Blogging live today from ed event: New teacher evals and challenges

I am at the annual daylong media symposium on education sponsored at the start of each legislative session by the Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education.

It is always a great event as it brings education newsmakers into a room with reporters from across the state — including lots of young, bright journalists from suburban and rural papers. I am always impressed with the caliber of news writers from small-town papers here in Georgia.

On the agenda to speak today are state employees, John Barge, Bobby Cagle, Matt Cardoza, Erin Hames, Teresa MacCartney and elected lawmakers Brooks Coleman and Stacey Abrams. Also, Herb Garrett of the Georgia School Superintendents Association will speak. A highlight was Jadun McCarthy, 2012 Georgia Teacher of the Year, who is a fantastic speaker.

“We are being told you need to do more with less,” he said. “That sounds like a great philosophy. But it presupposes you weren’t doing the most that you could with what you had in the first place.”

A Bibb County teacher, McCarthy said his school is in the bottom 5 percent of Georgia high schools, yet he and other teachers in school want their students to succeed.

“For whatever reason, we are not reaching them; they are not learning the way they should. Is that solely the responsibility of the teacher? I read the AJC education blog and it boggles my mind to read that teachers whine, that teachers complain. I know for a fact that is not the case. People tell me teachers should be happy. ‘You get summers off. Christmas vacations off.  Teachers need to stop complaining and get a job in the real world.’

“We work in the real world,” McCarthy said. “We are the foundation and basis of what happens in the real world.”

McCarthy said he has students who go to bed with no electricity and who wake up with nothing in their stomachs because they have not eaten since school lunch the prior day.

“People think my job is get this child to read ‘Beowulf,’ to understand Shakespeare, the bard of Avon. This child doesn’t care,” said McCarthy.  “This child wants to be in room with heat. This child wants to be safe. There is no test that measures that Mr. McCarthy made a difference in this child’s life because he kept him off the street. Our job goes beyond giving information and knowledge. Our job involves the creation and building up of a human being. ”

The first session of the day was the top 10 issues to watch in 2012, presented by the Partnership’s Dr. Dana Rickman. Rickman said Georgia is at a junction where leaders across the state are united in recognize of strong educational system to future growth. Among the top issues this year identified by Rickman: performance standards, teacher assessment, common core, rural schools, financing, pre-k, school choice, role of education in economic development and leadership and ethics.

Rickman said Georgia is above the national average for low-birth weight babies, which leads to education challenges. But the most troubling indicator is that we are increasing children living in poverty, now at 25 percent.

We also have remained relatively flat in fourth grade reading as measured by NAEP.  However, we are matching national average of fourth grade reading. With eighth grade math scores, we are closing the gap with the national average but still are slightly behind. But we exceed the national average of high school students obtaining AP credit.

We remain flat in our graduation rate from two year-colleges, but we are seeing small uptake in our graduates of four year colleges.

We are making progress on a list of 10 indicators of success, holding steady on four, but struggling with one of the most influential — poverty

Rickman went into depth on two of the top 10 issues, starting with challenges to rural schools. Our rural school enrollment grew by 11 percent between between 2004 and 2009. In addition, Georgia saw a 31 percent of students of color in rural schools during that time frame.  The rural systems have greater challenges recruiting staff and greater financing struggles.

We are seeing growing inequality in rural districts. In rural districts, 47 percent of students live in poverty. Rural students perform worse than their suburban counterparts in reading. On NAEP fourth grade reading, 33 percent of Georgia rural students scored proficient, compared to 39 percent of suburban students. Nationally, 35 percent of rural students scored proficient, so our rural students  fare worse than their counterparts nationwide.

Rickman also addressed the gap between the economic and employment needs of the state and the state’s ability to meet those needs in the coming years. By 2020, 60 percent of jobs in Georgia will require some higher education. Now, only 42 percent of Georgians have some education beyond high school. Rickman flashed a map on the screen that showed rural counties in which a third of the population doesn’t even have a high school degree.

