New report: Half of nation’s schools failed to make AYP

The Center on Education Policy released a new report on the number of schools that have failed to make adequate yearly progress  under No Child Left Behind in school year 2010-11. The report –  AYP Results for 2010-11  –  also presents six years of AYP trends in all 50 states and Washington, D.C.

According to the report:

–About half (48 percent) of the nation’s schools did not make AYP in 2011. This marked an increase from 39 percent in 2010, and is the highest percentage since NCLB took effect.

–In almost half the states, 50 percent or more of the public schools did not make AYP; in five states and D.C., at least three quarters of schools failed to make AYP.

–The percentage of public schools not making AYP in 2011 varied greatly by state, from about 11 percent in Wisconsin to about 89 percent in Florida. (In Georgia, 27 percent of schools did not meet targets.)

The AJC has a good explainer on the study. Among the points in the story: The findings are far below the 82 percent failure rate that Education Secretary Arne Duncan predicted earlier this year but still indicate an alarming trend that Duncan hopes to address by granting states relief from the federal law. The law requires states to have every student performing at grade level in math and reading by 2014, which most educators agree is an impossible goal.

“Whether it’s 50 percent, 80 percent or 100 percent of schools being incorrectly labeled as failing, one thing is clear: No Child Left Behind is broken,” Duncan said in a statement Wednesday. “That’s why we’re moving forward with giving states flexibility from the law in exchange for reforms that protect children and drive student success.”

Here is a more detailed summation from CEP on its report:

The adequate yearly progress (AYP) requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) have come under renewed scrutiny due to Congressional efforts to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) and Secretary of Education Arne Duncan’s decision to consider waivers of key NCLB requirements. Under NCLB, all public school districts and schools must make adequate progress each year in raising student achievement, culminating in 100% of students reaching proficiency by 2014. The Secretary’s plan to provide unprecedented flexibility through waivers was fueled in part by a growing concern that increasing numbers of schools are failing to make AYP each year and that most would fall short of the 2014 goal.

The Center on Education Policy (CEP), an independent nonprofit organization, has been monitoring national AYP data going back to school year 2005-06. In April 2011, we released a report with estimates of the number of schools in the nation and each state that did not make AYP in 2010, as well as trends from 2006 through 2010 in the national percentage of schools not making AYP (Update with 2009-10 Data and Five-Year Trends: How Many Schools Have Not Made Adequate Yearly Progress?).

This new report updates our April report in three respects. First, we have added estimates of the number of schools that did not make AYP in 2011, based on tests administered in school year 2010-11. These data were collected from what we believe to be the most reliable sources available at the time of our research. Second, the 2011 estimates have been added to our trend data to produce six-year trends in the percentages of schools not making AYP for the nation and each state. Third, the 2010 estimates in our April report have been updated with the official numbers of schools that did not make AYP in 2010, obtained from Consolidated State Performance Reports submitted by states to the U.S. Department of Education.

To make adequate yearly progress as defined by NCLB, public schools and districts must meet yearly targets, known as annual measurable objectives (AMOs), set by their state for the percentages of students scoring proficient on state tests and other performance indicators. If a school fails to make AYP for two consecutive years or more, it is considered “in need of improvement” and must submit to certain interventions mandated by NCLB that are intended to improve achievement.

The AMOs, as well as the content and rigor of tests used to measure student achievement, vary greatly among states. For that reason, AYP results should not be directly compared between states, and a state with a higher percentage of schools failing to make AYP should not be assumed to have a weaker educational system. (A more detailed explanation of how AYP is determined and why interstate comparisons are not valid can be found in the 2010 CEP report, How Many Schools and Districts Have Not Made Adequate Yearly Progress? Four-Year Trends.)

The 2011 data in this report are preliminary estimates of the percentages of schools not making AYP and should not be considered final.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

56 comments Add your comment

Another Math Teacher

December 15th, 2011
11:01 am

As long as everyone is better than average, we’ll be O.K.!

Dunwoody Mom

December 15th, 2011
11:06 am

And this surprises anyone? Who in their right mind would judge success or failure on test scores?

