Why aren’t people more concerned about the impact on kids from CRCT cheating scandal?

crcted.0920 (Medium)Albany Herald columnist Carlton Fletcher talked to the mother of a child in the Dougherty County schools about the fallout from the erupting CRCT scandal there and wrote a good piece about the conversation.

As we discussed here six days ago, state investigators issued a scathing report on cheating in Dougherty County schools, writing that there was “an acceptance of wrongdoing and a pattern of incompetence that is a blight on the community that will feel its effects for generations to come. This is the Dougherty County School System. Hundreds of school children were harmed by extensive cheating in the Dougherty County School System. In 11 schools, 18 educators admitted to cheating. We found cheating on the 2009 CRCT in all of the schools we examined. A total of 49 educators were involved in some form of misconduct or failure to perform their duty with regard to this test.

The mother told Fletcher that she was frustrated with the people who see the scandal only through its impact on the adults named in the cheating report. She wanted someone to write about how the allegations of cheating affected the children.

Here is an excerpt from the column:

The mom told me a little about her son, about how he doesn’t quite know how to deal with the things he’s hearing about the scandal. Although the bright-eyed youngster was timid about talking with me, he did say one thing that stuck with me.

“People are saying (here, the youngster mentioned the name of one of his teachers) did wrong, that she cheated,” he said in a voice that was halting and quiet. “My mama always told me that cheating is wrong, but I don’t want (teacher) to get in trouble. She just wanted us to do good on our tests.”

Her son’s comments brought tears to the young mom’s eyes. “I think that’s the worst thing about all this,” she said. “The people whose names are in the newspaper and on the television, the people who we trusted to educate our children, they took a shortcut to try and make themselves look better. They were willing to do what they knew was wrong just so they could meet some quota.

“They didn’t think about the little children like my son who idolize them and look to them for guidance. I know it’s not their job to raise my child, but it is their job to reinforce what I’ve tried to teach him. And one of those main things I’ve tried to teach is what’s right and what’s wrong.”

I offered no meaningful response to the woman’s comments. Clearly, she wanted to vent. And, frankly, I didn’t know what to say. I’ve said for years that No Child Left Behind, while good-intentioned, is a flawed standard by which school systems are judged. Among its unintended byproducts is a tendency of teachers to “teach tests” and, apparently, of educators to seek shortcuts to meet what most agree are all but unattainable standards.

But blaming this piece of legislation for unethical and illegal behavior is an example of one of America’s favorite cop-outs and one of its people’s biggest failings: finding a way to point a finger at others for our own shortcomings.

The CRCT scandal has a face for me now. When I listen to some bureaucrat use mumbo-jumbo to try and explain away the action of people who should have known better, I’ll think of this mother and her son, innocents who are left to pay a steep price for others’ betrayal. And I’ll also think, sadly, about the words of a friend who teaches in the school system: They’re only beginning to scratch the surface.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

113 comments Add your comment

carlosgvv

December 26th, 2011
10:21 am

All out social expermintation started in the 60’s to try and improve minority test scores. I suspect those in the know quickly realized that cheating was the one and only way to guarantee that the “no child left behind” concept could ever be made to work. So, look for a lot of sighs, hand-wringing and more experimentation since to publicly tell the truth would be unimagimably politically incorrect.

Jennifer Falk

December 26th, 2011
10:25 am

Your story brings back one of my fondest memories over the past decade. Early into the public announcements regarding the cheating scandal in APS, I attended a state board of education meeting. While the board was engaged in a discussion about the schools involved and their concern about adults who cheated, there was one State Board member, Ms. Zechman who, with just one simple inquiry, stopped the discussion cold. She asked what resources the district or state would be prepared to provide for the students who were cheated out of their education. You could have heard a pin drop.

nelson

December 26th, 2011
10:30 am

Cheating is too harsh a term, it is used for so many ominous happenings like spouse cheating, income tax cheating. I would much rather say “misrepresenting academic skills”. Now, is not that better.? It can become a way of living sooooo the sooner a stop is put to it the better.

