Principals in New York condemn teacher evaluation process as “education by humiliation”

testing (Medium)Michael Winerip has a good online piece in The New York Times about the revolt of principals in New York against the use of student test data to evaluate educators in that state.

The principals are protesting a new evaluation system that the state Department of Education under Commissioner John B. King Jr. has put in place to meet the demands of New York’s federal Race to the Top grant.

As one principal in the story noted, the new evaluation system has accomplished one thing so far; it has united teachers, principals and administrators in their contempt for the state education department.

Also a Race to the Top winner, Georgia will begin to pilot its new teacher/school leadership evaluation tool in January. It, too, will include student performance as a measure of teacher and principal effectiveness. I suspect that we will see the same complaints here, although we have yet to see principals rise up in organized opposition.

In a recent meeting with the Georgia DOE staff charged with launching this system, it was clear to me that they wished they had more time to create, pilot and then review the new evaluation system before it goes statewide, but the Race to the Top pacing does not allow years of testing and tweaking.

It may well be the haste of putting these sweeping reforms in place that will end up undermining the success of Race to the Top. That haste is one of the chief concerns of the New York principals. (I have to note that Georgia is at least piloting its evaluation system for five months; New York had no real pilot, according to this story.)

Here is an excerpt of the Times piece, but please try to read the full piece and the letter itself:

As of last night, 658 principals around the state had signed a letter — 488 of them from Long Island, where the insurrection began — protesting the use of students’ test scores to evaluate teachers’ and principals’ performance.

Their complaints are many: the evaluation system was put together in slapdash fashion, with no pilot program; there are test scores to evaluate only fourth-through-eighth-grade English and math teachers; and New York tests are so unreliable that they had to be rescaled radically last year, with proficiency rates in math and English dropping 25 percentage points overnight.

Mr. Kaplan, who runs one of the highest-achieving schools in the state, has been evaluating teachers since the education commissioner was a teenager. No matter. He is required by Nassau County officials to attend 10 training sessions, as is Carol Burris, the principal of South Side High School here, who was named the 2010 Educator of the Year by the School Administrators Association of New York State.

“It’s education by humiliation,” Mr. Kaplan said. “I’ve never seen teachers and principals so degraded.”

The trainers at these sessions, which are paid for by state and federal grants, have explained that they’re figuring out the new evaluation system as they go. To make the point, they’ve been showing a YouTube video with a fictional crew of mechanics who are having the time of their lives building an airplane in midair. “It was supposed to be funny, but the room went silent,” Ms. Burris said. “These are people’s livelihoods we’re talking about.”

Last year New York was awarded $700 million as one of 11 states, along with the District of Columbia, to win a Race to the Top grant. The application process was chaotic, with Dr. King’s office making the deadline by just a few hours. To win a grant, states had to pledge to follow policy priorities of the Obama administration, like evaluating teachers by student test scores, even though there were no implementation plans yet.

New York committed to an evaluation process that is based 60 percent on principal observations and other subjective measures, and from 20 to 40 percent on state tests, depending on the local district. In written responses to questions, Dr. King said while there are bugs in the system, “we are confident that as the state law on teacher evaluations phases in over the next couple of years, those educators charged with ensuring its successful implementation will do so professionally.”

Asked if he was surprised by the number of principals who had signed, he wrote, “It’s not at all surprising” that the introduction of a new evaluation system “would produce anxiety.”

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

97 comments Add your comment

Scott

November 28th, 2011
8:10 am

Evaluating *some* teachers on *unreliable* tests. Quickly thrown together and unproven evaluation tool. No mention of pre/post score comparisons. Top rated teachers missing cut scores. Sounds like there’s reason for angst. Testing has its place, but a poorly implemented test program doesn’t help anybody. Doesn’t New York have a reputation for having an excellent testing program?

Worries me for Georgia. Testing is a great tool for holding students accountable to learn. Not convinced how well it will help evaluate teachers. More worried about whether it will be used fairly. To assume that Lassiter teachers are better than say Campbell teachers based on outcome scores is naive. Because those kids arriving from Mabry are way different from the ones coming in from Griffin. And I’m sure every county has a similar tale to tell. So how are you going to fairly judge one teacher by the product of as many as 10 years in your school system? Not to mention other factors such as parental involvement and IQ?

Digger

November 28th, 2011
8:13 am

Scarlet letters are next.