Pluto

December 15th, 2011
11:11 am

Arne Duncan is the master of the obvious. But this whole flexibility thing can be a bit troubling as well? If we stay the course here we will see higher and higher percentages of schools not attain AYP. I see little if any effort to “fundamentally transform” our education system. All of that effort has gone toward transforming the economy. Maybe we are better off if nothing is done?

d

December 15th, 2011
11:17 am

Unfortunately, the transformation that would probably make the biggest impact is so politically incorrect that we’ll never see it happen…. We compare ourselves to Germany, Japan and the likes all the time – but we aren’t comparing ourselves to *all* of those students – just those in their academic tracks. Students who don’t cut it or show little interest in academics are put into trade schools to learn a useful skill so that they can be productive members of society. When we say an entire school is “failing” because of one subgroup, the system itself is out of whack.

Dunwoody Mom

December 15th, 2011
11:30 am

Here are 2 things I determined early on in this AYP “frenzy”. Making AYP does not, in and out itself, determine a successful school. Not Making AYP does not, in and of itself, determine a failing school. The way AYP determinnation is setup now, the more diverse your school, the less likely you are to make AYP.

Atlanta Media Guy

December 15th, 2011
11:32 am

The original authors of NCLB are no longer in office. Bush is a private citizen and Teddy Kennedy died, so transforming NCLB might be a good idea. However, how much money do we have to throw at education? Seems to me the more money we spend the more students fail at being successful. Why?

Tech Schools are a great start! The comparisons with other countries ring hollow since a large majority of students in the US MUST take the SAT. While in other countries, only the students planning to go to college take the SAT. Trade schools will help with our future, but we have to convince our government leaders that not every student is suited for a class room and books.

Don't Tread

December 15th, 2011
11:35 am

Well shame on us if we expect a 5th grader to possess the knowledge of a 5th grader. Half of them don’t, and we pass them along to the 6th grade anyway, because it might hurt their “self-esteem” or something.

While NCLB has its flaws, social promotion is much worse.

Dr NO / Mr Sunshine

December 15th, 2011
11:38 am

Well perhaps if we lowered the “grading” scale then everyone could pass.

V for Vendetta

December 15th, 2011
11:45 am

You mean . . . everyone is NOT special and equal. What a shocker.

Digger

December 15th, 2011
11:51 am

Anyone who thought that every single child would be on grade level in a few years is an absolute idiot. How did we get so stupid?

Adios!

December 15th, 2011
11:52 am

GOOD RIDDANCE TO AYP

Stooge

December 15th, 2011
11:53 am

School systems in agriculturally dominant areas(like mine) are hobbled at the starting gate with unsupportive homes, language barriers and generations of apathy towards education.
The goernment is not going to fix that with punitive testing and policies put together by people who only show up in classrooms for photo ops.

Rockdale Educator: not shocked!

December 15th, 2011
12:01 pm

We all know NCLB is a J-O-K-E. How can this nation seriously expect students to perform at a high level academically, and increase class sizes, limit funds to schools with high minority populations, and make excuses for the sorry parents who accept failure. Yes, I said it: SORRY. I’m not blaming parents by a long shot; there are some SORRY educators as well. I’ve seen how the people who “wear the hats” ruin kids for life. I’ve met principals with less that 2 years teaching experience, but they have all of the answers??? Come on people.

NCLB is great, in a perfect society. Realistically, it’s a failed policy that needs to be revamped or eliminated. The biases that exist on tests that only assess students ONE TIME on THAT PARTICULAR DAY needs to be re-thought. Children will continue to be left behind because of adults, where it’s parents, teachers, or administration. Educators have to worry more about test scores and pleasing parents rather than their students learning. Discipline is OUT OF THE WINDOW. I am not surprised by the AYP failures in the country…..I’m more shocked that some schools made AYP! It amazes me that some of these principals are soooooo excited about making AYP for their own personal gain. AYP is a BASELINE measurement. Students only have to learn HALF of the content in order to meet the requirements. Once Americans realize that we are soooooooo far behind Asia academically and changes are a MUST.

Check out this article and guess the winner’s ethnicity! :) http://tweentribune.com/content/teen-wins-100000-science-prize

@ Don't Tread

December 15th, 2011
12:08 pm

It’s a shame that we expect a child with a learning disability to perform at the level of all other students. It’s a shame that we expect a student who just entered the country three weeks ago to pass the same standardized test as native English learners (another issue all together). It’s a shame that the people making these absurd decisions have likely NEVER stepped foot in a public school in their entire lives, nor are they consulting veteran/current educators on their decisions. It’s a shame how much money the agencies administering these tests are likely making hand over fist, at the expense of our kids and our livelihoods.