The most questions went to Teresa MacCartney, who is leading the efforts to implement the Race to the Top grant and gave us an update. Most of the questions — including several from me — dealt with the adoption of a new teacher/principal evaluation system. I expressed concern that the pilot of the system — in which student performance will count 50 percent in tested courses and 30 percent where there are no standardized tests — is only being pilot from January through May and then imposed on the 26 participating Race to the Top districts in August.

Is there enough time to sort through the findings and data gathered in this five-month pilot? MacCartney acknowledged the challenging time constraints, but said 2012-2013 will also be used for fact-finding and revisions. She hopes the General Assembly will not jump the gun and pass any legislation tying the new teacher evals to pay this year, saying that the earliest we should see any legislation linking pay to performance should be the 2013 session  “We have to build a strong foundation first,” she said.

Despite the outrage that many teachers here on the blog expressed over plans to survey even kindergartners on teacher performance, MacCartney said the state still plans to pilot the survey. However, she said the early grades survey may be eliminated after the pilot. “That is the one piece we may have to back off,” she said.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

41 comments Add your comment

Beverly Fraud

January 20th, 2012
11:46 am

After witnessing THE largest cheating scandal in United States educational history and the DOCUMENTED cases of administrative retaliation therein, none of the “esteemed” panelists have a SINGLE word to say about placing safeguards into the evaluation instrument?

Do we want “change” or do we want FACADE?

Apparently the answer in patently obvious.

Maureen Downey

January 20th, 2012
11:50 am

@Bev, Day is still young. Lots more people due to speak.

HS Public Teacher

January 20th, 2012
11:51 am

Thanks for the update.

The “powers” are going to push through the evals no matter what. It doesn’t matter that they have not been properly tested. It doesn’t matter that no one knows how they will be interpreted. It doesn’t matter about anything.

They will push it through because it is what “they” want.

It is like Georgia to jump blindly into a pile of dung.

[...] Blogging live today from ed event: New teacher evals and challengesAtlanta Journal Constitution (blog)Despite the outrage that many teachers here on the blog expressed over plans to survey even kindergartners on teacher performance, MacCartney said the state still plans to pilot the survey. However, she said the early grades survey may be eliminated … [...]

Beverly Fraud

January 20th, 2012
12:05 pm

“Rickman said Georgia is above the national average for low-birth weight babies, which leads to education challenges.”

Well of course THE best way to address that is to make sure teachers DOCUMENT that they spend at least 15% of their time out of class time teaching health and nutrition classes to at risk parents.

That is, unless teachers aren’t willing to be held accountable.

Beverly Fraud

January 20th, 2012
12:13 pm

ONE teacher on the agenda to speak? Does that sound like a “Partnership”? For that matter ANY parents allowed to speak? Any HUMANS allowed to give a counterpoint to what is being discussed?

Or is disagreement only allowed within “acceptable parameters”?

Good Mom

January 20th, 2012
12:15 pm

Isn’t this an improvement according to teachers? Teachers wanted their performance evaluated by something other than test scores. Test scores count as half the rating, that should be an improvement according to a teacher. I like that. Half sounds about right to me. Every performance evaluation should have more than one criteria and student performance is absolutely measurable and teachers have a huge part in how well their students perform.

I do hope, as Maureen suggests, that some safeguards are put into place to prevent the cheaters and liars and thieves from changing test scores and from administrators pressuring them to do so. We need to get all school employees out of the school when testing time comes. If they are not there to do the cheating, the teachers cannot be pressured into it. Sounds expensive but must be cheaper than paying a million dollars a month for all those cheating teachers to sit on their hands collecting their paychecks while they are being investigated.

The school system (APS) has pledged to give back money to the federal government that it should not have accepted because they did not make the improvements after all. Wonder where those funds will come from.

As Beverly Fraud says, we have to build safeguards into the evaluation system so that no one can cheat even if they wanted to.

