Bill Gates: Shame won’t lead to improved teaching

Many posters to this blog resent the growing influence of Bill Gates on U.S. education policy, but I think a lot of them will agree with a New York Times op-ed Gates wrote deploring the release of teacher effectiveness ratings in New York on Friday.

Georgia is moving to teacher effectiveness ratings as part of its Race-to-the-Top-driven overhaul of how it evaluates educators. A new teacher evaluation system  — in which student scores will be considered for those content areas where testing exists  — is being piloted now in the 26 participating districts. Whether those ratings will eventually be released to the public is uncertain at this point and may fall to the Legislature to decide.  Or, as in New York, it may be a court that rules the ratings must be released.

(The Times had a good second-day follow to its news account of Friday’s release of teacher ratings in New York City. The story spotlighted some of the teachers who received the very top ratings. You can read that piece here.)

Here is an excerpt of the Gates’ column:

Value-added ratings are one important piece of a complete personnel system. But student test scores alone aren’t a sensitive enough measure to gauge effective teaching, nor are they diagnostic enough to identify areas of improvement. Teaching is multifaceted, complex work. A reliable evaluation system must incorporate other measures of effectiveness, like students’ feedback about their teachers and classroom observations by highly trained peer evaluators and principals.

Putting sophisticated personnel systems in place is going to take a serious commitment. Those who believe we can do it on the cheap — by doing things like making individual teachers’ performance reports public — are underestimating the level of resources needed to spur real improvement.

At Microsoft, we created a rigorous personnel system, but we would never have thought about using employee evaluations to embarrass people, much less publish them in a newspaper. A good personnel system encourages employees and managers to work together to set clear, achievable goals. Annual reviews are a diagnostic tool to help employees reflect on their performance, get honest feedback and create a plan for improvement. Many other businesses and public sector employers embrace this approach, and that’s where the focus should be in education: school leaders and teachers working together to get better.

Developing a systematic way to help teachers get better is the most powerful idea in education today. The surest way to weaken it is to twist it into a capricious exercise in public shaming. Let’s focus on creating a personnel system that truly helps teachers improve.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

56 comments Add your comment

Jeff

February 27th, 2012
1:59 am

I am pleased you think so. It’s all about doing what works, after all.

Pink

February 27th, 2012
2:24 am

So Bill thinks you can run a government institution the way you run a business. A ha hahahahaha He’s so cute. I guess he’s never heard of bureaucracy.

Dr. Craig Spinks/Georgians for Educational Excellence

February 27th, 2012
2:35 am

Without any disrespect to Mr. Gates, he should superintend a public school system for at least three years before he removes the “Shame” arrow from the public school superintendent’s quiver.

Posting Ratings is Ok

February 27th, 2012
4:23 am

This tax payer and parent champions the posting of the ratings. I think we need to go further and create and post ratings for all government employees including teachers, administrators, every politician, firemen, policemen, sanitation workers and so on. Teachers and other government employyes need to understand woho they work for — WE the citizens and WE the tax payers.
Good Mother

Shame Will Lead to Improved Teaching

February 27th, 2012
4:34 am

Shame will lead to improved teaching because those who are at the bottom will leave — they will either leave because they are ashamed or because they are pushed out. Either way, students and parents win.
They days of government employees having a job for life regardless of performance are over. Even postal workers are getting pink slips.
This wretched economy has one bright side — it allows us to separate the wheat from the chaf. It allows the government to be picky in terms of who they hire and who they choose to keep on the payroll. When schools can afford to be choosey they will choose the best and the brightest because parents like me will and do demand it. Those good teachers (and there are many) will not tolerate n’er do wells in their ranks and will lobby just as hard as I do to get rid of government employees who are incompetent or worse.
Shame leads to improvement in all alreas, not just the school system. shame a politician with pictures of his mistress and he will leave politics — John Edwards, Gary Hart, and others.
Good Mother

Question for Maureen

February 27th, 2012
5:19 am

Maureen,
Is there any way you or another reporter for the AJC could give the public an update on how this new teacher evaluation system is going in the 26 school districts that are piloting it this year? I would like to know when and if it is going to roll out to the rest of the state and hear what the teachers say about it in general. Thanks.

patrick crabtree

February 27th, 2012
5:58 am

Why all of a sudden a shift? He gave millions to these people/organizations to become bullies with threats of fear, job loss, and intimidations using as the vehicle, Effective Teacher in Every Classroom. He gave millions to ‘Small Learning Communities’ that turned out to be a dismal failure, and all that money to promote charters, where 83% fall far short of the public schools. Why doesn’t he ask teachers IN THE CLASSROOM? He could save millions and really do some good.

