Next year, parents on their own in transporting kids who transferred under No Child

A DeKalb reader sent me a note about local school districts no longer having to provide transportation for AYP transfer students next year. The reader said: “I think this will lead to a lot of angst, especially in DeKalb, where we had hundreds of transfer students.”

I agree.

Here is the letter from DeKalb County schools to parents, explaining the change:

As of June 30, 2012, there will no longer be a Public School Choice (ESEA Choice) transfer option under ESEA as reauthorized under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001  and the DeKalb County School District will no longer be required to implement ESEA Choice or pay for ESEC Choice transportation as implemented under the ESEA.

This change will go into effect for the 2012-2013 school year. All currently authorized travel reimbursements will continue to be processed through the end of the 2011-2012 school year.

Any student that has previously transferred to another school by exercising ESEA Choice must be allowed to attend that school until he or she completes the school’s highest grade; however the DeKalb County School District is no longer required to pay for the student’s transportation cost during the duration of the student’s attendance at the current ESEA Choice School.

If your student intends to remain at his/her current ESEA Choice School for the 2012-2013 school year, please notify your current school’s principal no later than Monday, April 16, 2012. This will allow the schools time to plan for the next year. Thank you.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

110 comments Add your comment

yes i am worried

April 14th, 2012
6:49 am

The transfer policy under NCLB was flawed from the beginning. A school could end up on Needs Improvement because of the performance of one subgroup, say students with disabilities, and the entire student body was able to transfer. In most cases, these students were leaving a Title 1 school for a non-title 1 school where virtually no services exist. If a student needs remediation in a DeKalb high school, they are much less likely to get those services at a school that isn’t Title 1. We have at least two high schools where more students who live in the attendance zone have transferred out than now attend the school.

The money can now be used to provide better and more services at the failing schools.

In DeKalb, since M to M transfer began, there has been the believe that African American students are better educated anywhere but in their S. DeKalb schools. Take a look at the recent graduation rates of Lakeside and Druid Hills as compared to Miller Grove and Redan and ask yourself if any evidence to that exists.

d

April 14th, 2012
6:52 am

I think too often parents were jumping ship rather than taking the time necessary to invest in their children and their schools. The whole “school is failing” mantra is the problem. The school is just a reflection of the community it serves. If the community doesn’t care and support the school and the students in the school, the students are the ones who suffer. Schools that have strong parental and community involvement thrive and don’t have the problems. Students who have involved parents thrive regardless of the school, but could do better if the whole community is involved. This allows for more programs, more support for the students who need it, and a better overall feeling in the building.

I think back to when I was in high school in Gwinnett County. My school was trying to build a stadium so we did not have to play home games at the neighboring high school. We came together as a community and raised the funds to build it. When there was a student with a serious health issue – the whole community came together in support. That’s what makes a school great and, in turn, the students successful.

NBCT

April 14th, 2012
8:10 am

I am very happy that this part of ESEA-NCLB is being chipped away. It was a problem from the start and, IMO, yet another attempt to destroy public education by those who want such a thing.

carlosgvv

April 14th, 2012
8:30 am

For those of you who actually believ the recession is over, with teachers and police officers still being laid off and with this bus service being cancelled, it’s not.

teacher&mom

April 14th, 2012
8:37 am

One of the criticisms of charter schools and vouchers is the lack of transportation. Isn’t this an example of school choice in action? Proponents of charters say lack of transportation will not be a problem. Parents will eagerly transport their student to a school of their choice.

It will be interesting to see how this plays out.

catlady

April 14th, 2012
8:49 am

Ms. Downey, can you look into this: I was told by a school system employee that the system has to provide transportation for a student who has become homeless and now lives in another county. So, if a Gwinnett system student becomes homeless and ends up in Cobb County, the system has to pick them up and return them home each day to Cobb County. I am not sure if this is only for sped students, or if it applies to everyone. The cost must be tremendous.

senseandsensibility

April 14th, 2012
9:07 am

well if there so upset then maybe they can use some of that energy to make their home school better. Instead of whining and complaining how things are unfair maybe they should work to change the home school. Students at failing schools are failing because their parents have failed them and possibly the school. Transfer students come to school unprepared for the rigors of a passing school. It takes alot of energy and time to bring these students up to par with the passing school. This is ridiculous. Fight for your home school and make it a passing school. If you want to go someplace else well then you provide the transportation. Use the transportation money then to pay teachers more or provide for after school tutorials or supplies, whatever it takes.