…and the only way to solve the poverty problem is to educate our citizens. We have to compete with everyone in the world, literally, for jobs and we cannot maintain a democracy with a mass population of citizens who cannot read their rights, much less understand them. Knowledge is power. America needs her power back.

CharterStarter

January 20th, 2012
12:41 pm

Maureen, it would be interesting to see what GPEE presents (if anything) about charter schools. For all their focus on data (which is a good thing), they seem prone to ignore or qualify data that support the value of schools of choice (another way of describing charters).

Struggling Teacher

January 20th, 2012
1:04 pm

One size does not fit all. Ever!

Tony

January 20th, 2012
1:06 pm

Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.

This is especially true when working with children. Our tests only measure a small portion of the knowledge and skills considered to be important, yet we are placing teachers’ careers in the balance based on their results. This will only further pervert the use of these tests in our schools.

Cindy Lutenbacher

January 20th, 2012
1:14 pm

Good Mom, I so appreciate your participation in this blog; I sometimes agree with you and sometimes do not, but you nearly always make me think.

I think the fifty percent piece of teacher evals based on standardized testing is a real problem because the standardized tests do not measure student progress. All reputable research (i.e. independent, not funded by corporations or entities who stand to gain monetarily from testing) shows that the standardized testing industry is as fraudulent as they come.

Student progress is measurable, but not by a one-size-fits-all approach.

Cindy Lutenbacher

January 20th, 2012
1:19 pm

[Sorry if this comment is a repeat...I think something blocked me a minute ago.]
Good Mom, I so appreciate your participation in this blog. I sometimes agree with you and sometimes do not, but you nearly always make me think.

I think the fifty percent piece of teacher evals is a real problem because standardized tests do not measure what they purport to measure. All reputable research (i.e. independent research that is not funded by the corporations or other entities that stand to gain monetarily from standardized testing) clearly shows us that standardized testing is as fraudulent as they come.

Student progress can be measured, but not by a one-size-fits-all approach.

Dunwoody Mom

January 20th, 2012
1:31 pm

I agree with Cindy – I think basing 50% of an evaluation on standardized tests is the not right way to go – unless you start with sometime of benchmark at the beginning of the school year and again at the end of the school year – to me that would be a better barometer of progress. Judging anyone, student or teacher on 1 test is just not a good measure of anything.

Maureen Downey

January 20th, 2012
1:41 pm

@charter, Not much on charters yet, although it was one of the top 10 issues to watch this year. John Barge is about to speak. Bobby Cagle is wrapping up. Reps. Coleman and Abrams have yet to speak.
Maureen

BT

January 20th, 2012
1:41 pm

The state TOTY is absolutely 100% correct!!

3schoolkids

January 20th, 2012
2:30 pm

How many good teachers will there be left to evaluate? I have family member and friend teachers all commenting on the teachers they know who are leaving teaching, taking private school jobs or leaving the state because they are so overwhelmed with the combination of teaching to the test and individual evaluations (that basicallly amount to each child in the class having an IEP). Test scores will only tell you how that child “performed” on that given day on that given test. Has any parent out there actually taken the time to read the test questions they give for the CRCT? Individually evaluating a child at benchmark times throughout the school year is the best way to go. However, we need to make sure the teachers have the resources they need to do this effectively. As for the math curriculum we are in for a world of hurt with graduation rates as the students who cannot pass 4 years of math even with support will give up and drop out. The current popular solution is Georgia Virtual summer school, which is an 18 week math course compressed to 10 weeks with timed testing.

d

January 20th, 2012
2:31 pm

I am still concerned how test scores will be used at the high school level. Since we will only have End of Course Tests, how will we show a year’s worth of growth between US History and Economics when these courses do not have overlapping material? How will the US History teachers have any data since the students will not have been tested in Social Studies since the 8th grade CRCT? There is usually 2 years between the 9th grade literature and American literature courses. Are students from one semester going to be compared to students from the next? One year to the next? Why can’t we get some information about how these scores are going to be used as opposed to just saying they will be 50% of my evaluation?

ssteacher

January 20th, 2012
2:33 pm

“One of the reasons we adopted common core standards across the country is to be on the same page, to have portability in our curriculum…Common assessments are coming with that to ensure students are learning what they need to learn,” he said.