Tonya C.

December 26th, 2011
10:30 am

Because many of these kids, at least in my experience, were already doing poorly to begin with. That is the crux of the problem. NCLB was expected to magically overcome the social issues that surround failing schools instead of actually solving the problems themselves. Now that I have a child in both middle and elementary school, and I have seen both the great and the not-so-great of public schools—I get it. I don’t excuse the cheating, but the supposed gains these students would have made I’m afraid wouldn’t have really materialized either way.

Let’s not forget that social promotion is still alive and well. And that many of the students who did fail the CRCT were committee-promoted instead of being retained anyway.

drew (former teacher)

December 26th, 2011
10:44 am

Well boo-freakin-hoo! How will these poor students EVER overcome the trauma of discovering that people sometimes cheat! Oh the horror! Perhaps we should make extra counselors available to help these poor children work through this horrific experience!

Maureen…you started to get it right (”I’ve said for years that No Child Left Behind, while good-intentioned, is a flawed standard by which school systems are judged.”), but then you dismiss that reasoning as finger pointing. Your first instinct was correct…NCLB IS the culprit here. Schools cheat for one reason: to make AYP! And as long as NCLB provides schools with a reason to cheat, there will be cheaters.

And your “beginning to scratch the surface” comment is dead-on. Indeed, we’d have to be pretty naive to think that the cheating is limited to those already exposed. And now that other systems have seen how these schools got caught, you can bet they’ll be more careful from here on out.

Erica Long

December 26th, 2011
10:44 am

Thanks so much for this post. One of my biggest frustrations of this tragedy is that so much of the focus has been on the feelings or well-being of adults. Since Ralph initially called for Beverly Hall’s immediate termination from APS, entirely too much of the feedback he heard from people was over the outcomes for the implicated adults. The focus should have always been the generation of children who were robbed of their one best shot at a high quality public education. Until we create child-centered schools, we will fail.

Tony

December 26th, 2011
10:45 am

The larger concern is how all the children’s education is being shortchanged due to the strict test-prep curricula being implemented in our schools. This is where our outrage should be focused. This is not to say that the cheating scandals are not a problem, but there effects on kids is not as great as the narrowed instructional opportunities in so many classrooms today. Tests have been oversold as an important means for school improvement. These children are paying a double price: failed policies from Atlanta and Washington and cheating on the tests.

catlady

December 26th, 2011
10:57 am

In a sense, your friend has said it correctly. I think We (the BIG we–not just teachers and educators) have cheated the kids unilaterally in several ways:

1. The test cheating-enough said
2. And even worse, the institutional academic cheating, ie test retakes, no grade below 50, etc.
3. Governmental cheating (We will give you $2 billion less than last year, but we expect higher results) (All kids will be on grade level by 2014-which would work, by the way, if we kept kids back until they WERE on grade level), (Overweight kids…Hey, here is another job we can load off on the schools!)
4.Parental cheating (It’ s up to the school to make you learn; it’s not my job)
5. Corporate cheating (Why should we have to pay taxes?)
And a hundred other ways our students are cheated out of the chance to earn (see that word) a good education for the well-being of our country.

