Being pagan in Georgia: Do schools promote some religions while denigrating others?

UPDATE: Folks, I closed comments on this at 10 p.m. Friday. Have a great holiday weekend. Maureen

A common plaint on this blog is that religion has been banished from our public schools. The usual comment is that we have kicked God out of the schools.

But some argue that not all religions are met with hostility in the classroom, only those far outside the mainstream.

That complaint was made this month via an Internet campaign on behalf of a pagan family in Carroll County. Stephanie Turner said her 11-year-old son was singled out and punished after he took off the neopagan holiday of Samhain. Once the boy returned to class, his teacher allegedly questioned him and said,  “Paganism is not a religion.” Then, the teacher assigned a class essay on “How Christmas started,” according to the complaint.

(You can read more details on the “Turner Family Support” Facebook page.)

I exchanged e-mails with Turner seeking information about her son’s experience, but then received a call from Selena Fox, founder and executive director of the Lady Liberty League, an organization that advocates for religious freedom for Wiccans, Neopagans and other nature religion practitioners.

A Wisconsin resident, Fox explained to me in our telephone conversation that she was calling on Turner’s behalf to let me know that they were attempting to meet with the school district. In the meantime, websites and pagan organizations that took up the Turner family cause urged people to send e-mails of protest to the Carroll school chief, principal and teacher. And apparently they did.

When I contacted Carroll County two weeks ago, spokeswoman Elena Schulenburg told me: We are currently working with the parent to review this matter. The e-mail was circulated over the weekend ahead of our opportunity to meet with the parent to discuss any concerns. As always, our focus is on the safety and welfare of all students.

Accompanied by four advocates including an attorney, Turner met with Carroll school officials on Dec. 12. She and her advocates issued a statement later on the outcome of that meeting: First, a sincere apology for recent events and misunderstandings has been given by school administration and accepted by the family. Second, the Bowdon Elementary School guidance counselor will educate staff and students about honoring and accepting the differences that make us individuals. Third, procedures have been put in place to ensure classroom activities don’t alienate students.

In a Dec. 13 radio interview on Pagan Warrior Radio hosted by Selena Fox, Turner thanked the national pagan community for its support, saying, “It has helped my son so much knowing that he is not alone.”

The New York Times has a good piece about the encroachment of religion in public schools. Several of the examples of proselytizing occurred in Southern schools.

The New York Times story notes:

At a school assembly here in South Carolina on Sept. 1, a preacher described how Christ saved him from drugs, telling his rapt audience that “a relationship with Jesus is what you need more than anything else.” A rapper shouted the Lord’s praise to a light show and most of the audience stepped forward to pledge themselves to Christ while a few remained, uncomfortable, in their seats.

Such overt evangelizing would not be unusual at a prayer rally, but this was a daytime celebration in a public school gymnasium, arranged by the principal for sixth, seventh and eighth graders.  When the rapper posted a video on YouTube, announcing that “324 kids at this school have made a decision for Jesus Christ,” he drew unwelcome public and legal scrutiny to the event. It was the kind of religious advocacy that is increasingly coming to light, legal experts say, as school populations become more diverse and as the objection of non-Christians — or, in this case, the rejoicing of evangelists — is broadcast on the Internet.

In landmark decisions in 1962 and 1963, the Supreme Court barred official promotion of religion in schools. That principle has remained solid, if pilloried by conservatives who blame it for what they see as the nation’s moral and social decline. At the same time, the courts and Congress have also reinforced the rights of students to pray on their own and to form after-school religious clubs.

But battles over the place of religion in schools continue. This month, the American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit demanding that the Chesterfield County, S.C., school district end what the suit describes as the continuing promotion of religion in several of its schools, including the middle school that held the prayer rally. The A.C.L.U. brought the suit on behalf of a seventh grader who said he was subjected to unwanted proselytizing and has been harassed for his avowals of atheism.