Libby

April 14th, 2012
9:17 am

NCLB and AYP were awful. School cannot control some students’ attendance, no matter how hard it tries. Subgroups involving mentally handicapped should never be used as an indicator. The best of the best can teach those children, with very little possibility of a CRCT score that meets the passing level.

Suzette

April 14th, 2012
9:20 am

If a child is homeless transportation must be provided, even across district lines. Adequate and fair resources must be given to every school. I graduated from an inner city neighborhood school. I did not realize until I went to college the resources that my school lacked. Students there had done labs that I had never done. It was not the fault of my teachers, We did not have the lab equipment. Our library (we did not have e book then) did not have the same magnitude of books. Our music department did not contain the same options.
Many students in my freshman classes had taken reading classes at their school. We did not have a reading class either for advanced students or those needing help. All schools need resources to support students, It is not just the academic classes but also career tech and the arts.
I read during the summer. I took Saturday and summer enrichment classes. My parents and siblings did everything they could to enhance my learning. I had many good teachers. The lack of resources in my school did hurt. If all schools were given equal resources, I think that not as many parents would want to transfer,

A Conservative Voice

April 14th, 2012
9:20 am

Folks, I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again…….”discontinue the whole student transportation system in DeKalb County”, or require the parents whose children use the system to pay their fair share of the cost of keeping the system. BUDGET BALANCED…….no need to thank me…..I don’t really need it :)

Solutions

April 14th, 2012
9:32 am

Going to better schools will not help students with average or lower IQ’s, it will just damage the better schools. Once again I must call for IQ appropriate education, the best and brightest must be challenged in the classroom with difficult subjects, advanced math and physics comes to mind. It is not the average and lower IQ people who will determine our future, it is the top 5%, educate them well, and all else will fall into place. The average and lower IQ people need better education in ethics, morality, and their social duties. They should learn to read, write, and compute at a level that will be required of them in their normal average lives. I urge the reintroduction of the McGuffey Readers in grades 1-6 at least.

Dunwoody Mom

April 14th, 2012
9:40 am

DCSD spends approximately $6 million or so on AYP Transfers, so this is money that can be put back into the classrooms. Also, DCSD needs to end transportation for Magnet programs as well. If you want your child to attend a “choice school” outside of your attendance zone, that’s fine. It should be the parents responsibility to provide the transportation to said school.

Homeschooler

April 14th, 2012
9:42 am

@ Catlady..I met lady Thursday who was temporarily staying in a hotel. Her 10 yr old was being transported across the county to her home school. The school was providing transportation. I had never heard of that. I don’t know the answer to your question but there is some truth to what you heard. Now, this was all within the same county so I don’t know about crossing county lines.

@senseandsensibility.. I’ll start by saying that I agree that parents should provide their own transportation. The strong republican in me says “if you want it done, do it yourself”. However, if I may play devils advocate for a minute…

I have seen parents who have kids in failing schools who are desperate to do better for their kids. I’m not talking about a middle class mom who happens to live in a “bad” area who just can’t afford private school so she takes advantage of the school transporting her child across town. I’m talking about the 8 dollar an hour Burger King employee who takes the bus to work. She started having kids at 15, is doing better than her peers because she’s not on welfare and has somewhere along the road realized what could REALLY make a difference. She’s thinking, if my child could go to JJ Daniel Middle school instead of Lindley, THAT would make a difference. She has no money, no skills, a crappy job and she knows this is not how she wants her her child to live. She does not like the high statistics of her child dropping out if he continues to attend Lindley or Pebblebrook. She knows that the probability that he will use drugs is greater if he is surrounded by people who do. This person is not in a position to “change” her home school. She is just trying to save her family one generation at a time.

Working for DFCS I saw a few moms like this. I know, only a few, but I was always so incredibly impressed that they were trying so hard. Same with the lower class, poverty moms and dads who send their kids to the Charter schools in Cobb. No, the schools are not great but they are better than the home schools. The fact that these parents understand that it is their responsibility to do better for their kids makes them top notch parents in my eyes.

Now back to the question. Many would argue (not necessarily me) that it is not fair that this woman, who is trying so hard to make a difference for her child, could not benefit from school of choice because she can not transport her child but the middle class stay at home mom with a minivan and all day to tote her kid across town can. Is that not the same argument people have against charter schools?