DCSS Teacher

December 26th, 2011
11:11 am

Dougherty County (Albany) has been rate the 4th poorest city in America for the past two years, I suspect it would be higher but they included Lee County. Lee County is a white flight bedroom community to the north of Albany.. Nothing will change in the DCSS, there is no drive to make it happen. A few will be allowed to retire, maybe one or two will be released and others will wait until the public angst to subside. I do not place all the blame on the teachers, (no I did not and will not cheat period), the school board (state and local) and the public have created this debacle and now refuse to own it! The past Superintendent touted her vast increase in the graduation rate, a 51% to near 85%, inprovements as great as that do not happen. It is the same idea as moving the USS Carl Vinson as if it was a bass boat, no way can that happen. No one questioned the dramatic increase, the same way the APS had drastic jumps in improvement. All the leaders wanted to believe the lies being presented and only a few questioned it, but they were drowned out by everyone patting themselves on the back for solving the education dilemma. Education is a combination of a vast array of influencing ingredients, social, ethnic, economical, religous and the list goes on. Change can come but it takes a long hard effort over time to make that happen. Until the public stops looking for a magic pill and understands it will take time, change in education will not happen. The cheating of these students had been occurring prior to this scandal and most likely will continue. The damage done to these student will never corrected no matter how much corrective instruction given the educational scars will remain with them all their lives.

Hall's Driver

December 26th, 2011
11:20 am

When will you freaking parents get that a teacher’s job is still just a job. Like any other industry, except you want to force emotions that can’t be forced. Stop expecting teachers to save your kids…they may have their own to worry about.

Halftrack

December 26th, 2011
11:28 am

Social engineering by the Government is one issue of concern. Second is that “elite’s” think they know more than anyone else how to handle a problem. Third, is that the PTO’s of the local area has little or no influence on the Political, Bd’s of Ed, and School officials and hold some to accountability. No one is listening to the voting public anymore. In short it is hard to fight City Hall as we watch our children grow up and do not know how to think critically about anything and go through life like experimental mice.

bootney farnsworth

December 26th, 2011
11:32 am

where’s the outrage? simple.
people no longer care.

after the abomination of APS, the implosions of Clayton and DeKalb, social promotions, ect ect ect most people simply view the public ed system as something like taxes to be endured. most people just hope
we don’t screw up any worse than we already do.

atlmom

December 26th, 2011
11:59 am

the thing is the schools can’t do what they need to do to get kids to do what they need to do. They are so afraid of lawsuits, they do nothing.
So one kid can disrupt a class, and the rest of the class has to wait around to learn, if it ever happens. If kids aren’t behaving, or worse, they should be taken out of the classroom, period (and put into an institution that can help them learn how to behave). But kids are allowed to do whatever, the teacher has to deal with it, there’s little help from a principal and no help from the administration.
We should get rid of the dept of ed. at the federal level because it comes up with idiotic ideas like no child left behind. Get the feds out of the education business.
It would be hunky dory if the federal govt came around with standards for schools, and with recommendations, but they don’t – they have no idea what they are doing and we have spent billions (probably trillions) over the years, and have little to show for it.

another aps teacher

December 26th, 2011
12:00 pm

Want the kids to learn? Start with going back to basics-phonics, math facts, rote memorization of basic skills. everyone can do that regardless of income or SES status. We understand that students can learn to read if they don’t know the letters of the alphabet. Why can’t we accept that students will never be proficient in math if they don’t know math facts? Hiring teachers who can name the capitols of the 50 states AND locate the states on a map would help improve our social studies scores. When I was a little girl teachers were expected to know more than just their subjects, and all of my elementary school teachers knew more math than the students were expected to learn. In my hometown no one got a teaching certificate that covered grades k-12 just because they had a college degree, as was the practice in Atlanta a scant 30 years ago.

Get off of the social promotion high horse. Social promotion is not for the self esteem of the kid being promoted, it is for the safety of the kids he will be sitting next to if he is retained. I asked before and I will ask again: Do you want your nine year old little girl sitting next to a pubescent 12 year old who has repeated the 4th grade twice because he can’t pass the test? Think about it… And while you are thinking about that, think about this too. If Johnny failed the 5th grade math test twice, why would anyone think he is ready to do 6th grade math? That does not compute (pun intended).

atlmom

December 26th, 2011
12:02 pm

oh, and the cheating scandal is horrific. It’s that these kids really didn’t learn this material (that really isn’t that difficult, it shouldn’t take more than a month to teach) – and then their parents/etc thought that they knew it, and they all moved on to the next lesson…so they were cheated over and again, because the parents thought they were learning (however, really…um…I quiz my kids every day as to what they are learning, so what exactly were these teachers doing every day with these kids? really? It’s craziness, actually).
There was some school system that was ONLY teaching math and reading. That’s it – in preparation for these tests. Idiotic. But my question is: NOT ONE PARENT in the whole school system ever asked their kids what they were doing? REALLY? Weird strange and awful.