Christian legal advocates counter that such plain violations are far less common than the opposite problem: overzealous officials trying to cleanse the schools of religion, punishing students for protected speech like personal prayer or handing out devotional messages to their friends.

Watchdog groups like the A.C.L.U., Americans United for Separation of Church and State and the Freedom From Religion Foundation say that in the last few years, they have learned more often about what they call blatant violations like the South Carolina rally. It is unclear, they say, whether the number of such events is growing, or whether they are now more likely to come to light. But still, these advocates say, even when clear violations occur, concerned families are often reluctant to bring legal challenges because they fear social hostility.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

563 comments Add your comment

Principal Skinner

December 28th, 2011
5:34 am

We only celebrate Festivus at my school

East Repeat

December 28th, 2011
6:27 am

Why would students feel “uncomfortable” rtemaining in their seats. They were “uncomfortable” because God was speaking to them in a still, small voice, urging them to come forward and accept the eternal salvation that He has offered. They know it and you know it, Maureen. No one will ever feel “uncomfortable” regecting Paganism or Wicans, as down inside, where the spirit of the Lord lives in all of us, our souls know all these secular “if it feels good do it” pseudo-religions are an abomination.

VietVet

December 28th, 2011
6:56 am

Some forms of paganism are a joyous and respectful celebration of the natural world and recognition of humanity’s humble part in the great cosmos. While I’m not a pagan, I find it a refreshing change from the more ignorant and arrogant extremes of the fundamentalist Abrahamic religions that dominate the world today.

Dooley

December 28th, 2011
6:57 am

Isn’t it amazing how a group of wiccans can come into a school system and intimidate the administration to get what what they want. It is sad that Stephanie Turner didn’t have the guts to fight her own battle. She had to go and enlists a national organization, their money, and their team of lawyers to do her dirty work. Come on Stephanie teach your son to stand up and be a man and to learn not to hire “hit men” when he doesn’t get his way. Life isn’t always fair.

Gavin Andrew

December 28th, 2011
7:00 am

Maureen, this is a good and balanced summation of the issues. As a Pagan myself, I can only add that America was founded upon a principle of religious liberty – to paraphrase Jefferson, whether my neighbor prays to one god or twenty, it neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg. However, to people like myself, it is often evident that Christians cannot comprehend the extent to which the rest of us are affected by their power. From churches on every corner, to holidays and celebrations structured around nominally Christian dates, to the pandering by political leaders, to the ceremonial deism that acts as a placeholder for state-sponsored religion. This position of privilege, combined with its coercive proselytizing, cast all those claims that Christianity is ‘under attack’ by secularism in a particularly unflattering light.

Dr NO / Mr Sunshine

December 28th, 2011
7:05 am

A Festivus for the rest of us. My relatives received their annual scathing and during the feats of strength I watched as my 47 year old sister thoroughly trashed my 72 year old grandmonther. It was hilarious watching old granny beg for mercy.

Wiggins

December 28th, 2011
7:12 am

In my opinion, when God was taken out of the schools our nations youth went to hell. Back in my youth, you didnt have school shootings or drive by shootings or none of this other crap. When is America gonna wake up and realize when you mess with God, you will be punished. Again, this is a social site and Im speaking my God given and constitutional right to say what I feel.

Jimbo

December 28th, 2011
7:16 am

Comments like those of East Repeat show how very similar the Christian fundamentalists are to the Taliban in their view of the absolute rightness of their beliefs and their desire to make sure everyone around them lives according to those beliefs. Why not have schools teaching Old Testament in the morning and New Testament in the afternoon? Why not ask whether Yahweh really, really thinks it’s okay for girls to be in the classroom…after all, they might not need so much book-learning if their fathers decide to sell them to a neighbor for a couple of goats.
Especially during the national election cycles, it makes me sad to see just how far we have NOT progressed from the mentality that originally forced the Pilgrims onto the sea and toward the great unknown in search of something so simple as freedom to control that most personal of things, their own religious beliefs.
Amen

sp

December 28th, 2011
7:20 am

@East Repeat

You know the definition of a “cult”? It’s the church down the street from yours…

Thanks for the funny post so early in the morning – great start to the day.