@ Don't Tread

December 15th, 2011
12:20 pm

“The comparisons with other countries ring hollow since a large majority of students in the US MUST take the SAT. While in other countries, only the students planning to go to college take the SAT”

This is an inaccurate statement. Only students entering four-year colleges “MUST” take the SAT or ACT. Students entering two-year or technical colleges can take the COMPASS placement exam at the college during their freshman orientation (or whatever placement instrument that particular college uses. ) Students who have no plans on attending college are under no obligation to take the ACT/SAT

Personally, this is the only time I’m okay with standardized testing. At the college level, either you’re ready or you’re not. And if you’re not, then there are other options for you.

sloboffthestreet

December 15th, 2011
1:33 pm

Under NCLB, the federal government told the states: “You can set your own standards, and you can write your own standardized tests, but you have to make sure your kids can pass them.

Then the states are allowed to add a cut score to the test results? After 10 years so far, the progress that should have been made is simply not apparent.

Once again I read responses about Arnie, NCLB, agriculture, ethnicity, and politicians never having been teachers? Really folks? One more time. The great Kathy Cox was one of you. Brooks Coleman was one of you. We have other state leaders that were one of you. You set the standards, {are told what will be on the test,} you write the test and then the curve is set at answering 50% of the questions correct and that is what is considered a passing grade. And for some strange reason every excuse in the book is presented as to why you continue to fail the students of Georgia.

I was asking a veteran teacher the other day why teachers don’t come together and bring a solution to this disaster. The answer was one I have been given over and over. “I have 5 years until I retire. It’s not my problem.”

And the beat goes on?

WOW!!!

V for Vendetta

December 15th, 2011
1:36 pm

slob,

So it’s our fault? Tell me, how should I go about changing the attitude of a student whose parents can barely speak proper English, let him or her dress like trash, and don’t enforce any sort of discipline or consequences for his or her actions? What would be your solution? Do share.

Public HS Teacher

December 15th, 2011
1:49 pm

Lost in this news report…. Georgia is doing better in education that at least half of the other states! Why is this swept under the rug?

Too often the news and some people rush to bash education in Georgia. Why not celebrate the good news?

Public HS Teacher

December 15th, 2011
1:52 pm

@sloboffthestreet – Your post above clearly shows why a real teacher union is desperately needed in Georgia. This union would provide the checks and balances needed in Georgia education.

However, the State law would need to change. The teacher representative would need a seat at every Board of Education table in every school system, as well as at the State level.

However, this is just a pipe dream. Why would “those people” want to give up any power that they hold?

sloboffthestreet

December 15th, 2011
1:55 pm

V

My first suggestion would be to put down your Iphone and turn your efforts to your job. Now that we have solved that problem perhaps the parents attitude and ability to provide for their children should not be your main focus. If you take the time to use your school council, PTO, churches and yes even a teachers group to find rescources to obtain proper used clothing for students who are, “Dressed like trash” that would be a very good start to raise a childs sense of self worth and give them a feeling that someone is actually interested in them and their future. Having done this, perhaps, just perhaps what you see as a discipline problem may just solve itself.

Digger

December 15th, 2011
1:55 pm

Georgia is doing better than other states because it’s standards are just above the retard level.

Whathappened

December 15th, 2011
1:58 pm

Until we dispell the myth in our society that education is unimportant and that things are acquired instantly and without thought or meaningful effort, education will continute to suffer. A blurred sense of history, zero sense of struggle, and lack of morals all contribute to poor decisions, poor parenting, poor governing, poor education and poor people. Many of us wouldn’t be in the situations that we’re in (foreclosure, bad credit, etc.) if we could simply read.
“If you can read they can beat you, if you can count they can cheat you”.
-Toni Morrison

Whathappened

December 15th, 2011
2:00 pm

“If you CAN’T read they can beat you, if you CAN’T count they can cheat you.”
-Toni Morrison
:-) ……oh the irony of the forthcoming comments regarding those errors….

sloboffthestreet

December 15th, 2011
2:05 pm

Public HS Teacher

I’m torn as to which of your posts I respond to first. I’ll take it from the top.