Sam

December 26th, 2011
12:05 pm

We have clear evidence that some teachers did not resist cheating when there was pressure on the outcome. It’s not evidence that all teachers cheat. I am sure they do not. At the same time, the scandal does create a set of questions about the moral commitment and courage of some of those teaching our children and those administering their education. This is the root of the problem. The fault is not in the temptation but in the cowardly choice of the people involved.
Cheating cheats the kids. Having kids taught by educators who would cheat is a bigger problem and we are not yet close to its root.

atlmom

December 26th, 2011
12:07 pm

hear hear aps teacher! Social promotion is idiotic, but the whole idea of the grades the way they are is idiotic to begin with. Putting kids together just because they are the same age is stupid. Why do we do that? then a teacher with 20 kids has to ‘teach to the kid’ for each of them. Rather than putting them together by ability (which I suppose we start to do in middle school). Why do we waste so much time in elem. school putting kids together by age? It’s dumb.
And in the end, many other schools in most of the world DO NOT have 7-8 hours of school a day. Many of them have four, and they are still ahead of us academically. Hmmm…how does that work.
I always say: outside of the US – those other school systems are homogeneous – all those kids pretty much are from the same culture/background/value system.
But that’s not the case with Israel. And they seem to be doing pretty well.

Maxine

December 26th, 2011
12:15 pm

By cheating, is that saying that the students cannot and / or will not be able to grasp the material on the test? If the students have not been exposed to the subject material on the test, then they most likely will not pass. For example, if there are fractions on the test and the student has been going to the same school since 1st grade and has never been exposed to fractions, they will fail. What I find is that a lot of the schools in the poor or minority neighborhoods have a curriculum that does not allow the students to compete with students in other schools. I attribute the problems to both parents and administrators. Parents need to get involved and demand better education for their children, and administrators need to provide the best education for the children. All of the poor performing schools need to revamp their curriculum starting with the 1st grade.

Tonya C.

December 26th, 2011
12:28 pm

atlmom:

Yes yes yes! Grouping kids by ability, the lack of real interaction between parents and their kids, non-homogeneous society with competing principles and values, and the inability of the public to accept reality that some kids will be left behind….leads us to where we are now. Let’s not even discuss the behavior issues in schools today, because no one wants to even look at that elephant in room.

Are We There Yet?

December 26th, 2011
12:30 pm

Why are all of my comments “Awaiting Moderation?” They are not ones that call others inappaopriate names, have inappropriate racial remarks, nor are they singling out persons who are not considered public officials. What gives Maureen???

a

December 26th, 2011
12:38 pm

How much of this “teacher cheating” is a direct result of diploma buying in colleges? You do remember the diploma buying scandal from the lesser accredited colleges that was quickly swept under the rug a few years ago. Right?

atlmom

December 26th, 2011
12:40 pm

tonya: the reality is that whatever we’re doing isn’t working.
But it’s not ONLY a school issue. It’s an issue of so many other things working together (when a parents just collects a check from the govt, they don’t really see a huge value in education, given that their kid can just collect same check in a few years. and…kid doesn’t know what it is to get a job because they’ve never seen parent getting a job, etc etc). There are so many issues, and then again, there are so many people who thing our govt has the answers, and they do clearly don’t. I know plenty of people who tell me what they think the govt *should* do and that we should keep throwing money at these programs (i.e., fed. dept of ed) – because it *could* be doing something else.
That’s all well and good, but really – it doesn’t and it has never. why are we throwing away so many dollars on programs that aren’t working at the fed level? Jobs program, I suppose.