…students are learning what they need to learn according to someone who has no idea who our students are, what they truly need, or if it will be worth knowing in ten years.

ssteacher

January 20th, 2012
2:35 pm

WAR

January 20th, 2012
2:37 pm

awwww….the old “lets evaluate the teachers and forget the responsibility parents and children have” jedi mind trick. good luck educators because when you get a crop of these rotten apples in your class youre gonna need it…unless youre on the north side of dekalb of course.

WAR

January 20th, 2012
2:41 pm

awwww….the old “testing will solve all the schools problems whether the child can read or not, so we can evaluate teachers with a snapshot of performance” jedi mind trick. good luck parents because when your child has bloated grades and poor scores, the closest they get to the college of their choice will be video games…unless youre homeschooling them of course.

WAR

January 20th, 2012
2:45 pm

awwww….the old “lets make these schools more accountable for situations they cannot control such as poor parenting and ill-mannered children who are hell bent on blaming anyone but themselves for beleaguered skills” jedi mind trick. good luck kids because when you are sitting in your remedial classes without getting credits and wondering why your parents didnt discipline you and the teacher just passed you to avoid trouble, maybe reality will settle-in…unless you drop out now and save us the trouble.

HS Public Teacher

January 20th, 2012
3:21 pm

Honestly, I don’t have a problem including standardized test scores on my eval. However, I do think that 50% is too high.

If my lunch duty, hall duty, bus duty, and so on is NOT on my eval, do I still have to do it?

The item I have most problem with is any part of my eval coming from some survey from kids. Sorry, but kids simply cannot have an INFORMED opinion on my performance as an educator. They might have an opinion on whether they “like” me or not – but is this really a measure of my ability to teach?

If you say, “yes,” then my plan for next year is to throw a party every Friday. We will have cookies and cake and ice cream. You see, I need to make sure that my kids “like” me to get good survey results!

Cindy Lutenbacher

January 20th, 2012
4:31 pm

Dear HS Public Teacher,
I think there’s a huge difference between “like” and “respect.” The two are not mutually exclusive, but they are far from the same thing.

To Cindy L and others from Good Mom

January 20th, 2012
4:33 pm

One poster, who agrees with Cindy L says “I agree with Cindy – I think basing 50% of an evaluation on standardized tests is the not right way to go – unless you start with sometime of benchmark at the beginning of the school year and again at the end of the school year – to me that would be a better barometer of progress.”

Well, you likley got your wish. I read the entire waiver, the one that exempts GA from NCLB and that is what it says in the waiver — that formative and summative tests are given. So the formative ones will tell the school how much the child is progressing before the summative one is taken. So it looks like you will likely get what you wanted.

There is also something else in the waivers that teachers wanted and that is teachers will be incentified to teach in poor -performing schools. That wish was mentioned manhy times by teachers on this blog — that teachers who have the greatest challenges (for example a school with many poor students) will be incentified to teach in that school. Incentives usually mean more money. I agree with that incentive too.

As a taxpayer, I expect my government to be held accountable for all of its action. I demand transparency and measurements. That goes double or triple for me for the government “business” of educatin because not only do I have a dog in this fight because I am a taxpayer, I am also a parent. That means I demand accountability in public schools. Part of that accountability, nay most of that accountability has got to be, for me, measuring how much students learn. Learning is the product. Schools produce that product. We must evaluate and examine this very-expensive, high-stakes product. Our country, our democratic way of living and millions of innocent lives depend on the product of education.

To HS Public Teacher from Good Mom

January 20th, 2012
4:41 pm

You write “If my lunch duty, hall duty, bus duty, and so on is NOT on my eval, do I still have to do it?”

