More Georgia students taking AP classes and passing exams

Here is some good news about Georgia and how well our high school student are doing on the AP exams and how many are now taking them. This is from DOE:

Georgia ranks 13th in the nation in the percentage of seniors scoring a 3 or higher on Advanced Placement exams, according to The College Board’s AP Report to the Nation released today. This report measures progress of the class of 2011.

“More Georgia students than ever before are taking AP courses and passing the exam,” said State School Superintendent John Barge. “Success on AP exams means that students are prepared for college and careers, which is our ultimate goal.”

Governor Nathan Deal added, “Our state’s excellent performance on AP exams demonstrates our success in cultivating excellence. With hard work and perseverance, young Georgians have the tools to achieve their dreams. Students who earn passing grades on Advanced Placement tests get a jump start on college and, in the long run, they help the state. These students represent the ‘best and brightest’ and are the future economic engines of Georgia. They also save our colleges and universities money by earning class credits.”

Advanced Placement classes and exams are administered by the College Board, which also administers the SAT. AP classes offer rigorous college-level learning options to students in high school. Students who receive a 3, 4 or 5 on AP exams may receive college credit.

The AP Report to the Nation looks at data for 2011 high school seniors. Among Georgia’s public high school seniors in 2011:

• There has been a steady increase in the number of Georgia’s public school students benefitting from the AP experience:

- 19.8 percent (16,476) of students from Georgia’s public high school class of 2011 scored 3 or higher on at least one AP exam during high school (ranking Georgia 13th in the nation), compared to 18.1 percent for the nation.

- 38.2 percent (31,764) of students from Georgia’s public high school class of 2011 took at least one AP exam during high school, compared to 26.0 percent (19,492) from the class of 2006 and 19.7 percent (12,332) from the class of 2001.

- Georgia is 12th in the nation when comparing the ten-year increase of seniors scoring a 3 or higher on at least one AP exam (9% growth compared to 7.3% for the nation).

- The number of African American graduates who took at least one AP exam during high school nearly doubled since the class of 2006, from 3,940 to 7,878. The number of these students who scored 3 or higher on at least one AP exam more than doubled, from 1,004 to 2,076.

- 12.6 percent (2,076) of African American students from Georgia’s public high school class of 2011 scored 3 or higher on at least one AP exam during high school (ranking Georgia 2nd in the nation), compared to 4.1 percent for the nation.

• More of Georgia’s traditionally underserved public high school graduates are participating and succeeding in AP.

- The number of low-income graduates who took at least one AP exam during high school nearly quadrupled, from 1,905 in the class of 2006 to 7,260 in the class of 2011. The number of these students who scored 3 or higher on at least one AP exam increased five times from 509 to 2,546.

- The number of Hispanic/Latino graduates who took at least one AP exam during high school nearly tripled since the class of 2006, from 778 to 2,247 in the class of 2011. The number of these students who scored 3 or higher on at least one AP exam more than doubled during that time, from 492 to 1,245.

- 7.1 percent of Georgia’s graduating class of 2011 was Hispanic/Latino, and 7.6 percent of successful AP exam takers from the 2011 graduating class were Hispanic/Latino. Georgia has achieved 100 percent AP equity and excellence for the Hispanic/Latino students.

• The 10 most popular AP exams taken by Georgia public high school graduates during high school, in descending order of popularity, were U.S. History, English Language and Composition, English Literature and Composition, World History, Psychology, U.S. Government and Politics, Calculus AB, Statistics, Biology and Macroeconomics.

When it comes to public school students enrolling in AP courses and taking the exams, Georgia is also a national leader. Only five other states in the country had a greater percentage of AP exam takers last year. The percentage of Georgia seniors who took an AP exam was 38.2%, compared to 30.2% for the nation.

Georgia has undertaken many successful efforts to increase participation in AP programs and success on AP exams. Among the initiatives:

From 2003-2010, the Georgia Legislature approved funds to pay for students to take at least one AP exam per year. For those seven years, economically disadvantaged students had all of their AP exams paid for each year. Budget cuts reduced that support to only one AP exam for economically-disadvantaged students in May 2011 and that support remains in place for the May 2012 exams.

The Georgia Department of Education has organized the distribution of AP Teacher Training Grants. Since 2006, GaDOE has funded approximately $1,302,693.00 in grant awards to train 1,837 new AP teachers. These awards have allowed 899 new AP courses to be offered in public high schools throughout the state. It is anticipated that in 2012 an additional 100 AP teachers will be trained.