NotANeoLith

December 28th, 2011
7:22 am

Okay, East Repeat, so if you were at a welcoming ceremony for the new moon with a group of Wiccans, you’d just pop right up and toss some sage in the bowl and revel in the burning scent? Would the “still, small voice” of the Eternal Goddess cause you discomfort? One is often uncomfortable because one is in a situation that is unfamiliar and/or unwanted. At a party, it is not Jesus Christ that keeps me hugging the wall and seeming inordinately interested in my punch; it’s the fact that I may not know anybody and feel like I don’t belong. Remember, Coming to Jesus is voluntary in this dispensation, East Repeat; you’ll get your chance to revel in the forced conversion of folks once your Millennium gets underway with all that wailin’ and gnashin’ of teeth and stuff.

Raiderbeater

December 28th, 2011
7:26 am

All it sounds like to me is a reason for people to get on here and degrade Christianity in a blog…….

If Paganism gets to the same stage/size that Christianity/Islam/Hinduism gets to it also will act the same way.

It’s not like the people are martyred…..it’s just the populare religion being………popular.

Thomas Jefferson

December 28th, 2011
7:28 am

“And the day will come when the mystical generation of Jesus, by the supreme being as his father in the womb of a virgin will be classed with the fable of the generation of Minerve in the brain of Jupiter. But may we hope that the dawn of reason and freedom of thought in these United States will do away with this artificial scaffolding, and restore to us the primitive and genuine doctrines of this most venerated reformer of human errors.”

“Millions of innocent men, women and children, since the introduction of Christianity, have been burnt, tortured, fined and imprisoned; yet we have not advanced one inch towards uniformity.”

“Question with boldness even the existence of a god; because if there be one he must approve of the homage of reason more than that of blindfolded fear.”

“History, I believe, furnishes no example of a priest-ridden people maintaining a free civil government. This marks the lowest grade of ignorance of which their civil as well as religious leaders will always avail themselves for their own purposes.”

“Christianity neither is, nor ever was a part of the common law.”

“In every country and in every age, the priest has been hostile to liberty. He is always in alliance with the despot, abetting his abuses in return for protection to his own.”

“It is between fifty and sixty years since I read it [the Apocalypse], and I then considered it merely the ravings of a maniac, no more worthy nor capable of explanation than the incoherences of our own nightly dreams.”

- Thomas Jefferson

I_teach!!

December 28th, 2011
7:29 am

I am always uncomfortable when in the situations described above.

It has nothing to do with “god” talking to me.

The intolerance of any other religion-other than Southern Baptist” is unbelievable. People here don’t even recognize Catholics as Christians..

Wiggins-? the number of shootings in school has nothing to do with taking “god” out of schools-it has more to do with unsupervised, neglected kids with access to guns. Additionally, more innocent people have been killed in the name of their religion than for any other reason.

If memory serves..wasn’t McVeigh a devout Christian?

hesalive

December 28th, 2011
7:29 am

Every knee will bow and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is lord. What about you? Today, if you hear his voice, don’t harden your heart. Respond to the one who loves you most and knows what’s best for you. His name is Jesus.

Thomas Paine

December 28th, 2011
7:31 am

“Of all the systems of religion that ever were invented, there is no more derogatory to the Almighty, more unedifiying to man, more repugnant to reason, and more contradictory to itself than this thing called Christianity.”

“You will do me the justice to remember that I have always supported the right of every man to his opinion, however different that opinion might be to mine. He who denies to another this right makes a slave of himself to present opinion because he precludes himself the right of changing it. The most formidable weapon against errors of every kind is reason. I have never used any other, and I trust I never shall.”

