights were violated ? WTF ?

Can a class action suit be filed against the incompetent teachers (used loosely) on behalf of the children ?

Oh……no, that’s right…..there won’t be any money there to collect…it’s all about the Attorney’s, Unions, and Benjamin’s :)

At the Corporation you would be placed in handcuffs and exited out the front door….Game Over!

-

Mary Elizabeth

April 18th, 2012
1:55 pm

A private sector employee’s comment, above:

“When our employer loses a contract (which has nothing to do with us) we lose our jobs.
There is no reapplying for jobs within a ‘district’ or other area. It’s OUT THE DOOR.
So cry me a river, teacher when you complain that only poor picked on YOU has to reapply
for your job.”
——————————————————————————————

A public school teacher’s comments, above:

“Many times you hear that you should be a dedicated employee and always do your best. Well where is the employer doing there [sic] best to find these people jobs. I think this stinks. As an employee they should be able to tell you where the vacancies are and you should be given first crack at the jobs. Why would you have to reapply or submit a resume or take a test. This is very demeaning and demoralizing.”

==================================================

During my active years as a public school teacher, if a teacher lost his/her job because of the closing of his/her school, as a result of dwindling enrollment, that teacher would be reassigned to another school within the school district by the system’s Department of Personnel. As I understand how the APS is organized, each school has its own autonomy, similar in that regard to that of the private sector.

I want my further remarks to transcend this particular issue. I want to pose a question which is more pertinent to our society-at-large than simply what happens within the APS, relative to teacher job loss.

Here is my question:

Do we want to create an America in which the public sector is made more like the private sector, with its survival-of-the-fittest mentality, which fosters aggression and jealousies toward others, as well as divisions among people, or do we want to create an America in which the private sector is urged to incorporate many of the service values of the public sector so that care for the employee is genuinely provided by the employer, so that a perception that “we-are-all-in-this-together” is created among employer, employee, and customer alike, and so that the customer is viewed with respect and appreciation instead of simply seen as a commodity for profit?

I think we would be wiser, as a nation, to encourage the private sector to emulate many of the values which are prevalent within the public sector than to have the public sector emulate the private sector’s “every-man-for-himself” values. If we, as a nation, were to understand the positive results of this shift of values, we would find ourselves caring that millions of Americans are provided with health insurance and healthcare who presently do not have it, caring that all old people are provided with Social Security in their old age, and caring that every child is provided with an excellent public school education by caring, service-oriented teachers, instead by private sector models in which our young may be used for profit by the shrewdly self-interested.

Ernest

April 18th, 2012
2:07 pm

I’m surprised that teachers from the schools that will be closed or reclassified will have to reapply for jobs. Typically the teachers follow the children, which means they will have jobs. Factor in the annual turnover due to retirements, leaving the profession, or other reasons, one would think any excess teachers could back fill those position. I see the non teachers (administrative and support staff, cafeteria workers, custodians, etc) possibly needing to reapply but one could make the argument they should be eligible for open positions also based on seniority.

Here We Go Again

April 18th, 2012
2:08 pm

@godogoo: You must live in a Communist country?

GrammarPolice

April 18th, 2012
2:22 pm

@ Another Comment, I noted at least 15 grammatical, punctuation and/or spelling errors in your comment. Good thing YOU aren’t a teacher…or are you?

benita wheeler

April 18th, 2012
2:29 pm

benita wheeler…we need emore community base education wherein the community is more involved.

Ron F.

April 18th, 2012
2:31 pm

Many of them will be rehired if the number of kids doesn’t go down. I support the interviewing to make sure the schools get the right teachers. I also suspect there will be those who won’t be rehired and probably shouldn’t be. The good ones will get jobs, I feel pretty sure.

Jack

April 18th, 2012
2:32 pm

Maybe these displaced teachers should try a different profession. I’m sure they have skills that can be put to use outside the classroom.

Ron F.

April 18th, 2012
2:37 pm

@godogoo: if due process is done, then the appeals will run out and there will be no recourse other than to cry in front of a news camera, if any will listen. Also, there are no unions to appeal to in Georgia, so that step is irrelevant. We have due process laws as public employees to offset the pay difference between us and the private sector. Once upon a time they actually needed teachers and had to offer benefits to attract them…can you believe it? If it has taken APS this long to process the evidence and charge those suspended, then it’s APS who’s to blame for the money it cost to suspend these folks with pay. They should have moved faster, especially with those from which they had confessions.

godoggo

April 18th, 2012
3:01 pm

@ Here We Go Again
April 18th, 2012 2:08 pm @godogoo: You must live in a Communist country?