Don’t believe everything you read. Simply making the test easier and adjusting the cut score works wonders for a states ranking among other states. Some states are more interested in student gains and the truth than rankings!

Our Board of Education is made up of 2 retired teachers, the spouse of a teacher and a parent of a teacher. I’m convinced one just does it for his beer money. I do agree with your statement, ” Why would “those people” want to give up any power that they hold?”

You’re absolutly correct. They don’t. They want teachers to continue to receive more and more with little to no consideration for student achievement. Now how about that?

Frankie

December 15th, 2011
2:12 pm

This whole thing is a joke the AYp, the CRCT,…how abuot tis we teach reading writing and arithematic.

My kid comes home and the teacher give him a study guide for a test the next day and not one thing on the study guide is on the test…
The other issue is that the teachers do not teach how to take test like they did when i was in school..
they don’t teach you how to solve the problems any more…they want 3rd graders to use deductive and inductive reasoning when they don’t even explain to them what it is and how to appl it…probably because they don’t know what it is either, because they just graduated college…

Frankie

December 15th, 2011
2:16 pm

They don’t even tell you when they are administering benchmark testing…
the tests they give in class is set up differently from how they give the test on the CRCT or the benchmark test…
Every week is sometype of testing measure…they spend more time measuring increase, than they do teaching reading, writing and arithematic…

Frankie

December 15th, 2011
2:17 pm

THe private schools have it right repetition, structure, then testing.
The public schools want to measure rather than teach…

Stooge

December 15th, 2011
2:19 pm

“they spend more time measuring increase, than they do teaching reading, writing and arithematic…”

sums it up pretty well

Joke on us

December 15th, 2011
2:23 pm

It’s all part of the PLAN

Fericita

December 15th, 2011
2:29 pm

Digger –

It’s not the standards that are sub-par, it’s the cut score that qualifies as a passing rate. I believe to pass the math section on the CRCT, students need to get 45% of the questions right, and on the reading portion, it’s 50%.

The number of schools making it is not a clear reflection of how students are doing. It never was. Even if your students pass in the “exceeds” category, your whole school can fail because the special ed sub group or the ELL sub group failed. I’ve seen principals slow down or even stop the special ed entry process so they don’t have the number of kids required for that sub group to count against them. What was supposed to protect these special groupings of students has ended up hurting them.

And now we have to pretend that RTTT is a great alternative; now that teachers’ ratings are tied to student performance, we can all of a sudden work miracles. It’s actually pretty insulting. Apparently, Arne Duncan thinks I haven’t been working hard, but if you dangle money in front of me, I will.

Just A Teacher

December 15th, 2011
2:45 pm

They need to repeal NCLB, not grant exemptions. It’s a ridiculous law! I’ve said it a million times over the course of my career; “Stay out of my way and let me teach, and I’ll do the best job that I can!” I’ve had success with that philosophy because I take my job VERY seriously. What a kid marks on a standardized test means less than nothing to me. If he gains knowledge while under my tutelage, I’m content. If he refuses to try and better himself, I will try to inspire him, but ultimately, that is not my fault. I’m not a miracle worker; I’m an expert in my field with valuable skills and information to share with my students. Having my teaching skills evaluated according to how students perform on standardized tests is demeaning and just plain irrational. If you want to know what my students have learned in my class, ask them to recite Shakespeare or to analyze and evaluate the works of Arthur Miller. They can and will do these things with varying levels of success because it is what is expected of them in my classroom. Unfortunately, none of those things are actually tested on the multiple choice tests which ultimately determine if I am a good or bad teacher. Go figure!

catlady

December 15th, 2011
4:38 pm

Georgia does so well because it uses a very minimal test and “adjusts” the cutoff scores. Time to see some truth in testing around here.

We had an African American kid move into our school sytem this week. We’d better watch it–that makes 3! Before you know it, we’ll have that subgroup to worry about!

catlady

December 15th, 2011
4:43 pm

don’t tread: Nonnative English speakers are excused from the CRCT for a year after arrival, except for science (all reading) and math (all word problems–figure out the thinking on that!).

Atlanta Mom

December 15th, 2011
6:08 pm

Until AYP is based on a national exam, with national cut scores, comparisons from state to state make no sense at all.