Maybe the answer is to do away with school of choice all together. Don’t know. I do believe that additional money should not be spent to transport these kids. Not with the price of gas and not with the talk of laying off 200 teachers.

Anonmom

April 14th, 2012
9:43 am

I know many will throw stones but in actuality, many folks were “gaming” the transportation option — they were running “shuttles” and transporting groups of students cross county while each student collected the monthly transportation stipends that could be around $500 a child. The “driver” would collect the cost of the transportation and everyone but the taxpayer came out ahead. Others collected the stipend (again, around $500 a child a month) and took Marta for much less. There has been no “check” to see if what was being “paid” by the taxpayer has been solely reimbursement for “actual” outlay of expenditure for the costs of atending a school on the other side of a very large county. There are very large groups of students waiting for rides at the corners of the “receiving” schools in my neighborhood. Additionally, the transferring kids are the subgroups that failed in the schools that they transferred into and there has been no “check” for success once they arrived and the numbers seem to show that the program has not worked, academically at least, on the whole. This isn’t to say that there isn’t a benefit to those transferring in as there has never been any study (that I’m aware of anyway) as to why the kids really transfer and the “scuttlebutt” is that it is more for safety than for academics and this is never really addressed by the system.

Beverly Fraud

April 14th, 2012
9:49 am

No money to transport a child to a decent school, but money for $2100 office chairs. Yes we are learning (thanks to Mary Elizabeth and others) about some of the more sinister aspects of ALEC, but can you not see why “choice advocates” wouldn’t make a deal with LUCIFER HIMSELF if it would help dismantle the death grip bureaucracy has on public school education?

Anonmom

April 14th, 2012
9:50 am

If the county would try to fully understand why the kids are transferring and if the reason really is safety or, another reason I have heard expressed often is that that “my child is ridiclued for wanting to learn in my community” (e.g. the black kid needs to be with more white or asian kids in order to feel comfortable in a community that values learning or doesn’t mock learning) than the answer is for the system to do a much better job in the home schools of providing safe environments and cracking down on any bullying but especially bullying associated with a ‘desire to learn”. Perhaps those of you in that “community” can comment on thes… I come from community with 4000 years that highly values education and this has never been an issue. I don’t know how you go about changing a culture that seems to “diss” learning — so those that want their children out of the culture, have been using the transfer option to escape the culure rather than trying an “all out attack” to change the culture itself. For a brutal reminder of just how bad it can get we can pause for a moment and remember Jaheem Herrara.

yes i am worried

April 14th, 2012
10:01 am

For those talking about homeless children, those requirements are set up by the federal government and there is some reimbursement. However, as of a few years ago, DCSS (D?) was doing a really crummy job of tracking these students and thus, missing out on the reimbursement.

Thank you Cynthia McKinney

April 14th, 2012
10:03 am

Catlady, etc.;

McKinney–Vento Homeless Assistance Act:

Notice cut-and-paste-
…….Following the Illinois statute, the McKinney-Vento Act also ensures homeless children transportation to and from school free of charge, allowing children to attend their school of origin (last school enrolled or the school they attended when they first become homeless) regardless of what district the family resides in. It further requires schools to register homeless children even if they lack normally required documents, such as immunization records or proof of residence……

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McKinney%E2%80%93Vento_Homeless_Assistance_Act

Ron F.

April 14th, 2012
10:22 am

“The school is just a reflection of the community it serves.”

Which is exactly why any reform movement currently on the table will not, in the long run, improve the overall outcomes. The same kids still have to be educated, and until we can somehow bring about a change in the communities, then all we’ll be doing in throwing money at a problem and not really solving it (much like we’re doing now).

Dr. John Trotter

April 14th, 2012
10:30 am

@ Ron F.: Sounds like we are singing from the same hymnal. Actually, we don’t even need to use a hymnal on such logic, right? You guys have a good weekend!

Ernest

April 14th, 2012
10:31 am

I have to agree with yes i am worried’s statement from 6:49 am. This was a flawed policy in the NCLB legislation. If the intent was to help those in the impacted subgroup, those should have been the only students allowed to transfer. At the end, more students probably leveraged AYP transfers per year than those that took advantage of M to M transfers, especially students outside of the impacted subgroups.