Lisa B.

December 26th, 2011
12:40 pm

When will we accept that one educational shoe does not fit all kids? I’ve worked in elementary, middle and high schools. By 5th grade, or even earlier, some students have already disengaged themselves from academics. Despite repeated failure, schools continue to force-feed these students academic material they have no interest in learning. Students drop-out in droves because they don’t value what we teach them. Schools need to offer options beside the college track. Students must be given opportunities to learn marketable skills so they can graduate high school and get jobs. Retaining kids until they are 2 or 3 grade levels behind is not the answer. We need to shift those students into vocational areas. All students are not the same. Schools need to stop pretending they are.

Lee

December 26th, 2011
12:47 pm

Sorry, these kids were not cheated by teachers changing answers on a test. They were cheated when they were sitting in fifth grade and couldn’t read. They were cheated when teachers and administrators closed their eyes and held their noses and passed them along from grade to grade when they couldn’t do the work.

We’ve blogged about this extensively. These kids were cheated by teachers, administrators, parents, school board, and policy.

I’m not concerned about the impact on kids from CRCT cheating scandals. I’m concerned that my tax dollars are being flushed down the toilet by the politically correct “equal outcomes” idiots who are cheating these kids out of their futures.

Vinny

December 26th, 2011
12:53 pm

Because people will cry ‘raaaaaaaaaaciiiiiiisssssm

JT

December 26th, 2011
12:59 pm

Exactly what impact would that be? Don’t you realize that the majority of the time students are passed on to the next grade regardless of whether or not they passed portions of the CRCT? The whole thing’s a pathetic joke. Perhaps if teachers weren’t constantly harassed and made to live in fear for their jobs, the alleged cheating wouldn’t be an issue. Of course, we’re all overpaid, incompetent, lazy fools with no rights or feelings whatsoever, aren’t we Downey?

atlmom

December 26th, 2011
1:00 pm

and, really, after the crct in the spring, many teachers just stop doing anything. Except my son’s teacher at the end of last year. He was amazing! he was teaching how teaching should be done the whole year! using experiential learning. the kids had fun AND they were learning. But the teachers are not allowed to do that during the year because goodness knows, learning should be boring and terrible and the kids should hate being in school. Right?
Allow the teachers to teach. Get most of the administrators OUT.
Also, Lisa: You are correct. I grew up in a small town, with two high schools. But there were several different ways one could get a degree. There was a small learning environment inside the school, and many kids ‘joined’ that – they could sort of help to design their own curriculum.
But we also had an ‘alternative’ high school, where kids who really couldn’t stand the pressure of the ‘big’ high school went. You actually still got a diploma from the ‘regular’ high school, which indicated you were college ready, but those kids completely and totally designed their own curriculum, there were maybe 30 kids in the whole school, and the kids went on to many different colleges (including harvard).
There was also vocational, where the school system partnered with others to ensure the kids could get what they needed/wanted. (we also had car mechanics as well as other classes like that in the high school).
You can’t have one curriculum and then think it’s for everyone. Our ideas of that must change. If you don’t like the local school, and the ONE way they do things, you are out of luck.
Which is why the magnet program in the city of atlanta was fantastic and I have no idea why they changed it (from what I hear, it was working really well. Maybe that was it- we can’t have any wins for the kids).

Ponder

December 26th, 2011
1:10 pm

Pardon my not tracking this, but what has happened, if anything, to (2) Beverly Hall and others in “high” positions, and (2) the teachers who were responsible and/or implicated for cheating?

Ponder

December 26th, 2011
1:11 pm

Sorry, a typo — should be (1) Beverly Hall….

Lisa B.

December 26th, 2011
1:17 pm

Part of the problem is that lawmakers promised parents that all students would graduate high school on grade level, ready for college. When that didn’t happen, news media, movie producers, billionaire computer moguls, and the public blamed the teachers. Students are no longer held accountable.