I want a response from ALL of AJC readers, Please! Here is the question: Would you want your job performance rankings, comparing you to your other co-workers? Would you want your performance score posted in the newspaper? If yes tell me why, if no, then tell me why and is it fair that teachers have theirs posted in the paper?

Maureen, post your evaluation and how many readers and paper sales you are actually responsible increasing. How about every news reporter, Jaime Sarrio, Christina Torres? (Not really, just making a point)

Has he had an epiphany? Is he trying to undo the lives he ruined by supporting directly or indirectly dictators like Beverly Hall and Michelle Rhee? What’s the lowdown, Bill? @Dr. The real ’shame’ should go to the school boards and supers, not the teachers.

Peter Smagorinsky

February 27th, 2012
6:17 am

His rhetoric and actions, like those of Arne Duncan, need better alignment. Duncan always talks about attracting the best and the brightest, while instituting policies that drive off creative people. Gates talks about respecting teachers, while saying that class size of 40+ is just as effective as class size of 20 because the test scores are about the same. I don’t think he’s ever spent his weekends grading papers, the way English teachers do, and finding that reading and responding to 40 papers in ways that improve student writing is no different from evaluating 20. When he understands what teachers actually do, maybe that would be a step toward respecting them. But till then, he’s doing far more harm to teachers and students than he is helping them or earning them greater respect.

catlady

February 27th, 2012
6:57 am

As long as the pressure is ever on the TEACHER to “improve”, we won’t see much on these evaluations using STUDENT data. Everyone has to have some serious skin in the game, and right now we are basing teacher accomplishment on what others decide to show on a particular day.

Sorry, Bill, you lost all credence years ago. Go make an app for that.

14 year teacher

February 27th, 2012
7:37 am

In my experience, bad teachers have no shame so that won’t work with them anyway. All it will do it make good teachers more paranoid and stressed out, leading to quicker burnout of these effective professionals. If you include student feedback, you don’t need to worry about releasing it to the public- that “useful” information is already on ratemyteachers.com.

thomas

February 27th, 2012
7:58 am

We need to separate teacher assessment and teacher evaluation. Assessment can be done on a single set of criteria for all teachers. However, evaluation should consider different circumstances – if a first year teacher is still struggling with classroom management, that may be perfectly ok and grant him/her the valuation, “meeting standards” (for the beginning teachers). However, if a 10th year teacher is still struggling with classroom management (ever since his/her first year), then that is not “acceptable.” Assessment should include details analysis of the teacher’s work. An evaluation should be based on the assessment, but consider the teacher’s situational setting.

Adam Smith

February 27th, 2012
8:22 am

Peter @ 6:17

Not just anyone can or should be a teacher.

Perhaps you have never held a real non-union job where job performance ratings and raises are common knowledge. The best employees are coveted and rewarded. The worst eventually go elsewhere. It is called ‘Efficient Allocation of Resources’. Perhaps you should read up on it.

ut96

February 27th, 2012
8:23 am

What about accountability on the student’s part. It is very presumptious on Gates part to assume “the students” will actually make an effort on a standardized test given by the government; unless, there are consequences geared to the students for not trying. Effective teaching is just one part of the equation. There has to be some culpability on students and parents part. It is too easy to blame teachers for all of the ills in our education system.

Mary Elizabeth

February 27th, 2012
8:31 am

I posted the following words last evening at 12:36 am on the previous thread. I am reposting my words here because, although I addressed Michelle Rhee’s approach to educational improvement in Washington, DC schools, the thoughts I shared last evening are relevant to this thread, also.