YES….Fulton county “plunder and loot”

@ Ron F.
April 18th, 2012 2:37 pm

YES….I agree ! It is the Systematic culture of APSand the Board……trying to solve the problem is like settling the MidEast borders…….AND LETS NOT GET INTO THAT…..

Lets see how long it takes to get the person charged in the E Rivers PTA issue in jail ? That will be resolved before the end of the school year. just sayin : )

Ron F.

April 18th, 2012
4:28 pm

“YES….I agree ! It is the Systematic culture of APSand the Board……trying to solve the problem is like settling the MidEast borders”

YEP, that about sums it up! :-)

A Conservative Voice

April 18th, 2012
4:38 pm

@benita wheeler

April 18th, 2012
2:29 pm

benita wheeler…we need emore community base education wherein the community is more involved.

Yeah, you might even benefit from attending :)

TO Michael Moore

April 18th, 2012
4:42 pm

You wrote “Private sector analogies cannot work.”
Baloney.
Government workers are not entitled to special privileges and status. They are just accustomed to it.
We cannot afford as many teachers.
We have to let some go.
That’s life.
Just because you are a teacher doesn’t mean you are guaranteed a job for life.
Now some of you government employees just might get a whif of what we in the private sector have already experienced.
JOB LOSS.
What is fitting and correct is that the teachers who will have to reapply for jobs came from the schools that closed in APS and the schools that closed were the BIGGEST cheaters on the CRCT.
So there you go.
What comes around goes around.

@MannyT

April 18th, 2012
4:55 pm

The time for signing contracts for 2012-2013 has not come yet. The legislature extended that date to May 15. So many districts will not issue contacts until May. The passing score for the CRCT is 800.

MB

April 18th, 2012
6:00 pm

Maureen, There was a story on early morning news a couple of days ago about Erroll Davis speaking to a group (maybe 100 Black Men?) about the school closings and what would happen with teachers. In the video clip from that, he said basically it just got harder to get a job as a teacher in APS. He noted that being able to read, write and speak proper English would now be a requirement.

Of course I can’t find it on the WWW (or I’d link to it now). This process of reapplying, a *writing prompt,* and allowing principals to interview and select – rather than just redistributing the teachers, seems to support that. Our general assembly called this year for an end to last-in, first-out on teacher RIFs; that system, used in several systems in recent years, would mean that this year’s APS hires, no matter their quality, would lose their jobs.

Sounds like Davis is following through on a pledge to better educate APS students to me..

MB

April 18th, 2012
6:12 pm

Oh, and the deadline for contracts is now May 15fh, by state law waiver, through 2015. http://www.legis.ga.gov/Legislation/20112012/109203.pdf

justbrowsing

April 18th, 2012
6:15 pm

I am just curious- do they not consider seniority when dealing with displacement? What is seniority for? Is seniority not going to be considered in this case? I feel bad for teachers with 27 years of SERVICE who have to apply for their jobs when cheaper options are competing against them.- this is not the private sector where years often equate to financial reward and promotion- this is a service oriented occupation.

the good doctor

April 18th, 2012
6:20 pm

We do the same thing in our county, in that, students at in the threhold grades, do their retakes (of the CRCT) before they leave school for the summer… no big deal

Jordan Kohanim

April 18th, 2012
6:33 pm

Mary Elizabeth– beautifully said. I agree completely.

Mary Elizabeth

April 18th, 2012
7:16 pm

Thank you, Jordan. It is rewarding to know that others agree.

There are those ideologues of wealth and power in our nation who have been, for decades, stealthily and consciously manipulating the public – both through legislation (ALEC) and propaganda – to change the ordered balance of power between the public and private sectors (where each has its proper place in our nation’s functioning) to a predominately private sector controlled nation.

I believe that their achieving their end will do our nation much harm. I believe that the ordered balance between the public and private sectors needs to be maintained. Those of us who see the service value to others of the public sector must continue to speak up in its behalf and explain its merits to others. We do not have wealth or power at our command, as do those leaders of the private sector corporations and institutions, but we do have our voices, our insights, and our commitment to this nation’s continuation as one designed with a “government of, by, and for the people.” We must continue to educate the public as to the value of the government in their lives, especially when the government, itself, is balanced through the system of check-and-balances as designed by our forefathers, and especially when our government sees itself as primarily as one that is service oriented for the people.

Beverly Fraud

April 18th, 2012
7:19 pm

Is it getting to the point that indicating a desire to teach might actually show up under DSM-IV criteria as being pathologically insane?