“I do not believe in the creed professed by the Jewish church, by the Roman church, by the Greek church, by the Protestant church, nor by any church that I know of. My own mind is my church.”

“All national institutions of churches, whether Jewish, Christian or Turkish, appear to me no other than human inventions, set up to terrify and enslave mankind, and monopolize power and profit.”

“Whenever we read the obscene stories, the voluptuous debaucheries, the cruel and tortuous executions, the unrelenting vindictiveness with which more than half the Bible is filled, it would be more consistent that we call it the word of a demon than the word of God. It is a history of wickedness that has served to corrupt and brutalize humankind; and, for my part, I sincerely detest it, as I detest everything that is cruel.”

- Thomas Paine

maharaji

December 28th, 2011
7:31 am

hahahahahah, wiccans you dorks, hahahahahahah. Not a religion, just a name for a gathering of dorks talking about alchemy and Harry Potter books.

Why don’t you get one of your witches to cast a spell over us to make us belive? Cause it isn’t true, hahahahah.

Question: Why all the pointy hats?

Norm

December 28th, 2011
7:32 am

Fundamentalist Christians do not believe in taking your life, or beating you, or perhaps stoning you for violation of Islamic beliefs such as the Taliban does. Believing Christians are told to go and spread the good news (Gospel) of Jesus, they do NOT force it upon you. Please don’t compare Christians to the Taliban, you will be on the losing end of the argument.

On the subject of diversity, which I assume is the direction you were heading with your comment on girls in the classroom, if you take the time to actually read the Bible and understand it, you’ll see that men and women of all ages and backgrounds face adversity successfully by embracing God. Their race or sex is not a factor. Christian teachings are actually quite tolerant of others, in contrast to other religions in particular.

maharaji

December 28th, 2011
7:33 am

“Every knee will bow and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is lord. What about you? Today, if you hear his voice, don’t harden your heart. Respond to the one who loves you most and knows what’s best for you. His name is Jesus.”

hahahahah, you’re a dork too. Keep preaching jackwagon. I’d rather hang with the Wiccans, at least they have wine with no guilt.

Mike Hipp

December 28th, 2011
7:33 am

It’s fascinating to me to see the difference between the United States and England on the subject of religion.

In England, there’s a state sanctioned church, yet most people are agnostic or atheist and no-one gives a flip about religion’s place in government.

In the United States, there’s a constitutional (like it or not, there is) seperation of chruch and state; yet there’s a religious litmus test for everything from the school board seat, all the way up to the presidency.

Frederick Douglass

December 28th, 2011
7:34 am

“I assert most unhesitatingly, that the religion of the South is a mere covering for the most horrid crimes– a justifier of the most appalling barbarity, a sanctifier of the most hateful frauds, and a dark shelter under which the darkest, foulest, grossest, and most infernal deeds of slaveholders find the strongest protection. Where I to be again reduced to the chains of slavery, next to that enslavement, I should regard being the slave of a religious master the greatest calamity that could befall me. . . I. . . hate the corrupt, slaveholding, women-whipping, cradle-plundering, partial and hypocritical Christianity of this land.”

- Frederick Douglass

East Repeat

December 28th, 2011
7:35 am

Are you posters upset that you cannot shake my FAITH. Not a fact, a faith in Jesus being the son of God, born of the Virgin Mary, sent to this earth to die for my sins. I don’t want to force my faith on others, but one is a fool not to accept God’s salvation, just so you can claim to be educated or a know it all who doesn’t believe in God. Gavin Andrew, you are correct, neither picks my pocket or breaks my leg. Now what do the secular, non-religious population do- they pick your pocket (higher and higher taxes to support the entittled class). and Wiggins, you are dead on correct, but liberals can’t accept that we are better off following Christian principles. Pagans and Wican and Muslims have as high a moral calling and standards as Christians, ha-ha with tongue firmly in cheek. Wallor in your own slop or accept Jesus as your saviour. No skin off my back as i am doing my part in challenging you to accept Jesus and making you aware of His salvation.