Inman Park Boy

November 28th, 2011
8:19 am

The federal government shpouid have no role in education. They can’t even pass a budget, for crying out loud! Millions will be spent on this nonsense with litle or no change in student learning. Please, mark my word!

Doris M

November 28th, 2011
8:32 am

Inman Park Boy you are so right!!

carlosgvv

November 28th, 2011
8:42 am

I worked in various Corporations for 40 years. Almost without exception, my workplace was hostile and my bosses were toxic. Needless to say, my performance was constantly evaluated, each and every day. So, I don’t have any sympathy for teachers who must undergo periodic evaluations. If they don’t like it, let them work in the private sector, where they will learn a whole new meaning of the word “humilation”.

HS Public Teacher

November 28th, 2011
8:42 am

The difference, and a major one at that, is that Principals in Georgia view themselves so very far above the “classroom teacher” that they rarely give a darn about us. They view us as disposable labor and it doesn’t matter if we are “good” teachers or “bad” teachers.

No way would a Georgia Principal ever ever risk their job or reputation to stand with us on any issue at all.

HS Public Teacher

November 28th, 2011
8:43 am

This will never happen in Georgia.

Principals here feel that they are so above “classroom teachers” it is funny. They view all teachers as “disposable labor” and it doesn’t matter if they are good or bad teachers.

HS Public Teacher

November 28th, 2011
8:45 am

@carlosgvv – You honestly have no clue to the issues so I wonder why you feel that your comment has any value at all.

Teachers are already evaluated everywhere in most every way. That is not the issue at all.

Please educate yourself on any issue before forming an opinion and certainly before you feel it worthy to SHARE your opinion!

HS Public Teacher

November 28th, 2011
8:49 am

@carlosgvv – By the way, I am RETIRED from the corporate world and KNOW the differences between those evals and teacher evals. These teacher evals are much more severe and really are humiliating to a professional.

Get Real

November 28th, 2011
8:52 am

Read the United States Constitution, folks. It says absolutely nothing about education, which, by its own Tenth Amendment, means that education defaults to each state. The federal government has no constitutional authority in educational matters at the state level. Yet, they continue to become more micro-managing in our schools. Get the feds out and you will see national improvement.

Really?

November 28th, 2011
8:59 am

carlosgvv – so nice that you don’t have a problem sending children to learn in a ‘toxic and hostile’ environment.

A school is not a business – we need leaders that can get their small little minds around this simple fact.

mathmom

November 28th, 2011
9:03 am

Additionally, a minority of districts in Georgia collaborated on the Race to the Top grant application, but all of the districts will be forced into this evaluation scheme. This is just another step in downgrading education in Georgia as teachers are forced to focus on the lowest-performing students. This is insanity.

oldtimer

November 28th, 2011
9:06 am

End the Department of Education…

Dekalbite@carlosgvv

November 28th, 2011
9:09 am

“Almost without exception, my workplace was hostile and my bosses were toxic.”

You are a grown-up, as are our teachers. However, don’t forget that children share the same physical, mental and emotional environment as the teacher. Children by definition do not have the same coping abilities for a “toxic” environment as adults. “Toxic” environments impede the learning process. The members of the classroom (teacher and her students) have a symbiotic relationship. You cannot negatively impact the environment of the teacher and not affect the students. Children also need stability. Rotating teachers in and out of the classroom is a recipe for disaster for the most vulnerable group of students – low income students with an unstable situation in their home lives. The first question should have been – how any and all of our actions affect the students? Surely, the students deserve more than a plan that has not been piloted and is “up in the air”.

Batgirl

November 28th, 2011
9:16 am

@HS Public Teacher and Really?, thank you so much for your comments to carlosgvv.

carlosgvv

November 28th, 2011
9:33 am

HS Public Teacher

You know nothing about the companies I worked for and nothing about how hostile, toxic and humilating my circumstances were. And, yet, you feel competent to post as though you know all about me. Therefore, I can only conclude you were incompetent in the classroom and are one of the reasons teachers are facing critical evaluations.

Really

Your post is a non sequitur. Looks like reading comprehension is not one of your skills.

Dekalbite

And, after working all day in that hostile envrionment, I came home to my CHILDREN, you moron.

Batgirl

You can go back to sleep now.

Dr NO / Mr Sunshine

November 28th, 2011
10:03 am

“By the way, I am RETIRED from the corporate world and KNOW the differences between those evals and teacher evals. These teacher evals are much more severe and really are humiliating to a professional.”