Legislation exists in GA that allows parents to move their students to other schools in that district, space permitting. HB 251 was sponsored by State Rep. Alisha Thomas Morgan of Cobb County back in 2009. The key was that parents were required to provide transportation. I am concerned about parents such as those described by Homeschooler that realize later in life education is the pathway to better opportunities.

Sadly I must admit that a ‘culture’ was created in DeKalb where parents expected the school district to transport their children outside of their home school zone. Hopefully energies can be channeled into improving all home schools. I believe the keys are strong parental/community involvement, fair but firm discipline policies, strong school leadership with motivated, highly qualified teachers and having a ‘high expectations’ attitude throughout each school.

teachertoo

April 14th, 2012
10:38 am

We are seriously overcrowded at our school due to transfer request students. These children rarely participate in afterschool programs, the parents are not active in PTA, and our car-riders take up an entire hallway. Not allowing transfers is the way to go, the out of district students are also chronically tardy. Community schools help everybody, when love and pride grow, nothing but good comes from it.

@ Catlady

April 14th, 2012
10:42 am

Catlady,
It’s called the McKinney Act.

Interesting Observation

April 14th, 2012
11:15 am

carlosgvv

April 14th, 2012
8:30 am

and time after time Mr. Obama called on Congress to throw a lifeline to local communities to help them keep teachers and firefighters on the job, and the tea party said not know but hell know.

Interesting Observation

April 14th, 2012
11:24 am

Anonmom

April 14th, 2012
9:50 am

I agree, and as a black man I say without apology we spend more time in church hollering and praising the lord among other spectacles and propping up bishops like Long etc. while our communities fall apart. There are more churches per capita in the black community than any other community. We may not make to it PTA, but we waste no time to hear bishop speak. Shameful absolutely shameful.

Interesting Observation

April 14th, 2012
11:27 am

How in the hell did I type know for no? shameful absolutely shameful … a senior moment, perhaps?

Parent

April 14th, 2012
11:39 am

Sometimes a group of parents do try to repair a community school but they don’t want it fixed in just the long run. They want to see results NOW, not next year when test scores are reported to show how last years kids did. And these are the parents or community members with time to help. But the school just wants to keep on cruising towards retirement or promotion. No waves, just calm seas. Maybe not a great opportunity to challenge children but everyone keeps their job. No pressure on the un-involved parent, after all they sent the child to school prepared to learn and that was all they really needed to do. No pressure on the teachers to step up their game. They work long hard hours just producing the minimum, to ask more is unfair considering the salary they receive. No pressure on the principal, most of the kids are promoting, most of the kids are staying out of trouble, most of the parents are not complaining, most of the teachers come to work every day. Easy for the regional superintendent to manage. AVERAGE. Now who really wants the basic average Georgia education for their child? Parents want GREAT. If they try for great at the local school and no one complains about CHANGE then great it works out. Reality shows that CHANGE is hard and even a little push back from the school or community will cause parents to look for a better short term fix. The easiest short term change is to move to a better school.

In my opinion the worst schools are the mediocre ones. A bad school gets the attention it deserves and parents know not to send a child there. A great school has what all their children need – a safe opportunity to acquire an exceptional education. The middling school is just coasting along glad that no one notices what a marginal education they provide. Adults earn a salary, some kids graduate and some don’t but enough do that scores stay average.

Ashley

April 14th, 2012
11:50 am

@Interesting Observation……As a black woman I totally agree with you , some of these black communities may not have adequate schools, but the opulences and money spent on these churches and con men like Eddie Long is astounding and ridiculous. Your message is not lost on me or the many who agree with you.

Uh

April 14th, 2012
12:02 pm

That McKinney wasn’t Cynthia. Did you read the article you posted?

Ron F.

April 14th, 2012
12:14 pm

Ashley: Perhaps if the community called upon its leaders in the church to help push change and become true community leaders, we might see something begin to happen. For a while, my system had a group made of up church and business leaders who met with the superintendent often to discuss how to get important information out via the churches and businesses in town. I think it helped. The fact that the church is such a focus and involves so many is a great attribute. Now members have to call upon those church pastors to step up and help get the word out.

Chris Murphy

April 14th, 2012
12:15 pm

@Parent: I agree, but with APS, a caveat: even the worst schools’ staffs get to coast to retirement.

Ole Guy

April 14th, 2012
1:31 pm

To all of you who thought that the Boy Bush could actually do anything right (ala NCLB)…

Tony

April 14th, 2012
1:53 pm

The transfer policy under NCLB was one of many ridiculous components. The cost to implement transportation for the transfer students was only ONE factor, but it was basically an unfunded mandate. For those of you who expect school systems to use their resources conservatively, you should be happy this has gone away. I am.