=================================================================

“@Brandy, 9:43 pm

From the NY Times article you linked, p. 2:

‘The Atlanta and Washington situations are similar in several ways. Ms.(Michelle) Rhee and Beverly Hall, the former Atlanta superintendent, both relied on fear to motivate, relentlessly driving their work forces. Dr. Hall told principals that if scores didn’t go up enough in three years, they’d be fired. Ms. Rhee bragged about how hard she pushed. ‘We want educators to feel the pressure,’ she said.’

============================================================

‘. . .both relied on fear to motivate. . .’

This is the polar opposite approach needed to motivate teachers and students. Creating a school environment of fear and intimidation is not productive for teachers, nor for students.

Test scores should be used primarily for diagnostic purposes to target and enhance instruction for the benefit of students. The purpose of the data should be enlightenment, not punishment.

If test data is used to assess teachers and schools, then that data must also contain knowledge of student potential, as indicated on IQ tests, to be fair, valid, and complete. Test score data, if used for teacher evaluations, should only be one of many factors with which to assess teacher competency. Test data should not be used for heavy-handed intimidation, but as an aid for improvement. Fear inhibits. Education should be about growth, not fear. To enhance growth, teachers and students must exist, together, in a relaxed environment, in which excellence, and respect, are valued.”

============================================================

A final thought: Only in America, with its long-standing Puritan roots, which still affect the thinking of many today, would shame be considered an effective method to foster improvement within any arena. We must evolve past this limited way of perceiving how to relate to others. A “shame” approach stands inherently in opposition to the egalitarian spirit upon which America was founded.

To Patrick Crabtree

February 27th, 2012
8:43 am

You asked “I want a response from ALL of AJC readers, Please! Here is the question: Would you want your job performance rankings, comparing you to your other co-workers? Would you want your performance score posted in the newspaper? If yes tell me why, if no, then tell me why and is it fair that teachers have theirs posted in the paper?”

I want ALL government employees to be rated and have their ratings posted on the Internet and in newspapers because all government employees work for WE tax payers. WE have a right to know. Just as private companies have a right to know how their employees are doing — tax payers and citizens have a right to know what they are getting with their money.

I mean the sanitation worker who throws my garbage can in the yard or fails to pick up the waste. We already watch our politicians at work — with live video of what goes on in the Senate and house. We know what they voted for and against and how many days they were in the office. We absolutely should be able to rate policemen and firemen. We already post the crime statistics in the areas and I can read all the crime that goes on all around the city and tehe city’s crime statistics I can see. So YES we should rate ALL government employees and publish it everywhere. If you are uncomfortable with that, you shouldn’t be a public servant…go work in the private sector where there is zero tenure and rarely a pension and you can be fired for no reason at all.
You make your choice,Patrick, when you choose your profession. If you choose to be a politician, you choose to have your private life scrutinized. If you chosoe to be a public servant, be prepared to have your professional performance evaluated and published.
Good Mother

Atlanta Mom

February 27th, 2012
8:44 am

Why any intelligent person would take a job for which evaluations are published in a newspaper is beyond me.

Atlanta Mom

February 27th, 2012
8:46 am

My comment was directed towards people thinking about entering the teaching field, not the people currently employed as teachers.

To ut96

February 27th, 2012
8:47 am

ut96, you ask a fair question, which bears repeating “What about accountability on the student’s part?”

Students are children.

They do not have the same standards as we adults. You cannot expect a child to behave with the same level of maturity as an adult because their frontal cortex (that portion of the brain that controls and processes that type of information) is not fully formed until much later — in the 20s.

Children will and do screw up. They are allowed. That’s why they need we adults to guide them. They need increasing levels of responsibility but are not to be held accountable as an adult is because they cannot possibly do that.

Good Mother

Tony

February 27th, 2012
9:02 am

Teaching and learning requires a lot of trust between the partners – parents, students, teachers. The partnerships will not be improved by using faulty labels like “teacher effectiveness ratings” because these labels are derived from information that is not within the control of the teachers. It is futile to spend precious resources chasing after this elusive and preposterous pipedream.