LOL…*chuckle* Love the comedy routine!! Keep em coming…

Dr NO / Mr Sunshine

November 28th, 2011
10:05 am

With all these teachers and public education officials whining and bellyaching its no wonder we are turning out, one graduating class at a time, a nation of ignorant crybabyies.

Ron

November 28th, 2011
10:39 am

Test scores should be part of our evaluation. I would hope my teaching would result in a majority of my students being beyond a simple standardized test. That said, I have to face the reality that I cannot control attendance, I cannot control the quality of their lives beyond my classroom…I can’t even control the temperature in my classroom. Something as simple as getting enough sleep or what they eat for breakfast can significantly impact student test scores. One test, on one day, is not even close to a valid measure. Create portfolios on children, with framework assessments along the way, and actually chart growth for an entire year. Show me those numbers and I’ll gladly take responsibility for those who don’t grow that were in my classroom a majority of days.

d

November 28th, 2011
10:40 am

@Get Real – the fun thing is that the Federal Government cannot regulate education – unless the states let them. Georgia let them by accepting $400,000,000. The Feds said do this and we will give you this money, and Sonny Perdue, in yet another example of his contempt for what is actually good for Georgia bit. Heck, we don’t even have to give any tests, worry about AYP or any of that mess, it just eliminates Title I and IDEA funding from the federal government. I’d be happy to let Georgia do its own thing and forgo that money. That’s just me, though.

HS Public Teacher

November 28th, 2011
10:47 am

@carlosvv – I absolutely NEVER said that I knew about you or your circumstances. I challenge you to find where you think that I did.

However, YOU do seem to feel competent to post and comment on the teaching profession. So, please share – when and where have you taught?????

HS Public Teacher

November 28th, 2011
10:52 am

@Ron –

The problem is that you are trying to reason with folks that… (1) know nothing about teaching/education, (2) have no interest or ability to reason, and/or (3) likely have a hidden agenda and have no interest in lisening to reason.

[...] Principals in New York condemn teacher evalulation process as “education by humilation”… Michael Winerip has a good online piece in The New York Times about the revolt of principals in New York against the use of student test data to evaluate… Source: blogs.ajc.com [...]

Justice Seeker

November 28th, 2011
10:56 am

Ron @ 10:39 should not be allowed to post…he tells too much truth.

Ron

November 28th, 2011
10:56 am

HS- one of the problems with education now is that most of the decision-makers are either from totally unrelated fields or are former teachers who couldn’t handle being in the classroom for more than a few years. Give them an office and a title, and they suddenly know everything…

Cobb County Parent

November 28th, 2011
11:30 am

@ Ron,
You’re so right, but I caution you that the Grand Puba’s don’t like discussions of “tracking” student progress. They also don’t want to discuss ability grouping. It’s so much easier to say that differentiation is possible, not just fantasy. Maybe if teachers had less disparity in the class, they could have time to educate all cohorts.

HS Public Teacher

November 28th, 2011
11:53 am

@Cobb County Parent – You are right. However, you make the assumption that the Grand Puba’s give a darn about teachers or how teachers can better succeed in the classroom. I’m not convinced that this is a good assumption.

From where I sit, the Grand Puba’s really don’t care. They continue to add more and more students in every class without concern. They continue to cut back on supplies without concern. They continue to allow more individual student accomodations without concern. They continue to add more administrative responsibilities onto teachers without concern. All of these things have a large impact on how well a teacher can perform (and thereby helping students).

Ron

November 28th, 2011
11:54 am

Parent: It’s not about “tracking” in a traditional sense. It’s about showing growth from point A to point B in a year, which will vary a lot among students in my class. I work with classes largely made up of kids labeled as “at-risk”. Many barely pass state assessments, but I can prove learning progess on every one of them, even those that fail the multiple-guess assessments. I worry because my kids who often fail tests are actually very smart, but they may be two+ years below what is considered ON grade level. They learn, they grow, but one test on one day will never accurately show it. I am lucky that I have a small enough class that differentiation is actually possible. It’s really not that hard once you get used to doing it.

Digger

November 28th, 2011
11:56 am

Make sure little sociopath Johnny approves of you, teachers. He will be evaluating you!