To Mary Elizabeth

April 18th, 2012
7:49 pm

ME you asked “Do we want to create an America in which the public sector is made more like the private sector, with its survival-of-the-fittest mentality.”
My answer?
Absolutely yes!
There aren’t enough good teachers like you, Mary Elizabeth.
As one poster above said, we should give them an oral test as well as a written test.
We have too many deadbeats in the system that need to be fired.
Bring on the reduction in force. I’m all for it. It looks like the only way to get rid of the idiots who “aks” questions.

Lee

April 18th, 2012
7:52 pm

Oh good grief, making teachers reapply for their jobs due to school closings is to make it easy for the administration to let folks go. APS probably already knows who they will keep and who they will let go. What this “reapply for jobs” scenario does is to keep the administrator from having to call someone in their office and tell them they are being terminated. Most likely, they will get a form letter informing them they were not one of the “lucky ones” chosen for the few positions available.

BTW, they exercise this ploy in the private sector all the time.

Jordan Kohanim

April 18th, 2012
8:41 pm

Mary Elizabeth,

What you say is absolutely true. Sadly, I fear there is little hope in keeping public education out of the hands of privatization. As my friend Larkin said, “Education is the last great social service.” She’s right, and as such, education suffers from a paralyzingly litigious, overly-entertained, anti-intellectual shift in society. This shift sees little value in the long term investment that true learning (not just data-driven “education”) provides for society.

It is scary, but more than that it is sad.

It seems many of us (sometimes myself included) have resorted to fatalism and gallows humor.

@justbrowsing

April 18th, 2012
8:48 pm

“I feel bad for teachers with 27 years of SERVICE who have to apply for their jobs when cheaper options are competing against them.- this is not the private sector where years often equate to financial reward and promotion”

This doesn’t make any sense. Either teachers are paid more just for seniority (without any regard specifically to whether they are actually better teachers), or they’re not. If they aren’t paid more, then there will be no incentive to lay them off. If they are paid more, “then this is not the private sector where years often equate to financial reward” is a false statement. Which is it?

dontyouwanttoknow

April 18th, 2012
9:16 pm

APS is paying for summer school this year. However, it will not be for remediation. It’s for students to preview the common core standards.

Concerned

April 18th, 2012
9:44 pm

The concern here is the fairness factor. Why are the teachers at closed and merged school shouldering the burden of the district? If the district has too many teachers then ALL teachers should reapply for the available positions. It seems as if these teacher at these schools are just unlucky in the fact their schools were selected and approved for closure, not due to underperformance of teaching ability. There are great teachers that are in jeopardy of losing their jobs and poor teachers at other schools (even in the northern schools) that have a job without making any positive impact on student achievement simply because they are a school not slated to close. Sad

Ron F.

April 18th, 2012
9:48 pm

“education suffers from a paralyzingly litigious, overly-entertained, anti-intellectual shift in society. This shift sees little value in the long term investment that true learning (not just data-driven “education”) provides for society. ”

@Jordan: I agree completely!! My school and system are becoming ever more data driven and less concerned with individual needs. I take the “data” and then work with individual kids to figure out what their needs truly are. It’s amazing how out of fashion that is becoming. It’s all about groups lumped together by data and interventions planned for those groups without any understanding of individual needs- needs which can often be met easily with the right tools and the right understanding of what a child knows and needs. I’m with you in believing that in the end, it’s really more about dumbing down the population than about helping them build individual skills, talents, and thinking.

Concerned

April 18th, 2012
10:00 pm

The district seems to be tackling too much at once. Rather than focusing on the major issues and building a strong foundation focused on instruction, the focus appears to be on developing programs that have not brought much value to students. Limited resources, disconnected staff and stretched teachers are asked to go above and beyond with the no pay increase in over three years. In addition it appears that our new leader only believes the north Atlanta and Grady school clusters are the only successful schools. This shows arrogance and a total disconnect from the student in Atlanta.

Mary Elizabeth

April 19th, 2012
12:09 am

“Sadly, I fear there is little hope in keeping public education out of the hands of privatization. As my friend Larkin said, ‘Education is the last great social service.’ ”
====================================================

Jordan, this is why education, in general, and teachers, specifically, have been the last concentrated targets of those ideological business magnates who seek to turn education into a business enterprise in which they will be able reap additional financial gains through personal investments in privatized education (and perpetuate their ideological propaganda on the young).

Children for profit. Teachers as commodities. We must not give up in our hope that this will not happen. Education that is a public service and, thus, is not for profit is the better delivery approach to ensure that depth of learning is provided, which brings wisdom and insight, to America’s citizens. Certainly, not all public school teachers are excellent in their jobs but they can be improved, and public education, improved, is so much better for our young than education as a business for profit.