That said, I still do not condone the cheating.

atlmom

December 26th, 2011
1:17 pm

ponder: nothing. and nothing probably will happen. seriously APS is obligated to pay all her attorney’s fees, so probably nothing technically will happen. Technically at this point she doesn’t have a job, but realistically someone will hire her to do something, I would suppose.
Nothing happens to these people…so you are correct…why not play the system for all it’s worth? I mean, other than that your rep will suffer. Many people don’t seem to care about that, though.

Lisa B.

December 26th, 2011
1:20 pm

Ponder, from what I’ve read, the few administrators who have had hearings with the Professional Standards Commission had their teaching certificates permently revoked. The teachers who have had hearings lost their certificates for a year. I would expect that caused them each to lose their jobs, since they are no longer certified. I don’t think many hearings have been held. This is going to take awhile. In Dougherty County, the teachers and adminstrators involved were mostly still at work as of the Christmas Break.

Mahopinion

December 26th, 2011
1:24 pm

Remember, these teachers and administrators who did the cheating are the same ones who wring their hands and complain about the abysmal lack of ethics on the part of the students and their parents.

I wonder if the can spell “hypocrisy” without having to look at someone else’s paper…

Mahopinion

December 26th, 2011
1:28 pm

One other point. Why did these teachers and administrators cheat? It had nothing to do with helping the kids and everything to do with covering up the fact that their methods of educating our children are FAILING.

Felicity

December 26th, 2011
1:32 pm

I CARE. As a parent of 2 students living on the south side, I noticed the inferior education my first child was receiving right away. It’s very disheartening when the admin isn’t responsive. I like NCLB, as it puts a spot-light on where the education problems are. We were able to escape through transfers for lower grades and magnet high school. The higher performing schools don’t over-stress the test, which I’ve always refused to have my kids study for. But it isn’t fair that inferior employess(Cobb had a campaign they named save the 60, who couldn’t pass the praxis) are allowed to keep these jobs and the school year ends and onlt the student is harmed.

Beverly Fraud

December 26th, 2011
1:33 pm

Since Ralph initially called for Beverly Hall’s immediate termination from APS, entirely too much of the feedback he heard from people was over the outcomes for the implicated adults.

And let us NOT forget in a sea of apologists, (Concerned Black Clergy, Andrew Young, Shirley Frankiln, members of the Chamber of Commerce, selected staff at the AJC, Arne Duncan etc.) Ralph Long virtually ALONE had the integrity to do the right thing.

I can JUST imagine (but FULLY understand if he or his wife don’t comment publicly on it) what some of the above mentioned names might have done, for the “good of the community” (read: IMAGE) to put pressure on Rep. Long to not make his stand.

atlmom

December 26th, 2011
1:47 pm

ralph long is awesome. enough said (this is not the only time he has stuck his neck out and been correct).

Bro

December 26th, 2011
1:53 pm

If you want to find out what kind of a job a teacher has done, then spot check their students using an unbias judge. A test such as the one given only serves to show that a student has not been taught. When a student fails the math, science or english graduation test the teacher’s or the ones that should be punished not the student. It is their failure for letting the uneducated get that far in the system. The failure here is not the student, but the system. Lool at the Dougherty County school system. What schools were involved in the cheating, what was the ethnic group involved, and what has been the education level of students that failed to graduate after leaving these schools. The system here is the true failure. There are way to many overpaid admin personnel in this system and all the others. Way too many so called educated rejects teaching in the system. A lot of the colleges that these educators graduated from need to be investigated for what they are-diploma factories. If you do not provide proper education of teachers then you get what you pay for-not much.

carlosgvv

December 26th, 2011
1:56 pm

Ponder

I would guess that little or nothing has or will happen to them. Those is charge are counting on the public’s short attention span and, unfortunately, they probably won’t be disapointed.