That comment sounds rather snarky to me. It doesn’t sound like you are a team player. In my daily duties as a businesswoman I do many things that are not on my evaluation but I don’t whine about doing them. They just need to get done and we all pitch in to help. As an active duty military person, for example, I had a collateral duty of the mail. It was extra work, made me have to work harder and rush and it sure wasn’t part of my evaluation but we just didn’t complain about it. We all had a collateral duty and it didn’t help us but so what.

It’s little petty whines like “my bus duty is not on my eval so why do I have to do it,” that gives your profession a decreased level of respect.

Teachers have valid concerns in this state. A corrupt administration is a valid concern and one worthy of attention. Overcrowded classrooms jeopardize learning. That’s certainly a concern but bus duty? Really?

You must accept the fact that this is not a teachers-only blog. Parents and taxpayers and everyone else is listening, HS teacher. So when you blog and whine about petty things, you’re making yourself and the rest of your colleagues look small.

To d from Good Mom

January 20th, 2012
4:51 pm

D you said ” Since we will only have End of Course Tests, …”

Did you read the waiver? It;s lengthy for sure but it may be worth your time. The waiver says that both formative and summative tests are given. That sounds like what you are looking for — something (formative) to measure your progress during the year for those “once only” subjects.

To ss teacher from Good Mom

January 20th, 2012
4:57 pm

You said “…students are learning what they need to learn according to someone who has no idea who our students are, what they truly need, or if it will be worth knowing in ten years.”

I have very young children. At this tender age they have literally learned the importance of Dr. King’s work — they tell me Dr. King wanted to make sure all the children got to go to a good school and that everyone should be treated fairly. They “got” it. Someone taught them that and it was the teacher in an APS public school.

They also know the three stages of matter. They “get it” they understand it. That’s real science and they were taught that by their teacher, not me.

Those things are in the curriculum, the one you claim is no good and made up by someone who doesn’t know what they are doing.

Will you “cop” to an exaggeration, here? Surely you think the civil rights movement is worthy of being in a GA school’s curriculum and surely you think the properties of matter, well, matter.

GA Teacher

January 20th, 2012
6:43 pm

To Good Mom (in support of HS Pub Tchr)

January 21st, 2012
12:19 am

Good Mom – I think you completely missed HS School Public Teacher’s point about “professional duties” (not to mention put words in his/her mouth with your paraphrase “my bus duty is not on my eval so why do I have to do it”).

S/he isn’t whining about doing those duties; s/he’s asking a rhetorical question about what constitutes a teacher’s performance and the evaluation of such, if the bulk of the evaluation is test scores and student evals. Personally, I don’t like it when my colleagues slack on those duties because it makes it harder for all of us. The performance of professional duties and responsibilities IS currently a part of our evaluation, and IMHO, not only is it an important part, but it should remain on there, no matter what else they add.

Your bias is showing.

And, please, you can quit with the lecture “You must accept the fact that this is not a teachers-only blog. Parents and taxpayers and everyone else is listening… So when you blog and whine about petty things, you’re making yourself and the rest of your colleagues look small.”

You forget that teachers are parents and taxpayers as well. You also forget that many of us have served in the military and worked in the private sector, and recognize people who don’t know what they are talking about when comparing the three career environments. You occasionally have some good points, but they are often lost in your soapbox stand and misinformation about teachers’ working conditions. Have a nice weekend.

HS Public Teacher

January 21st, 2012
1:11 am

@GoodMom -

Wow. I just noticed that you throw around the term “whine” just like another poster we all know that uses multiple names. Now I am wondering if you are also that same individual. Your attitudes and opinions certainly match.

sloboffthestreet

January 21st, 2012
8:34 am

HS Public Teacher

Wow. GM calling you a whiner was on target. Let me suggest a few alternatives so she isn’t confused with the other posters on here who share her thoughts.

Cry Baby, Moaner, Grumbler, Complainer, Grouch.