Samuel Clemens

December 28th, 2011
7:36 am

“Man is a Religious Animal. He is the only Religious Animal. He is the only animal that has the True Religion – several of them. He is the only animal that loves his neighbor as himself and cuts his throat if his theology isn’t straight.”

- Mark Twain

All religions are cults

December 28th, 2011
7:37 am

It’s just that some have a lot of members who band together to declare that theirs is the “right” one, bestowing upon themselves the “right” to feel superior while denigrating and marginalizing everybody else of different beliefs.

Tom

December 28th, 2011
7:41 am

Yep, the only thing that actually separates “cults” from “religions”….

…..sales volume.

jw

December 28th, 2011
7:41 am

That same old, tired canard – “God was taken out of the schools” – these people will always allow others to lead them blindly rather than investigate for themselves what the Supreme Court decision actually ruled.

All religions are cults

December 28th, 2011
7:44 am

If Christians actually followed the teachings of Christ, the world would be a much better place. Mocking those of those different beliefs as “fools” who are “wallowing in slop”, universally scorning the less fortunate as “entitled”, and claiming moral superiority in all matters are acts that would Jesus would be mortified by. Some people need to study their Bibles a bit more closely. Being religious does not automatically make you a moral and decent person….it takes a bit more work than that.

EVF Jr.

December 28th, 2011
7:46 am

“Every knee will bow and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is lord. What about you? Today, if you hear his voice, don’t harden your heart. Respond to the one who loves you most and knows what’s best for you. His name is Jesus.”
I could not have said it better. Serving the Living God is the path to attaining that inner peace we all strive for. His birth and death on the cross guarantee our salvation if you would only ask. The gift is free. Why would you want to turn it down?
Jesus loves you unconditionally!!!!!

Tom

December 28th, 2011
7:48 am

Ricky Gervias: “Since the beginning of recorded history, which is defined by the invention of writing by the Sumerians around 6,000 years ago, historians have cataloged over 3700 supernatural beings, of which 2870 can be considered deities. So next time someone tells me they believe in God, I’ll say “Oh which one? Zeus? Hades? Jupiter? Mars? Odin? Thor? Krishna? Vishnu? Ra?…” If they say “Just God. I only believe in the one God,” I’ll point out that they are nearly as atheistic as me. I don’t believe in 2,870 gods, and they don’t believe in 2,869.”

Now hold on just a minute

December 28th, 2011
7:50 am

I dont attend any church regularly, but grew up in and spent part of my adult life in the Protestant church. Most people dont want freedom of “religion” or integration of church and state. They want freedom of Christianity and integration of THEIR church and state. People want their child to be able to attend a assembly like the one in the article above, but what if the message was Muslim instead of Christian? Just a little something to think about

Reverend Reason

December 28th, 2011
7:51 am

If a man happens to meet a virgin who is not pledged to be married and rapes her and they are discovered, he shall pay her father fifty shekels of silver. He must marry the young woman, for he has violated her. He can never divorce her as long as he lives.

- Deuteronomy 22:28-29

John Vank

December 28th, 2011
7:51 am

East Repeat, people like you are why we need to get rid of this crap. Feel free to be crazy and talk about the voices that speak to you, but don’t talk to me about it, don’t talk to my kid about it in school, and just keep those voices to yourself. It’ll keep you out of a mental institution.

Marsh

December 28th, 2011
7:56 am

It only took East Repeat 2 posts to mention “liberals.” East Repeat, people like you genuinely scare me. So judgemental, so convinced you’re right, so unwilling to hear another point of view, so “Christian” and yet so against your taxes going to help a fellow man. You said it all, right in that one word. Your ilk will be our downfall. Open your mind, I’m begging you.