Roach

November 28th, 2011
11:58 am

Education is important, so teacher evaluation is important. But snagging federal dollars is way more important, so NY, TN and GA (at least) skip steps involved in developing reliable and valid tools for teacher evaluation, for the sake of having *something* in place by deadline. HOT lanes, anyone?
Obviously, there are people in senior positions in our educational system whose jobs depend on winning these federal grants. If it weren’t for the grants, they wouldn’t have jobs. So we have two choices–create pointless and unconstructive turmoil through our educational system, or shed these useless folks. Not a hard choice if “it’s all about the kids.”.

V for Vendetta

November 28th, 2011
12:01 pm

carlosgvv,

Was your performance based on the performances of children who you sometimes had little or no control over? If there were a way to measure my performance based solely on my effectiveness as a teacher, I wouldn’t mind a bit–but there’s not. No such evaluation exists because it is impossible. There are far too many variables that are beyond the teacher’s control to be able to somehow compile statistics which can determine the teacher’s effectiveness.

When I worked in Advertising sales it was simple: did you sell enough and make your quota? If so, good for you. If not, you could be fired or your team fired.

I can’t fire my students, and I can’t fire their parents–though many of them should be.

But I suppose it’s fine to evaluate me based on that, especially if it affects my pay. Well done.

Dr NO / Mr Sunshine

November 28th, 2011
12:07 pm

HS Public Teacher

November 28th, 2011
11:53 am

Makes perfect sense. And in the CorpWorld/Private Industry you either perform “addl duties as assigned”, you get out or get thrown out.

Pick one, go with it and stop whining.

Dr NO / Mr Sunshine

November 28th, 2011
12:08 pm

On the other hand Ive heard so many teachers make the statement “I didnt get into education for the pay”

Such a nobel gesture.

Dr NO / Mr Sunshine

November 28th, 2011
12:09 pm

Oops…noble.

Mahopinion

November 28th, 2011
12:24 pm

What I see here is teachers complaining that they don’t want test scores being included in their evaluations. If not test scores, just what should the evals consist of? How popular you are with your students? Whether your attendance is good? How many craft projects you include in your curriculum each year?

Aren’t the report cards you fill out for your students evals of a sort? Aren’t test scores included in those evaluations?

If your work environment is “toxic”, rather than complaining about your principals and students, perhaps you need to look at your own adversarial stance in relation to them.

Dr. Pangloss

November 28th, 2011
12:26 pm

“Miss Fidditch, from now on your livelihood will depend on the score some teenage videogame addict makes on a test that somebody just dreamed up.”

That’ll attract a whole lot of talented people into the teaching profession.

Dr. Pangloss

November 28th, 2011
12:27 pm

Inman Park Boy
November 28th, 2011
8:19 am

The federal government shpouid have no role in education. They can’t even pass a budget, for crying out loud! Millions will be spent on this nonsense with litle or no change in student learning. Please, mark my word!
————-
In this case it’s the state government that is making things worse instead of better.

Dr. John Trotter

November 28th, 2011
12:35 pm

Through the years, I have written many articles about why any form of merit pay to judge a public school teacher’s performance and adjudicate his or her pay relative to a student’s performance on a standardized test is a concept flawed beyond repair. American public schools have to deal with all children…of all kinds of backgrounds. Some children come to school with absolutely no motivation to learn. Some children come to school very eager to learn. Some kids have almost a blank slate when it comes to cognitive preparation; however, some kids have been cognitively nurtured from the beginning of their lives and can read and write before they enter kindergarten.

Would you judge a dentist as being unworthy of certain pay because his patients all come to him with rotten teeth? What if his patients refuse to exercise dental hygiene at home or even refuse to listen to his at his office? What if the young patients tell him or her: “My momma says that I don’t have to listen to you or do what you say about my teeth!”? What if these rotten-teeth patients still refuse to brush their teeth, floss their teeth, or rinse with mouthwash? What if this dentist has a twin sister who is a dentist in a very prominent side of town where all of her young patients come to her dental office with pearly white teeth which obviously have been the objects of much care? What if both twin dentists attended the same dental school and made the same grades, finishing summa cum laude of their dental school? The only difference was that one of the dentists decided to practice in a rough area where dental hygiene is way down on the list of their survival skills. His or her patients come to the office because a social worker brings them; they would never come of their own volition. They are forced to come. They have never bought into the system of dental hygiene.