The GaDOE has sponsored regional workshops for teachers of AP for the past four years. These workshops are led by master teachers of AP in Georgia high schools. To date, over 2,426 AP teachers have participated in these course-specific workshops.

The Georgia Virtual Schools (GAVS) continues to add AP classes, increasing access to students throughout the state, including those that might not otherwise be able to take an AP class. More than 1,300 students took an AP course with GAVS for the 2011-12 school year.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

65 comments Add your comment

me

February 8th, 2012
11:25 am

But but we are always the worst!

GA education is in last place

GA teachers are idiots. Right?

Right?

Dunwoody Mom

February 8th, 2012
11:34 am

I just went through the college admission process for my oldest child. It was an eye-opener as to how many colleges really want to see those AP classes. Students will not get into UGA or Tech without them from what I could see.

Pluto

February 8th, 2012
11:45 am

Why do we celebrate achievement and then seek to punish the achievers in our society?

Shar

February 8th, 2012
11:59 am

I wonder how the new HOPE GPA requirements will affect students’ willingness to risk a GPA hit to take a more challenging class.

Rick in Grayson

February 8th, 2012
12:13 pm

I would be surprised that a “3″ on an AP course would/should qualify for college credit. Does a “3″ mean mastery of the class or just getting by?

Dunwoody Mom

February 8th, 2012
12:20 pm

AP Exam scores are reported on a 5-point scale as follows:

5 Extremely well qualified*
4 Well qualified*
3 Qualified*
2 Possibly qualified*
1 No recommendation**

East Cobb Parent

February 8th, 2012
12:34 pm

Most colleges I spoke to do not take a 3, even if you score a 4 or 5 they don’t always give college credit.

guest

February 8th, 2012
12:39 pm

Pluto,

Well said. Poor kids, they don’t know they’re working so hard to provide for those that didn’t take AP classes.

Henry

February 8th, 2012
12:39 pm

From 2003-2010, the Georgia Legislature approved funds to pay for students to take at least one AP exam per year. For those seven years, economically disadvantaged students had all of their AP exams paid for each year. Budget cuts reduced that support to only one AP exam for economically-disadvantaged students in May 2011 and that support remains in place for the May 2012 exams.

When something seems to be working in K-12 public education in Georgia, what happens? The funding for it gets cut.

MiltonMan

February 8th, 2012
12:44 pm

Not sure where you are getting the information on a “3″ being accepted toward college credit. They was not the case a couple of years ago at least at both UGA & Ga Tech

Also, the state politicians want a piece of the pie in taking credit for this “success” yet at the same time they are enterntaining the possibility of income caps on HOPE.

Yes. Let’s penalize those evil rich students in out best schools in East Cobb & North Fulton even though they are the best students in this state.

HS Public Teacher

February 8th, 2012
12:47 pm

Along with the College Board AP scale, in general a 3 or higher is considered a “passing” grade for the AP test.

No college or university is required to accept the AP test results. It is entirely by choice of that institution to determine their own policy regarding which AP tests they accept and also which cut score they accept.

Parents and students should check the college board web site to see if their college of choice will take the AP credit (which course), and also what that college AP cut score is accpetable.

HS Public Teacher

February 8th, 2012
12:48 pm

Will Georgia teachers be given any credit at all for this improvement. If History tells us anything, then the answer is no.

Sad. Very sad.

KMHSmom

February 8th, 2012
12:51 pm

$87 for 3-8 hours of college credit is a bargain. Some colleges are more generous with giving credit, some are less, but either way, the AP class on the high school transcript is a valuable thing in the admissions process. The HOPE GPA calculation needs to be changed to give +0.5 bonus for an “A” in an AP class. Right now, you get +0.5 bonus only if you make a “B” or less – how asinine is that?

Digger

February 8th, 2012
12:53 pm

Most GA teachers think Calculus is a rapper.

Maureen Downey

February 8th, 2012
12:55 pm

Milton, Not so. You can look here at UGA’s list:
http://www.reg.uga.edu/creditFromTesting/advancedPlacement/uga_ap_credit_equivalencies

A 3 in an AP exam gives you credit in many course, including biology, chemistry, Chinese, computer science, economics, English, French, geography and more.

Maureen

Scott

February 8th, 2012
12:59 pm

A lot of spin on the numbers here. Anyone else notice that out of over 31,000 AP test takers in Georgia, almost half scored (over 15,000) scored no higher than 2 on any AP test? For Georgia, only 51.87% of test takers have ever passed an AP test. From the college board site, I see that nationwide 540,619 out of 903,630 have scored at least a 3 or higher… 59.82%.