V for Vendetta

December 15th, 2011
6:43 pm

slob,

So schools should feed, cloth, and raise the less fortunate? Is that what you’re suggesting? It clearly shows how little you know about education or what takes place inside the walls of a classroom. If a person has a child, he or she should be responsible for his or her child. You see, I have my own children. I teach, coach, and work during the summer in order to provide them with a comfortable life–one free from want or need. I take care of my finances and make smart decisions with money in order to secure a stable future for my family, and, hopefully, give my children a jump start when the time comes for them to go to college. I’m always thinking of them and what I can do for them.

So, when someone decides to abdicate his responsibility to his children and expect the rest of us to take up the slack, we should turn that duty over to the classroom teacher? The same teacher who is charged with EDUCATING–i.e., not raising–up to 150 other students during the school day? The same teacher who is expected to bring all of those students up to some preordained “standard” developed by the county, state, or country? The same teacher who works other jobs or works towards advanced degrees to make more money? The same teacher who, in addition to his or her classroom duties, is expected to monitor the bus lane, walk the parking lot, meet with parents, help students after school, and implements the curriculum cure du jour?

Is that the teacher you’re talking about?

Oh, and as for your comment that there are teachers in high places . . . as you’d expect in many jobs, there are plenty of people who are more interested in moving up than they are in the actual job. Pointing out our less than stellar peers who have made a job out of embarrassing themselves at higher levels doesn’t really prove anything except that people lose sight of what’s important in the face of a larger paycheck and political pressure.

sloboffthestreet

December 15th, 2011
6:55 pm

Atlanta Moms comment @ 6:08 hits the nail on the head. It is unfortunate the Feds lack the power to mandate a national curriculum. and one test. I hear educators and administrators state the reason this is not possible is because of local heritage. Now that has to be the most ignorant thing I have listened to from a teacher. I take this to mean teaching Rebel Flag waving and the south won the Civil War?

Local control of public education MUST COME TO AN END! The slogan will read,”Stop The Stupidity.”

Call Fran Millar and Brooks Coleman and demand a change. Senator Millars home page states in huge bold letters, “Effectiveness Matters.” I agree. It’s time public education was effective. His cell # is 770.490.0213. Be sure to wish him a Happy Belated Birthday. It was 12/9. House Rep. Coleman can be reached @ 770.476.4471.
Then email the rest of Georgia’s law makers and demand the same. Only you can prevent stupidity. It’s time for a change. Lets make it one that is EFFECTIVE!

You don’t like NCLB? Let us all bring an end to NCLB. Replace it with one test and one cut score for every student in the country.

sloboffthestreet

December 15th, 2011
7:11 pm

V asks????

“Is that the teacher you’re talking about?”

Funny you should ask V because that is exactly the teacher I am talking about. You referenced the student dressed in rags and the parents that don’t speak English? Your words, not mine.

I am going to guess that your parents were English speaking Americans. That you had breakfast, lunch & diner every day? That you arrived to school each day dressed in neat clothes? You lived in a nice home. They helped you with your studies and somehow found or helped you move toward a college education. So you point out the less fortunate child and make fun of his or her poverty pointing to their clothing as an indication of their willingness to succeed? You’re not the teacher I was talking about. I see you have little interest in being part of the solution. Good for you and yours though! Keep coaching for cash and your summer job. Your the MAN! It’s obvious that is what is important to you.

Oh yeah, Forget what I said about your Iphone. It is clear why you have so much time to blog during the school day.

sloboffthestreet

December 15th, 2011
7:21 pm

V

One more point I would like to make. During a teachers career it is possible to teach a second generation of the same family. I would think the biggest reward a teacher could give to themselves would be to witness the second generation come to school dressed, fed and prepared knowing their parents did not have the same opportunity and you personally had a direct hand in making the change that allowed their parents to become a success.

Now that’s a teacher!

I love teaching. I hate what it is becoming...

December 15th, 2011
7:21 pm

@slob “If you take the time to use your school council, PTO, churches and yes even a teachers group to find rescources to obtain proper used clothing for students who are, “Dressed like trash” that would be a very good start to raise a childs sense of self worth and give them a feeling that someone is actually interested in them and their future. ”

LOL! You are so cute! My first year teaching, I bought clothing for one of my neediest children… (after okaying it with the mother)…new shoes, pants, shirts and a coat as the child only had a light jacket that was too small… thought I could maybe make a difference. Child took the clothes home, and I never saw them again. After a few days I asked, “Sweetheart, why are you still wearing those old shoes that don’t fit? Why don’t you wear the new shoes I bought you?” She told me her mother sold the clothes and bought cigarettes.