So, in the State’s foolhardy attempt to upgrade the dental health of the entire State, the dentist working with the rotten-teeth youngsters who have no motivation to clean their teeth and to care for them will be judgd much more harshly than his or her twin sister who works with youngsters who come to her office highly motivated to maintain the beauty of their pearly white teeth, even though the first dentist works 20 hours per week longer than the latter dentist. What do we call this? S-T-U-P-I-D. Not looking at the mitigating circumstances of each peculiar and unique situation is a call for disaster. The State ought to tell Arne Duncan, the U. S. Secretary of Education who has never been a teacher and knows nothing about public education, to stick Race To The Top where the sun doesn’t shine. In fact, the State of Georgia ought to jettison all of the Federal funding which invariably comes with strings attached so that our State’s teachers could then be freed up to get on with the joy of teaching. When the joy is taken out teaching, then disaster is on its way. We need to restore the joy of teaching. As we always say at MACE, you cannot have good learning conditions until you first have good teaching conditions.

I have written a number of articles on merit pay through the years, most of which can be found on these two sites:

http://www.theteachersadvocate.com

http://www.georgiateachersspeakout.com

Janet

November 28th, 2011
12:42 pm

As I understand it, the entire state of Georgia did not have to participate in the Race to the Top program. Forsyth, Cobb, and I beleive a couple of other counties “opted out”. Forsyth specifically gave the reason that they wanted to keep local control and did not want the federal government dabbling in their education. Given what we now know about how RTTT is working out… it seems, from the outside looking in at least, Forsyth leaders have some visionary thinkers and don’t just see $$ signs.

Instead, I see Forsyth recently (2010) won the i3 development grant. “EngageME – P.L.E.A.S.E (Personalized Learning Experiences Accelerate Standards-based Education), Infinite Campus congratulates the district for receiving a $5 million award from the U.S. Department of Education.”….. “The Forsyth vision is to eliminate the current paradigm resulting in silos of data and replace it with a single system to assist classroom teachers and students with the learning process. While none of the individual technologies that make up this system are new, what is different about this concept is how the technologies work together to address the needs of each student.”

I understand that Forsyth is a much smaller district than Gwinnett or APS, but was wondering if anyone here has any experience with them? I get that all districts have their problems, but wondering from a teacher persepctive if Forsyth lives up to the hype?

HS Public Teacher

November 28th, 2011
1:00 pm

@ Dr NO/Mr Sunshine….

Sorry, but you are wrong. A dental hygenist is not asked to go outside and cut grass. They are not asked to perform billing duties after a full load of patients teeth cleaning. They do not walk around and empty trash cans. They do not give up their lunch break (or other breaks) to monitor the front office. A job is defined as a list of specific duties (which is shared BEFORE the person takes the job).

A teacher is interviewed for the job of teaching children. No one says that ‘by the way’ you also must be at school an extra two hours afterwards for …. whatever. No one says that ‘by the way’ you also must give up your short lunch break to monitor ….. whatever. No one says that in ADDITION to teaching that you also must complete documentation of every email you send to parents and every phone call to parents. All of these things are told to the teacher well after the first day or work and the contract has been signed.

What you say is total bull and CLEARLY shows that you know NOTHING of the teaching profession.

HS Public Teacher

November 28th, 2011
1:08 pm

@Mahopinion….

Where do I start?

First, teachers already ARE evaluated. Teachers in Georgia have had evaluations and reviews for DECADES. This is nothing new. Are you so far from the question at hand that you did not know this????

Second, yes, STUDENTS are evaluated (assessed is a better word) by teachers. Teachers are adult trained professionals that have been to college to learn how to give appropriate evaluations to students. Students are not fully developed humans. Students brains are not developed until around the age of 21. Students have not been trained how to evaluate. Students are immature emotionally. Are you SERIOUSLY comparing those? Really?

Third, teachers in Georgia have sat by and have been quiet for YEARS. And, look at the result. Do you REALLY want teachers to be quiet? Are you REALLY happy with how education has been going in Georgia? If so, then we can continue to allow politicans and administration folks run education in this State and run it into the ground!

It confounds me how the general public: (1) blames everything on the teacher when the teacher has such little say and influence on education policy, (2) never looks to the people actually making the decisions in education such as the politicans and administration, and (3) knows so very little about education and yet has such strong opinions.

Dr. Craig Spinks/ Georgians for Educational Excellence

November 28th, 2011
1:14 pm

Let’s rename “Race to the Top” as “Rush to mis-Judgement.”