Participation is good, but if our passing results trail the nation by almost 8%… what exactly are we bragging about here?

Scott

February 8th, 2012
1:03 pm

oops… please mentally remove the extra “scored” in my previous post…

I am also using the convention that 3 or high is a “passing grade” though it may not be enough for college credit in all cases. (Former AP teacher here, FYI.)

Dunwoody Mom

February 8th, 2012
1:03 pm

Each university offers their own credit (or not) for AP Exam scores and this information is usually posted on the school’s admission website. While GT does not offer credit for scores lower than a ‘4′, UGA does for certain AP exams. Georgia Southern does gives credit for some ‘3′ exam scores – all depends on the University/college.

Dunwoody Mom

February 8th, 2012
1:06 pm

@KMHSmom….a .5 is given for an “A” in an AP class.

Dr. Craig Spinks/Georgians for Educational Excellence

February 8th, 2012
1:07 pm

KUDOS to our state’s students who accepted and met the academic challenge afforded by Advanced Placement courses.

Georgians for Educational Excellence salutes these young scholars.

Gtech

February 8th, 2012
1:11 pm

Getting a 3 won’t cut it at Tech. You need 4’s and 5’s, with the exception of one Music Theory course.

http://www.catalog.gatech.edu/students/ugrad/geninfo/advplacement.php

Scott

February 8th, 2012
1:13 pm

Here’s the link to the full report: http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/public/pdf/ap/rtn/AP-Report-to-the-Nation.pdf

Focus your attention on page 15, which displays the percent of test takes who score 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5. As you can see, only about 15 states have more failures than Georgia, making us 35th out of 50 states.

The other data, which is cited by the DOE, is skewed by participation levels. But this is highly misleading, like saying a 6 out of 12 free throw shooter is better than one who made 4 out of 5 shots. But the first shot only 50%, the latter 80%. Just because you try more often doesn’t mean you are learning better than other states.

But of course, AP promotes participation levels… as more test takers is more business for them. Don’t get me wrong, I think AP is great. But lets focus on real statistics, not fluff.

irisheyes

February 8th, 2012
1:13 pm

Once again, some people have to find the black cloud behind every silver lining. That shows that no matter what we do, they’ll never be happy.

Scott

February 8th, 2012
1:14 pm

“test takers” – sorry for the typos today

Shar

February 8th, 2012
1:22 pm

AP points very roughly correlate with letter grades, although the percentage of students making the higher numbers is smaller than most ‘A’ pools and the percentage of lower numbers correspondingly higher.

My youngest took 10 AP classes and did very well on all of the exams. However, she got very little direction on which to take, either from me or her counselor, with an eye toward what her requirements would be in college given the credits she was awarded. In hindsight, for example, she very much wishes she had taken AP chem and regular physics instead of the other way around, as a general chemistry credit would have permitted her to take organic chem earlier. As organic is a gateway class for almost every science major (and at present she’s hoping to finish a genetics major along with English and economics), having it out of the way a year earlier would have allowed her to get into upper level science classes in biology, chemistry and even some physics sooner.

I regret to say that I never thought of those considerations while she was in high school, and neither did her teachers. UGA is very generous in accepting AP credit, much more so than most of the other colleges to which she applied, but from the perspective of college we both wish we’d been a little more forward-thinking in choosing which APs she took.

A word to the wise. Which I wasn’t.

Ron F.

February 8th, 2012
1:23 pm

Milton Man: when you guys get your Milton county out there and everyone wants to move there for your great schools, what will you do to “approve” them so you don’t ruin your schools? I remember when Sandy Springs and Roswell were THE places to live and the schools were great. I remember when Dekalb county was THE place to be. Of course, that was before white flight kicked in. I remember when the almighty Alpharetta was a little hicktown in the country and the kids were dirt farmers. Your schools are great because of the economic affluence of your population. I grew up and graduated from a south Fulton school that was old, constantly in need of something updated, and actually made it to college and graduated with honors. So did a lot of my friends, and we knew the south county schools got short shrift so the precious schools up north could have new building with the latest everything. Nobody’s trying to punish you. We just wish you’d quit running away and stay with us so we could all work together to have great schools where we are now. You’re running out of places to run!

Fred

February 8th, 2012
1:28 pm

@Dunwoody Mom
Hope gives .5 for other AP Grades, but not for As.