Your comment that some people post under different names is only in your head. I have found in life that things people accuse others of is often the same behavior they themselves display. Read on, your words not mine. Then please consider getting some professional help. I think it’s covered under your health care plan.

You write,

“Now I am wondering if you are also that same individual. Your attitudes and opinions certainly match.”

Did you write the 12:19 post in support of you or was it your Mommie? Whoever it was makes statements that I would like to see some facts to support their/your argument. The claim is “MANY” teachers are veterans and have worked in the private sector.” Facts Please?

The other is that “Teachers “ARE” parents.” The fact is some are and some aren’t and some will never be. One thing has been proven time and time again with respect to the teachers that are parents. They are the true, original “Helicopter Teacher Parents.” I always find humor in the fact that teachers are the first to recognize this trait in others but NEVER EVER see it within themselves proving once again the existence of the “Do As I Say, Not As I Do” rhetoric blatantly displayed by MANY public educators. You see, the parents labeled by educators as “Helicopter Parents” are simply imitating teachers behavior with their own children. I would think teachers would find this behavior flattering with imitation being the highest form.Remember, the opposite of MANY is FEW. Now quit your whining and get to work. Don’t you have papers to grade?

Rural Education

January 21st, 2012
9:03 am

There is no fair way to work this for those of us who teach at High Schools. I teach core classes with an eoct while the teacher down the hall teaches electives. My potential risk is high while hers is zero. Those of us wo are to be judged by scores should receive higher pay. More risk more reward.

sloboffthestreet

January 21st, 2012
10:34 am

Rural Education

There will never be anything fair about teaching middle and high school students until the failures of elementary education are documented and corrected. As someone correctly pointed out with this dog & pony show, parents were not and never will be any part of public school corrective action. Funny how Matt Cardoza was a speaker. So it appears it will be left to the @ 100,000 public school educators and administrators to find a proper way to educate Georgia’s children. According to the legislature, DOE, BOE, and administration and teachers, the rest of us just aren’t as smart as you folks. So please, whatever it takes, fix it.

You see, your jobs do depend on this being corrected. When the working public cannot earn enough money to pay enough taxes to support schools, salaries, benefits including the fairytale retirement package, {ponzi scheme} because they lack the knowledge to be employed at a living wage, the whole thing comes to a grinding halt. You think you are being asked to do more with less now? Give it another 5 years.

Some see that education is exactly like private business. You must produce a useful product no matter what the circumstances. If your raw materials are defective one must identify the problem and go to the supplier to find a solution. Not simply complain it’s the parents. By the very title teachers hold, “Educators,” it would seem that yes, it encompasses many jobs where one must wear many hats. This too holds true in private business. You stay until the job is done. Not any earlier. It is definitely not for everyone involved. The parents of the children you complain about were taught by the very same public school systems you work for today. What happened there?

echo

January 21st, 2012
11:33 am

How many people posting on this blog would be all for “school choice” if it cut both ways? If parents were allowed to “choose” the school they wanted their children the attend AND the schools were also allowed to “choose” which students they would accept, would things change in public schools? I highly doubt that all these people screaming about “school choice” would be as thrilled about it if they realized the school they would choose wouldn’t choose them!
The reason teachers don’t like parents involved in trying to solve the problems we have in education is because they have blinders on, they only worry about what helps their child(ren). The school/teachers have hundreds if not thousands of kids they have to try to help. We can’t solve all the problems these kids bring to school with them and yes, this extra baggage will affect the entire classroom environment and the education of every kid in it! Have you ever met a kid who doesn’t get ANY time or attention from their parent(s)? They will do almost anything for attention from a teacher. Now try having 2 or 3 of those along with the kids who have learning disabilities, ESOL kids, average kids and highly functioning kids all in the same classroom.
It is amazing to hear how those bloggers like slob and good mom think they have all the answers when they don’t seem to have a very good grasp of the real problem. If your solution is telling teachers who show up to work everyday to actually fight this crap to “stop whining”, then YOU are clearly part of the problem. Go ahead and get your college degree, get your teaching certificate and get your a$$ in a classroom since you have the solution or you need to stop whining about the quality of schools and the teachers in them.