Parents and teachers who work together will create the best opportunities for the children. Let’s stop the blame game and begin the real work.

ut96

February 27th, 2012
9:09 am

Good Mother, I don’t disagree with anything you said; however, my point was primarily dealing with using test scores as part of an evaluation process. One can be an effective teacher and still have students perform poorly on standardized testing due to lack of effort or some other factor. Also, what if a teacher teaches in a school where environmental factors come into play. As someone pointed above, testing use should be used for diagnostic purposes only.

thomas

February 27th, 2012
9:20 am

@ good mother and others,

Ranking will always result in some people being “at the bottom” – there is no Lake Wabegon (sp?).

Public workers, although they are public servants, ARE also tax payers.

Measurement experts will tell you that any measurement instrument (including student achievement tests) should be used to measure what it was designed to measure. No standardized tests was designed to measure teacher performance, therefore, it is not an appropriate measuring tool. At best, it is a very crude and unreliable proxy.

An app for that

February 27th, 2012
9:31 am

Catlady, you have the wrong IT guru. It is APPLE who has an “app for that” and Apple is Apple, recently run and headed by Steve Jobs NOT Bill Gates. Bill Gates is Microsoft.

GM

AlreadySheared

February 27th, 2012
9:31 am

Hey Maureen,
I used to be able to skip GM’s comments by ignoring anything posted under his/her name. Seems GM has figured out people are doing this, started posting under varying names like “To Patrick Crabtree”, and then only signing his/her username at the end of a long … written comment.

“Name” is required, yes? Please help.

To Thomas

February 27th, 2012
9:40 am

Thomas you write “Ranking will always result in some people being “at the bottom” – there is no Lake Wabegon (sp?)”

Every student at Woodward Academy graduated and was accepted into a premier institution. I am sure that there are those who graduated at the bottom of Woodward Academy and there are those who graduated at the bottom of every class of Harvard university BUT any graduate who is listed at the bottom of any graduating class of Harvard or Woodward is far more respected than someone who graduated at the top of his or her class at Jackson High School or FAMU.

If a teacher is ranked at the bottom of a high achieving school where students are appreciated and parents are respected and real education takes place, then being the bottom of that barrel is no shame at all.

Top of the class at Jackson High School or bottom of the class at Woodward? Which one gets into a great college?

Bottom of the list as a teacher at Woodward Academy or top of the list as a teacher at Parks? What do you think?

GM

AlreadySheared

February 27th, 2012
9:41 am

BTW,
Mr. Gates’ comments above are spot on and completely correct. We will not be able to ‘purge’ our way to a better public education system.

Indeed, it’s ironic that an institution whose sole purpose is educating ALL of its student clients would end up throwing some of its employees under the bus in lieu of training and improving THEM.

To Already Sheared from Good Mother

February 27th, 2012
9:45 am

If you don’t want to read my posts, just look at the bottom of the post to determine if I wrote it…and you do realize, don’t you, that I don’t have to sign my posts at all?
What your beef really is, Already Sheared is that I am not a teacher who blindly defends other teachers. Get Schooled is not a blog for teachers to complain and whine. If you want to do that, go elsewhere. Get Schooled is for everyone who wants to discuss education. If you don’t like the free press, create your own website and create your own credentials that allow only posts from disgruntled teachers.
GM

To Already Sheared from Good Mother

February 27th, 2012
9:50 am

You make an interesting comment about teachersm who need improvement. You write “Indeed, it’s ironic that an institution whose sole purpose is educating ALL of its student clients would end up throwing some of its employees under the bus in lieu of training and improving THEM.”

Students are immature and are not adults. They have no work experience and have very little education. They cannot be judged by the same standards as we haev for adults.

teachers are supposed to know how to teach BEFORE they enter the classroom as a teacher. That is what an EDUCATION degree is supposed to teach you and every teacher is supposed to have student teaching before they become a teacher. In other words, we don’t provide on the job training for teachers. Teachers are supposed to show up to work KNOWING how to teach. That is what that education degree is supposed to indicate. If you want a job that provides on the job training you’ll have to choose a different one that pays very little. McDonalds has on teh job training for $7.25 an hour. No pension. No benefits. Limited hours.
Wal-Mart also has some on the job training positions. They also start at $7.25 an hour, have little benefits and limited hours…but

….if you want to be paid as a professional you must act like a professional and know how to do your job before you get paid to do your job.