Live and learn.

sloboffthestreet

December 15th, 2011
9:03 pm

I love teaching. I hate what it is becoming…

What a cute story!

abacus2

December 15th, 2011
9:15 pm

A few years ago, my middle school cohorts collected money to provide a nice Christmas for a needy family. The mother showed up at the school the next day complaining about the quantity and quality of the gifts. Needless to say, we never did that again! I now make a donation to the Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee. I know the “girls” there appreciate my gift.

About education – we are spending our time and money at the wrong end of the pipeline. No child should reach sixth grade unable to read and do basic math. Instead of spending all the money on remediation and “fixing” kids so they can graduate, why don’t we put our resources into extra classes in elementary school for children who haven’t learned the basics? Older 4th, 5th, and 6th graders can be placed in classes with children their own age and stay there until they have the skills to move on. END SOCIAL PROMOTION! It’s killing education in this country.

justathought

December 16th, 2011
12:00 am

The answer to successful children is involved, responsible parents. It is not the responsibility of a school to raise children. Parents that allow schools to feed their children two meals a day( or dress them) are abdicating their responsibility and should have thought a little harder before having children if they couldn’t handle the obligation. Having children isn’t a right, everyone shouldn’t do it and expecting others to do your job is a crime.

Anonmom

December 16th, 2011
6:33 am

May I return to the boarding school idea for a lot of these children? Perhaps the best answer of all is taking all the resources we, as a society are spending on these “needy” and “poor” kids with parents who are “clueless” (or much worse) and just get them the heck out of their situations and stop rewarding their parents with the social welfare benefits……

Asian comparison

December 16th, 2011
7:52 am

@ Rockdale educatos and the like can you answer these questions…
What are the test scores for the special education children in China, Japan, Norway, Malaysha, etc who are doing better than we are?

Is there any cheating detected in these countries as far as their standardized tests?
What kind of proof do these countries offer? Can their data be believed? Are communist countries honest in their reports?

What kind of support system is already in place for these students? Are both parents in the home? Do you honestly believe that all Asian children excel in all academics?

What’s the background of the children that are actually tested?

Finally and I could go on but IF our system is so bad why do immigrants STILL risk their lives to come to this country?

I’ll wait for your answers and data…

V for Vendetta

December 16th, 2011
8:08 am

slob is the typical ultra liberal “we can save them all” type who has never step foot in a classroom and would get chewed up and spit out if he did. You mistake my lack of tolerance for indifference, apathy, and waywardness for a lack of compassion. Not true. I routinely bend over backwards to help students who show me the slightest bit of interest. I have been helping one disabled girl with muscular dystrophy for the past five years. She will graduate from college soon, and she still comes to my room every Friday to have her essays edited and papers discussed.

The problem with you, slob, is that you listen to my words and assume that I do this job for a paycheck and a summer vacation–and I obviously couldn’t care less about poor, disadvantaged students. Nothing could be farther from the truth. However, I do NOT care about the leeches and the moochers, the type of people who see the upper and middle class as a giant ATM machine from which to withdraw money they feel they are owed, the type of people who drive leased BMWs and Mercedes even though their children are on the free breakfast/lunch program, the type of people who couldn’t be bothered to discuss their child’s grade until AFTER he or she has failed.

Those are the people I could care less about.

Yes, those people have children and those children are in a horrible situation in life. But, by the time they cross my threshold, it is far too late to save most of them. Sure, I’ve had success in the past here and there, but the vast majority are too far gone to be saved by me during my fifty minutes a day.

So you go right ahead thinking your better than me, doing whatever it is you do because you’re too weak and scared to do what I do. I’ve seen a hundred kids in grad school just like you: they think they’re going to crusade for the poor kids when they get out of college and change all of their perspectives. Most of them quit after year one. Some sooner.

But what do I know? I’m the bad guy, right? I’m a teacher.

PHLASH

December 16th, 2011
8:25 am

Clearly, schools can no longer be entrusted to the public sector. There is a crisis–a CRISIS, I tell you–and the only way to save our great nation is to privatize, privatize, privatize schools. Invest in your charter school hedge funds, boys! There’s money to be made! Invest in the standardized testing industry, girls! Rake it in!