NotANeoLith

December 28th, 2011
7:57 am

@East Repeat

I don’t want to shake your faith or your FAITH. I just don’t think people should be shaking their faith in other people’s faces using tax dollars!

I’m a Christian, and my devotional this morning encouraged me to see the Son of God in everyone I meet today, just as Anna & Simeon recognized Jesus in the Temple during His consecration.

I work to bring about the Kingdom of God on earth, and I certainly vote for candidates who espouse and support policies that will achieve that goal: policies of helping the poor and uneducated, the hungry and unclothed; policies that promote peace and work toward a cessation of war; policies of tolerance. But these guiding principles are the result of my moral development as a Christian; they are not proscriptions that I would force upon others.

I want judicious husbandry of my tax dollars. That’s why I don’t want ANY religion using those oh-so-sacrosanct tax dollars used in the furtherance of ANY religion.

My faith is not unshakable–I would not be so presumptuous as to put myself about our Lord; after all, Jesus was tempted in the wilderness and in the garden, and what temptation is not temptation if it cause not your faith to wobble–but in the final analysis, I have faith that I shall not be moved.

John K

December 28th, 2011
7:57 am

Ah yes, and yet again here come the “freedom of religion, but only for my specific brand of Christianity” folks. (Yes, I do know all Christians are not like that.)

Wiggins, God was not taken out of schools. What was removed was administration led observances and prayer. If your children go to school without God, that falls completely on your shoulders. Don’t blame others for your failings, take responsibility for your actions.

Sam

December 28th, 2011
7:58 am

Fringe religions are the only religions that liberals support. The educations establishement has been busy for a generation trying to chase Christainity from the public square. In their ill considered embrace of multi-culturalism, they are busy committing cultural suicide.

nazan yar

December 28th, 2011
7:58 am

This is such an easy fix – get rid of public schools! Teachers must teach from a worldview of some kind, whatever it is. If you define religion/philosophy as having a worldview, you can’t ever have separation of that (whatever that is) and life (state). Kill the illusion.

Tom

December 28th, 2011
8:01 am

I, too, fail to understand the seemingly-automatic connection some draw between atheism and liberalism. I’m not a theist, but am pretty darned conservative. Been voting GOP almost my entire life…..even though many in the party still feel the need to pander to those who want their faith codified into legislation.

John K

December 28th, 2011
8:03 am

Chase Christianity from the public square? LOL, I am always amazed at the culture of victim-hood carried by so many members of the 85% majority. Yes, keep believe you’re being repressed, it keeps you loyal.

Your real complaint is that you cannot force others to subscribe to the same belief as you, but you’d never admit it.

Grumpy Old Man

December 28th, 2011
8:04 am

If we do not get religion out of politics and politics out of religion we as a species who call America our home are doomed. Having said that, Christians, Jews, Muslims and all others please do not take offense to those of us who religious indoctrination does not take hold.

East Repeat

December 28th, 2011
8:08 am

My faith is unshakeable. “Less fortunate” is a euphamism for “don’t want to work because of my back or leg or I am uneducated, or I can’t be the boss first day on work”, any excuse will do. Don’t wallow in your slop, shake it off and help yourself. And a good place to start is by accepting Jesus as your saviour. Glad I was able to start so much conversation. Off to work to pay for liberals to stay home. Truth hurts.

Big Al

December 28th, 2011
8:10 am

Christianity has to be the biggest sham in the history of mankind. It’s amazing that such simple-minded people exist who believe in that rubbish. At least other relgions can trace their origin to a person who actually existed. I mean you can actually visit the graves of Buddha, Muhammad, Confucius, and Bahaullah. Why can’t you visit Jesus’ grave. Come to think of it, why can’t you visit the graves of any of the people who are mentioned in the Bible? Could it be because they never existed. Could it be because the Bible is a work of fiction.