GM

AlreadySheared

February 27th, 2012
9:52 am

@GM
See, if you put “from Good Mother” or some such as part of your posting name, that works fine.

A common courtesy observed by every other participant on this blog.

irisheyes

February 27th, 2012
9:53 am

It bears repeating one more time, because some people on here are slow learners.

THERE ARE NO TEACHERS UNIONS IN GEORGIA. PAGE AND GAE ONLY FUNCTION AS PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS. They lobby on behalf of teachers at the Capitol, since we can’t since we’re teaching all day, and they offer advice and representation if a teacher is sued or unfairly dismissed. THEY DO NOT NEGOTIATE CONTRACTS, SALARIES, OR WORKING CONDITIONS.

Thanks! Now back to your regular programming of ranting about how horrible the teachers in Georgia are. :)

AlreadySheared

February 27th, 2012
10:31 am

@GM:
(I’m so stupid … can’t believe I am doing this … can’t help it..)

You assert
“If you want a job that provides on the job training you’ll have to choose a different one that pays very little ….
if you want to be paid as a professional you must act like a professional and know how to do your job before you get paid to do your job”

Seriously? This is your deep understanding of how to build a great institution with world-class employees – people show up, do what they already know how to do, and get paid without learning new skills or improving?

So over at Mr. Gates’ Microsoft, people walk in the door and hit the ground running, so to speak. 5, 10 years later, if they are still at Microsoft they continue to do the same stuff with the same skillset they arrived with because they are professionals and Microsoft has NO interest in training them, improving them, or nurturing their talents.

Honestly, ill-informed, shrill, one-notedly mean-spirited and bizarre analysis like the above is why I really would prefer to see “GM” or some such up front.

Saves me time.

GM...really? Get your facts straight...

February 27th, 2012
11:00 am

To Already Sheared from Good Mother
GM @ 9:50 am

“teachers are supposed to know how to teach BEFORE they enter the classroom as a teacher. That is what an EDUCATION degree is supposed to teach you and every teacher is supposed to have student teaching before they become a teacher. In other words, we don’t provide on the job training for teachers. Teachers are supposed to show up to work KNOWING how to teach. That is what that education degree is supposed to indicate.”

It would be nice IF that were true, but it isn’t. Colleges of Education are woefully behind in preparing those in the college of education in all of the things they need to understand in order to teach. For instance, a great deal of time is spent in child psycholgy, but the pedagogy that is addressed is usually about 10 years behind in current teaching practices as the professors have been out of the classroom for that long. Additionally, basic skills such as classroom management are not addressed. Also, teachers do not receive any form of education in basic school law which may have a big impact on how they conduct their classes.

As a result, new teachers are arriving in the classroom woefully unprepared. They are not used to the current practices of Learning Focused, Read 180, or what have you. They meet students who are unmotivated for whatever reason and do not have a ready made bag of tricks to motivate that student. Furthermore, they now are told that they have to “differentiate” their instruction at least 10 different ways in one class which means making 10 different plans.

To GM

February 27th, 2012
11:01 am

You may want to check your spelling and grammar before ranting about education and “bad” and “disgruntled” teachers. Or, will you simply blame that, as well, on “bad” teachers?

thomas

February 27th, 2012
11:02 am

@ good mother,

You write:
===
If a teacher is ranked at the bottom of a high achieving school where students are appreciated and parents are respected and real education takes place, then being the bottom of that barrel is no shame at all.
===
Why shouldn’t they be? You can’t even teach those great students – maybe your students aren’t getting “real education” – just enough education to get by when your students have so much more potential.

You also wrote,
===
Top of the class at Jackson High School or bottom of the class at Woodward? Which one gets into a great college?
===
Never know.

===
Bottom of the list as a teacher at Woodward Academy or top of the list as a teacher at Parks? What do you think?
===
The data (ranking) are totally inconclusive – useless.