A five-month piloting project is ridiculously short. No piloting at all is worse than stupid.

Dr. Monica Henson

November 28th, 2011
1:16 pm

I know Dr. John King and have worked with him when he was a school leader in Massachusetts, before he began his graduate work at Teacher College/Columbia. He has taken a courageous stand in getting the ball rolling in New York. He acknowledges that there will be evolution and phasing in of the whole process, and I believe in his integrity and his understanding of the difficulty in implementing the process of evaluation. He has the guts to say, “Let’s do it,” even if it means figuring much of it out as we go along.

The simple fact is, in order to make informed, intelligent decisions about teacher and administrator retention, we cannot continue to ignore student achievement outcomes data. Those who oppose including this as one measure for evaluation teacher and administrator performance indulge in the either/or fallacy: They posit that all evaluations are based solely on a single standardized test score, and therefore it cannot possibly be fair, so we must ignore any student performance data.

The whining and complaining about the “quality” of students and parents has got to stop, and we have to face the fact that we must educate them all, and educate them well, if we are going to maintain the middle class in this country. It is insane to assume that 95%+ of all teachers perform at competent levels when so many students are unable to demonstrate minimum levels of skills in reading and mathematics.

It is equally insane, and downright immoral, to assume that those students who don’t perform at grade level (absent severe special needs) are unable to do so, are lazy, have parents who don’t care, etc., etc., when we have so many pockets of excellence emerging across the country in environments that are filled with students who are “hard to teach.”

If not now, when? If not us, who? We educators have to begin behaving like the professionals we aspire to be if we are to earn the respect of those who understand that true professionals submit to peer review, to industry review, and to the demands of the market. I have never seen any teacher evaluation instrument in any state that was based purely on a single standardized test on a single day. Ron at 10:39 is right on the money. We need more teachers like him, and teachers like him need to consider becoming school leaders.

Flash

November 28th, 2011
1:39 pm

Imman Park boy you got it right the first time.

Atlanta Principal

November 28th, 2011
2:41 pm

New Yorkers are a little more sophisticated and a little less barbaric than Georgia. Additionally New York is heavily unionized and it’s extremely difficult to accuse anyone without proper due process. People in New York are smart and very careful about trying to destroy people’s reputation and they are not as racist as these folks in Georgia. The worst people in the world is located right here in Georgia, they are so misguided by race that they have failed to look at any issue without the scope of race as the basis for any decision that they make. I feel so sorry for you folks in Georgia, you are sad, Misguided, and fake to the bone. Yeh and your unions are so under sophisticated and crude that no one will ever take you serious.

Ron

November 28th, 2011
3:12 pm

Dr. Henson: I’ve tried for years to convince those in charge that assessment can and should be done differently. Unfortunately, far too much money has been spent developing tests that our leaders are unwilling to abandon for reasons I don’t understand. I just hope we can find a way, in the meantime, to use the current skewed data in some sort of useful way. I fear the new evaluation system will only create more pressure to perform on the year-end assessment and further limit the quality of our teaching. If my pay is going to be tied to that test in some way, then considering my lot of challenging kids, I’ll have to make sure they can pass it. That’s the unfortunate reality of the times, and I hate it.

Beverly Fraud

November 28th, 2011
3:41 pm

“He has taken a courageous stand in getting the ball rolling in New York. He acknowledges that there will be evolution and phasing in of the whole process, and I believe in his integrity…”

Any time you have to “phase in” INTEGRITY, you have a MAJOR problem. (And if you are going to “evaluate” someone based on criteria you WON’T tell them because your act isn’t together enough to be ABLE to tell them, “integrity” is NOT the word that comes to mind.)

Not even if you claim it’s “for the children”

Atlanta Principal

November 28th, 2011
3:44 pm

Beverly Fraud

November 28th, 2011
3:44 pm

***It is equally insane, and downright immoral, to assume that those students who don’t perform at grade level (absent severe special needs) are unable to do so, are lazy, have parents who don’t care, etc., etc., when we have so many pockets of excellence emerging across the country in environments that are filled with students who are “hard to teach.” ***

Isn’t this essentially what Beverly Hall said?

Atlanta Principal

November 28th, 2011
3:45 pm

New York, Georgia, Night and day. People in New York are sophisticated and leading in Education. Georgia is at the bottom. You cant compare