Christian to the Core

December 28th, 2011
8:10 am

Once again we hear of one individual who is uncomfortable and the masses have to accomodate him. I’m betting 95% of the kids in this elemantary school are Christian, but one individual feels out of place and we are to make sure that Christ is eliminated not to hurt this childs feelings or the parents feelings. You wonder why society is the way it is today? God Bless!

thomas

December 28th, 2011
8:11 am

I know Christians are feeling persecuted these days, but if you look at their most vocal spokespersons (from Rick Perry to Pat Robertson) and the kinds of posts that scream the loudest here (see the above admonishments from those supposedly filled with grace and redemption), you have to at least understand a little bit of a reason there’s a backlash.

It’s a tad insulting when you have faith in something that requires the same leap as Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Wiccan, etc, but you speak of those faiths as if they are nutty, evil, or ‘fringe’, when if you took an objective look at your faith – while very true and earnest to you – it could rightly seem just as superstitious and potentially dangerous to someone who was not raised in it. I’m not saying it might not be the truth – it is certainly your truth – but your assumption that everyone must see the logic in ’speaking English’ when they were raised speaking a different language and it’s the culture they know/understand/trust is a bit small-minded. (That was a metaphor there, in case you missed it.)

The Wiccan/Pagan belief system is as old and storied as Christianity. And, I would venture to say, they are as ridiculed and persecuted as any Christian in America today feels. We pretty much demand if a person runs for office in this country that they be ‘God fearing Christians’. What would happen to a Wiccan, a Buddhist, or a person of Bahai faith if they ran for office here? They’d be scrutinized, demonized, and eliminated based on their beliefs.

Face it, Christian brothers and sisters, you still run this country. There is not liberal plot to destroy your faith. There’s just a backlash against the kind of language and tactics people see you using that don’t jibe with the words and deeds of Jesus Christ, who you claim to represent.

honested

December 28th, 2011
8:11 am

Thus has been the problem in GA schools since before I attended them through the ’60s.
There was always an effort to skirt the rules and bring in some traveling revival-like nonsense and
there was always a blatant disregard for anyone not holding the popular superstition.

While I still enjoy stringing lights in my yard for Samhain/Saturnalia/Christmas/Whatever and I allow my family to drag a dead tree into the house and hang stuff on it, I don’t need a superstition to let me ‘believe’ the spring will come and the next growing season will commence. I have sufficient ‘proof’ and previous experience to know it will occur whether I am involved or not.

Proof, it beats every superstition (popular or fringe) hands down!

MeAgain

December 28th, 2011
8:17 am

I’ve heard more than once that Fulton Science Academy has a prayer room that Muslims can and do us during the day. Why isn’t anybody angry about this. That’s religion in schools too. Why don’t some of these conservative groups check into this. I know the school is closing, but if they’ve been catering to the Muslims all these years, I think it needs to be known.

EVF Jr.

December 28th, 2011
8:17 am

Big Al,

You cannot visit Jesus’ grave because…HE IS ALIVE

Believer

December 28th, 2011
8:19 am

Isn’t christmas and easter a pagan holiday also?

Being a true Believer of Christ Jesus the Messiah is not about following man’s traditions with these so called days that has absolutely NOTHING to do with Him. Please read the Scriptures and stop listening to some of these so call pastors/preachers/bishops/ministers.

Darwin

December 28th, 2011
8:20 am

The religious right has leanred to play the victim card.

Steve from Tucker

December 28th, 2011
8:20 am

Maybe the reason a few remained uncomfortable in their seats is that they could not support the circus atmosphere surrounding what was supposed to be a worship service and the use of public intimidation to coerce false professions of ‘faith.’ Why would anyone want public school administrators indoctrinating their children in ANY faith? “Stay in your seats, kids.”

roddy

December 28th, 2011
8:22 am

Maureen Downey, “GOD” bless the free press. This was a great article and I really enjoyed the comments. I worries me, that someday, all we will get to read is a press release from some church, politician, or corporation.