High School Parent

February 8th, 2012
1:28 pm

Dunwoody Mom, the HOPE does not give .5 for an “A” in an AP course and I agree with the other poster that this is ridiculous. Go to “MY HOPE GPA” section of the College 411 website. I just printed out my child’s HOPE GPA last night.

HOPE also does not give weighted credit for taking a college course even though the student is subject to the often more rigorous college grading procedures.

WAR

February 8th, 2012
1:29 pm

good job georgia teachers and students!

Just How Many

February 8th, 2012
1:31 pm

I think this statement needs to be qualified “More Georgia students than ever before are taking AP courses and passing the exam,” said State School Superintendent John Barge. “Success on AP exams means that students are prepared for college and careers, which is our ultimate goal.”

More students than ever before…could mean.

Ten students took the AP test before and now we have 15.

Or it could mean 10,000 students took the test before and now 50,000 are taking it.

Maureen, will you please find out just how many students in GA are taking the test and how many are not taking it?

The students in my high school who took the ACT made an average score of 30 on the ACT, which is phenomenal….and could be touted as a real progress for that poor school unti l you realize that only three of us took the ACT out of 150 who graduated high school….out of a class that started out as 400 students.

My freshman class was 400 students. 250 dropped out of high school before they graduated. About ten of us went to college and three of us actually graduated — and one transferred in from a Northern school. Out of the two kids who actually graduated from college, from a class of 400…there were only two of us who were from the area.

So “more than ever before” needs to be qualified. How many out of how many are taking the test? Out of those who took the test, how many didn’t pass?

I am always suspicious when any politician spouts figures.

Dunwoody Mom

February 8th, 2012
1:33 pm

Dunwoody Mom, the HOPE does not give .5 for an “A” in an AP course

Well, they did for my child..Hopefully, we are talking an unweighted “A”, right? From GA411…

Re-weight AP/IB- This is the weight added back to the converted 4.0 grade if the course
is an AP/IB course. If the AP or IB course ended before June 15, 2006, 1.0 is added to
the converted 4.0 grade, not to exceed 4.0. If the AP or IB course ended on or after June
15, 2006, 0.5 is added to the converted 4.0 grade.

Dunwoody Mom

February 8th, 2012
1:36 pm

Okay, never mind…I was wrong. Her report shows a .5 added for AP/IB, but the Grade remained at 4.0.

Dunwoody Mom

February 8th, 2012
1:37 pm

And now I agree that is wrong….

Shar

February 8th, 2012
1:37 pm

Fred and High School Parent are correct. HOPE does not give extra GPA points for As in AP classes, which made the difference between my daughter getting the Zell Miller scholarship and “HOPE Light”. If they’d allowed that extra 0.5, she would have cruised. She graduated in 2010, however, so we didn’t anticipate the changes and had her take the difficult classes she wanted instead of the less challenging ones that would inflate the GPA.

Old Physics Teacher

February 8th, 2012
1:38 pm

Maureen,
You are right. The student DOES get credit for the course. HOWEVER, the department chair, who controls whether or not you get your major on your diploma, makes the final decision whether or not you have to re-take the course. It’s not so cut and dried. In the sciences you can get a one semester credit for a non-science major (3), a one semester credit for a science-major (4), or credit for both semesters (5). You then have to take additional courses BASED on your knowledge of those freshmen courses. A five, while quite an accomplishment, does not mean you know, in depth, the subject matter.

As someone once said, an “A” does not mean you know everything you need to know. All it means is that you know everything the teacher asked on that particular subject on that particular day

The real advantage of the AP Courses are that it weeds out the unwilling and if you have a good teacher, it weeds out the unqualified. It tells the admission officer about the drive of the applicant – something far more predictable to college work than a high-stakes test score.

the prof

February 8th, 2012
1:42 pm

Also, beware of 3’s in major’s. Note that UGA’s 3 acceptance in biology is for a “non-major’s” bio course. This will help those non-bio major’s, but it takes a 4 or 5 to get credit for a major’s course.

MiltonMan

February 8th, 2012
1:54 pm

Ron F. I am not running out of places to run pal. My youngest will be finishing high school this year & has already been accepted to an Ivy league school on a Merit based scholarship. I can guarantee you that I attended a much worse high school in Alabama than you but I knew early on that I was going to succeed only with hard work.