There were other costs in implementing the transfers, too. Some of these costs were not necessarily financial, but the disruptions caused by the logistics of running buses across counties for the transfer students was a nightmare. Wasteful in both time and money.

To some extent, I am in agreement with school choice policies that allow parents to pick a child’s school. I am not in agreement with any policy that erodes the budget resources of our already tapped out finances in order to carry out choice policies. This includes the upcoming referendum on charter schools.

As for the homeless children’s transportation, I have mixed feelings about it. The federal law that requires this also provides funding for its execution. I don’t think it is appropriate to fund cross-county transfers. At some point, economical solutions should be part of the package. Unfortunately, the feds seldom include this kind of thinking in their rules and regulations.

Hey Teacher

April 14th, 2012
2:15 pm

My understanding is that the McKinney act is intended to be a short-term solution so that homeless students stay in school. In my district they follow those students very carefully to make sure that the student is indeed homeless and not just trying to stay in our district. Not every district does this though — it requires a lot of effort to follow up.

Ned Ed

April 14th, 2012
2:51 pm

Since part of the topic is why students from some attendance zones want to attend other schools, I thought I would offer the following. I am a DeKalb teacher who teaches in one of the “northern” schools but who lives in the south end of the county. I hold degrees from elite institutions, teach AP courses and am highly regarded by students, parents and peers. I would prefer to teach closer to home, cutting down on my commute. But the abusive treatment to which teachers are subjected at the “southern” schools keeps me from transferring.

Everyone needs to understand something: one of the biggest problems in DeKalb schools are the terrible principals, with their bogus degrees from diploma mills, their poor command of the English language, their lack of personal integrity, their overblown egos and their delight in intimidating subordinates. These people don’t know what good teaching looks like because they’ve never experienced it. They attended sub-par primary schools, sub-par secondary schools and sub-par colleges and universities. Since they are incapable of identifying effective instruction, they place their emphasis on such factors as whether word walls follow official county guidelines and bulletin boards are organized correctly. They are bullies and they are morons. I am so grateful to teach at a school where the principals value quality of instruction and allow their teachers to teach. There’s a reason why we keep sending graduates to schools such as Duke, Cornell, MIT, North Carolina, Virginia, and the University of Chicago.

As I say, I would prefer to take my expertise to the south side. But unless something is done about the abusive principals there, I’m going to stay where I am.

yes i am worried

April 14th, 2012
4:13 pm

Ned has it right. (Though there are plenty of crummy principals on the North side and I am sure there are some good ones in S. DeKalb.) DCSS has a leadership dearth. On top of that, we have board members (hello, you know who you are) who have historically meddled in the day to day operation of both the system and individual schools. These board members want certain people as principal and under Dr. Lewis, they generally got what they wanted.

On top of this, I would argue that not enough S. DeKalb parents really understand what a good school looks like, how good principals manage and how good teachers teach. Crawford Lewis took advantage of this (as did Dr. Halford) and really made a mess of things.

It is so sad really.

Thank you Cynthia McKinney

April 14th, 2012
4:56 pm

Enter your comments here

Thank you Cynthia McKinney

April 14th, 2012
4:59 pm

Uh – yes, I read it, but too fast…shame on me…. you’re right. She co-sponsored something relative….I knew she was connected, : )

http://archives.allthingscynthiamckinney.com/mckinney.house.gov/women.htm

…..Violence against women remains a major issue in our society that requires legislation and social programs for education, counseling and support for shelters to protect battered women. I co-sponsored H.R. 3171, to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act of 2005, and amends numerous related acts including the McKinney-Vento Homelessness Assistance Act and the Battered Immigrant Women Protection Act of 2000. H.R. 3171 would reauthorize, revise and establish various programs for prevention of violence against women, including domestic violence, child abuse, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking…….

Humbly…….

Jayne

April 14th, 2012
5:20 pm

This is just another way to maintain the status quo of failing public schools.

ABC

April 14th, 2012
5:36 pm

Oh yeah you got problems. *eye roll*

This is just another fail on the part of NCLB. It’s a failed system. I hope they get rid of it once and for all. Do you know what happened when no child was left behind? No child got ahead.