sloboffthestreet

January 21st, 2012
11:33 am

I wonder why they didn’t invite the teacher that was recognized by a National Educational Group last year as one of the countries best educators to come speak to the nice people? What was her name?

sloboffthestreet

January 21st, 2012
1:49 pm

echo

I hear a lot of whining but you present no answers. Just more teacher Bla, Bla, Bla,,,,

The reason teachers and the rest of the system don’t want parents involved in education is because most teachers cannot admit they are wrong. That what they teach and their methods for many years have failed to educate the students before them. So instead of having to look at what they have been doing year after year after year with poor results, they find it proper to keep their blinders on and deflect any critique away from their school. “That’s the way we always dunit.” Hey ST671. Ever heard that one before? I don’t think Mother T ever so much as whispered such a phrase. She just worked harder without any consideration for herself. You sir are no Mother Theresa. I really wanted to add the part about “I knew Mother T” but I didn’t.

You see, I don’t ask you to come do my job after I have failed to perform it properly. If I am not productive in my work they have a thing called “The Door” and they are not shy about showing it to any of their employees without as much as a hearing. And the only lame argument you can come up with personally and as a group,{teachers} is that you want me to do your job after you have failed to perform it with any consistent level of success? Well, that is unless you spell success, succe$$. The sad part is I have to do it 180 days a year after school and during the summer along with endless school meetings to simply find out what it is they are teaching and making sure it is being taught. Thanks Infinite Campus!

And that is why parents are not involved in the education conversation. Not because they choose not to be. Because somebodies little feelings might get hurt. I have first hand experience of several teachers methods/plans being changed because of a common sense comment from parents. The sad part is these ideas were presented to the teacher and with a great deal of disdain the teacher said, “Go tell the principal” thinking what they were and always had taught was acceptable. Surprise!!! It wasn’t and now these same teachers walk around like they sucked on a lemon and never make eye contact and constantly gossip. Now who is acting childish here?

d

January 21st, 2012
5:37 pm

OK, here’s the answer – the AMA and ABA are in charge of certifying who is allowed to practice medicine and law respectively. They set the rules. They’re the professionals in the field who have the education and experience to know who should be there and who should not be. NEA needs to have the same authority for the education profession in this country…. or are we too afraid that these professionals can’t govern themselves?

echo

January 22nd, 2012
1:04 am

@ Slob…I present the “answer” everyday when I show up to work. I can hardly wait to hear your great solutions! BTW, how would you like to measure how well I do my job? Test scores? Great, my on level classes typically outperform the state average significantly. Student surveys? I do those just for kicks at the end of the year and most kids (even the ones who earned an ‘F’ in the class) give me and the class a thumbs up. I have worked at several schools in 2 different states, never been shown the door. I once had a school board member call me in the summer to ask me to reconsider my resignation; her son had been in my AP class, so I guess parents who actually give a crap tend to appreciate what I do as well.
Do you really feel that you are such an expert at all things education that anyone should take you seriously? You are an armchair quarterback. Reading your posts makes me cringe because of the illogical line of thought, misspellings and crappy grammar. Not sure you would be fit to run a dog walking service let alone a classroom full of kids. So maybe you should just continue your present line of work for everyone’s well-being.

HS Public Teacher

January 23rd, 2012
7:59 am

@sloboffthestreet -

Who elected you moderator of this blog? Who made you God of all that is right? Why do you think it is okay for you to preach to others (or lecture to others)?

You need to return to the street.

HS Public Teacher

January 23rd, 2012
8:00 am

@sloboffthestreet -

Echo calls you an “armchair quarterback” and they are being nice to you with that name. Echo also says many things about you that are oh-so-true. Read that post carefully and take it to heart (if you have one).