You sound like you suffer from wealth envy

MiltonMan

February 8th, 2012
1:58 pm

Thanks Maureen for the clarification. I can tell you though my son who is now in the dental program at MCOG did not receive credit at UGA for his AP Biology test exam score of 3 even though he made an A- in the course.

Jerry Eads

February 8th, 2012
2:08 pm

@Shar makes an interesting comment about students avoiding AP in order to maintain or reach a high enough GPA to qualify for HOPE. It’s these sorts of unintended consequences that those of us in the policy research biz spend our time trying to warn policymakers about. Almost always, unsuccessfully.

I’ll bet my Ph.D. that there have been, are now, and will continue to be students who will figure out the obvious and take Intramural Basketweaving as an elective rather than an AP course if the GPA is borderline for their HOPE funding. This (finding out the incidence of AP course taking by students with GPAs close to the HOPE cutoff), by the way, would be an EASY study to conduct given the data the state collects.

Gerald

February 8th, 2012
2:14 pm

Right wing conservatives:

First off, please quit trying to bring the income caps for the Hope Scholarship into this issue. They are totally separate; one has nothing to do with each other.

Second, the reason for paying for AP courses for low-income students has never been to obtain college credit for such courses. The FAR SUPERIOR way to accomplish this has always been dual enrollment where high school students can take actual college courses, which charter schools and online education now make possible on a wide scale (and it is only lack of leadership from both the political and educational communities why this has not been adopted … why every high school does not offer the option of allowing any kid with a superior academic record to take online general education type classes from junior colleges and receive high school credit and instruction assistance for them when the technology has long existed … never mind). It is also not so Georgia can compete with the AP courses of states where only a tiny number of affluent students take the test.

Instead, the purpose of the program was to increase the college graduation rates of low income and minority students by exposing them to more demanding coursework in high school. It was a way of addressing the poor quality of schools in low income and minority areas, and also of “normalizing” GPAs: an elite university would be more comfortable with the academic record of a Clayton County, DeKalb County or APS student when comparing it with a similar record of a Cobb, Gwinnett or Forsyth County student if the former had taken several AP courses and passed them.

Incidentally, THIS WAS NOT A LIBERAL PROGRAM. Instead, the liberal idea was quotas and preferences based on race and socioeconomics regardless of grades or performance on such things as AP tests. This idea was created by REPUBLICANS in California like Ward Connerly and in Florida like Jeb Bush to REPLACE quotas and preferences by working to better prepare minorities and low income people for college. I haven’t looked at the results of the measures in California and Texas, but in Florida (where I was attending college when Jeb Bush enacted One Florida to replace traditional affirmative action preferences and quotas with such ideas as increasing minority/low income participation in AP courses and such) the results have been generally regarded as positive by everyone except those at the far right and far left ends of the ideological spectrum.

Now again: I believe that the emphasis on AP courses should be sunset and replaced with one where every high school in the state allows a student with a “B” average in a college preparatory curriculum to take English, math, history, algebra etc. from junior colleges (either in person or online) in place of their junior and senior year high school courses, and that kids who are not interested in college or cannot do college work be offered similar opportunities from vocational institutions. So, I have no dog in this hunt. I am merely opposing the nonsense. The state paying for AP courses has nothing to do with RESTORING income caps on Hope Scholarship (which by the way, I oppose anyway as nothing more than a government welfare program, and I oppose the lottery that funds Hope even more so), and pretending that it is some crime for a college-bound kid in a Savannah housing project or in rural Georgia to earn a “2″ in his AP courses and therefore be less likely to flunk out of Kennesaw State or Valdosta State as a result is totally ridiculous. It is as if you folks don’t want low income kids to go to college at all. Or worse: you are totally fine with low income kids not going to college SO LONG AS IT MEANS YOUR NOT HAVING TO PAY FOR THE COLLEGE EDUCATIONS OF YOUR OWN KIDS. That is actually WORSE than economic/social Darwinism.

high school teacher

February 8th, 2012
2:28 pm

Hey Gerald, check out the Move o When Ready program, which was passed in 2009 or 2010 (can’t remember). Also, there are some colleges who will not accept dual enrollment credits from certain schools, but will accept a 4 or 5 on the AP exams. Dual enrollment is not necessarily the best route; it depends on the college.

high school teacher

February 8th, 2012
2:29 pm

…Make that Move on When Ready…

Fred

February 8th, 2012
2:38 pm

Fred

February 8th, 2012
1:28 pm

@Dunwoody Mom
Hope gives .5 for other AP Grades, but not for As.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Would you please choose another screen name? I’ve been using this one for years here at the AJC. pretty much since they first started online blogs.

carlosgvv

February 8th, 2012
3:07 pm

What’s far more likely is that teachers have just found another way to cheat.