Provide your own transportation or focus on improving your own school.

Two Cents

April 14th, 2012
5:37 pm

Bring All schools up to standard; not just the high rent schools; and parents get involved and support the teachers more and this problem won’t exist.

Finally

April 14th, 2012
7:09 pm

Dear Parents,
Start taking “real: responsibity” for your children,Schools transport your children to and from school, we feed the students both breakfast and lunch, we educate, we have social workers, psychologists, nurses and the list is never ending. If you want your child to go to another school, other than those in your district, you have two solutions: a.) relocate to the area with which you want your child to be educated or b.) drive your child to school and pick up you child from your “Choice” school. The “free ride” is over, literally.

Jennifer

April 14th, 2012
9:07 pm

That is not the parent letter I saw from DeKalb. The one I saw talks about the ability to transfer a child regardless of where they attend based on the Public School Choice legislation. Interesting.

Finally

April 14th, 2012
9:19 pm

CHOICE IS DEAD ALONG WITH NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND

The whole story...

April 14th, 2012
10:08 pm

Here’s the text of the whole letter that I received. Maureen must have received an edited copy.

In November 2011, the Georgia Department of Education, submitted to the United States Department of Education, a waiver requesting flexibility of ten Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) requirements and their associated, regulatory, administrative, and reporting requirements. One of the ten requested waivers directly affects the ESEA Choice transportation.

This letter is to inform you that as of June 30, 2012, there will no longer be a Public School Choice (ESEA Choice) transfer option under ESEA as reauthorized under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), and the DeKalb County School District (DCSD) will no longer be required to implement ESEA Choice or pay for ESEA Choice transportation as implemented under the ESEA. This change will go into effect for the 2012-2013 school year. All currently authorized travel reimbursements will continue to be processed through the end of the 2011-2012 school year.

Any student that has previously transferred to another school by exercising ESEA Choice must be allowed to attend that school until he or she completes the school’s highest grade; however, the DeKalb County School District is no longer required to pay for the student’s transportation cost during the duration of the student’s attendance at the current ESEA Choice school.

Parents will still have a Choice transfer option under House Bill 251: The Quality Basic Education Act; Intra-District School Choice. If you have additional questions or concerns regarding Georgia’s House Bill 251 option, please contact: Pat Copeland, Director of School Choice, at 678-676-0035 or pat_copeland@fc.dekalb.k12.ga.us.

If you intend for your student to remain at his/her current ESEA Choice school for the 2012-2013 school year, please notify your current school’s principal no later than Friday, April 27, 2012. This will allow the schools time to plan for next year.

Thank you

The whole story...

April 14th, 2012
10:12 pm

I’m sorry. The date at the bottom of my letter is Monday, April 16th. I was looking at something in my office & typed the wrong date. My apologies.

Dunwoody Mom

April 14th, 2012
10:21 pm

School choice is not “dead”. School choice is now governed by state legislation referred to as “HB 251″.

catlady

April 14th, 2012
10:46 pm

I know someone in school transportation and Gwinnett picks up and returns kids to counties completely across the metro area–several counties away–whose families have become homeless. While I feel horrified at the idea of being homeless, how sensible is it to transport kids like this? Not only is there the cost, but also the risk of accident. If a child is living in another county, they should go to school there, it seems to me, until such time, whenever that is, when/if their parents are able to find affordable housing in their former home county.

catlady

April 14th, 2012
10:50 pm

ABC-”Do you know what happened when no child was left behind? No child got ahead.” You are mostly on target with this. The only group I see not suffering are the gifted, at least in my area. The rest of the kids (sped, ESOL) get “served” by push in (doing a disservice to them and the other kids as well). The gifted still get pulled out to their own special place with their own teacher dedicated solely to their needs.

Fred ™

April 14th, 2012
11:08 pm

What a diabolically Republican way to gut NCLB, itself a Republican program. Yes I know Dekalb is strongly a Democratic party County, but the unfunded mandated was forced on us by Brother George Herbert Walker Bush. Since the State and Federal Gov’t (republican controlled) have cut unnecessary expenditures, such as educating our children, this is to be expected.

I will still drive my child to Woodward Academy every day though. Aren’t I an “elitist.” Should I feel so smug.

I don’t. I’m disgusted. We now leave children who have no cash in crappy schools because republicans want to make sure the richest of the rich can provide jobs to slaves in China while they increase their personal wealth. how nice.