To GM

February 27th, 2012
11:09 am

Teachers do not expect on the job training, they are required to constantly get it in order to renew their certification with the State Board of Professional Standards. In addition, the constant professional development that they go through allows them to improve their abilities and grow within their profession, as it would with any profession. You should do a little research on what you are ranting about before you begin your rants.

thomas

February 27th, 2012
11:26 am

@ good mother and whoever that responded to her,

According to a post, good mother said, “teachers are supposed to know how to teach BEFORE they enter the classroom as a teacher. That is what an EDUCATION degree is supposed to teach you and every teacher is supposed to have student teaching before they become a teacher. In other words, we don’t provide on the job training for teachers. Teachers are supposed to show up to work KNOWING how to teach. That is what that education degree is supposed to indicate.”

A teacher education program – usual colleges of education or TFA “summer institute” – only prepares the first year teacher. They know something, but they don’t know many things. Getting a teaching certificate is just like getting a driver’s license by going through a driving school. You have enough knowledge and skills not to be dangers for other publics. However, you are definitely not ready to drive in Daytona 500. We expect too much from first year teachers – and we are expecting too much from colleges of education.

HS Public Teacher

February 27th, 2012
11:33 am

I will champion the posting of teacher ratings….. as long as they:

1. are fair
2. are quantitative and not qualitative (no “opinion” but rather just the facts)
3. don’t include input from a minor or from anyone who’s brain is not fully developed

Won’t anyone ask at least these 3 things?

Frankie

February 27th, 2012
12:00 pm

And who is going to do these evaluations….the bad administrators who have never taught in a class room, the bad teacher who left teaching to become an administrator…or the good teacher whose objectivity is to keep others below her/him…

@GM…show me your evaluation and I will show you mine..

All evaluations are not equal in fact they are very subjective,…and if my bosses wife refused to pleasure him the night before, that could reflect on my evaluation….

Or here you go…let the computer evaluate our teachers and adminstrators for that matter…lets not just relegate this to teachers…adminsitrators

Frankie

February 27th, 2012
12:06 pm

if you include government, then you need to include the contrators they employ…hell I think I can start my own evaluation business..thanks fo rthe great idea….

efavorite

February 27th, 2012
12:06 pm

Bill Gates has NOT had an epiphany.

He doesn’t want to stop using Value-added scores to rate teachers, he just doesn’t want them to be PUBLISHED, because he realizes that then everyone will be able to see how unreliable they are and how unfair it is to use them against teachers.

Ron F.

February 27th, 2012
12:13 pm

“Shame will lead to improved teaching because those who are at the bottom will leave — they will either leave because they are ashamed or because they are pushed out. Either way, students and parents win.”

Really? What about those of us who choose to work with kids who struggle to learn? I teach at-risk kids all day, and my scores on standardized tests will naturally stink. I see kids 2 years below grade level and worse. If I leave because of the test scores, who takes over? Kids will never be 100% on grade level, and we need more, not fewer, teachers who are willing to work with the kids at the bottom. I do, I LOVE it, and can’t imagine leaving just because their scores on a test at a grade level they’re not ready for yet are low. How do parents and students win then?

Ed Johnson

February 27th, 2012
12:23 pm

@patrick crabtree and @Peter Smagorinsky,

Thanks to both of you for saving me the trouble.

I simply add, check out Gates’ involvement with ALEC…

http://www.gatesfoundation.org/Grants-2011/Pages/American-Legislative-Exchange-Council-OPP1044898.aspx

Brandy

February 27th, 2012
12:55 pm

@Good Mother and anyone else who is championing shame…

Please reread the article from the New York Times in regards to the formula this evaluation system uses. It is designed to ALWAYS have 5% at the very top and at the very bottom. Get rid of the current bottom 5%, next year there will just be a new bottom 5%. Eventually, the current top 5% would become the bottom 5%. It is conceivable that you would eventually run out of teachers completely using such a system.