Lisa B.

December 26th, 2011
2:00 pm

Bro, I agree with you that the Dougherty County school system has failed many students entrusted to its care. When something does not work, it is insane to keep doing the same thing over and over again and expect a different outcome. There are some good teachers in DCSS. Unfortunately, most folks around here seem to think all the teachers cheated, but only a few got caught. Even the newspaper reported that many more teachers were suspected, but there was not enough evidence to indict them.

Tamara Cotman

December 26th, 2011
2:01 pm

You want to know what’s happening with us? I’m sittin’ on the beach with Bev in Jamaica sippin’ some Pina Coladas. Thanks, suckers!

Laurie

December 26th, 2011
2:50 pm

atlmom wrote: “Putting kids together just because they are the same age is stupid.”

So true.

Sir Ken Robinson has argued that one harmful part of “production line teaching” is that we nonsensically “group students by date of manufacture.” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDZFcDGpL4U

He gets a laugh for that, but the thing is, it’s really true.

Wise Man

December 26th, 2011
2:52 pm

instead of getting educated, the kids have learned from those who propagated the scandal is that:

they (kids) can get what they want out of life by cheating… so there will be no need to learn

wise man say: you can’t teach what you don’t know and can’t lead where you won’t go

Pb

December 26th, 2011
2:53 pm

I’m not a teacher – but how can so many of you assume that these children did not get an education because the teacher cheated? The teacher may have taught as best as she/he could and resorted to cheating to make sure they reached the administration’s goals.

d

December 26th, 2011
3:04 pm

@Bro…. I teach at the high school level. There is little I can do to prepare a student for a high-school level test if they are years behind academically when they get to me. That being said, there is also little I can do if there is not sufficient motivation for the students themselves to pass. Frankly, although retention in and of itself is a problem, placing students in grades that they are unprepared for is another problem. I will say no test is really a good indicator, but people are too lazy to use and evaluate authentic assessments to see if students are really ready.

D

December 26th, 2011
3:09 pm

The kids that benefited from the cheating were for the most part poor, minority students. The kids that get socially promoted are for the most part poor, minority students. The kids that benefit from federally funded breakfast and lunch programs are for the most part poor, minority students. Throw in Title 1 and myriad more programs and we end up here. All these resources thrown at them for the better part of a half century or more and still very little progress academically, relatively speaking. Why all the fuss? It’s not like minorities are getting special treatment in college admissions as well. Oh, wait…. I’m not minority bashing here, but lets put all the cards on the table and speak honestly about what all this is really about. The govt. has been trying one social experiment after another in the public schools and none of them have worked or even made a dent in the real problem. It’s easier to hold teachers accountable for the failings of others because we’re a sitting duck. They won’t hold the students responsible and they can hold the parents responsible, so that leaves teachers holding the bag. Oh well. Guess I’ll crawl back in my hole now and continue to make a difference while the”grown ups” try to decide what’s best.

D

December 26th, 2011
3:10 pm

Meant to say CAN’T hold the parents responsible.

Beverly Fraud

December 26th, 2011
3:19 pm

“It’s easier to hold teachers accountable for the failings of others because we’re a sitting duck. They won’t hold the students responsible and they can hold the parents responsible, so that leaves teachers holding the bag.”

Yet can you get a SINGLE Republican leader (you know, the “personal responsibility” crowd) to say that? And can you get a SINGLE Democratic leader who will call the Republicans on their silence?

bootney farnsworth

December 26th, 2011
3:22 pm

@ Beverly

this goes well beyond party politics, and you know that

Grob Hahn

December 26th, 2011
3:24 pm

The greatest portion of students targeted by all of this cheating are black. Cheating black children out of their education is absolute racism. This is being overlooked simply because the people who are doing the cheating are also black. If the black community isn’t willing to raise hell over this, how is anyone else expected to care? Any non-black people who do care will be called racists the moment they recognize the facts of these cases.
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