HS Public Teacher

February 8th, 2012
3:50 pm

@carlosgvv – Really? Give me a break. There is no way to “cheat” on an AP test. Trust me. Many students have spend many hours trying to figure that one out.

The College Board creates a new test each year. No teacher in any State can see any part. The tests arrive sealed the day before the test date. Only the one designated administrator has possession. There is no answer key provided. The test is given by the one designated administrator and cannot have any connection to the specific test/class. That person immediately takes up the test when finished and seals the envelop and immedidately must mail it back to the College Board.

So your negative comment and attitude is unwarrented and unwanted.

Gerald

February 8th, 2012
3:54 pm

high school teacher:

Georgia Tech, Georgia State, GHSU and UGA will accept transfer students from junior colleges, and they allow their own students to take classes at such schools and apply them to their degrees. Therefore, they would have no basis for rejecting credits from high school students with the same grades from those same colleges. If UGA will accept a “B” in MATH 1151 (Calculus 1) from a Darton College (a junior college in Albany) from a Darton student, they have no basis for rejecting the same grade in the same course from a high school student at Monroe High School who sat in on the class, or from Carver-Columbus who took it online. If they do, then the Regents need to enter the 20th century (note that I said the 20th, not the 21st!) and mandate that they should. If private schools like Emory or Mercer or out of state schools won’t accept those credits, then that is an issue for the kids who wish to attend those schools. For such kids, AP classes would still be available, and let them pay for it with no subsidy from the state, just like kids at private/parochial schools do.

carlosgv:

“Move On When Ready” is a good step, but only a small one. The real agenda – better integrating high school and postsecondary school – needs to be pursued. The only reasons why high school and college education were not more integrated was
A) a small portion of the population went to college,
B) practical barriers such as classroom space and getting high school students into college classrooms and
C) many high school students – and their parents – prefer to use the last 2 years of high school to compile a record that gets them into elite schools like Duke and Harvard.

The modern economy means that A) is no longer a factor. Distance learning technology eliminates B), even if it does create the problem of junior colleges needing to add more adjunct faculty, but as the JUCOs would receive funding for every high school student that they enroll, that problem would be addressed also. As far as C) goes: getting Georgia public high school graduates into Vanderbilt or Stanford is not a state interest, so let those kids pay for their own AP courses, International Baccalaureate programs and whatever else they need, or simply go to private schools. (Right now, public education politics in Georgia is being held hostage by the 5% to 10% of the population that is angling to get their children into elite universities.)

The main beneficiaries of the integrated, synergistic approach between high school and postsecondary education would not be the minority of children who go to college, mind you. Instead, it would be the majority of children who do not; 70% if I am correct. They would really benefit from the ability to learn welding, auto mechanics, computer programming (college is for computer science, which is bizarre since industry requires mostly computer programmers and few computer scientists!), and vocational school level accounting/business skills while still in high school. The reason is that most kids who do not go to college also do not go to vocational school either. They leave high school with a diploma but no skills. Better integrating high school with postsecondary school would address that problem.

Of course, the affluent folks who want to continue sending their kids to UGA for free using the unreliable proceeds from a socially destructive lottery only care about their own interests, and not actual education policy.

Wait and see

February 8th, 2012
3:58 pm

@Milton man, Ivy-league educations are not as desirable as they used to be. Recruiters are looking for students with practical job skills these days: http://blogs.ajc.com/business-beat/2010/09/14/corporate-recruiters-prefer-state-universities-to-ivy-league/ . Your child would, ironically, be better off at Georgia Tech, a far better school than those Ivy Towers. Look at all those STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) schools at the top!

HS Public Teacher

February 8th, 2012
3:59 pm

How dare Deal try to take any credit at all for this success!!!!!!! If anything he (and the other state republicans) have made it more difficult for education to maintain status quo much less improve. Their continual budget cuts, teacher furloughs, etc…..

Does he really think that these actions are what improved the scores? Give me a break!

Wait and see

February 8th, 2012
4:05 pm

@Gerald, right thinking that not every child should go to college. High school vocational training could have more real world relevance than an art history major in college (and would cost less, too).

Sally

February 8th, 2012
4:59 pm

Milton Man- Ivy doesn’t give merit money………….