“In New York City, a curve dictated that each year 50 percent of teachers were ranked “average,” 20 percent each “above average” and “below average,” and 5 percent each “high” and “low.” Teachers received separate reports for math and English. Principals also received a general report placing teachers’ names in a graphic according to their performance rankings.” (New York Times 2012)
http://www.nytimes.com/schoolbook/2012/02/24/teacher-data-reports-are-released/?ref=education

Please, also consider that the rankings are not based upon a direct examination of student test scores. Rather, they are based upon a computer system’s predictions of future student performance. It is conceivable that a computer could get things wrong:
“The rankings are also known as value-added assessments. In simple terms, value-added models use mathematical formulas to look at the past and forecast the future. A computer predicts how a group of students will do in next year’s tests using their scores from the previous year and accounting for several factors, like race, gender and income level. If the students surpass the expectations, their teacher is ranked at the top of the scale — “above average” or “high” under different models used in New York City. If they fall short, the teacher receives a rating of “below average” or “low.”” (New York Times 2012)
http://www.nytimes.com/schoolbook/2012/02/24/teacher-data-reports-are-released/?ref=education

Jonathan

February 27th, 2012
1:16 pm

For all the talk about this data that was released, I couldn’t find it. Finally found this: http://teachrate.com. Anyone else find anything?

Beverly Fraud

February 27th, 2012
1:20 pm

Will shame lead to improved teaching? It’s a question, that’s for sure.

But here’s the question we DARE not ask:

Will improved teacher lead to improved learning, IF we don’t give teachers the AUTHORITY to hold students accountable for academic work AND behavior?

THAT’S what we need to address, but we seem to be willing to address everything BUT that.

“Hey teacher sorry I’m late. I know, three DAYS late. But I robbed 4 old ladies, went on a 48 hour crystal meth binge, collected 4 DUI’s in 3 stolen cars, and redefined the term ’scourge of the community.’ What do I get, teacher?”

Well…according to POLICY, you get a 50! 5 points higher than me by the way, because it’s MY fault your binge dropped “my” test scores.

Jonathan

February 27th, 2012
3:01 pm

Here’s the only place with the data http://teachrate.com

catlady

February 27th, 2012
3:40 pm

GM, you mean Microsoft doesn’t have apps? I thought they had a word processing app, a spreadsheet app, etc.

MikeyD

February 27th, 2012
3:44 pm

When will people learn not to feed the “Good Mother” troll.
He/she is just a loser with a wifi connection who enjoys getting a reaction out of folks.
If every single poster here would just completely and totally ignore him/her, then before you know it he/she would go elsewhere. It’s the cycle of losers without lives.

Dr. Craig Spinks/Georgians for Educational Excellence

February 27th, 2012
3:46 pm

(P)atrick,

Shame can be an effective tool for motivating folks at any level of an educational organization. As a matter of fact, off the top of my head, I can think of several local superintendents and other high-level educrats of whose commissions and omissions they should be ashamed. And we concerned teachers and other citizens shouldn’t be reticent about disseminating information about such shameful commissions and omissions.

Joy in Teaching

February 27th, 2012
3:48 pm

Let me get this straight. Bill Gates and his ilk want the following:

* Students cannot be held accountable (or shamed) for their behavior or actions (per parents and administrators)

* Some parents cannot be shamed into providing for their children, making sure that they come to school well rested, fed, and with materials.

* Politicians can’t be shamed (run out of office) for underfunding education and using millions of that money for the failed Go Fish project.

* School administrators cannot be shamed even if they speak out of both sides of their mouths, fail to back up teachers, and fail to enforce discipline?

* Teachers CAN be publically shamed for not being able to take what they are given (students, supplies, paperwork) and not being able to turn them around?

Is there some reason why only teachers are being held accountable in education?

Patrick Crabtree

February 27th, 2012
4:50 pm

@to to Patrick Crabtree. Please give me your employer, I want to know how you do. What is good for government worker are good for private companies as well. @ DR. S, shame didn’t work for Hall, Augustine, or Cotman but they used it on us. I am so glad you have such esteem. For many who find fault often do not look in the miorror. I know I have shortcommings, but I cannot help what students I am delivered. What would you do if you were a fruit peddler and a bad batch of fruits were delivered to you? Would you like to be evaluated on that batch or send it back? Well we can’t send our batch of students back. We work with them. Is that fair I get ranked because what was delivered? As for Woodward, there are failures there, too. Don’t get me started on ‘elitest’ schools.