It’s not about money. It’s about drilling down into the data!

It’s not about money. It’s about rigor!

It’s not about money. It’s about adhering to standards!

It’s not about money. It’s about [insert your favorite educational non sequitur here].

sloboffthestreet

December 16th, 2011
8:39 am

Sticks & stones V, sticks & stones.

I’ve been called many things but never a “Typical ultra liberal.”

You really know how to hurt a guy! {:o{

sloboffthestreet

December 16th, 2011
9:46 am

V, You wrote,

“So it’s our fault? Tell me, how should I go about changing the attitude of a student whose parents can barely speak proper English, let him or her dress like trash, and don’t enforce any sort of discipline or consequences for his or her actions? What would be your solution? Do share.”

So I shared and you really took a dislike to my response. Students who are properly dressed seem to have a different attitude than the students who “dress like trash” as you put it. Also respect is a two way street. Just because it isn’t taught at home dosen’t mean it is not attainable. Leading by example is often the only way. Give them a fish or teach them to fish. You’re the teacher, you decide. Being a middle child of six I never wore new clothes or owned anything new. What I did have were loving, caring parents so if my concern for students being well dressed in this throw away society we live in makes me “Ultra Liberal” then that is what I am. My clothes as a child were not new but they were clean and presentable and for that I am thankful. I never owned a new bike until I bought my own but there was always one there to ride that worked. I was very aware that nothing I had was new so my number on priority was to earn money and buy my own clothes and extras. I do consider myself very fortunate to have grown up in a home where my basic needs were always met, a father that worked and a mother that stayed home and cared for us and our home.

Our boys outgrow clothes and shoes like every other child and I struggle to find a proper place to donate them to. Yes there is Goodwill but I would much rather give them directly to someone who has a need. I have suggested this to the school system but they have little interest. I know it is a sensitive subject for some that are proud but still cannot properly provide. That is why I suggested School Councils. They do keep sending home notices that parents will be called if students arrive with torn clothing. It’s in the Handy Dandy Student Handbook also. So what is the holdup? Shoes are another issue also. I have pairs of almost new sneakers and shoes I would love to see on the feet of a child who needs them. I donate everything useable at the moment to foster parents that have established a clothing closet. I’m not asking anyone to buy new items or provide Christmas for a family. Simply see a need as you have stated you observe and meet the need without spending one penny. Once again we have a situation where parents are more than happy to help, contribute and are simply looking for leadership from educators and administration and all we as parents get are threats and demands. Never answers to very obvious needs and problems.

So if you see a need and complain about it without suggesting or putting in motion a proper solution what does that make you? A teacher?

Anonmom

December 16th, 2011
10:04 am

There was a post I read earlier about the teachers who collected like you’re suggesting and donated and the recipients complained about the quality and the other story about the mom who just sold the new stuff to buy cigarettes. I think there are people who really do want to “game” the system off of those of us who started in the middle class and lower middle class and below and worked our butts off to get our educations in order to make something of our lives and who are now upper middles or higher. They want what we have without actually working for it themselves. They are takers and users and that’s all they do and will do with life. This is human nature and it’s been around since the dawn of time — Darwin noted it in his origin of species but in most societies they don’t “prop up” the bottom the way we do, so they can’t keep on clinging on…. we make it really easy to cling. There are others who are down because of temporary circumstances who really and truly appreciate what people do for them, they are the working poor and I really like helping them out — I like to find them and to give them things. Our government and its programs does a really, truly awful job of truly helping and encouraging our working poor to get into the middle class — every program it has is actually designed to keep folks down and ‘game’ the system — larger section 8 homes for more kids, larger food stamp vouchers for more kids, no checks and balances in places, programs flat out disappear if your income goes over a certain point rather than phasing out so there’s no incentive to work — you can’t make a few cents and also collect some of the programs — e;.g. unemployment benefits and work — even if there are costs associated with working like child care … you still lose dollar for dollar for what you earn against your benefits received — no built in incentives to get on your feet — if your income goes over the max for food stamps, they drop off, completely, no incentive to earn over that maximum level, unless you are way over it…. lousy set up…… encourages the mouching.

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